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T H E M A G A Z I N E PA R E N T S L I V E B Y I N TA R R A N T C O U N T Y

A P R I L 2018

MEET MOM NEXT DOOR

ELIZABETH CHAMBERS HAMMER WHY KIDS NEED TO LEARN TO GARDEN

THE FOOD ISSUE! GETTING YOUR PICKY EATER TO...

EAT

9 CLASSES TO LEARN COOKING & ETIQUETTE

+

WAYS TO HAVE FUN IN APRIL

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spec ia

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sing section: erti v ad

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Family Travel Guide


Dr. Sheri Puffer

Dr. Joy Carter

Dr. LaTasha Jarrett

Dr. Joan Bergstrom

Dr. Jessica Brown

Dr. Kiran Nangrani

Dr. Dawnette Peppler

Women’s Health Services now provides patient care in two locations in Arlington. We also provide state-of-the-art maternity care in the newly renovated labor and delivery suites at Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital (THAM). THAM is ranked among the best hospitals in Dallas-Fort Worth, and was awarded American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Magnet status, an award that recognizes hospitals that provide nursing excellence. Women’s Health Services has been providing quality health care for women of all ages for the past 32 years. Our OB/GYN group been recognized in the community for its reputable and thoughtful care. In 2017, Women’s Health Services won Suburban Parent Magazines’ award for Best of Family Healthcare in Obstetrics and Gynecology, as well as DFW Child Magazine’s Mom-Approved Doctors award for OB/GYN. Women’s Health Services’ doctors provide full OB/GYN services and are skilled in managing all aspects of women’s health care, such as normal and high-risk pregnancy care, gynecologic surgery, incontinence treatment, annual exams, and contraceptive and hormone therapy needs. Visit our new website and make your appointments online at www.womenshealthservices.com. We look forward to seeing you soon!

North Office:

South Office:

1001 N. Waldrop, Suite 505 Arlington, TX 76012

5005 S. Cooper St, Suite 275 Arlington, TX 76017

Phone 817-277-9415 • Fax 817-277-0360 Email info@womenshealthservices.com


pages / A P R I L

2018

FEATURE 14 Quitting The Kids Menu

To get kids to eat, parents beg, bribe and settle for cheeseburgers and chicken nuggets. Here’s how to win again in the kitchen. words Jessica Elliott

DEPARTMENTS NOTED 5 Garden to Table

If you want your kids to eat healthier, try gardening

REAL MOMS 9 Mom Next Door / Elizabeth Chambers Hammer

The TV personality, Bird Bakery owner and mom of two shares her recipe for doing it all

12 Routines / Becky Lee Burk

Life is a zoo for this veterinarian mom of two No mom wants to be a short-order cook. Jessica Elliott shares some strategies to turn your selective eater into an omnivore. p. 14

Cooking, baking and etiquette classes for kids

ON THE COVER

THE FOOD ISSUE

KID CULTURE 33 Knead to Know 43 The Agenda

George of Hurst Photography: Cindy James Hair/Makeup: Jenn Karsner, Wallflower Management Styling: Meredith Mosshart

Our favorite family events this month

COLUMNS 46 Confessions / Mommy Fails

When bad things happen to good parents

PUBLISHER/ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Joylyn Niebes CREATIVE DIRECTOR Lauren Niebes EDITORIAL Managing Editor Carrie Steingruber

Associate Editor Alexis Manrodt Assistant Editor Lisa Salinas Calendar Editor Elizabeth Smith ART Graphic Designer Susan Horn

Editorial Designer Katie Garza Art Assistant Sara Strugger ADVERTISING Associate Publisher Diana Whitworth Nelson Account Executives Nikki Garrett, Maggie Marston,

Nancy McDaniel, Kristen Niebes, Sandi Tijerina, Laura Vardell, Kerensa Vest Advertising Coordinator Amy Klembara

Promotions Coordinator Beth McGee

PR/MARKETING Audience Development Director Candace Emerson

Office Manager + Distribution Robbie Scott

ADMINISTRATION Business Manager Leah Wagner

FortWorthChild is published monthly by Lauren Publications, Inc. FortWorthChild is distributed free of charge, one copy per reader. Only FortWorthChild authorized distributors may deliver or pick up the magazines. Additional or back copies of FortWorthChild are available for $2 per copy at the offices of Lauren Publications, Inc. We reserve the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. FortWorthChild is ©2018 by Lauren Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without express written permission prohibited.

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GARDEN TO TABLE

gardening is good for the mind, body and palate WORDS ERIN BURT

PHOTO COURTESY OF REAL SCHOOL GARDENS

“A

lice, what’s your favorite part of gardening?” Bethany Cowin asks her daughter. “Planting seeds,” 6-year-old Alice nearly whispers. “What’s Hilde’s favorite part?” Hilde is Alice’s little sister. “Eating everything.” The girls have been involved in their family’s garden since Alice was 2 1/2 years old and before Hilde could walk. Now gardening is part of the Grand Prairie family’s homeschool curriculum. In fact, improved academic outcomes associated with gardening have elevated the hobby to a serious part of many schools’ curricula. REAL School Gardens started in Fort Worth to improve life for children in urban areas through school-based gardens. Now a

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nationwide program, the organization helps “Hilde loves eating the food we grow,” install outdoor learning gardens and trains Cowin says. “During the summer, she loves teachers in how to use the space. Kids maingoing out and grabbing everything for tain the gardens and get hands-on lessons in salad, and now she loves eating salad.” biology, weather, even math and language arts. The kids who participate in Independence “These aren’t just gardens,” says Mary Gardens also take their Freeman, executive director for the Texas produce from garden to region. “They are outdoor classrooms. table. “After we harvest They are just as importhe food, we show the tant as the computer lab, kids how to cook it,” library or other specialized Richey says. This is an HOME & classroom space.” opportunity to give the In a longitudinal study kids more new experiencGARDEN for REAL School Gardens, es with food. “We always Kids can reap the benefits Southern Methodist introduce a new ingredient of gardening right at University found increased that they may not be familhome, says Sammy Wren, pass rates on standardized iar with, like quinoa and an instructor for REAL tests and greater student coconut milk: ingredients School Gardens. “If you want to plant a garden engagement at schools with that make food nutritionin the ground, go with a learning gardens. Other ally dense. … We do that raised garden.” studies of school-based because we want kids to ask gardening programs report about the ingredients.” HOW TO BUILD A higher science scores, as RAISED BED GARDEN: 1. Create a 4-by-4-foot space well as better communicaBRINGING IT HOME with landscape barriers. tion skills and increased Fort Worth mom CJ 2. Fill with potting soil. self-esteem. Evans and her four kids 3. Place an unglazed clay pot Then there’s Hilde’s started edible gardening (like an olla pot) in the center favorite part: the food. with a small space in their for irrigation purposes. backyard; now they plant 4. Plant easy-to-grow items: EAT WHAT YOU SOW tomatoes and herbs right tomatoes, peppers, radishes, Chonnie Richey is the in the front yard. “To me, garlic, herbs, strawberries founder of Independence it’s prettier than any flowand cantaloupe. Gardens, a parent-led ers,” Evans says. People 5. Water plants slowly and for a long time. This is where your organization that’s installed walk up and comment on clay pot comes in—fill it with edible gardens on three it all the time.” water, and it will release the voacl campuses. The kids Their home gardenwater slowly. get their own plot to plant, ing habits are reinforced 6. Watch your food grow! tend and harvest. at school, where Texas For inspiration, visit A Tasteful “In our first harvest Christian University runs an Place at the Dallas Arboretum there were two boys talkedible garden. Gina Jarman to see a working edible garden ing, and one said to the Hill is the associate profesand sample recipes featuring freshly harvested ingredients. other that he had never sor of nutritional sciences Daily tastings available from seen carrots this big or this who leads students in the 10am–4pm; view each week’s color orange. The other garden at North Hi Mount menu at dallasarboretum.org. one answered, ‘I didn’t Elementary and at the know carrots came from University Christian Church the ground,’” Richey recalls. Weekday School. “The first “That was such an moment for all the adults year we had an open house, the parents said around them: How can we expect kids to things about how they would be at the grocery make healthy food choices if they don’t know store and their preschooler would tell them, where food comes from?” ‘Broccoli is a leafy green!’ and the parents Maintaining their own gardens can teach would be so surprised,” Hill recalls. kids about fresh produce and inspire them to That’s really where it all starts: Talk to make healthier eating choices. A study pubyour kids about food when and where you lished in the journal HortTechnology in 2016 can. Introduce fresh ingredients, talk about reported that elementary students who were where they come from and let your kids help part of a three-year gardening program added a make your food. “Maybe you buy basil at the wider variety of fruits and veggies to their diets. grocery store to add to spaghetti. First, let your Cowin, the homeschooling mom, has kids smell it and cut it. Let them add it so they a separate garden that her girls are responcan see the difference,” Richey suggests. sible for, where they get to pick what they “You’re building steps to engage them in grow and learn how to care for it. “They are the food,” she adds. “If you start engaging responsible for everything—weeding, pickkids in these activities, they can take responing, watering,” Cowin explains. And of course sibility for that. And when kids make it, they they’re involved with the eating too. are more likely to eat it.”

PHOTO COURTESY OF REAL SCHOOL GARDENS

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real moms.

mom next door /

ELIZABETH CHAMBERS HAMMER

tv personality and owner/ceo of bird bakery INTERVIEW NICOLE JORDAN PHOTOGRAPHY NICK PRENDERGAST

A

n audit of Elizabeth Chambers Hammer’s lexicon would likely show “perspective” as one of her highest-ranking words—over and over again, she cites the importance of perspective to success in all of life’s arenas, from parenthood to philanthropy to entrepreneurship. “It’s so easy to lose perspective and forget that every single day we’re blessed to do what we want because we live in a country that’s free,” says the Texas native. “There are so many people that don’t have those freedoms.”

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real moms / E L I Z A B E T H

YOU HAVE A LOT GOING ON. WHEN DO YOU SLEEP? I don’t. I’m checking emails

at 3:00 and 4:00 in the morning. It’s not something I’m proud of, but I probably sleep four hours a night. DOES ALL OF THE TRAVEL GET EXHAUSTING? HOW DO YOU DO IT? We

live on airplanes but have always just taken the children along with us. Harper had been on 158 flights before turning 3. You just kind of do it. It’s all a balancing act, for sure. HOW DO YOU AND ARMIE STAY CONNECTED? We have a rule not to be apart for

more than five days. And we try to take a trip in the summer and in the winter. I think the most important thing you can do for your family is have a strong marriage. Like anything, you get out what you put in. WHAT DO YOU DO TO KEEP YOURSELF HAPPY? My “me time” is my maintenance. I

do a blowout once a week. I try to get a facial 10

april 2018 / fortworthchild

once a month. I get my nails done every two weeks … we’re no use to others if we’re not our best selves.

YOU WERE PREGNANT WITH FORD WHEN THE DALLAS BAKERY OPENED. WHAT WAS THAT LIKE? The timing was dif-

ficult because it took over a year and a half to negotiate, and by the time we signed, we had eight weeks to do my build-out. I was eight months pregnant and working 20-hour days on my feet. You do what you have to do. YOU’RE DRIVEN. IF YOU HAD TO PICK A FEW OTHER WORDS TO DESCRIBE YOURSELF, WHAT WOULD THEY BE? Ambitious,

WOMEN JUST GET IT DONE. I’M AMAZED BY SO MANY OF THE WOMEN IN MY LIFE.

thoughtful—I enjoy thinking about other people—and overscheduled.

AND PHILANTHROPIC. TELL ME ABOUT YOUR WORK WITH THE HUMAN RIGHTS FOUNDATION. My first job out

of school was working at Al Gore’s network, Current TV. I did everything from cross the border with illegal immigrants to go down into an oil well. When the network closed, I really missed the more meaningful journalism. I was losing perspective a bit. The president of the Human Rights Foundation asked me to come on as a correspondent, and it was a chance for me to tell meaningful stories again, which was exactly what I was missing.

The wife of actor Armie Hammer (currently on everyone’s radar for his role in the Academy-award winning film Call Me by Your Name), Chambers Hammer would never be content as a Beverly Hills housewife. She’s a force in her own right. The 35-year-old mom of two studied journalism at the University of Texas at Austin, where she fell in love with storytelling. A gig on Access Hollywood catapulted her career, landing her spots on E! News, the Today show and reality shows such as Cup“I LOVE cake Wars and Sugar TRADITIONS,” Showdown. SAYS CHAMBERS HAMMER, WHO Perhaps best MAKES A POINT known for her baking TO SHARE prowess, Chambers HOME-COOKED MEALS WITH Hammer launched HARPER, 3, AND Bird Bakery in San FORD, 1. Antonio in 2012. The Highland Park Village location came four years later. She splits her time between San Antonio, Dallas and Los Angeles, overseeing bakery operations while maintaining a robust TV career. Meanwhile, she serves as chief correspondent for the Human Rights Foundation. She recently supported her husband through a 15-month press tour leading up to the Oscars. And she’s a hands-on mom to Harper, 3, and Ford, 1. Her recipe for doing it all involves little sleep and lots of—you guessed it—perspective. Being a woman helps too. “Women just get it done,” she says. “I’m amazed by so many of the women in my life.”

CHAMBERS HAMMER

DO YOU THINK YOUR WORK MAKES YOU A BETTER MOM? [It’s] taught me to

compartmentalize. I learned early on that if I’m on a conference call pushing my daughter on a swing, I may feel like I’m multitasking, but no one is actually getting my full attention.

IS THERE A MOTTO OR GOLDEN RULE YOU LIVE BY? I believe you should live every

single day like it’s your last because tomorrow isn’t promised. It’s easy to get caught up in the small things and lose perspective. ANY ADVICE FOR ASPIRING FEMALE ENTREPRENEURS? Do your homework and

try to learn from as many people’s mistakes as you can. You can Google anything, but draw on experience from people who have done it. And don’t give up. WHAT DO YOU WANT YOUR LEGACY TO BE? An amazing mother, the best wife I

could be and bakery mogul. And somebody who told stories that people resonated with. I think telling others’ stories is the best way to keep perspective.


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a monday in the life of

BECKY LEE BURK Dr. Becky Lee Burk is a small animal veterinarian practicing in Benbrook. She and her husband Michael, an Air Force pilot, live in Aledo with their children—Ezra, 9, and Libby Rose, 6— and their two dogs, Boy and Clovis.

5

:20AM Wake up. The first thing I do is let our dogs out, and then I get showered and do my makeup. I enjoy the process of putting on makeup. For lips, it’s always Jeffree Star Velour Liquid Lipstick. I have the luxury in my profession to be able to kiss my patients so I need a product that will not leave lipstick residue behind on their fur. 6:15AM I attempt to gently wake up my kids. I like to give them plenty of time to get up and moving in the morning well before school. My son is really great about getting himself dressed and fixing his own breakfast. My daughter has ADHD so I have to be with her to walk her through all of the steps: get dressed, wash face, brush teeth, etc. 6:30AM Breakfast usually consists of cereal, but since we have time today, we do something a bit more elaborate. My daughter loves to help me cook her eggs in the morning. 7:20AM It’s a mad scramble to put Boy and Clovis into their kennels, grab a protein shake and run around frantically looking for shoes and backpacks. 7:30AM I make it over to the school in time for drop-off before heading over to the veterinarian practice where I work in Benbrook.

8AM After arriving at the practice, I immediately get busy. I start with reviewing test results and then move on to catching up on voicemails and emails. I have a little extra time before my appointments start so I try to finish up some outstanding medical records. 8:20AM My appointments begin. Even though we have wellness exams scheduled every 20 minutes, our practice also sees walk-ins so it’s hard to know what the day will bring. 9AM Between appointments, my team does clinic rounds. We discuss appointments, assign a technician to each of our hospitalized patients and triage surgery times. We try to end with a joke to lighten the mood and get everyone ready to tackle the day. 11AM Surgery time. Our practice offers promotional discounts on dental prophylactic cleanings for National Dental Health month in February, but so many pets need cleanings we’ve extended our discounted procedures into April. I do two dental cleanings and spay and neuter procedures. 1PM I head home for lunch and let the dogs out. I have a Cobb salad and a slice of homemade passion fruit tart. I hate to cook but I love to bake, so I typically have at least one kind of baked good around the house at all times. I tidy up the house from the chaos of the morning and even have time to watch a little television before heading back to work. 2PM As I drive back to the practice, I listen to an episode of one of my favorite podcasts, Dax Shepard’s Armchair Expert. 2:30PM I go through the appointment list for the afternoon, then read through old medical records to prepare and catch up on phone calls to clients who called while I was in surgery. 3PM Appointments start back up again. Today one of our walk-ins is a 13-year-old Boston terrier who has rapid onset weight loss, weakness in his hind legs and increased thirst and dehydration. A huge part of veterinary medicine is being a good listener and knowing which questions to ask owners since our patients cannot speak for themselves. I do an exam and blood work confirms that the patient is in diabetic ketoacidosis. Then comes the hard conversation about treatment and what the owners could expect long term for a diabetic pet. Once my job as diagnostician and educator is over, the owners must decide how to proceed. 6PM I finish up with my last appointment of the day. Before I leave the office, I go through my call list one last time to make sure all prescription requests have been completed, finish up my medical records and check on hospitalized patients. 6:30PM I finally head home for the day. 7PM Thankfully my husband has something ready for dinner by the time I get home.

Diaries are penned by moms (and dads) in the Fort Worth area. The authors volunteer to share a day of their choosing and are not paid or endorsed by FortWorthChild. Send your diary to editorial@dfwchild.com. All submissions are subject to editing and may be cut for space. 12

april 2018 / fortworthchild

PHOTO COURTESY OF BECKY BURK

real moms / R O U T I N E S


the fine

print

©ISTOCK.COM/MALTIASE

FAVORITE INDULGENCE
Going to see a movie by myself when my kids are in school FAVORITE MOVIE Predator FIRST CELEBRITY CRUSH Jordan from NKOTB BEVERAGE OF CHOICE Sweet tea BEST PURCHASE EVER
My Louis Vuitton Speedy handbag. It is an investment that I carry every single day that has been dropped, dragged and spilled in and on for many years and shows very little sign of wear. FAVORITE PODCASTS My Favorite Murder, Cold Case Files, Ear Hustle, 2 Dope Queens, and Myths and Legends GO-TO UNIFORM Scrubs WORDS SHE LIVES BY Preach the Gospel at all times. Use words if necessary. FAVORITE APP Instagram

We both hate to cook so this is always a point of contention in our house. Tonight he picked up an enchilada casserole from Your Personal Chef here in Aledo—we eat pre-made meals from here at least twice a week. It’s super delicious and very convenient. After dinner, I review school folders and check homework for Ezra and Libby Rose. I try to have both kids bathed and ready for bed by 8pm. 8PM It’s time to unwind as a family. I read one or two of the Elephant and Piggie books by Mo Willems with Libby and get her tucked in for the night. Ezra stays up reading a book from the Who Was? nonfiction biography series for another half an hour. 8:30PM I finally get to sit down and just disconnect for a while. Michael and I watch something on Netflix, and I play one of the Lego games on Xbox. My daily life is composed of noise, like barking dogs, yowling cats and yelling kids. Mindlessly bashing Lego bricks is very cathartic for me. It really allows me to unwind and de-stress. 9:30PM I begin my nighttime routine to get ready for bed. I love makeup but I’m terrible about skin care—my best friend does the Korean 10-step skin care program so she often sends me products. The latest is some kind of “snail cream.” Once I’m ready for bed, I read for a bit and then check through my emails one last time. 10PM Lights off.

TODAY

WEEKDAYS 4:30-7 AM

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Kids Menu QUITTING THE

IN AN ATTEMPT TO SATIATE FINICKY DINERS, PARENTS ARE INCREASINGLY TURNING TO KID-APPROVED STANDBYS—CHICKEN NUGGETS, MACARONI, GRILLED CHEESE—IN LIEU OF MORE NUTRITIOUS, ADVENTUROUS OPTIONS. HERE’S HOW TO WIN AGAIN IN THE KITCHEN.

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WORDS JESSICA ELLIOTT

N

ILLUSTRATIONS BY BEASTFROMEAST

ight after night, Cindy James’ sons Wyatt, 7, and Iain, 5, would ask for the same meal: chicken nuggets. The Dallas photographer and her husband both work full time, and making two nutritious meals daily was out of the question. “We gave into it in the beginning,” she says, “but I knew they weren’t getting any nutrition.” It is a common conundrum for parents: In an effort to ensure our children eat, we give them what they want. “Our basic innate parenting instinct is to nourish our children,” says registered dietitian Angela Lemond of Lemond Nutrition, which has locations in Plano and Rockwall. “The problem is that we start worrying when it’s 6pm and they aren’t eating a balanced meal. So we start subbing chicken fingers. Most families try to give their children a healthy food, but when they don’t eat it, that’s when things start going awry.” Enter the creation of the short-order cook—parents who craft entirely separate meals for their picky kids or hit the freezer for what are often less nutritious options. The desperate haste to get something on the table and into our kids’ stomachs can also lead to less-than-ideal strategies like bribery. (In a well-meaning attempt to encourage adventurousness, my own mother once promised a piece of cherry pie if I would eat an entire blue cheese-topped burger—I did. It took me 20 years to eat blue cheese again.) If you’re tired of begging, bribing or cooking to order, try a new tactic to break away from the kids menu. KIDS MENU? WHAT KIDS MENU?

Children in other countries often eat what their parents eat (lessons can be gleaned from French Kids Eat Everything by Karen Le Billon) while convenience foods are a staple in American households. Societal pressures—like seeing what their friends are eating at school—

also influence young children’s diets, and the lack of variety on restaurant kids menus makes it easy to stay in the rut; cheeseburger, grilled cheese, chicken nuggets, repeat. “I wish we didn’t even have kids menus,” Lemond says. She believes that parents should make one meal and serve it to the entire family. After nightly chicken nugget requests, that’s exactly the process James instituted. “I say, ‘You don’t have to eat what I cook, but I’m not cooking another meal,’” she explains. She does provide two other options: They can eat anything from the counter (always fruit) or make their own dinner as long as it’s not packaged. (She says Wyatt once made a “salad” with carrot slivers and two pieces of spinach—and was thrilled.) “They don’t have to clear their plates,” James says. “But if they get up from the table once they are excused and didn’t eat, they aren’t allowed to have anything later. Usually they realize they aren’t going to get anything later and eat.” While it doesn’t work every night—she still serves up chicken nuggets on some busy evenings—it’s successful more often than not, she says. “We’ll sometimes do something easy like sandwich night or breakfast for dinner. It’s not always this sea of nutrition we are eating, but we are realistic. If we do 70-30, then we are good.” Dallas-based registered dietitian Robin Plotkin suggests including one or two items per meal that your children will eat—as long as it’s part of the family meal and not something special for the child. “If you know your kiddos will always eat blueberries or cucumbers and ranch, then terrific—serve them to the rest of the family too,” she says. You can also serve meals buffet style, Lemond suggests. But if your kiddos still won’t eat, it really and truly is OK for them to go to bed without emptying their plates. “We have to remember that as parents we are not sending them to bed hungry—they are choosing not to eat,” she says. “Sometimes children pick at food

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time to eat. It’s good all around to take a break and taste your food and connect and keep the mealtime a positive experience.” GET THE KIDS INTO THE KITCHEN

KEEP THE FAMILY MEAL SACRED

Sports practice, schoolwork, laundry, food prep—the list of reasons to grab dinner on the go is extensive. But our harried schedules are equating to a sharp decline in families’ shared mealtimes. In 2013, 86 percent of Americans said they enjoyed a family dinner only once weekly, with 58 percent dining together at least four times weekly, according to a report by The Harris Poll. And 59 percent pointed out that they used to enjoy more dinners together while growing up. With each generation, we gather together less often. Yet studies consistently tout the benefits of dining as a family five nights a week or more. “It could be cereal; it could be chicken, potatoes and asparagus, but that time together is important and builds a strong foundation,” Plotkin says. “Research shows you how important eating together as a family is—children make better life choices.” Studies from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse have revealed that kids who regularly eat family dinners receive higher grades and skip school less. Then there are the nutritional benefits. The 2009 study “Family

16

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Dinner and Diet Quality Among Older Children and Adolescents” from the Archives of Family Medicine found that children who ate dinner with their families had healthier diets with more fruits and vegetables and less saturated fats, trans fats, fried foods and soda. Though encouraging the family to sit at the table might seem daunting, meals don’t have to be long—even 15 minutes with a toddler is enough to instill the routine. Moms who might not need to eat while their children are eating can munch on fruit or a snack, suggests Lindsay Matuson, a Fort Worth-based health and fitness expert who has two young sons. “Make it social so they see happiness and togetherness early,” she says. Find ways to encourage kids to stay at the table longer. The Family Dinner Project, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit, suggests rounding off the meal with ice pops made from real fruit or fresh juice and offering portions of the meal as courses—for instance serving vegetables as an appetizer and fruit for dessert. Congregating at the table for breakfast or lunch is just as beneficial. The key is gathering together frequently to reinforce good eating habits, healthy conversation and togetherness. “Even when we get older, the mindfulness—tasting our food— is important,” Lemond says. “People just aren’t taking the

HIDE THE GREENS, IF YOU MUST

When desperation sets in, it’s tempting to follow Jessica Seinfeld’s lead and go the stealthy route with the vegetables your

MY OWN MOTHER ONCE PROMISED A PIECE OF CHERRY PIE IF I WOULD EAT AN ENTIRE BLUE CHEESETOPPED BURGER. … IT TOOK ME 20 YEARS TO EAT BLUE CHEESE AGAIN. specializes in women’s and children’s health. “Eating has to go beyond simply sitting at the table—food needs to be experiential in nature,” agrees Lemond. She suggests visiting pick-your-own farms to teach children how to select ripe produce from spoiled and explaining the nutrients and benefits of each to encourage taste testing. Once home, encourage your kids to take part in age-appropriate activities, from rinsing and stirring to seasoning and tossing.

kids won’t eat—her cookbook Deceptively Delicious contains recipes for inserting pureed veggies into mac and cheese, spaghetti and other kid favorites. While this approach may make your child healthier with less hassle, nutritionists agree that eating veggies in ignorance shouldn’t be the primary way kids consume them as it discourages exploration. “You can’t always hide foods in dishes because kids have to get comfortable with certain foods,” Lemond says. “It’s not always going to be done at school

ILLUSTRATION BY BEASTFROMEAST

an entire day and others eat like horses. That’s just them listening to their bodies.”

From planning weekly menus to browsing farmers markets for ingredients to washing, cooking and serving food, allow children to share in culinary activities for an adventurous, multisensory experience that fosters healthy eating. A 2014 study published in the research journal Appetite found that children who helped with cooking ate more salad, chicken and calories in general. Those children also reported feeling more positive and in control. “It’s so important for children to be involved in the cooking and at the grocery store, having them pick out a new vegetable or fruit while learning new colors and looking at things the family members have never tried, like jicama,” says Amy Gonzalez, a Fort Worth-based dietitian who

They can feel the texture of broccoli, pound out dough, watch a multigrain muffin rise, or smell and select a spice. “They can very often do more than you think they can—it’s OK to challenge them and set expectations,” says Plotkin, whose son Ben, 8, sets and clears the table, among other activities. Dishes can even be named after children—Sophie’s Salad, for instance—to celebrate their efforts. While James’ sons typically play catch with their father when she heads to the grocery store on Mondays, she always gives them a rundown of the list. “I ask if they have any requests for the week, let them have input on what we purchase and what’s for dinner—and then I don’t have to come up with it five days a week,” she says.


or the restaurant so it’s more of a Band-Aid. They have to discover food on their own.” Gonzalez adds that frequently recognizing, feeling and tasting food helps to build confidence, especially when parents describe what their children are eating. “The more they see it, the more likely the children are to have that acceptance—it becomes a normal part of their day-to-day routine,” she says. Still, there are benefits to creatively concealing vegetables alongside serving them whole. Hiding avocado in pudding, cauliflower in pizza crust or spinach in a green smoothie can bolster your children’s nutrition and be a great supplement to a balanced diet. Matuson loves to take familiar foods and make them more nutrient dense. She serves her two sons spaghetti with zucchini noodles, muffins with hemp hearts, and after-school energy bites made with cinnamon, almond butter and flax seeds. “Even my pickiest eater will ask if we are making his favorite [cauliflower] pizza,” she says. “The fact that everyone in my family eats it and we can have the same thing—it’s worth it.” PLAY WITH YOUR FOOD

Trying new foods can be intimidating and is often fraught with pressure and anxiety for both parents and children. “Kids are very intuitive, and if we’re anxious [about getting our kids to eat], that can come off in our language, such as, ‘Look, Daddy’s eating it,’ or trying to rush them,” Gonzalez says. “That can come across as pressure, and for kids who are very sensitive, that can create anxiety or apprehension.” So relax, create a stress-free environment and set an example by eating the food yourself—but don’t add pressure by pointing out to your child that others are eating a food they’re resisting. “Say, ‘Wow, this is tasty,’ but don’t guilt them into it,” Lemond says. Gonzalez’s 3 1/2-year-old son, Jude, developed food neophobia, or the resistance to try unfamiliar foods, when he was 18 months

old, which is common. Now if she offers something and he refuses, her go-to phrase is, “You don’t have to eat it.” “I’m not going to offer him a different meal, but that takes off the pressure,” she explains. “It takes the pressure off me too because I don’t have to jump through hoops to get him to eat it.” Both Gonzalez and Lemond have found games to be a useful tool for combating apprehension. “When it’s a game, the majority of picky eaters will try the food,” Lemond says from experience. Gonzalez’s son loves trying samples at Costco, so after reading a tip from It’s Not About the Broccoli: Three Habits to Teach Your Kids for a Lifetime of Healthy Eating by Dina Rose, Gonzalez re-created the Costco setting by filling cups with foods—some he loves, some new—and asking him to describe the taste, texture and temperature. “That engages his senses so he can develop that terminology and describe what he doesn’t like about it,” she explains. She provides context too. “If they are trying a new dip, you can say that the dip tastes like what they had at their grandmother’s house,” she says. “Compare it to something else they had so they know what to expect.” When Gonzalez stumbles upon a food her son enjoys, she offers it daily but in different forms. He loves yogurt, for instance, so she might serve plain yogurt and honey one day, blend it with strawberries the next and offer a smoothie another day. “He’s still getting something he likes and will accept it, but it’s encouraging variety,” she says. The goal is to enable her son to be in tune with his body. “Children are learning conscious eating. They have the ability to accept or reject something, and they learn to eat when they are hungry or stop when they are full. That mindfulness will carry them into adulthood to help avoid emotional eating and overeating,” she says. Matuson’s oldest son still has high anxiety levels when

trying new foods, something she feels she was able to avoid with her second son by allowing a little revelry. “Let your children play with their food—from 6 months on let it be messy, let them get it on the floor, let them build trees out of broccoli,” she says. “It makes them comfortable. It’s completely exhausting, but my son is now a food champion.”

But, if after all you’ve tried your children still won’t touch that asparagus, don’t despair. “You have to remember that you as an adult might only want to eat cereal for dinner, and that’s OK,” Plotkin says. “Take a deep breath and relax. As long as you are offering a wide variety of foods, colors and textures, you are doing your job.” Lemond adds, “Any experience is forward progress.”

Quick & Healthy Tips More ways to avoid the food fight and broaden your kids’ palates

MAKE FOOD TASTE GOOD. Tap into your own culinary creativity and try slicing vegetables in new ways or adding a variety of spices, says Dallas dietitian Angela Lemond. Try roasting instead of steaming and add healthy oils. Another tip: Make one veggie three different ways. “You can explain how the flavors are different based on how they are prepared,” Lemond says. “That’s why cooking is so important—the kitchen is like a lab, and the same food can taste different three different ways.” OFFER HEALTHY SNACKS. Dallas mom Cindy James offers a “buffet” of healthful foods—such as carrots, hummus, fruit and cheese—when her two boys arrive home from school. “They were going to the pantry and getting a granola bar so by dinnertime they weren’t hungry,” she says. “So now if they don’t eat dinner because they had a snack, at least they are filling up on healthy foods not junk foods.” DECONSTRUCT MULTI-INGREDIENT MEALS. Serve spaghetti noodles and sauce separately, for instance, to make them less overwhelming. “Too many foods mixed together can be intimidating, so have them separated so kids can choose how to combine them,” Lemond says. CREATE A WEEKLY MENU WITH YOUR KIDS. Lemond hangs a menu for her children, Hannah, 14, and Evan, 11. “I let them help with the menu and put some of their favorite foods on it so it’s not a battle when they sit down to the table. Even if Evan doesn’t like Monday’s menu, he knows that on Thursday his favorite meal is coming.” CLOSE THE KITCHEN APART FROM MEALTIMES AND SNACK TIMES. Provide structure by setting a

schedule for snacks and meals. “It’s good to get an idea of what a typical day is like for a toddler versus a school-age kid, what is realistic, when they are going to be hungry,” says Lemond. For example, toddlers typically need three meals plus two to three snacks, whereas school-age kids can get by with fewer snacks. If your kiddos choose to skip, don’t make dinner on-demand for them later.

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FINDING YOUR

BY KAMBRY RUBY

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN AN IDYLLIC NEST FOR TWO AND HOME FOR A GROWING FAMILY CAN BE VAST. AFTER YOUR FAMILY GREW FROM JUST THE TWO OF YOU TO A GROUP OF THREE OR MORE, CHANCES ARE THAT THE COZY COTTAGE YOU ONCE LOVED AS NEWLYWEDS IS STARTING TO SEEM SMALLER THAN IT USED TO FEEL. NOW THAT YOUR LIFESTYLE IS CHANGING, YOUR HAPPY NEST FOR TWO MIGHT ALSO NOT HOLD QUITE THE SAME CHARM—OR FUNCTION—IT ONCE DID. WEIGHING YOUR PRIORITIES AND CONSIDERING ALL YOUR OPTIONS CAN TAKE THE DAUNTING GUESSWORK OUT OF ONE OF THE MOST EXCITING AND IMPORTANT STEPS YOU’LL EVER TAKE—BUYING YOUR FAMILY HOME.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CLINT BREWER; RON WOMMACK/CHARLES DAVIS SMITH, AIA

LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION It’s an old adage, but it continues to hold true for most people in the homebuying market today: location, location, location. First, define what kind of location you want for your growing family and what you want out of your location. Is your ideal, perfect place to raise your children a sprawling property in the suburbs with space to spare, or do you need a 10-minute commute to your office in downtown so you can spend more time at home and less in the car? Where do you like to eat, shop and play, and what kind of proximity do you want to these places that you love to frequent? Once you hone in on a specific part of town, shift your focus to the location of your home in terms of site and/or the lot, whether you’ve decided to take on the task of building your dream home or purchase one on the market. A tenured architectural expert in Dallas, Ron Wommack guides his clients as they decide on a property site to consider everything from east-west orientation on the lot to

what kind of natural elements are found on the site. “Select a lot that offers an amenity,” he says. “For example, choose a site with a great tree or an optimal view.” Finally, consider the surrounding streets within a neighborhood, how busy the traffic is around the home and the walkability of the area—all aspects that affect the environmental personality of the location for you and your family. “Start by considering the proximity of the home to the rest of your life, such as schools and work, and then decide if it’s a safe place to live and play,” says Wommack. “The greatest gift you can give your children is a home where they feel both security and freedom.”

LIFESTYLE While no perfect home exists, keep in mind that the goal is to find a home that’s perfect for your unique lifestyle and growing family. Sit down together to outline your needs and define your priorities. Next, differentiate needs versus priorities and then determine which items you’d be willing to compromise on and which categories are not negotiable. Also, discuss which recreational outlets you enjoy and your preferred lifestyle. Are you most comfortable with an atmosphere of fortworthchild / april 2018

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city living, nearby proximity and an urban environment, or are you looking for an escape with family-focused amenities and an intentional separation between work and home? How do you like to socialize and entertain family and friends? The community at Morningstar is conveniently located with nearby access to downtown Fort Worth and offers residents in search of an escape from the big city a quieter atmosphere with a slower pace. This quaint, familyfriendly community in Aledo ISD offers plenty of wide, open spaces, and an amenity package that features resort-style pools, an indoor resident event center, soccer fields, winding creeks and hike and bike trails, rolling hills and a lake system with beautiful waterfalls. “The combination of attractive amenities designed for families and the backdrop of a property that boasts natural beauty at every turn make Morningstar a unique, very desirable

option for families hoping to achieve both a location with good proximity to job centers as well as a setting and lifestyle created with parents and children in mind,” says Kim Gill, president of FG Aledo Development, LP, the development company for Morningstar.

COMMUNITY

The phrase “it takes a village” might never resonate so much as when you become a parent. Finding a community that offers an atmosphere that suits your family dynamic and personality is often equally important as loving the architectural style

or floor plan of your new home. For families who love to spend time outdoors exploring the world around them, the new community of Wildridge is a peaceful, oasis-like getaway. Tucked away on a quiet peninsula of Lake Lewisville, Wildridge contains more than 800 home sites and offers scenic views and a natural sanctuary of mature trees, green spaces and winding trails. “Kids and parents alike can take advantage of weekly fishing lessons at stocked ponds, an amenity center with a resort-style pool and wading area, and an outdoor pavilion with an open fireplace—all ways to get outdoors and spend time together,” says Steve Yetts, general manager at Wildridge.

EDUCATION

Whether you just had your first baby and kindergarten seems like a lifetime away or you already have school-age children, education is undoubtedly a major

Fresh New Floor Plans in Dallas! Taylor Morrison is excited to bring new communities with fresh new spaces to the Dallas area this Spring and Summer. These spectacular spaces will be worth the tour. VISIT DFWSPACES.COM FOR LOCATIONS

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DFWSpaces.com | 469.732.3890 America’s Most Trusted Builder 3 years in a row** *Design Studio Incentive of $1,000 Off Design Options (“Design Incentive”): Valid for all qualified cash or financed (either Outside Lender or Approved Lender or Outside Lender) buyers on select new home contracts entered into as of 4/1/18 –4/30/18 (“Design Incentive Promotion Period”) for the purchase of eligible to-be-built homes at Taylor Morrison’s Dallas Communities only (each, an “Eligible Home”). Any unused portion of this Design Incentive may not be used towards a reduction in the Purchase Price and will be forfeited by Buyer. Ad must be presented on first visit to receive incentive. Not valid in conjunction with any other offer. **Taylor Morrison received the highest numerical score in the proprietary Lifestory Research 2016, 2017, and 2018 America’s Most Trusted® Home Builder study. Your experiences may vary. Visit www.lifestoryresearch.com. Offer void where prohibited or otherwise restricted by law. All information (including, but not limited to prices, views, availability, incentives, school assignments and ratings, floor plans, site plans, features, standards and options, assessments and fees, planned amenities, programs, conceptual artists’ renderings and community development plans) is not guaranteed and remains subject to change or delay without notice. Maps and plans are not to scale and all dimensions are approximate. As-built condition controls. Prices may not include lot premiums, upgrades and options (depending on specific stage of construction of Eligible Homes). This material shall not constitute a valid offer in any state where prior registration is required or if void by law. All Eligible Homes for either promotion subject to prior sale. Please see a Taylor Morrison Community Sales Manager and your purchase agreement for community specific details or visit www.taylormorrison.com for additional disclaimers. © March 2018, Taylor Morrison of Texas, Inc. All rights reserved.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF WILDRIDGE/ASHLAR DEVELOPMENT

35W


AT THE LAKE, KIDS CAN GET

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AIR. Master-Planned living from the $300’s on the scenic shores of Lake Lewisville • Amenity Center with resort-style pool, wading area • Texas-themed pavilion with outdoor bar, grill and open fireplace • Natural Trails winding throughout the community • Stocked fishing pond • Natural playground • Open spaces, parks and creeks • Lifestyle coordinator planning events throughout the year

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consideration in the search for an ideal family home. Regardless of whether you’re leaning toward public or private education, you’ll never regret choosing a home located in a strong public school system—a factor that can heavily affect your property value and offers your family a viable option for education no matter what the future holds. Many master-planned communities are situated in highly coveted school districts and several even offer on-site elementary schools—making the idyllic image of neighborhood families walking to school alongside one another a reality. The development at Morningstar takes education seriously—it features 15 acres solely dedicated to an on-site school.

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The need for modern amenities or a change in floor plan might be some of the chief reasons you’re looking for a new nest. Open concept floor plans beloved for today’s lifestyle create a natural, comfortable flow for friends and families to congregate and affords parents of young children the ability to keep a watchful eye on little ones throughout the day. Consider features such as good closet space, a versatile layout, adequate storage, outdoor areas and a functional garage as you look for a new home— amenities that make a significant difference not only in the livability and life of a home, but also in its marketability if and when you decide to sell in the future. The builders at Taylor Morrison offer homeowners the opportunity to personalize their spaces within floor plans designed for longevity, comfort and livability. A leading national homebuilder and developer and recognized by Lifestory Research as “America’s Most Trusted Builder®” for three consecutive years, Taylor Morrison is known and loved by families for the impeccable attention paid to even the smallest details, affordability, architectural integrity and quality construction. Their homes are located near the things that matter most— great schools, convenient shopping, amenities and easy access to jobs, recreation and entertainment. Located in communities around the Dallas-Fort Worth area, homes by Taylor Morrison offer a variety of familyfriendly floor plans that feature large living spaces and gourmet kitchens as well as community perks like green spaces, nature paths, extensive trail systems and community gated entries.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CLINT BREWER; FG ALEDO DEVELOPMENT LP

ronwommack.com

Photo credit: Charles Davis Smith, AIA

FLOOR PLANS AND ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES


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FINDING THE FAMILY HOME:

RESOURCE DIRECTORY IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT PLACE FOR YOUR FAMILY TO CALL HOME, LEARN TO ASK THE RIGHT QUESTIONS AND PRIORITIZE YOUR NEEDS—AND REMEMBER, FINDING THE APPROPRIATE PEOPLE TO ADVISE AND HELP YOU IS EQUALLY IMPORTANT. THE FOLLOWING INDUSTRY EXPERTS ARE HIGHLY SOUGHT AFTER FOR THEIR IN-DEPTH KNOWLEDGE AND THE EXPERIENCE THEY BRING TO EVERY PROJECT. WORKING ALONGSIDE A TRUSTED EXPERT CAN PROVIDE INVALUABLE INSIGHT WHEN FINDING YOUR FAMILY’S HOME.

MORNINGSTAR

MASTER-PLANNED COMMUNITY Wake up to a whole new way of living at Morningstar. Conveniently located near downtown Fort Worth and situated in Aledo ISD, this dynamic community development offers young families and empty nesters alike an amenity package that includes resort-style pools, retail development, a community amphitheater that overlooks cascading waterfalls, soccer fields, play areas, 2½ of hike and bike trails, and a winding creek surrounded by natural beauty. Morningstar was designed to accommodate more than 2,000 lots, and the community also features 15 acres committed to an on-site elementary school. Home prices range from the $250s to the mid $400s, and families can select from a variety of newly designed floor plans by Highland Homes, Impression Homes, Rendition Homes and D.R. Hornton. Morningstar is managed under the leadership of Tim Fleet and Kim Gill of FG Aledo Development, LP, and this team boasts more than 75 years of experience in new home building, development and real estate transactions. Their dynamic portfolio operates primarily in North Texas with an emphasis on areas in Tarrant and Parker counties. Morningstar 128 Heather Wind Ln., Aledo, TX 76087 817/952-6220 morningstartx.com

RON WOMMACK ARCHITECT

Ron Wommack, FAIA, established his firm, Ron Wommack Architect, in 1990. Prior to opening his firm, Wommack worked for two of the Southwest’s most recognized design-oriented firms, the Oglesby Group and Frank Welch Associates. Wommack and his team’s award-winning architectural portfolio includes a wide range of projects, from the refurbishment

of older housing units into viable urban dwellings and the development of new, denser housing typologies to single-family residences, corporate office facilities and community projects for the public. Since 1994, the firm has been the recipient of numerous component design awards from the American Institute of Architects (AIA), including six Texas Society of Architects and AIA/Dallas Honor Awards. The firm has also won several “Home of the Year” awards and honors by D Magazine as well as awards from Preservation Dallas. Wommack earned his architecture degree from Texas Tech University in 1976. He is a former adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Arlington and visiting studio critic at Texas Tech University. Wommack was elected to the College of Fellows of the AIA in 2004, and his firm was named “Dallas Firm of the Year” in 2006 by the AIA. Ron Wommack Architect 1111 Lagoon Drive, Dallas, TX 75207 214/808-2255 ronwommack.com

TAYLOR MORRISON

RESIDENTIAL HOMEBUILDER The builders and visionaries at Taylor Morrison ultimately understand that the goal is to build houses that families will not only love to call home but will also be proud of for years to come. They start every project with one simple question: What makes a great home? Based on the values homebuyers expect from their homebuilder, Taylor Morrison’s objectives include spaces that are thoughtfully designed to work for each family, warranties that provide peace of mind and financing programs that save time and money—all accomplished by industry leaders who are passionate and knowledgeable about their work. Taylor Morrison is a leading national homebuilder and developer, and the company has been recognized three consecutive years by Lifestory Research as

“America’s Most Trusted® Home Builder.” Taylor Morrison homes are located in areas that are closely situated to schools, shopping, high-quality amenities, recreation and job centers, and homeowners have the opportunity to personalize their new home to meet their family’s unique preferences. Taylor Morrison 469/732-3890 dfwspaces.com

WILDRIDGE

MASTER-PLANNED COMMUNITY Tucked away on a quiet peninsula of Lake Lewisville in the esteemed Little Elm ISD, Wildridge offers families a peaceful oasis and the chance to get away from the hustle and bustle. From a kayak excursion or yoga practice in the park to mingling with neighbors during events organized by the community’s lifestyle coordinator, Wildridge is a haven for families seeking outdoor activity and offers something for every life stage. Wildridge is beloved for its breathtaking sense of natural beauty. Residents are surrounded by a sanctuary of mature trees, green spaces and ponds—all interlaced around the coveted area of Lake Lewisville. Not only can families enjoy walking distance access to the lake, sunsets over the watery view, open green spaces, creeks and an amenity center with a resort-style pool, kids can participate in weekly fishing lessons at the stocked ponds and play on a natural playground. Boaters and water enthusiasts can take advantage of six nearby marinas as well as two lakeside restaurants. An extraordinary oasis where winding trails and rolling hills serve as the backdrop to families’ new homes, this 400-acre community is the perfect place to create lifelong friendships and lasting memories. Wildridge 3500 Wildridge Blvd., Oak Point, TX 75068 469/513-5600 liveatwildridge.com fortworthchild / april 2018

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Planning the Perfect

Family Vacation Ready to get out of town? Whether you’re looking to jet away to a faraway destination or stay a little closer to home, family fun awaits you at these great escapes.

THE PERFECT PLACE TO SIT BACK AND RELAX OR

step back in time frontier heritage | festivals & events | over 30 wineries and tasting rooms museums & historic sites | peaches & wildflowers | golf | sophisticated shopping eclectic art galleries | Hill Country cuisine | live Texas music | cycling

Fredericksburg

THE TEXAS HILL COUNTRY Fredericksburg—it’s not just for grown-ups. Enjoy the Hill Country by taking a family hike at Enchanted Rock, renting bikes or “ooh-ahhing” at the wildflowers. Afterward, fuel up with one of the many kid-friendly goodies such as mile-high burgers, brick oven pizza and homemade ice cream. Take your little history buffs to an authentic World War II reenactment or walk the historic Main Street to browse over 150 shops. To round out your day, put on your dancing shoes for some live music and two-stepping.

PHOTO COURTSEY OF FREDERICKSBURG CVB

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Kemah Boardwalk TEXAS

www.kemahboardwalk.com

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For a seaside escape located just 20 miles outside of downtown Houston, load up the car and head for Kemah Boardwalk. With 60 acres of waterfront fun, a trip to Kemah Boardwalk promises a wide array of amusements and activities. Stroll up and down the Midway for dancing fountains that shoot water up to 12 feet high—kiddos love splashing around these water jets, which are illuminated at night. You’ll also find Midway games for all ages and a double-decker carousel boasting painted seals, horses and zebras to mount. If the Ferris wheel seems a bit too tall for your little ones, head for the Wonder Wheel, a child-size version of the classic attraction. Be sure to schedule a visit to the Kemah Aquarium. Between the rainforest exhibit with African elephant and lowland gorilla animatronics and the specialty-themed restaurant housing a 50,000-gallon tank filled with tropical fish, everyone in your crew is sure to be impressed. If you have little daredevils in tow, steer toward the Stingray Reef to touch (and even feed!) Southern and Cownose stingrays. If you’re looking to cover a lot of ground, hop aboard the C.P. Huntington, a gas-powered train that carries passengers around the property. Give your family a taste of history on this gas-powered train, which is a handcrafted replica of a Central Pacific Railroad train from 1863. Plan your trip for the first half of this month to catch the Crawfish and Zydeco Festival, during which families can enjoy fresh-boiled crawfish, crawfish races and live Zydeco music. Schedule your visit for the last weekend in April to watch Blessing of the Fleet, a decorative boat parade traveling from the Clear Creek Channel into Galveston Bay.


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$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Kemah Boardwalk. Does NOT include the Boardwalk Beast, Stingray Reef or Iron Eagle. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC

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$5 OFF ALL DAY ALL RIDES PASS Clip out and present this coupon to receive $5.00 off an All Day All Rides Pass. Coupon valid for up to five (5) people/ five (5) passes. Includes unlimited access to the rides at the Pleasure Pier. Coupon must be exchanged at the amusements ticket booth for actual dated wristband. Wristband is valid for day of redemption only. Not valid with any other promotions or offers. No cash value. Tax not included. Must present coupon at ticket booth to be valid. Expires 8/31/18 DC TM

2501 Seawall Blvd • Galveston Island, TX 77550 409.766.4950 • 855.789.7437 • pleasurepier.com


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Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort SAVE UP TO

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FLORIDA

Located in popular South Walton is the iconic Sandestin Golf and Beach Resort. This sprawling 2,400-acre resort is rated the #1 Resort in Destin by U.S. News and World Report and universally recognized as the finest resort on the Emerald Coast. This four-season resort for all ages features miles of pristine beaches and bayfront, deluxe accommodations, championship golf, tennis, marina, shopping, fitness center, spa and The Village of Baytowne Wharf. Sandestin also offers entertainment all summer long; from movie nights and concerts to evening luaus and fireworks, the events are endless. Time spent on Sandestin’s world-famous beaches with their white sands and warm emerald waters of the Gulf of Mexico is priceless. And with a full array of beach services, it is effortless as well. Soak up the fun in the sun with beautiful beaches, amazing events, endless shopping and more. Start planning your summer vacation to Sandestin and enjoy savings up to 25%. Visit sandestin.com/dfwc or call 877/567-2257.

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PHOTO COURTSEY OF SANDESTIN GOLF AND BEACH RESORT

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Galveston Island TEXAS

For a beach vacation that goes beyond sand and surf, plan your stay at Galveston Island. Home to Schlitterbahn Waterpark, the Historic Galveston Island Pleasure Pier, Moody Gardens and 32 miles of beaches, families can enjoy both an exhilarating and relaxing stay on the island. Head to Galveston this month to witness the Tall Ships Festival, which features six historic vessels offering sail-away excursions and interior tours, as well as plenty of music, food and family fun. Plus, splash around at Schlitterbahn’s indoor water park and ride Pleasure Pier’s new 5-D Theater Ride—both attractions are open weekends in April. Make your stay both fun and educational by taking advantage of Galveston’s online home-school materials, which include activity sheets, interactive maps labeled with historical sites and tips for making each stop memorable. And if you’re looking to plan for summer, go ahead and snag an Island Pass for 40% off admission on the island’s popular attractions!

PHOTO COURTSEY OF COURTESY OF GALVESTON ISLAND CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

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Hop aboard the Grapevine Vintage Railroad for Day Out With Thomas,™ presented by Mattel® !

Grapevine

The fun-filled event features a 25-minute train ride with Thomas the Tank Engine™, Thomas & Friends™ themed entertainment, storytelling, video viewing, an Imagination Station with arts & crafts, temporary tattoos of Island of Sodor friends, Lone Star Hi-Railers model railroad display and more. TICKETS: $21 – $25 PER PERSON. TICKETS ARE REQUIRED FOR GUESTS AGES 24 MONTHS AND UP.

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For more information, visit www.GVRR.com or call 817.410.3185 705 S. Main St. • Grapevine, Texas 76051

28325_GCVB_Child_DOWT_April_2018_ad_v3.indd 1

Hyatt Regency Lost Pines Resort & Spa TEXAS

For a nature escape fit for the whole family, plan your stay at Hyatt Regency Lost Pines. Get active with rock climbing, horseback riding and kayaking, or relax at Spa Django. Fuel up at one of the four restaurants on-site, or grab a slice of Hawaiian or veggie pizza from the new “Pizza in the Pines.” If you’re looking for a kid-friendly way to celebrate Easter, take advantage of the Easter Celebration, which includes a delicious brunch, egg hunt and photo ops with the Easter Bunny.

lostpines.regency.hyatt.com/en/hotel/home.html

Historic Grapevine is your gateway to Texas fun! Hop aboard the Grapevine Vintage Railroad or unwind along Grapevine’s Urban Wine Trail. Play 81 holes of golf or take advantage of 8,000-plus acre Lake Grapevine. Enjoy LEGOLAND® Discovery Center or SEA LIFE Grapevine Aquarium, located at Grapevine Mills. Enjoy great seasonal fun at the New Vintage Wine and Gallery Trail, Main Street Fest and SummerBlast. Make time for great shopping, dining and more throughout Grapevine. For more information, visit grapevinetexasusa.com.

3/9/18 4:01 PM

PHOTO COURTSEY OF GRAPEVINE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

TEXAS

April 13, 14, 15, 20, 21 & 22


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Dad loved the WWII submarine

North Little Rock ARKANSAS

For a family-friendly trip filled with outdoor fun, pack your bags for North Little Rock. Plan your getaway this month for the inaugural Arkansas Italian Food and Culture Festival, which includes an Italian car show, cooking lessons, grape stomping and more. Take your crew out to the ballgame at Dickey-Stephens Park to see the Arkansas Travelers, and make sure to visit the Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum, which houses a functioning submarine from World War II—your kiddos can climb down the hatch and experience life as a submariner!

Fun at Wild River Country!

iful Beaut oon aftern Old e at Th ill M

This weekend away was just what our family needed.

northlittlerock.org

PHOTOS COURTSEY OF NORTH LITTLE ROCK CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

Twin Coves Park and Camp Ground TEXAS

Strap on your hiking boots, mist some bug spray and snag some marshmallows for a camping trip at Twin Coves Park and Camp Ground. Home to fully furnished cabins, RV sites (with optional hookups) and primitive campsites, you can choose the best fit for your family. During the day, take advantage of the boat dock and kayak launch along Lake Grapevine, or enjoy hiking the Northshore Trail. You’ll also find a playground, short disc golf course and plenty of picnic tables, grills and pavilions along the 243-acre park.

TWIN COVES PARK 243-ACRE PARK ON THE NORTH SHORE OF GRAPEVINE LAKE

twincovespark.com

DAY & O V E R N I G H T V I S I T S

+ Furnished cabins + RV sites + Fishing pier + Playground

+ Pavilions + Picnic areas + Hike/bike trails + Boat ramp/dock

5001 Wichita Trail, Flower Mound, Texas

twincovespark.com 972-874-6399

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kid culture.

KNEAD TO KNOW

cooking, baking and etiquette classes for kids

PHOTOS COURTESY OF SUR LA TABLE

WORDS ALEXIS MANRODT & LISA SALINAS

I

t’s never too early to get your little ones making their own meals or setting the table for dinner. Classes throughout Tarrant County teach the basics of cooking, baking and table etiquette all while building kids’ self-esteem and equipping them to fend for themselves in the kitchen (wouldn’t that be nice?) or in a four-star restaurant. Besides, getting dressed up for a dinner party or getting messy in the kitchen is just plain fun—and who doesn’t love tasting food before it makes it to the plate? So grab your apron and start with these local classes.

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kid culture / K N E A D

TO KNOW

The Children’s Spot 1222 E. Debbie Ln., Mansfield, TX 76063 info@childrensspot.net // 817-473-0441

www.childrensspot.net We are now enrolling for all ages including an Accelerated Pre-K Class this Fall! Sign language Cooking Classes Spanish Classes S.T.E.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) Frogstreet Curriculum

“Where learning never ends!”

Serving Toddlers, Children and Teens

o See You ve T Sm o L i

le!

W e

In-Office Sedation – Hospital Dentistry Parents Welcome in the Treatment Room

Manivara P. Krone, D.D.S.

Diplomate, American Board of Pediatric Dentistry

817-283-8600

Harwood

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G ACCEPTIN NTS NEW PATIE

1N

pediatricsmiles.net 3004 Hwy 121 @ Harwood, Ste. B Bedford

april 2018 / fortworthchild

PREVIOUS PAGE // Kids ages 7 and up learn cooking and baking techniques at Sur La Table classes. ABOVE // Kids learn baking and cookie-cutting techniques at the Central Market classes

mini cooks in the kitchen C E NTR A L M A R K E T // Instead of grabbing

dinner to go from Central Market, stay and make it yourself. The store offers classes for kids and adults to cook together—and of course you get to sample the food afterward. Register early—with tempting menu items like blueberry pancakes, cheesy garlic bread and beef sliders, classes fill up in advance. Upcoming classes for kids include Parent & Child: Grilling Favorites for age 5 and up on April 21 (Southlake) and Parent & Child: Chinese Take-Out at Home for age 7 and up on April 28 (Fort Worth). Prices for parent-child classes start at $80 per pair; register online. 4651 W. Freeway, Suite 100, Fort Worth, 817/377-9005 // 1425 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake, 817/310-5665; centralmarket.com/ cooking-school S U R L A TA B L E // Dig in to the many culinary classes at Sur La Table—with a different schedule every week, there’s always something new on the menu. Kids 7 and up can join Mom and Dad at Family Fun classes to make a dish or two; upcoming themes include Funfetti in April and Spain in May at both Fort Worth and Southlake. Kids 8–12 can sharpen their knife skills in a twohour class offered on select Sundays, or join a two-day or five-day series during the summer, in which chefs-in-training work together in groups of four to learn (and taste!) popular recipes from Sur La Table’s professional chef instructors—everything from American favorites like hamburgers and peach cobbler to international cuisine like souvlaki and falafel. For baker babes, the Bakeshop Fundamentals series centers on sweet and savory baked goods like soft pretzels, ciabatta breads and various pies. Class calendars are available months in advance—good thing,

as seats fill up quickly. $55 per person for twohour classes; $120 for two-day series; $300 for five-day series. Register online. 3400 Bryant Irvin Road, Suite 120, Fort Worth, 817/377-0683 // 1151 E. Southlake Blvd., Suite 340, Southlake, 817/416-6257; surlatable.com TA S TE B U D S K ITC H E N // Though it doubles as an adult kitchen at night (complete with BYOB option), Taste Buds boasts a lengthy lineup of classes for toddlers to teens and their families. Two- to 5-year-olds and 5- to 8-year-olds can make pizza, doughnuts and more dishes—from unicorn cupcakes to quiche fromage—with Mom or Dad, while older kids and teens learn the recipes for dumplings, sushi, empanadas and more during family workshops and weeklong camps. Speaking of camps, the Future Celebrity Chef Camp (for ages 4–8 and ages 9 to teen) teaches cooking skills through games inspired by competition shows like Top Chef. Singlesession classes and weeklong camps are available Monday–Saturday starting at $28 per chef, including one caregiver. Sign up online.

2140 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake, 817/488-0538; tastebudskitchen.com YO U N G C H E F S AC A D E MY // At Young Chefs Academy, kids age 5 and up learn more than just how to cook—weekly hands-on classes also teach kitchen safety, table setting, dining etiquette and more. The classes tie into a different theme each month, like April’s Authentic World Culinary Expedition, during which kiddos will explore recipes from around the world. YCA tailors its programming to three separate age ranges: KinderCooks (ages

PHOTO COURTESY OF CENTRAL MARKET

• • • • •


Your next family adventure starts at Your Place. Park Place presents a bold new take on legendary Porsche performance: the Panamera Sport Turismo. With an athletic body style, versatile five-door design and increased luggage capacity. Along with a spirited new powertrain and numerous engine options. Of course, no matter which you choose, a one-of-a-kind ownership experience comes standard.

That’s what makes Park Place feel like Your Place.

Š2018 Porsche Cars North America, Inc. Porsche recommends seat belt usage and observance of all traffic laws at all times.

Park Place Porsche Dallas 6113 Lemmon Avenue Dallas, TX 75209 214.525.5400 park-place.porschedealer.com


5–7), whose lessons only run 60 minutes, and Junior Chefs (ages 7–14) and Senior Chefs (ages 14–18), whose lessons last an hour and a half. Classes meet on various days Tuesday– Saturday; prices start at $35 per class or $89 per month. In summer, sign up for Camp Can-I-Cook, YCA’s weeklong camps for ages 7–14 with themes like Cupcake Shoppe and the competitionstyle YCA Showdown. 6333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Suite 260, Fort Worth, 817/989-2433; ftworthtx.youngchefsacademy.com

dessert, anyone?

1

C A K E C A R O U S E L //

TO KNOW

M I S S P E R S I S S TU D I O // Since 1954, Miss Persis Studio has offered a seasonal cotillion program for Arlington sixth-graders. During six Saturday lessons, students learn about formal dining presentation and etiquette, plus other social skills, before practicing their party manners at a Spring Fling event at the end of the program. (Fifties night and Country Western night are also on the schedule.) Though enrollment is not exclusive to certain schools, the studio does organize the program into four sections based on feeder school neighborhoods. $160 per person.

222 W. Main St., Arlington, 817/261-7921; misspersisstudio.com N ATI O N A L L E AG U E O F J U N I O R COTI L L I O N S // Under the 29-year-

Satisfy your little one’s sweet tooth with decorative dessert classes at Cake Carousel. Besides stocking supplies to practice your sweets-making techniques at home, the all-things-baking store offers cake decorating and cookie-baking classes year-round, though the cookies change seasonally—in April, cookies are spring- and Mother’s Day-themed. Watch the online class list (be sure to choose “grid view” to see the full selection) for specialty classes like Macarons on April 24. Ages 8 and up are welcome at every class, as long as Mom or Dad comes too. Classes range from $45–$70 and are typically an hour and a half; register online. For more information contact cakecarousel@cakecarousel.com.

old National League of Junior Cotillions umbrella, the Southlake chapter offers traditional cotillion classes for middle schoolers that run concurrent with the academic year and highlight everything from personal presentation to dining etiquette. But it’s the one-day pre-cotillion classes for secondthrough fourth-graders that set director Jayne G. Smith’s program apart from the rest. Little ones receive a formal introduction to setting the table, using utensils, fastfood etiquette and even how to eat soup (say goodbye to slurping!). The three-hour class is currently offered exclusively on June 19; contact jayne.smith@nljc.com for more information and availability.

4623 S. Cooper St., Suite 137 Arlington, 817/375-5894; cakecarousel.com

Keller, 817/490-1224; nljc.com

mind your manners

TE X A S E TI Q U E T TE AC A D E MY & F I N I S H I N G S C H O O L // Book a tea party—

FO R T WO R TH COTI L L I O N // Part of the 69-year-old JDW Cotillions network, the program at Ridglea Country Club has been teaching Fort Worth kids and teens how to act with grace and decorum for more than four decades. Kids in elementary through high school learn communication skills, teamwork and traditional dances like the waltz and fox 2 trot, but the standout is the program’s dining etiquette segment, which covers proper table setting, dinner party hosting and plenty of other skills that go way beyond just keeping elbows off the table. The sixweek cotillion courses are offered by school grade for $225 per student. To learn more, email fortworth@cotillion.com.

complete with etiquette lesson—for your prince or princess and all their friends from Texas Etiquette Academy & Finishing School. Social skills need polishing first? Director and mom of five Misty Harris and her team offer etiquette classes for kids 5 and up. Classes focused on dining skills including utensil usage, party manners, conversation skills and more are available the second Saturday of April, June, August, October and December for $55. For a more customized education, Harris offers private lessons—priced between $60 and $250 per student—to focus on specific etiquette skills, like fine dining and dinner party hosting. Sign up for classes online, or email texasetiquette@gmail.com to inquire about private lessons.

3700 Bernie Anderson Ave., Fort Worth, 303/408-4233; cotillion.com

Fort Worth, 817/476-0138; ingoodcompanyetiquette.com/texas

1 // Little chefs cook up delicious recipes at Taste Buds Kitchen. 2 // Misty Harris, director of Texas Etiquette Academy & Finishing School, has offered etiquette classes since 2010. 36

april 2018 / fortworthchild

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TASTE BUDS KITCHEN; TEXAS ETIQUETTE ACADEMY & FINISHING SCHOOL

kid culture / K N E A D


BEST Saturday, February 24

Sunday, February 25

Parish Episcopal School

Botanical Research

EVER

Institute of Texas

PHOTOS BY WJN PHOTOGRAPHY

Thank you for joining us !

There’s still time to plan an awesome summer !

See page 38 or visit dfwchild.com to explore more.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

Impacting Students for Christ in North Richland Hills since 1958! At Fort Worth Christian School, parents experience a Christ-centered community focused on the formation of their students for the future! In this rigorous academic setting, PK3 to 12th grade students are taught excellence in and out of the classroom. Coming up on our 60th anniversary since opening in northeast Tarrant County, FWC graduates who have gone on to great success and lives of service at the university level and beyond!

6200 Holiday Lane North Richland Hills, TX 76180 817-520-6200 www.fwc.org/camps

During our FWC Summer Program, our campus remains constantly busy! Camps are operated by our FWC staff who love Jesus! These Godhonoring men and women seek to provide the most engaging camp experience in the context of a loving, safe environment in which your children will be known, loved and valued, just as if they are fulltime FWC students during the school year. Our camp offerings challenge students in the areas of athletics, STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math), fine arts and creative academic programs to continue sharpening the minds of students while enjoying a fun, relaxed atmosphere. We have a variety of camps for all ages, so check out fwc.org/camps and fill up your child’s summer with fun activities that help prepare them for success in the future!

The #1 Summer STEM Camp Learn new skills and discover a passion for technology! At iD Tech, students ages 7–18 learn to code apps, design video games, learn programming with Roblox, mod Minecraft, engineer robots, design Fortnite-inspired games,  discover cyber security, create levels in virtual reality, build websites, 3D-print objects and much more. In each weeklong session, students explore a top campus, learn from top-tier instructors, create an impressive project and build in-demand skills that last long after summer. Campers are taught in small groups of just an average of 8 students per instructor for the most personalized instruction. 1-844-788-1858 info@idtech.com www.iDTechCamps.com

iD Tech summer programs are held at 150 prestigious campuses nationwide, including the University of Texas at Dallas, SMU, TCU, Rice, Westlake Academy, the University of Texas at Austin, MIT and more. While most programs are weeklong (overnight stays optional at many locations), teens can enroll in two-week, pre-college academies for the most immersive, in-depth instruction. Join us this summer to see why over 300,000 camp alumni can’t stop talking about iD Tech summer camps. Visit www.iDTechCamps.com or call 1-844-788-1858 to find the right program for your student.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

It’s all good at Summer Zoo Camp!

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

With summer break on the way, it’s time to register for Summer Zoo Camp at the Fort Worth Zoo! We have the perfect experience for your camper, from 3-year-olds to 12th graders. Animal presentations, Keeper Chats, Zoo excursions and more make Zoo Camp a fun and engaging experience all summer long. Summer Zoo Camp is open to children ages 3 to fifth grade and runs June 4 through August 17. Each week is themed to give campers a variety of educational and exciting experiences.

817-759-7200 www.fortworthzoo.org

Middle School Camp is geared toward entering sixth, seventh and eighth grade students. With topics ranging from Keeper-in-Training to Photography, these one-of-a-kind sessions are sure to fill up fast. Zoo Careers Camp gives high school students a rare opportunity to explore the worlds of zoological sciences, wildlife conservation and animal-related careers. This overnight camp is an immersive experience for ninth to 12th grade teens. Visit fortworthzoo.org for dates, times and complete details.

All Saints’ Episcopal School 9700 Saints Circle Fort Worth, TX 76108 www.aseschool.org/SummerUniversity

The Children’s Courtyard 30 DFW area locations 877-701-4908 www.ChildrensCourtyard.com/summer

Summer University at All Saints’ offers more than 140 classes to encourage academic growth, stimulate imagination and keep students active. Students ages 3 through high school seniors can participate in classes including (varies by age) Robot Transformer Creation, Equestrian, Art, Sky Ranch Launch Camp, Field Hockey, ACT/SAT Prep, Golf, LEGO® Engineering, Choir, Sailing, Chess, College Application Essay Writing, Cooking and many more. Come join the summer fun!

Make this summer exceptional. Enjoy a wide variety of weekly themed experiences (exploring interesting subjects such as science, art, animals, history, fitness, world cultures and games), engaging activities, fun field trips, and healthy meals and snacks. Choose your favorite weekly camp themes or spend the whole summer here. Plus, campers get a new T-shirt, water bottle, and drawstring bag for all their summer adventures! Sounds great, right? Then what are you waiting for? Sign up now for our Summer to Discover Camp, only at The Children’s Courtyard®. Call 877-701-4908 or visit ChildrensCourtyard.com/summer to learn more and find your local school. fortworthchild / april 2018

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

Summer just got more awesome!

3000 Meadowmere Ln. Grapevine, TX 76051 For questions: 817-228-9104   www.GoGrapevine.com/DoveCreek

The shores of Grapevine Lake can be your child’s next summer adventure — full of watersports, wilderness skills, camp games, archery and so much more! Dove Creek Day Camp offers your child the experience of overnight camp without the hassle of packing for a full week. Multi-child and multi-week discounts are available for families. We can’t wait to see you this summer for all the fun we have planned! Visit GoGrapevine.com/DoveCreek for dates, times and complete details. Dove Creek — DFW’s all day adventure Day Camp!

Arts, Crafts, Science, Cooking and More! Summer is more fun with Adventure Kids Playcare! Take advantage of our flexible drop-in options with a new camp theme each week for children ages 3–12! Choose from all 8 locations where each day is packed 9160 North Freeway #410 with arts, crafts, science, cooking and so much more! Fort Worth, TX 76177 Themes include Inventors Workshop, Animal Planet, 817-741-2572 Young Entrepreneurs, Grossology, CSI Spy Camp, 621 E. Southlake Blvd., Suite 120, Southlake, TX 76092 Challenge Island, Crazy Chemistry, Kids Who Rock, 817-488-4600 Chef’s Academy, DIY Stars, Myth Busters. www.adventurekidsplaycare.com

2430 Hwy. 39, Hunt, TX 78024 830-238-4650 • 830-238-4670 jane@hohcamp.com • conor@campstewart.com www.hohcamp.com • www.campstewart.com

Separate boy/girl camps owned and operated by Ragsdale family, Camp Stewart for boys 6–16, and Heart O’ the Hills Camp for Girls 6–16. Worldwide, limited enrollment, personable and fun! Instruction-oriented, offering more than 50 activities—including English and western riding, Red Cross swimming instruction, sports, canoeing, archery, tennis, climbing and rappelling, survival skills, crafts. Stewart has a unique Trail of Advancement for all boys; older boys specialize in equestrian, ranchman, outdoorsman, sportsman, or campmaster. The Heart has a tradition of etiquette. Also intangibles—self-confidence, teamwork, leadership, individual identity, dealing with challenges. New one-week term (Stewart only), two- and four-week terms.

Animals • Science • Adventure There is no better place for an animal lover! Camp is home to more than 300 animals including lemurs, llamas, miniature horses, cats & dogs, hedgehogs, wallabies and that’s only a few! There are over 100 hands-on activities campers may choose to do while at camp:

Cub Creek Science & Animal Camp Rolla, Missouri 573-458-2125 • MoScienceCamp.com

• Animal Care • Culinary Science • Pottery • Veterinary Medicine • Crime Science • Arts & Crafts • Survival Skills • Ropes Course • Archery Spend just a week making friends and memories that will last a lifetime!

Camp Clayton 5/29–8/10

Fort Worth and Keller 817-923-9888 www.claytonyouth.org

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Day camp locations in Keller ISD: Caprock Elementary, Eagle Ridge Elementary, Ridgeview Elementary, Shady Grove Elementary, Sunset Valley Elementary. Downtown Fort Worth: Lily B. Clayton Elementary. Crowley Area: Woodway Elementary Keller & Fort Worth — $140/wk Crowley area — $115/wk   Sibling discounts and financial assistance available. Register by May 26 and receive 50% off registration fee. Registration fee: $50 one child / $90 family   Ask about our specialty camps! Science, Art, Cooking and Travel. $195/wk for select weeks and locations.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

DESTINATION SCIENCE

Multiple Locations in Dallas Fort Worth Area Colleyville, Coppell, Dallas, Fort Worth, Frisco, Keller, Plano 888-909-2922 • destinationscience.org

Save $20/wk! Ends 4/30/2018

BEST Summer EVER CAMPS/TRAVEL/SPORTS/ARTS/EDUCATION

920 US Hwy. 287, Suite 300 Mansfield TX 76063 682-400-8383 www.kidcreatestudio.com

The fun science day camp where kids ages 5–11 get to have “Aha!” moments of creativity and discovery while building and experimenting with unique takehome toys, astonishing gadgets and fantastic gizmos. Our top-notch, enthusiastic educators make STEM learning an adventure! 2018 topics include Science Makers & Inventors Camp, Amusement Park Science Camp, Transforming Robots Camp and Rovers Rocketing to Space Camp!

Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids! Our award-winning summer camps are designed to inspire and educate young artists, ages 3 to 12, in an environment where giggles and grins are encouraged. Children get messy with paint, clay and so much more! This summer’s camps include Glitter & Glow, Mad About the Masters, Shopkins Cute, Sparkle Power and many more! Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

We produce three completely different musical theater camps!

1300 Gendy St. Fort Worth, TX 76107 817-737-5437 • www.kidswhocare.org

Mini Musical Theatre // Ages: 4–7 June 5–9, 8:30am–12:30pm. Family Showcase: June 9, 10:30am   Intensive Musical Theatre // Ages: 1st–12th Grades June 10–24. Experience what it is like to be a full-time actor for two weeks while producing Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat   KidPower International // Ages: 1st–12th Grades July 8–29. Join an international cast and make friends of all ages from around the world while producing an original musical! 

5900 W. Pioneer Pkwy. Arlington, TX 76013 www.theoakridgeschool.org/summerprograms

Summer at The Oakridge School allows children, age 3 through 4th grade, to discover a world of possibilities! Summer Days (K–4th grade) allow boys and girls to engage in academic, arts, technology and other enrichment classes. Oakridge Sports Camps (1st–9th grade) offer baseball, football, tennis and other athletic opportunities. Programs are open enrollment. Visit theoakridgeschool.org/summerprograms or call 817-563-9742 for more information.

703 NW Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington, TX 76006 817-860-6752, ext. 102 registrar@riverlegacy.org www.riverlegacy.org

Learn from the best classroom on earth: Nature! From Outdoor Adventure Camps to interactive, engaging hands-on classes for students ages 3 to 8th grade, Summer at the Science Center is sure to beat those summertime boredom blues! Weeklong age-appropriate programs investigate the wildlife, ecology and environment of River Legacy Park with explorations in animals, water, eggs, slime and more! 7th and 8th graders explore the science behind roller-coasters with a trip to Six Flags!

Ballet Basics introduces boys and girls, ages 3 to 6, to the fundamentals of ballet. The camp experience also includes crafts, story time and choreography to correlate with the theme of the week. 1540 Mall Cir., Fort Worth, TX 76116 817-763-0207 Option 3 www.texasballettheater.org/summer-program

Young Dancer Intensive and Junior Intensive broadens the perspective of 7–13-year-old ballet students with a variety of classes including ballet, modern and jazz.

fortworthchild / april 2018

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GRAPEVINE MILLS 972.539.5001 rainforestcafe.com

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kid culture

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WORDS ELIZABETH SMITH

2 3 F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY E V E N T S Y O U C A N ’ T M I S S I N

APRIL O’REILLY AUTO PARTS 500 RACE WEEKEND

PHOTOS COURTESY OF TEXAS MOTOR SPEEDWAY; FORT WORTH ZOO; MATTEL

EASTER BUNNY TRAIN

G R A P E V I N E V I N TA G E R A I L R OA D April 1 After the Easter Bunny finishes his egg-hiding duties, you’ll find him hanging out onboard Vinny, a 1953 diesel locomotive stationed at Grapevine’s Cotton Belt Depot. Join them both for an Easter Sunday train ride (hourlong excursions depart at 2 and 4pm) and, of course, a few holiday treats from the Easter Bunny. $14. 705 S. Main St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 gvrr.com

CRAYOLA EXPERIENCE OPENING

T H E S H O P S AT WILLOW BEND Now open daily This brand-new family attraction just opened in Plano, on the other side of Dallas-Fort Worth, but hear us out. This Crayola Experience, only the fourth in the nation, is a 60,000-square-foot venue featuring a retail store, cafe and 22 interactive areas. The trek to Plano is definitely worth seeing your kids make their own melted wax spin-

art and learn how crayons are made in a live factory show. $20.99 at the door; $18.99 online. $30.99 annual passes. Free for kids under 3. 6121 W. Park Blvd., Plano; 469/642-2901 crayolaexperience.com/plano

DISNEY ON ICE – DARE TO DREAM

AMERICAN AIRLINES CENTER April 4–8 Moana takes center stage in her Disney On Ice debut. Your kids will thank you for making the drive to Dallas (the tour’s only stop in North Texas) to watch her save her island with the help of demigod Maui. See mouse masters of ceremonies Mickey and Minnie usher in Moana and fellow female heroes Belle, Rapunzel, Cinderella and sisters Elsa and Anna. Kids 13 and younger are welcome to dress in costumes. Tickets from $15 on opening night. 2500 Victory Ave., Dallas; 800/745-3000 disneyonice.com

TEXAS MOTOR S P E E D WAY April 5–8 NASCAR fans: Bring your sunscreen, sunglasses and kids’ ear protection for a weekend full of races at the speedway. Listen to a Q&A with the drivers on Thursday night ($10), and climb up the grandstands for sprint car races on the dirt track and the two big races (300- and 500-mile races) on the oval track. Tickets vary by race, from $25 for adults, and free for kids 12 and younger. Call for details. Discounts available for season ticket holders. 3545 Lone Star Circle, Fort Worth; 817/215-8500 texasmotorspeedway.com/ events

CURIOUS GEORGE – THE GOLDEN MEATBALL

ARTISAN CHILDREN’S T H E AT E R April 6–28 After unforeseen circumstances throw a wrench into little monkey George’s favorite day, the annual All-YouCan-Eat Meatball Day, the Man with the Yellow Hat and George (with his own chef’s hat) travel to Rome to enter the world-famous Golden Meatball Contest. Bring your young fans of the book series to watch this new musical about food and friendship. $11 adults; $7 children age 12 and younger. 444 E. Pipeline Road, Hurst; 817/284-1200 artisanct.com

ZOO RUN

FORT WORT H Z O O April 7 Help support the Fort Worth Zoo’s resident animals by dressing up

like your favorite and joining this family 1K and 5K run/walk through the zoo exhibits and surrounding neighborhoods closed to through traffic. After everyone roars through the finish line, the 21st annual Zoo Run event continues with a live Animal Outreach presentation and awards. $30 through April 6; $35 on race day. Children 3 and older must register. Strollers are welcome. 1989 Colonial Parkway, Fort Worth; 817/759-7555 fortworthzoo.org/zoo-run

GISELLE

F ORT WORT H COMMUNITY ART S CENTER April 7–8 Ballet Frontier of Texas presents its season finale with Giselle, a centuries-old Romantic ballet about a young peasant girl who, though betrayed by her suitor, Albrecht, loves and protects him from beyond the grave. Watch as special guest artist and native Texan, Kathryn Boren from American Ballet Theatre, dances the lead role of Giselle on the W.E. Scott Theatre stage. $25. 1300 Gendy St., Fort Worth; 817/852-6887 balletfrontier.org

SCARBOROUGH RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL

SCARBOROUGH FA I R G R O U N D S April 7–May 28 Journey south of DallasFort Worth to experience a family-friendly version of 16th-century life when the annual Renaissance fair opens on weekends through Memorial Day. Marvel at the elaborately dressed enter-

tainers and patrons alike. To help your kids get into the role, take them to the Royal Marquee for knighting ceremonies each day at 4pm. $28 adults; $13 children ages 5–12; free for age 4 and younger. On opening weekend, up to three children get in free with each paid adult. 2511 FM 66, Waxahachie; 972/938-3247 srfestival.com

DAY OUT WITH THOMAS

G R A P E V I N E V I N TA G E R A I L R OA D April 13–22 Climb aboard a real-life Thomas the Tank Engine during his Big Adventures Tour stop in Grapevine. For two weekends, Sir Topham Hatt welcomes families for a 25-minute train ride aboard Thomas the Tank Engine’s coaches and to stay for a day full of fun. Entertainment includes stage performances and magic shows, a huge model train layout, a sandbox dig and more activities in the Imagination Station. $21 for timed tickets. Tickets required for age 2 and older. 705 S. Main St., Grapevine; 866/468-7630 ticketwebdowt.com

COCO MOVIE IN THE PARK

O V E R L O O K PA R K AT V I R I D I A N April 13 This movie won big at the Oscars for animated feature film and best original song, making the song co-writer Robert Lopez the first person ever to win a double EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony). Now come sing along to “Remember Me” at a screening of the

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Disney Pixar film on Friday night. Blankets, lawn chairs, picnic baskets and coolers are welcome. FREE 1210 Viridian Park Lane, Arlington; 817/200-6543 viridiandfw.com

AGENDA

Fort Worth Convention Center, Fort Worth; 817/336-2787 mainstreetartsfest.org

KIDS OBSTACLE CHALLENGE

VILL AGE CREEK MOTOCROSS PA R K April 14 Don’t even try to stay clean at this mud run made for kids. Runners are released in waves and by age groups through a course of a dozen or more obstacles, from a cargo net climb to rope swing over a mud pit. Registration from $52 for kids 5–16 and unlimited re-runs for only $5. Parents run with their kids for free. There’s no race-day registration so be sure to sign up in advance. Bring clothes and shoes to change into after rinsing off. 4840 Shelby Road, Fort Worth; 888/655-1127 kidsobstaclechallenge.com/ dallas

OPEN STREETS

THE NEAR SOUTHSIDE April 15 Pack up your kids’ favorite wheeled apparatus—bikes, trikes, skates, skateboards, scooters—and let them roam free during this community play day. Magnolia Avenue. closes to traffic and opens up with free space for riding and fun with 100-plus activity providers, ranging from fitness and obstacle courses to break dancing and bikesafety training. FREE Magnolia Avenue from Eighth Avenue to Hemphill Street, Fort Worth; 817/923-1343 nearsouthsidefw.org

MAIN ST. FORT WORTH ARTS FESTIVAL

DOWNTOWN F ORT WORT H April 19–22 This massive arts festival spans more than 27 city blocks through Fort Worth’s “main street,” with juried artists, a full musical lineup, festival foods and, near the courthouse, MAIN ST. Creates! for kids. Head to this outdoor arts-and-crafts studio first for fun with sand art, henna tattoos and tons more. Free admission; some activities require coupons. Tarrant County Courthouse to 44

the chores (tilling the soil, planting cotton) and the fun (riding on the wagon, jump rope making, visiting the furry farm animals). Free admission. Coupons required for some activities. 626 Ball St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 nashfarm.org

SPRING SOCIAL

PRESCHOOL DISCOVERY CLUB

F ORT WORT H N AT U R E C E N T E R AND REFUGE April 20 and 27 Explore how aquatic insects such as dragonfly larvae and water beetles make their home under and near water on April 20, and on April 27, learn how rivers provide valuable resources for plants and animals during these Friday morning programs for kids ages 3–5, each with crafts, games and outdoor time. $8 per child with paid admission: $5 adults; $2 children ages 3–12. 9601 Fossil Ridge Road, Fort Worth; 817/392-7410 fwnaturecenter.org

DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST JR.

C AS A M A ÑA NA April 20–May 13 See Beast and Belle in this family favorite musical at Casa Mañana for a three-weekend run, and on select days, get extra time with characters off stage during Tea With Belle, offered at noon before the 1pm performances on Saturdays, April 21 and 28. Enjoy a meet-and-greet with Belle at a tea party in the Reid Cabaret Theatre where the musical characters serve as wait staff. $55 for tea, plus performance ticket, available from $21. 3101 W. Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth; 817/332-2272 casamanana.org

LOG CABIN VILL AGE April 21 The city of Fort Worth’s heritage village depicts life as it was during Texas’ pioneer era in the 19th century, but this year, Log Cabin Village itself turns 52. Help wish the venue and its devoted staff a happy birthday at this party with all the usual activities and more. Meet the historical interpreters for tours, historic games and crafts. $6.50 adults; $6 kids ages 4–17; free for 3 and younger. 2100 Log Cabin Village Lane, Fort Worth; 817/392-5881 logcabinvillage.org

CARDBOARD BOAT REGATTA

SIX FL AGS H U R R IC A N E HA R B OR April 21 Witness an epic competition as young souls set sail across the water park wave pool in boats made of nothing but cardboard. The 29th annual regatta hosted by River Legacy is also a great excuse to get access to the water park before it opens for the season. $100 for boat kit. $5 park entry fee; $10 passes for unlimited spins on select rides: the Tornado, Tsunami Surge, Typhoon Twister and Hook’s Lagoon. 1800 E. Lamar Blvd., Arlington; 817/860-6752 riverlegacy.org

april 2018 / fortworthchild

In honor of Earth Day, enlist your kids to join a statewide litter cleanup, study the earth sciences and nurture their souls with the latest fitness trend: goat yoga. EARTH DAY FESTIVAL

RIVER LEGACY LIVING SCIENCE C E N T E R April 14 Every day is Earth Day at the River Legacy Living Science Center, but educators amp up the fun with even more naturefocused activities such as making wildflower seed balls, folding magazine origami and listening to presentations from the Nature’s Edge Wildlife and Reptile Rescue, as well as playtime in the center’s new Discovery Room. FREE // 703 NW Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington; 817/860-6752 // riverlegacy.org

MOTHER EARTH ARTISAN MARKET

O V E R L O O K PA R K AT V I R I D I A N April 21 At this Earth Day market, let the kids make their own pine cone bird feeder, learn how to compost and, best of all, take part in a fitness-class-meets-petting-zoo led by Happy Goat Yoga. Practice poses during this not-so-serious class while pygmy goats linger and jump around and on top of you. Free admission to market. $35 for class; includes postworkout playtime with the goats. // 1210 Viridian Park Lane, Arlington; 817/200-6543 // viridiandfw.com

transforms into an open-air art museum all weekend when more than 160 artists and artisans show off their masterpieces. Take a stroll around the square with your family to draw inspiration, then head to the Kids Korner for age-appropriate art activities, such as stained glass making and wing decorating. Free admission; all kids’ zone activities require tickets. 1256 Main St., Southlake; 817/329-5566 artinthesquare.com

VIRIDIAN BIO BLITZ AND CAMPOUT

SPRING INTO NASH

N A S H FA R M April 21 Spring’s a busy time around the farm. Join the commotion during one of Nash Farm’s biggest family days of the year by taking part in both

LOVE MOTHER EARTH

ART IN THE SQUARE

SOUTHLAKE TOWN S Q UA R E April 27–29 The Southlake Town Square

O V E R L O O K PA R K April 27–28 Explore the wildlife and nature trails at the Viridian community’s park during the fourth annual Bio Blitz and Campout. Bring your tent for the free family overnight on Friday with s’mores and nature stories, and stay through 3pm on Saturday for tours and activities, such as examining real fossils

that were discovered at Viridian, meeting live animals and competing in the invent-yourown-animal contest. FREE 1210 Viridian Park Lane, Arlington; 817/200-6543 viridiandfw.com

JAPANESE GARDEN SPRING FESTIVAL

F ORT WORT H B O TA N I C G A R D E N April 28–29 Experience the traditions of Japan at this semiannual festival in the Fort Worth Botanic Garden’s dedicated Japanese garden, an oasis with cherry trees, Japanese maples and koi pond home to over 1,200 fish. Bring your quarters to purchase handfuls of fish food, witness the taiko drumming and see demonstrations of Japanese swords and martial arts, and more children’s activities presented by the Fort Worth Japanese Society. $8 adults; $4 children. 3220 Botanic Garden Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/392-5510 fwbg.org

F O R M O R E F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY F U N T H I S M O N T H , C H E C K O U R O N L I N E C A L E N DA R AT D F W C H I L D.CO M/C A L E N DA R.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAUL MOSLEY; NEAR SOUTHSIDE INC.; RIVER LEGACY FOUNDATION; ©ISTOCK.COM/SAEMILEE

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confessions

MOMMY FAILS ILLUSTRATION MARY DUNN

I took my daughter to Bubble Guppies Live. After, I couldn’t find my keys—I had left the car running for three hours!” —ASHLEIGH, ARLINGTON

WHEN I PICKED UP MY 3-YEAR-OLD SON FROM THE BABYSITTER, I ASKED HOW HE’D BEEN THAT DAY, EXPECTING A GREAT REPORT. SHE INFORMED ME THAT HE CRAWLED ONTO THE COUNTER AND PEED INTO THE SINK.” —ANGELA, LAS COLINAS

“My 9-month-old had a double ear infection, and the doctor gave him antibiotics. One morning I smelled something. I looked in the back of his diaper, but it was too late. Imagine a tube of toothpaste rapidly shooting up— but poop.” —ANNIE, PLANO

Got a parenting fail you’d like to share? We’d love to hear from you. Send it to editorial@dfwchild.com.

“My husband and I don’t swear often, but we both say ‘Oh s#!%!’ as a first reaction after something bad happens. Our little one is in the potty training stages, and she missed the potty. Out comes from her precious mouth, ‘Oh s#!%!’” —NINA, RICHARDSON

“My son lost a baby tooth and placed it underneath his pillow that evening for the tooth fairy. Well, the tooth fairy completely forgot, and he woke up confused and slightly disappointed. I told him she must not have been able to find it. So, to be sure, it was right in the middle of his pillow the next night. Oops!” —NORA, ROWLETT

I LET MY 6-YEAR-OLD TAKE A SHOWER BY HIMSELF. WHEN HE CAME OUT HE DIDN’T SAY ANYTHING, BUT WHEN HE SAT DOWN TO EAT HE WAS COMPLAINING ABOUT HIS UPPER LIP. WHILE IN THE SHOWER, HE GRABBED MY RAZOR AND DECIDED TO SHAVE HIS ‘MUSTACHE.’” —MELISSA, ROYCE CITY

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april 2018 / fortworthchild


I FEED HER BRAIN A HEALTHY BREAKFAST. GO PUBLIC. â„¢

KERA Kids has a world of teacher-tested, kid-approved content, online and on the air. Go for the shows, videos and games. Go because fun and learning go hand-in-hand. Go to enrich their education, with the same member-supported organization that probably helped support yours. Go Public.

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After fighting cancer, Luis now dreams of curing it.

Luis, Age 11 Retinoblastoma Patient

When Luis was diagnosed at 7 months old with an eye tumor, his mom trusted Children’s HealthSM with his care. After multiple rounds of chemotherapy and surgery to have his eye removed, now his future couldn’t be clearer. Today, Luis dreams of being a scientist, curing the same cancer he fought.

Every patient has a dream. Read more at childrens.com/littledreamers

FortWorthChild April 2018  
FortWorthChild April 2018