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FORTWORTH

T H E M A G A Z I N E PA R E N T S L I V E B Y I N TA R R A N T C O U N T Y

A U G U S T 2019

20 EVENTS TO KICK OFF AUGUST

WHY RISKY PLAY IS HEALTHY MOM NEXT DOOR:

LAUREN BLOCK

MOM APPROVED WELLNESS PROFESSIONALS CHOSEN BY YOU

+

KID CULTURE: MAKING NEW FRIENDS

UNDER THE RADAR HOW DOES DYSLEXIA GO UNDIAGNOSED


pages / A U G U S T

2019 FORTWORTH

DEPARTMENTS NOTED 7 Play Dirty

Why adventurous play might actually be safer and healthier for kids

11 ABOVE // Lauren Block of Hey Gang and her daughter Birdie in Block's Fort Worth workshop.

FEATURE 18 Under the Radar Why girls with dyslexia often go undetected

18

words Misty Jackson-Miller

COLUMNS

4 dfwchild.com / Off the Pages

Conquer back-to-school jitters, succeed with ADHD and get your kid into reading words Elizabeth Quinn

46 Confessions / Mom Truths

From a forgotten blankie to a fashion faux pas

ON THE COVER

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF NICK PRENDERGAST; ©ISTOCK; ILLUSTRATION BY MARY DUNN

CREATIVE + CONTENT DIRECTOR Heather Vance Devers EDITORIAL Executive Editor Carrie Steingruber Managing Editor Elizabeth Quinn

Assistant Editor Lisa Salinas Calendar Editor Elizabeth Smith Contributing Editor Stephanie Sarles ART Contributing Editorial Designer Lesley Busby Graphic Designer Susan Horn

We chat with the mastermind behind kid’s clothing line Hey Gang

14 4 Things... / Mood Board

Our Mom Next Door’s favorite spots for shopping, family time and more 16 Routines / Brittany Harms She has two toddlers, works full time and goes to school part time

KID CULTURE 27 Buddy Up Making new friends can be intimidating for kids, so here’s how to help

30 Celebrate / Under the Sea

Make a splash with this mermaid-themed party 32 Travel /

Emerald City Views

Your family travel guide to Seattle from a former North Texan

37 Calendar / The Agenda

Cover Kid: Taylin of Rowlett Photography: Cindy James Hair/Makeup Styling: Kay Reeder / Independent Artists Art Direction/Styling: Heather Vance Devers

PUBLISHER/ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Joylyn Niebes

REAL MOMS 11 Mom Next Door / Lauren Block

CREATIVE DIRECTOR AT LARGE Lauren Niebes ADVERTISING Account Executives Alison Davis, Kristen Gramling, Mendy Lea, Nancy McDaniel, Diana Whitworth Nelson, Sandi Tijerina Advertising Coordinator Alexa Wilder

Our favorite family events this month

MOM–APPROVED DOCTORS 22 This Month: Wellness Professionals Local counselors and chiropractors nominated by readers

PR/MARKETING Audience Development Director Candace Emerson Promotions Coordinator Corey Tate ADMINISTRATION Business Manager Leah Wagner Accounting Jeanie Vance

NorthTexasChild is published monthly by Lauren Publications, Inc. NorthTexasChild is distributed free of charge, one copy per reader. Only NorthTexasChild authorized distributors may deliver or pick up the magazines. Additional or back copies of NorthTexasChild are available for $2 per copy at the offices of Lauren Publications, Inc. We reserve the right to edit, reject or comment editorially on all material contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. NorthTexasChild is ©2019 by Lauren Publications, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without express written permission prohibited.

fortworthchild / august 2019

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online / D F W C H I L D . C O M WORDS ELIZABETH QUINN

OFF THE PAGES

what’s in store this month on dfwchild.com

IT’S BACK TO PACKING THE PINTEREST-PERFECT BENTO BOXES INTO LUNCH BAGS, or if you’re running behind, you’re packing a Lunchable, but the morning frenzy means school is in session—cue sigh of sorrow from little ones but sigh of relief from parents. The most thrilling part of getting ready for school as a child, at least for us, was getting all the new school clothes and supplies. It was like an early Christmas! We’ve got all the back-to-school essentials and must-knows on our website. FYI: You can now sign up online to receive a physical copy of FortWorthChild magazine in the comfort of your home (er, mailbox). Also, be sure to sign up for our weekly e-newsletter, Childish, on dfwchild.com.

ADHD: Tips for Back-toSchool

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be a challenge during school. On top of the high energy that already lives in the classroom, it can be difficult to guarantee success for a little one with ADHD. We talked to an expert mom who has a kid with ADHD about some tips for making it a positive year.

Back-to-School Jitters

It’s not just you, Mom. Sometimes, little ones can be nervous and scared to go back to school. It might be because they are starting at a new school, moving into a new classroom or just working on more challenging curriculum. Whatever the case might be, we’ve talked to experts on how to tame the back-to-school jitters so that any child is able to thrive.

What do you do when your kid isn’t the most keen on those paperbacks? Especially when moving from picture books to longer, more text-heavy books, munchkins might not be too thrilled to look at words on words on words. We’ve got 11 ways to get your kids to love reading as well as 12 tips on how to raise a reader. 4

august 2019 / fortworthchild

©ISTOCK

Raising a Reader


fortworthchild / august 2019

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noted.

ABOVE //

PHOTO COURTESY OF SUMMER MILES PHOTO

Little ones are immersed in nature while doing activities at Tinkergarten.

PLAY DIRTY why kids need adventurous play WORDS

ASHLEY HAYS

I

T’S A STEAMY SUMMER MORNING. I’ve got to get my 8-year-old twins out of the house, so we slather on the sunscreen and head to our favorite park. About five minutes in, my son is climbing up the slide. “Brylon!” I shout, “Get down, please!” He continues to ascend—in sandals nonetheless. I hear squealing to my left and see that my daughter is clinging to the top bar of the swings. “Hi, Momma!” she giggles as she sways back and forth. I’m a nervous wreck, mentally listing all the sprains, splinters and burns that are bound to happen because they’re playing the “wrong” way. Personally, I love the rubber surfacing and plastic-coated bars that are replacing wood chips and metal at North Texas playgrounds; however, these safety-minded changes are in sharp contrast to “adventure playgrounds” appearing worldwide. (The closest one is in Houston.) There, children are given sand piles, zip lines, old electronics, busted tires and various tools with little to no instruction. Antoinette Martinez, a registered play therapist at Nourish Play Therapy in Dallas who also has a master’s degree in education, praises this type of “free-range play.” → fortworthchild / august 2019

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“Play is a child’s language, and toys and materials are their words,” she explains. “When we give them structured play, it’s almost like we’re just giving them a script.” In 2017, a playground research and design nonprofit in Pennsylvania published a study comparing British and American playgrounds. The British playgrounds included attractions considered to be more hazardous, but surprisingly, the injury rates there were lower. That’s likely because attempting to reduce risk through rules and standard play structures often leads to boredom, so kids begin to test their limits by misusing the equipment. “When we see a standard play structure, it looks fun,” Martinez says. “And kids do have fun there … it’s just short-lived.” Audrey Rowland offers professional development and consulting services for early childhood educators. At Play Studio, which she opened last year in Fort Worth, you’ll find an indooroutdoor space that encourages unstructured play. Rowland agrees with Martinez that while kids enjoy the standard swing-and-slide playground, it’s a short-term interest. “As a child develops, the brain and the body are working together to make sense of the world,” she says. “The brain is compelling the body to figure things out. That’s why children feel compelled to go up the slides or jump off the swings. They have figured out what they are supposed to do with this stationary apparatus, but then the brain starts wondering what else it can do.” Rowland advises parents to assess risk versus hazard. A hazard is a danger that your child might not recognize; a risk is the possibility of an outcome that your child can manage by making choices. “It is absolutely our job as adults to prevent hazard, but we need to embrace perceived risk,” Rowland says, explaining that it’s healthy for children to explore risks in order to develop decision-making skills and cope with fears. Both Rowland and Martinez are seeing signs of local parents adopting atypical play, but until there are more public options in our area, here’s how to encourage it in your own environment:

PROVIDE THE SPACE

Martinez believes that adventure playgrounds might be slow to spread for fear of legal problems. So she suggests finding open space where your child can run around freely, such as Samuell Farm in Mesquite or Trinity Park in Fort Worth. The fewer distractions your child has, the more they will use their environment to keep them entertained. BE PATIENT

“What I hear a lot from parents when they’re trying to incorporate unstructured play is that their children get bored quickly,” says Rowland. “The children should get bored; that’s part of the process.” Resist the urge to offer suggestions. Allowing kids to sit in their boredom will inevitably prompt creativity. “This type of play has been stifled for so long that it takes some time to emerge,” she says. “Set up a base of materials. Ask your child questions to support their own ideas. Just be patient.” She also urges parents to refrain from using the blanket phrase “be careful” without a particular goal. “If there is no specific instruction, then all they’re doing is confirming that there is an unknown fear or hazard present,” she explains.

“THE CHILDREN SHOULD GET BORED; THAT’S PART OF THE PROCESS.”

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DIRTY

TRUST THE PROCESS

Martinez stresses that rigid helicopter parenting can lead to deficits in the development of a child’s psyche and gross motor skills. “If parents overly police their kids during risky play opportunities, that feeling of anxiety is absorbed by the child,” she says. “It’s important to just sit back and observe your child through the process of free play. It shows that you are listening to them.”

In the Wild

If you’re looking for outdoor play opportunities (that you don’t have to clean up), try Tinkergarten classes, held at parks across North Texas. For an hour and 15 minutes, kids ages 6 months–8 years participate in outdoor activities. Free trial available. Multiple locations; tinkergarten.com


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real moms. BELOW //

If Lauren Block had to choose between beaches or mountains, she’d pick beaches for the heat.

QUICK CUT AGE 39 HAILS FROM Dallas;

grew up in Las Colinas LIVES IN Fort Worth’s Fairmount neighborhood SIGNIFICANT OTHER

Josh, music producer and drummer for Leon Bridges and one of the owners of Niles City Sound OFFSPRING 3-year-old Birdie ALMA MATER University of Texas with a degree in art history CV HIGHLIGHT Launching her own kids’ clothing line in August 2018 BUSINESS ADVICE “‘Do it now.’ This is my dad’s motto. It’s hard to always do sometimes, and I definitely fall into procrastination from time to time, but things run so much smoother if you just check it off your list!” ORGANIZATION APP “I try to use apps, but never end up using them. I’m best with notes on scrap pieces of paper.”

mom next door /

LAUREN BLOCK piece maker I N T E R V I E W K E L LY W O O L E Y PHOTOGRAPHY NICK PRENDERGAST

S

PENDING TIME WITH L AUREN BLOCK IS LIKE A BREATH OF FRESH AIR . Her down-to-earth, easygoing attitude makes her instantly likeable. Although Block and her husband, Josh—both artists by trade—didn’t grow up in Fort Worth, their artsy, eclectic lifestyle couldn’t be better suited for the Fairmount area that they call home. Josh is a drummer, producer, sound engineer and one of the owners of Niles City Sound, and Block has been in the fashion merchandising business for more than 15 years. She now owns her own line of children’s clothing, Hey Gang. When you hear that her daughter inspired the line, thoughts of ruffles, smocking and florals might come to mind. But Hey Gang couldn’t be more different. “I wanted to design a line of clothing that was functional, that kids could really get dirty in,” Block says. “I’ve always loved menswear and vintage clothing. I collect vintage photographs and love to look at the clothing in the pictures. Back then, clothing was designed for functionality, not just style, so I work to incorporate that into all of my pieces.” → fortworthchild / august 2019

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real moms / M O M

NEXT DOOR

FortWorthChild: How did you and Josh meet? Lauren Block: He was a customer at

Bows and Arrows, a men’s and women’s clothing store I owned in Austin. Once we started dating, we got serious pretty quickly.

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FWC: When did you decide to start trying for a baby? LB: We got married in 2013 after

the move to Dallas and started trying pretty soon after that. With him on the road for work all the time, it made it a little difficult.

everything is so girly, and I’m such a tomgirl. I just couldn’t find any brands that I really loved.

FWC: You moved to Fort Worth when Birdie was 4 months old … What prompted the move? LB: Before having Birdie, I was working in

Dallas at Shinola, a luxury brand of leather goods, jewelry and audio products, overseeing their U.S. distribution. After Birdie, they were so incredibly flexible with me, but I was still in limbo. I worked part time in Fort Worth, where Josh was and went to Dallas once a week to be in the office. Finally, I made the tough decision to leave Shinola. Josh had just opened the studio in Fort Worth, so it just made sense to move here.

still is), there were so many exciting things happening in Fort Worth. It’s the perfect size and such a great place to raise a family. The Fairmount area where we live is so perfectly fitted for our personalities and lifestyle.

FWC: Do you plan on having more kids? LB:

to toddlers

12

august 2019 / fortworthchild

FWC: Did Birdie inspire you to develop Hey Gang? LB: Yes. When it comes to girl’s clothing, FWC: Does Birdie like the clothes in your clothing line? LB: [Laughs.] Not really—only

the dresses. She’s certainly her own little person, much girlier than I am. It’s because of her that we will always have items in pink! FWC: Hey Gang is based online. Do you plan to open a store in Fort Worth? LB: At this

point, no. We do some pop-up stores occasionally in Austin, and Baby by Design on Camp Bowie has the whole collection, and it’s selling really well.

“I LITERALLY THOUGHT THAT I WOULD NEVER BE CREATIVE AGAIN.”

FWC: What made you guys want to call Fort Worth home? LB: At the time (and there

newborns ®

FWC: What’s your favorite thing about being a mom? LB: Watching her become their

loop since I’m such a tomboy. But obviously I love it and wouldn’t change it for the world. Birdie was a terrible sleeper, so I was sleep deprived and felt like I had lost all of my creativity. I literally thought that I would never be creative again.

everything for

both just follow our instincts. We’re pretty lax and just want her to be her own person.

so excited. Josh was excited, too, but he stayed stunned for a long period of time.

FWC: So, how did life change after becoming a mom? LB: Honestly, it was hard.

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FWC: Do you and Josh follow any specific parenting philosophies? LB: Not really—we

own little person. Her girliness is 100% her. She told me that girls aren’t supposed to wear pants! She loves the spotlight, which comes from her dad.

FWC: How did you react when you found out you were pregnant with Birdie? LB: I was

FWC: Did you picture yourself being a girl mom? LB: Not really. It really threw me for a

Find a store near you or shop online at

schedule. Birdie is in school Monday through Wednesday, and I dedicate Thursdays and Fridays to be with her. I’ll never get that time back with her.

I still want another one but need to hurry up since I just turned 39. It may not be in the cards, but I really do want another one. FWC: How do you balance work and being a mom? LB: Do I balance is the question.

Working outside the house wasn’t working, so I do have a separate studio with a play area for her. I’m lucky to be able to make my own

FWC: Why is it so important for your clothing to be made in Texas? LB:

With the inspiration being vintage Americana, it just didn’t make sense to have it produced overseas. It also allows me to be hands-on, which I love. Most of our pieces are produced in the Dallas-Fort Worth area and El Paso.

FWC: Why is it important to have a charitable connection to the clothing line? LB: My

purpose in life is not to just be someone who makes expensive clothes for kids. I believe strongly in giving back to our communities, especially our schools. Two dollars from each chain stitch customization order (offered on most pieces) is donated to DonorsChoose.org, the leading platform for giving to public schools. FWC: As a mom, we often forget to take care of ourselves. How do you de-stress? LB:

I love going out with girlfriends, but overall, I’m pretty low-key. I love to drink wine on our porch and take walks with our dog around the neighborhood. I also love historical fiction. Right now, I’m reading a great book about Amon Carter.


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real moms / 4 T H I N G S

INTERVIEW NICOLE JORDAN

MOOD BOARD mom next door lauren block shares

FO R R E TA I L TH E R A PY

2

3

FO R FA M I LY TIM E

“We love taking Birdie to both the Modern and Kimbell museums. She loves Tillery Park. We also love doing day trips to Glen Rose and Waxahachie, where Josh is from.”

FO R DATE N I G HT

MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH // 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth; 817/738-9215; themodern.org KIMBELL ART MUSEUM // 3333 Camp

‘‘

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Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/332-8451; kimbellart. org TILLERY PARK // 2200 Rockridge Terrace, Fort Worth; fortworthtexas.gov/parks

FO R VAC ATI O N

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‘‘

W DURABLE GOODS // 108 S. Freeway, Suite 110, Fort Worth; wdurablegoods.com TRIBE ALIVE // 1455 W. Magnolia Ave., Suite 109, Fort Worth; 682/708-3122; tribealive.com KENDALL DAVIS CLAY // 1208 W. Magnolia Ave., Suite 102, Fort Worth; 214/394-1653; kendalldavisclay.com

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august 2019 / fortworthchild

LIL’ RED’S LONGHORN SALOON // 121 W. Exchange Ave., Fort Worth; 817/740-0078; longhornsaloonfortworth.com LONESOME DOVE WESTERN BISTRO // 2406 N. Main St., Fort Worth; 817/740-8810; lonesomedovefortworth. com TWILITE LOUNGE // 212 Lipscomb St., Fort Worth; thetwilitelounge.com SHIPPING AND RECEIVING // 201 S. Calhoun St., Fort Worth; shippingandreceiving.bar

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We love to go dancing in the Stockyards at the Longhorn. There’s usually an amazing band playing. We like to grab a bite at Lonesome Dove beforehand, even if it’s appetizers at the bar. We also love Twilite Lounge and Shipping and Receiving, where Josh’s studio is located.”

“Terlingua, near Big Bend, about an hour and a half south of Marfa. We love it so much, we got married there! It’s an actual ghost town, surrounded by the most beautiful country.”

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fortworthchild / august 2019

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a wednesday in the life of

BRITTANY HARMS Fort Worth mom Brittany Harms has two little ones, Annistyn, 3, and Kenneth, 2. She works full time at General Motors while going to school part time to get her bachelor’s in kinesiology.

4

:15AM Alarm goes off. I honestly don’t know why I set this alarm. I literally never get up to this one. 4:30AM Alarm goes off. OK, time to get up. I hit snooze and go back to sleep. 4:37AM I finally get up. My job doesn’t require any specific attire, so I throw on my usual running shorts, T-shirt and a baseball hat. I’m not a morning person, so this is a big perk for me. I shower and pack my lunch the night before, so my entire morning routine takes no more than five minutes. 4:45AM I creep into Kenneth’s room and grab him from his crib. All smiles—he’s so happy in the mornings. I love that. I don’t bother changing the kids out of their PJs since they go right back to sleep at their dad’s house. I load him in the car and run, literally run, to grab Annistyn, who somehow ended up in my bed last night. 4:55AM We get to their dad’s house, and I run Annistyn upstairs to her bed and then quickly run back down to get Kenneth. I

give him a couple quick kisses as I lay him down, and he’s back to sleep. “Sing to me,” Annistyn says right before I’m out the door. It will put me a little behind, but I don’t care—worth it. “You Are My Sunshine” is her favorite. I kneel beside her bed, and she rolls over and falls asleep before the song’s over. 5:10AM I’m back in my car and headed to work. 5:30AM Starbucks stop—a seriously bad habit I need to break (or at least make a healthier drink choice). Venti iced latte with two extra shots of espresso. I know; it’s excessive. 5:57AM I’m clocked in and headed to my area to get ready for the day. I grab my ice water, gloves, safety glasses, ear plugs, headphones and a protein shake for breakfast. 6:06AM The line starts, and I’ll be here until my first break. 8:00AM I get the first text of the kids’ day. They’re about to go to the park, and my sitter lets me know they are all hugs and smiles this morning. I love their relationship and the constant updates. 8:23AM More texts. Ella, Annistyn’s best friend, just showed up at the house. Yay! 8:30AM It’s my break time. I refill my water and grab a snack. 8:46AM The line starts, and I’m on my feet again. I’m lucky enough to have a job where I can listen to my recorded lectures on my headphones and occasionally glance at my textbook. I have to get studying in where I can. 9:30AM I pause my lecture to look at the pictures I just received. They’re picking out rocks from the park and going back to the house to paint them. My mama heart aches wishing I could be with them. 11AM Lunch. I sit and eat and spend the short 30 minutes browsing my phone. 11:30AM The line starts, and I’m back to work. 11:45AM More pictures. This time the girls are cuddling on the couch. Can’t. Get. Enough. They’re so cute! 2:06PM I’m off work now and head to pick up the kids. 3:20PM I get to the kids, and they’re all smiles and eager to see me. “Mama!” Kenneth is talking so much now, and his little baby voice is so adorable. I let the kids finish their snacks while I get an overview of their day, and then we load up in the car. 4:00PM I always try to get the kids outside for at least an hour every day, so we head straight to the splash pad to burn off some energy. On the ride to the park, we have as much conversation as a 2- and 3-year-old can have. 5:30PM Kenneth is not ready to go, so I’m forced to carry him back to the car surfboard-style as Annistyn walks beside me crying for me to carry her. 6:30PM We are back at the house with fajitas, and there’s rice and beans everywhere.

Diaries are penned by moms (and dads) in the Fort Worth area. The authors volunteer to share a day of their choosing and are not paid or endorsed by FortWorthChild. Send your diary to editorial@dfwchild.com. All submissions are subject to editing and may be cut for space. 16

august 2019 / fortworthchild

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRITTANY HARMS

real moms / R O U T I N E S


the fine

print

WHAT SHE’S READING: Atomic Habits by James Clear BOOK ON HER NIGHTSTAND: A dream journal INSTAGRAM SHE FOLLOWS: Random meme pages WHERE SHE GOES FOR RETAIL THERAPY: Amazon BEVERAGE OF CHOICE: Water or Modelo FAVORITE SCENT: Cleaning supplies BIGGEST PET PEEVE: Loud chewers WHAT SHE DOES WHEN LIFE GETS STRESSFUL: Go for a run MOTH-

ERHOOD IN FIVE WORDS: It’s hard but worth it. CELEBRITY MOM SHE ADMIRES: Jordan Page (celebrity-ish) FAVORITE CHEAP MEAL WITH THE KIDS:

My mom’s house, ha! WHY SHE CHOSE WHERE SHE LIVES: It’s close to most of my family. WHAT’S IN HER NETFLIX QUEUE: New Girl and Schitt’s Creek SHE’S REALLY GOOD AT: Seeing all sides of an issue or subject SHE’S REALLY BAD AT: Making decisions. I’m so indecisive. HABIT SHE CAN’T QUIT: Starbucks IF SHE HAD TO CHANGE CAREERS, SHE’D BE A: Physical

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE COMPANY; ©ISTOCK; POP MEDIA GROUP

therapist. Working on that now!

Kenneth signs for more, so I get him a second helping. Before I can sit down, Annistyn asks for a drink. Somewhere in between the back and forth, I sneak a bite or two, and then they’re done eating. 7PM I clean up dinner as quick as I can while the kids play until bath time. After bath, Annistyn starts crying because she doesn’t want me to brush her hair, and Kenneth starts crying because he wants more toothpaste. We finally settle on the couch for our evening snuggles. 8PM Bedtime. I lay Kenneth down, and he immediately jumps up and starts pointing and asking for every toy in his room. I hand him a book instead and lay him back down. I lay Annistyn in bed. “Sing to me, Mama.” Again, “You Are My Sunshine” is the song of choice. “One more time,” she says. OK, one more time … we do this about 10 more times. Couple more kisses for each kid, and I sneak out. 8:30PM I sit down and check my school for any assignments that need to be done online. Nothing today. I make my lunch for tomorrow and jump in the shower. 9:30PM I finally get in bed, and I instantly pass out.

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Science suggests that girls and boys experience dyslexia differently, which means struggling girls might be overlooked WORDS

SUNDEY MCCLENDON

©ISTOCK

C

hontae Feldman wasn’t sure how to tell her oldest daughter the results of McKinney Independent School District’s dyslexia evaluation. Julia had always been one step ahead of her classmates, but as her “mirror writing” and tendency to reverse letters persisted in the years after kindergarten, her mom saw something she recognized. “[I] worried that I was seeing my own experiences in her,” Feldman recalls. The 39-year-old was identified as dyslexic when she was in the third grade. She describes her younger self as the “typical dyslexic”—“a poor reader with low comprehension, bad spelling, left/right confusion and letter reversals.” She recalls being placed in a small remediation class at Shriners Hospital to address her challenges with reading and writing. She was the only girl in the class of about four or five students. Feldman remembers a boy in her class who “appeared to have an attention issue” and was constantly acting out. He was the de facto “class clown” of their little group. Looking back, Feldman says this makes sense to her. “As a dyslexic,” she explains, “you either try to blend in or act out as a class clown.”

For a long time, Feldman was one of the kids who blended in. She was a twice-exceptional student, which meant she qualified for both special education and the gifted and talented program at her school. She didn’t talk about her dyslexia with friends or fellow classmates. When her family moved into a new school district, not even the teachers knew. “Nobody knew I was dyslexic,” she says. “I didn’t want them to think I was a ‘dumb kid.’” So when Feldman sat down with her 9-yearold daughter, all of these memories gave her pause. Feldman had no idea how Julia would take the news that she had been identified as dyslexic. What she hadn’t expected was for Julia to break into a huge smile. “Her face just lit up,” Feldman remembers, “and she says, ‘You mean, I’m smart just like you?’ She was so proud.” In fact, many people with dyslexia are highly intelligent and keenly innovative. The traits that help them compensate for their learning difficulties in school are the same traits that later help them achieve both personal and professional success. But in kids, this creative compensation can delay the evaluation process, leaving these kids— especially girls, evidence suggests—without the academic tools they need in order to thrive.→

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LEFT BEHIND

Broadly speaking, dyslexia is a neurobiologicalbased learning difference that affects how individuals process language. In fact, it is widely agreed that dyslexia is the most prevalent language-based learning difficulty; here in Texas, reporting school districts counted 194,214 students with dyslexia and related difficulties during the 2018–2019 school year for the annual PEIMS Standard Report. There are other things we know about dyslexia. It tends to run in families, and it is often comorbid with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)—that is, a child who has been diagnosed with ADHD is much more likely to also have a learning disability. And though it’s hard to nail down a precise number, dyslexia is more commonly observed in boys than in girls. The published history of dyslexia at the intersection of gender is long and fascinating and sometimes contentious. It often circles back to the question of “Why?” Why are girls less likely to be identified as dyslexic? Is it because they’re less likely to have dyslexia, or because they are underdiagnosed? Endia Lindo, associate professor of special education at Texas Christian University, says that “part of the issue is what you define as ‘dyslexia.’” Most researchers share a common definition of dyslexia provided by the International Dyslexia Association; however, in the classroom, the working definition of dyslexia can vary from district to district. And since dyslexia surveys tend to be based on samples of individuals identified through their public school districts, the different definitions and protocols for evaluation make it hard to determine whether dyslexia in female students is underdiagnosed. Scientists have determined that there are brain differences between boys and girls that could help account for the discrepency in diagnoses. For example, girls consistently perform better on reading tests. In a 2017 study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, a team of researchers confirmed the sex difference in reading ability and suggested that girls’ faster processing speeds and better inhibitory controls might explain the gap in dyslexia diagnoses. Furthermore, a 2013 study at Georgetown University Medical Center found that the brain anatomy of people with dyslexia varies by sex. Using MRI scans, the team found less gray matter (versus a control group) in the language processing centers in males, whereas in females, they found less gray matter in the motor and sensory processing centers. It might be that these brain differences in girls serve to mitigate some of the more obvious symptoms of dyslexia.

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august 2019 / fortworthchild

“They’re encouraged to be more verbal, and girls tend to use both sides and larger sections of the brain for language processing,” Lindo says. “Girls also tend to behave more in class; they tend to comply with instructions. Girls are often socialized to want to please.” Michelle Roy is a licensed certified academic language therapist and the founder of the I Heart Learning Academy in Dallas. She’s seen hundreds of students of all ages in her practice and agrees with Lindo that “girls, dyslexic or not, mature at a faster rate and are generally better at reading and writing. But because of their nature to please, they may be more quiet about their struggles.” So for a girl to be diagnosed with dyslexia in the early elementary years, “you have to have some obvious signs,” Lindo explains. “If you’re not acting up, if you’re trying your best, then you might not get noticed. So you’ll try to work around it.” Over time, that will catch up to them, and without accommodations or remediation strategies in place, those girls will have a harder time

lessons during the day, but after eight hours (in other words, when it was time to tackle her homework) the medication would start to wear off. Maisyn’s homework started piling up— three to four hours of homework every night. “Her little brain just stopped after two hours of homework,” Lay says. “She just hit a wall. She couldn’t do it anymore.” One evening when Maisyn was in seventh grade, Lay sat down with her daughter and asked her to read aloud. She was completely caught off guard by what she heard. “It was very choppy,” the mom remembers. “It didn’t flow as I imagined a seventh-grader should read. I beat myself up over it. I had been so hard on her. I didn’t know she needed assistance, but I also knew she was very capable.” It took several months, but Maisyn was eventually determined to have dyslexia and qualified for appropriate accommodations through a 504 plan; eventually she qualified for an IEP, or individualized education program, so that she could receive special education services. For 14-year-old Maisyn, finding out she

“They might tell themselves, ‘I’m not smart, I can’t do those things, but I’m quiet, I’m pretty.’ It can create a sense of learned helplessness.” trying to keep up as the curriculum shifts from learning how to read to an emphasis on vocabulary, reading comprehension and verbal reasoning. Until a girl is found to have dyslexia, they might feel “like everyone’s got the key to the puzzle but [them],” Lindo says. “They might tell themselves, ‘I’m not smart, I can’t do those things, but I’m quiet, I’m pretty.’ It can create a sense of learned helplessness.” TURNING POINT

Flower Mound resident Ashleigh Lay, 45, had no idea why her bright, outgoing daughter had so many hours of homework to complete every night. In fifth grade, Maisyn was diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed medication. It greatly improved her ability to focus on her

was dyslexic—“just figuring out what was going on”—was “a good moment,” Lay says. While learning differences in some students can be identified as early as kindergarten, especially (but not always) when the child has accompanying behavioral issues, Roy (the academic language therapist) notes that for most students, “third grade and seventh are the years that everything comes to light” as the curriculum gets more difficult. Still, she says, it’s never too late to be seek remediation for a learning difference. “When students get the right remediation strategies, it’s like a light bulb going off, and they’ll say, ‘How did I not know this earlier!?’” Girls tend to be rule-followers, “remediating girls can be easier,” Roy adds. “They can apply these rules to reading and writing.”


THINKING FORWARD

Once Maisyn was identified as dyslexic, Lay threw herself into researching everything she could find. One of the books she highly recommends to other parents is The Dyslexic Advantage. In it, authors Brock and Fernette Eide explain how dyslexia should be thought of as a distinct learning style that can give students an advantage in surprising and unexpected ways. Because of their unique way of looking at the world, children with dyslexia often excel at problem solving and spatial reasoning, and they are known to make interesting connections that other people might miss. “When there’s an impairment of the language processing parts of the brain,” Roy says, “you might see a student shift their strengths somewhere else.” In many of her female students with dyslexia, Roy sees an abundance of creativity. “In my experience, the girls I see are significantly more creative, very artistic, very expressive—they excel at theater and art and dance,” she says. Roy challenges her students to use those strengths to their advantage in the classroom. For example, one of her students was regularly failing spelling tests. So Roy had her draw a picture of each word and put that word into the picture. The student passed her next spelling test with flying colors. Given their original approach to problemsolving, it should therefore come as no surprise that so many girls with dyslexia have leveraged their creativity to become smart, capable women who never back down from a challenge. Among their ranks you’ll find pace-setters, dreamers and industry leaders—the likes of Erin Brockovich, Octavia Spencer, Agatha Christie and famed polar adventurer Ann Bancroft, who in 1986 became the first woman to cross the ice to the North Pole. According to the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity, Ann Bancroft often tells parents, “My dyslexia and the challenges through school were the absolute perfect training for an expedition. Expedition people are all about one step in front of the other and not going very fast, just doing the hard work. What better way to get the work ethic than by having a learning difference?” Hard work, creativity and self-motivtion— the exact qualities every parent hopes to nurture in their child, no matter their age or gender. These are things that build resilience and prepare that child for a life of adventure. If a younger girl is struggling with dyslexia, Maisyn says she’d tell her not to worry about it. “It affects everyday life, but not as much as you think it does,” she says. “With the help of accomodations, with the help from teachers, dyslexia can actually lift you up.”

STANDING OUT

Understanding dyslexia has brought Maisyn and her mother even closer together. “It brought a new perspective to all of us,” says Lay. “It changed my life.” In fact, all the mothers interviewed for this story have very close relationships with their daughters—due in part to the dyslexia diagnosis and what it forced to the surface. For McKinney mom Sara O’Malley, her daughter Ashley’s dyslexia diagnosis brought into focus her own struggles with reading growing up. She had never been evaluated for dyslexia. But understanding dyslexia helped her understand herself just a little bit better— she too is very likely dyslexic. As it happened, her daughter was in the same remediation class as Chontae Feldman’s daughter Julia, and the two mothers became good friends. And Feldman? Feldman is definitely not the blending-in type anymore. “My kids got me to learn more about dyslexia, even about my own,” she says. Her younger daughter, Carly, was also identified with dyslexia and other learning difficulties at age 9. Securing the accommodations that Carly needed to succeed at school proved to be more challenging than it was with Julia (now 11); there was even a moment of “smart-shaming” when an administrator implied that Feldman couldn’t possibly understand what Carly needed to succeed at school after Feldman mentioned that she herself was dyslexic. If she hadn’t gone through the process with Julia, Feldman says she might not have known how to push back. In 2016, Feldman founded the popular Facebook page The Dyslexia Initiative: North Texas to help parents connect with each other and better understand the evaluation process. Last year, the organization hosted Discovering Dyslexia Through Art. Thirty-one children submitted original work for the exhibit; 23 of these artists were girls. When Feldman’s employer announced it was sponsoring a diversity seminar, she decided to speak about dyslexia. A brilliant and well-respected colleague privately messaged her. He told her that he was dyslexic, though nobody at their company knew, and urged her not to speak about dyslexia—based on his experience, he warned, it would be “career suicide.” She spoke anyway. (And it wasn’t.) Two years ago, Feldman helped Julia create a Star Wars-themed project board about dyslexia to display in her school’s library for Dyslexia Awareness Month. Last year, another school got Feldman’s name and asked if she’d present on dyslexia for their disability fair. Feldman checked Julia out of school that day, and they went to the fair and spoke about dyslexia—together.

IN YOUR CORNER DALLAS IDA (INTERNATIONAL DYSLEXIA ASSOCIATION OF TEXAS)

The oldest dyslexia association in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, Dallas IDA hosts support groups, conferences and speaker series for parents across North Texas. dal.dyslexiaida.org THE DYSLEXIA HANDBOOK

Published by the Texas Education Agency, this free handbook provides legal definitions of dyslexia and dysgraphia and outlines the procedures used by Texas school districts for screening, evaluating and supporting students with learning differences. tea.texas.gov/academics/dyslexia THE DYSLEXIA INITIATIVE: NORTH TEXAS

A very active Facebook page that hosts a closed group for North Texas parents, as well as providing information about advocating for a child with a learning difference. The organization’s second Discover Dyslexia art show is slated for Oct. 4–6, 2019. facebook.com/northtexasdyslexia LEARNING ALLY

Formerly known as Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic, Learning Ally is a nonprofit, subscription-based service that offers audio recordings of books and textbooks to students with documented sensory disabilities and learning differences. Since many Texas school districts subscribe to this service, ask your school if your student can obtain a PIN. learningally.org UNDERSTOOD

A nonprofit, resource-rich website designed to support parents of children with learning differences and attention issues. The site is recommended by Endia Lindo, associate professor of special education at Texas Christian University, for its emphasis on executive functioning; you can also find inspiring personal stories from celebrities and kids next door alike. understood.org

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SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

WELLNESS PROFESSIONALS WORDS DALLASCHILD EDITORS

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A COUNSELOR, A PSYCHOLOGIST AND A PSYCHIATRIST? If you’re expecting a dad joke, sorry to disappoint—but these quick stats will increase your knowledge of kids’ health and wellness care.

6.6% OF TEXAS KIDS

RECEIVED ANY MENTAL

HEALTH TREATMENT

OR COUNSELING

1 to 449 PARENTS AND CAREGIVERS

should understand about half a child’s speech at age 2 and about three quarters at age 3. At age 4, the child should be mostly understood, even by strangers.

THE AVERAGE

TEXAS COUNSELORTO - S T U D E N T R AT I O

IT TYPICALLY TAKES

15–20 HOURS

OF THERAPY TO CORRECT A SPEECH DIFFERENCE.

*The national average was 9.3%.

TOP REASONS KIDS SEE A PHYSICAL THERAPIST: SPORTS INJURIES DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS CEREBRAL PALSY ORTHOPEDIC DISABILITIES OR INJURIES HEART AND LUNG CONDITIONS CONGENITAL DISORDERS ACUTE TRAUMA HEAD INJURY LIMB DEFICIENCIES MUSCLE DISEASES

A TYPICAL PLAY THERAPY SESSION LASTS 30–45 MINUTES. THE COST OF A COUNSELING OR THERAPY SESSION TYPICALLY RANGES FROM

$50.00–$200.00 CHIROPRACTORS TREAT KIDS FOR

MUSCULOSKELETAL PROBLEMS 22

CANCER

august 2019 / fortworthchild

WETTING THE BED

ASTHMA

ILLNESS PREVENTION

IN TEXAS: • A licensed counselor has a master’s or doctoral degree in a counseling-related field • A licensed psychologist has a doctoral degree in psychology • A psychiatrist is a licensed physician with a medical degree and specialized training in psychiatry

SOURCES: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY, AUSTIN STATESMAN, CANADIAN PAEDIATRIC SOCIETY, GOODTHERAPY, KIDSHEALTH, NATIONAL SURVEY OF CHILDREN'S HEALTH, STATE OF TEXAS

IN 2017,


T

aking care of your child’s health is about more than checkups and flu shots—it means looking after their social, emotional, mental, spiritual and physical health. So parents turn to North Texas’ many chiropractors, counselors and other skilled professionals to keep their kids thriving from head to toe. How do you find a trustworthy provider? Start here with our list of wellness professionals recommended by local moms and dads.

WHAT IS A MOM APPROVED WELLNESS PROFESSIONAL? A Mom Approved Wellness Professional is a counselor, chiropractor or other wellness provider who has earned the trust, admiration and respect of parents. Local parents reached out to our magazine, recommended these providers and told us why. These providers have impressed moms and dads like you who love their kids and care about their whole health. All of these providers are licensed and were in good standing with their respective certification or examination board at press time. WHAT MAKES MOM APPROVED WELLNESS PROFESSIONALS DIFFERENT? Each year various publications come out with lists ranking area health care professionals. Often these providers are chosen not by patients but by other providers. We think Mom Approved Wellness Professionals are special because they’ve been nominated by the consumers: local moms and dads. These providers didn’t make it on our list by purchasing space in the magazine, and their inclusion doesn’t imply an endorsement by FortWorthChild. This is truly a parent-to-parent referral list.

ACUPUNCTURE

Wang, Calli (Xizi) LAc North Texas Whole Health Wellness Center, Keller

Winn, Hannah DC, EMT-B Chiropractic Wellness Cafe, Crowley York, Meghan DC, CACCP Loving Life Chiropractic, Southlake

COUNSELING ABA THERAPY

Bauman, BrieAnna RBT PediaPlex, Southlake Elsken, Kristan BCBA ABC Pediatrics, Trophy Club Suckarieh, Nadia MA, BCBA Hope Center for Autism, Fort Worth Vandegriff, Amy RBT PediaPlex, Fort Worth Wilshire, Tayla BCBA PediaPlex, Southlake

AUDIOLOGY

Seibold, Andi AuD Little Ears Audiology, Fort Worth

CHIROPRACTIC

Adams, Jordan DC Calibration Chiropractic, Mansfield Annas, Mary Beth DC Prime Chiropractic, Southlake Connolly, Tara DC Sozo Chiropractic & Wellness, LLC, Grapevine Crabtree, Randal DC Chiro Plus Clinics South, Fort Worth Garcia, Terry DC Inner Light Chiropractic, Fort Worth Hosaka, Kristen DC Turning Point Wellness, Burleson Moore, Rachel DC Align My Spine, Keller Moulton, Kael DC Moulton Chiropractic, Grapevine Porteus, Nikki DC, CACCP Renew & Restore Wellness, Southlake Puente, Emily DC, CACCP Bridge Family Chiropractic, Mansfield Robinson, Lindsey DC Inner Light Chiropractic, Fort Worth Scott, Mark DC Inner Light Chiropractic, Fort Worth Whaley, Rachel DC Chiropractic Wellness Cafe, Crowley

Afzal, Sabaa MA, LPC Happiness Co. Counseling and Intervention, Euless Atwood, Michael LPC Alliance Child & Family Solutions, Bedford Booher, Erin MEd, LPC, NCC Erin Booher Counseling, Fort Worth Clark, Rebecca LPC Cook Children’s, Mansfield Ekobena, Queen LPC Logos Counseling, Keller Gortney, Michele MS, LPC-S Michele Gortney, Burleson Huey, Kristin LPC Alliance Child & Family Solutions, Aledo Huffstuttler, D’Lisa LPC Alliance Child & Family Solutions, Aledo Johnson, Nikolaus LPC, EMDR-Trained Center for Counseling & Family Relationships, Fort Worth Johnson, Rhonda LPC-S, LMFT-S, RPT-S, CEAP, EMDR-Trained Center for Counseling & Family Relationships, Fort Worth Kelso, Gay MSSW, LCSW Logos Counseling, Keller Leonard, Julia MS, LPC Mid Cities Counseling Center, PLLC, Burleson McComas, Lacey MA, LPC Logos Counseling, Keller Michero, Emily PhD, LPC-S Dr. Emily Michero, Fort Worth Missimo, Christopher MA, NCC, LPC-Intern Missimo Motivation, LLC and Psychological Services of North Texas, Colleyville Monge, Sadi (Siomara) MS, LPC-S, RPT Family Connections Counseling, Colleyville Ritz, Stefanie LPC Alliance Child & Family Solutions, Fort Worth Ruffin, Roci LPC The Oaks Life Center, Fort Worth Shepard, Jessica MA, LPC Little Love Counseling, Hurst

IS THE LIST EXHAUSTIVE? The list is by no means exhaustive—there are likely many outstanding local professionals who aren’t on the list because our readers didn’t pass on a recommendation. If you have a local counselor, nutritionist or other whole health care provider you love, tell us. HOW DO I RECOMMEND A PROVIDER? FortWorthChild holds four surveys a year for readers to nominate their favorite health care providers. Visit our website at dfwchild.com/doctors to complete the current Mom Approved Doctors survey. We ask that you leave comments telling us why you love this particular provider. Other parents want to know why you think this professional is special. Comments we publish will be edited for grammar and clarity. WHERE CAN I VIEW COMMENTS ABOUT THESE MOM APPROVED WELLNESS PROFESSIONALS? The full list with comments from the parents who recommended them can be viewed online at dfwchild.com/doctors.

Taylor, Anastasia MSSW, LCSW-S Alliance Child & Family Solutions, Fort Worth Webb, Sascha MA, LPC-S, RPT-S, NCC The Well Counseling, Royse City Willis, Harold L. MA, LPC, LCDC, SAP Willis Counseling, Grand Prairie

PHYSICAL THERAPY

McCauley, Jennifer PT, DPT, OCS Inspire Physical Therapy and Wellness, Southlake Woerner, Marie PT, DPT, WCS, CLT Woerner Physical Therapy, Fort Worth

EQUINE THERAPY Dunn, Annadee Victory Therapy Center, Roanoke

FASCIAL INTEGRATIVE THERAPY

Burget, Frankie OTR/LC, LMT/MI, BCIM, BCIP, SEP, CST, CNDT Windsong Therapy, Bedford

PSYCHIATRY

Choudhry, Zohra MD Dr. Zohra Choudhry, Fort Worth

PSYCHOLOGICAL THERAPY

Brandon, Anna PhD, ABPP Anna R. Brandon, PhD, ABPP, Southlake See ad on page 24

MUSIC THERAPY

Bailey, Jordan MT-BC Heart and Harmony Music Therapy, Fort Worth Fabian, Emily MT-BC Heart and Harmony Music Therapy, Fort Worth Michel, Madison MT-BC Heart and Harmony Music Therapy, Fort Worth Roberson, Annie MT-BC Heart and Harmony Music Therapy, Fort Worth

NEURO INTEGRATION

Rae, Leanna MSSW, CPLC, SPT, TEB Kid’s Brain Tree, Fort Worth See ad on page 25

OSTEOPATHIC MEDICINE

Roop, Jay P. DO North Texas Musculoskeletal Medicine, Southlake

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY Kokkinis, Cheryl OTR/L Therapedia, LLC, Keller

PSYCHOLOGY

Brenner, Caroline PhD The Jones Center for Children’s Therapy, Mansfield Nadelson, Kathleen PsyD Psychological Services of North Texas, Colleyville Weckel, Geoff PsyD Restoration Counseling, Fort Worth See ad on page 25

SPEECH THERAPY

Fields, Lakeisha MS/SLP Magnolia Speaks Speech Therapy Center, Grapevine Hudspeth, Hayley SLP PediaPlex, Southlake Jochens, Ashleigh SLP Cowtown Pediatrix, Fort Worth Rankin, Marilyn MA, CCC-SLP Carter Therapy, Fort Worth Richmond, Kristen MS, CCC-SLP Therapedia, LLC, Keller Smith, Melissa MS, CCC-SLP Cook Children’s, Fort Worth Check out our Mom Approved directory at dfwchild.com/doctors. Each health care professional is nominated by local moms, just like you.

fortworthchild / august 2019

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mom approved

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Anna R. Brandon, PhD, ABPP Psychological Therapy

Dr. Anna Brandon is a board-certified clinical psychologist in private practice in Southlake, Texas. Anna completed her doctoral training at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and subsequently received a Master of Science in Clinical Science as a National Institutes of Health funded Clinical Scholar. As an Assistant Professor at UT Southwestern, she assisted in the development of a free standing Women’s Mental Health Center, and was awarded an early career development award from the National Institute of Mental Health to develop Partner-Assisted Interpersonal Psychotherapy (PA-IPT) for perinatal mood disorders. Her research took her to the University of North Carolina, where between 2011 and 2014 she was also the staff psychologist at the first dedicated perinatal psychiatry inpatient unit in the US. Anna returned to Texas in 2014, establishing a private practice specializing in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders in adolescent girls and women who are struggling in the context of reproductive events (premenstrual tension, infertility, pregnancy, pregnancy loss, perinatal trauma, postpartum distress, and menopause). Anna continues to practice Partner-Assisted Interpersonal Psychotherapy, educating spouses about mental disorders and inviting them to be part of a woman’s recovery process. She also sees couples, particularly when emotional distress appears to be linked with relationship issues. In 2017, Anna and a colleague, Neysa Johnson, MD, (a reproductive psychiatrist) founded My Red Tent, a federally recognized non-profit devoted to providing free resources to underserved women struggling with depression and anxiety during pregnancy, after pregnancy loss, and in the first postpartum year. The mission of My Red Tent is to reduce the financial barriers preventing women from seeking and receiving necessary support and hope during the transition into the important role of motherhood. Alongside connecting women all over the US with generous clinicians for local services (there are 124 professionals listed in 32 states so far), My Red Tent holds two free support groups at 305 Miron Drive, Southlake, TX 76092 the first Saturday of each month. Mothers struggling during pregnancy and the postpartum meet from 11am to 12:30pm and women struggling with pregnancy or infant loss meet from 1:30pm to 3pm.

My Red Tent 305 Miron Dr. Southlake, TX 76092 214-460-0420 annarbrandonphd.com

24

august 2019 / dfwchild.com


mom approved

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Leanna Rae, MSSW, CPLC, SPT, TEB Neuro Integration Kid’s Brain Tree is an integrative model that supports child growth and development from birth through adolescence and beyond. Our research informed model and structure is built on interpersonal neurobiology, attachment, brain research and bodybased approaches. Kid’s Brain Tree is supported and advised by national experts who are working with KBT to apply leading edge Neuroscience into best practices. Our model recognizes that change occurs when we create a relational circle of trust and safety that supports the whole person, whole family and whole community. We have designed an Empowered Caregiving Model. Though we work 1 on 1 with a child, we are always working on integrating through the parent and family framework which means that the family is our actual client. Often asked if we diagnose, we do through Dr. Brian Dixon. Dr. Dixon is a KBT Advisor, founder of Progressive Psychiatry Clinic in Fort Worth, and he specializes in managing all mental health needs for children to adults.  Kid’s Brain Tree combines the expertise of professionals in the fields of child psychiatry, education, behavioral regulation, integrative medicine and nutrition. Think of each of these fields as a branch to your child’s Brain Tree. All branches are rooted in the same principles of treating your whole child. We work with all age groups’ cognitive abilities to decrease learning, emotional, and social challenges.

Kid’s Brain Tree 817-382-1425 kidsbraintreefortworth.com

Geoff Weckel, PsyD Psychology

Dr. Geoff Weckel, PsyD, has been working with families in a variety of different settings for over twenty years. He has earned graduate degrees in Marriage and Family Counseling and Clinical Psychology. In addition, he has been trained in multiple therapeutic approaches, neurofeedback, and psychological assessments. Geoff currently works with a team of well-trained clinicians who compassionately walk alongside people to develop the insight and practical skills to live their life to the fullest. His experience and training make him a great resource for families who are wishing to have a holistic approach to help their child become the person they were created to be. Restoration Counseling 550 Bailey Ave., Ste. 302 Fort Worth, TX 76107 817-291-9872 • restorationcec.com

When your child is sick or hurt, little else matters. Check out our Mom Approved directory at dfwchild.com/doctors to find doctors and health care professionals to fit your family’s needs. Each Mom Approved health care professional is nominated by local moms, just like you.

fdfwchild.com / august 2019

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kid culture.

©ISTOCK

BUDDY UP

how to help your kid make friends WORDS ELIZABETH QUINN

M

ICHELLE MEALS’ COMMUNITY WAS TIGHTER THAN YOUR FAVORITE

pair of skinny jeans. We’re talking a your-neighbor-knows-your-kids’-namesand-your-mom’s-name type of community. So when the mom of two moved to a new neighborhood elsewhere in North Texas, you could say she was a little uncertain about making new friends. In her previous community, Meals was involved with the early childhood parent teacher association as well as mom groups, and her son Henry had lots friends in the neighborhood. “I was 6 months pregnant with [Henry’s brother] when we were planning to leave,” Meals says. “I was nervous to leave the community that we had there.” So what happens when your kid is forced to make new friends because of a move—or when your kid just needs new friends? How can you help? → fortworthchild / august 2019

27


kid culture / B U D D Y

UP

LEFT // Dive into the ball pit at the bottom of the slide at Peek n Play.

BELOW // KIDS CAN GO TO OPEN PLAY AT SMALL WORLD BIG IMAGINATION AND PRETEND THEY ARE IN THEIR OWN CITY SUCH AS A MINI CENTRAL MARKET.

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august 2019 / fortworthchild

“I think that where your kids go to school ends up being such a crucial place for moms to connect,” Meals says. “You’re seeing each other every morning at dropoff. You’re seeing each other every day at pickup. You don’t even realize how many times you ask another mom that your kid goes to school with, ‘Oh my gosh, my car keys! I can’t find them. Can you pick my kid up from school?’ or ‘Shoot! I’m out of yogurt. Can you pack an extra yogurt for my kid?’” A LITTLE PUSH

Although parents would love to find such an organic fit into their community, sometimes it takes a little more umph. “It’s challenging for kids [to make new friends] because kids are afraid of being rejected,” explains local mom of two Carly Chambers, whose name has been changed for privacy reasons. When kids are younger, “everything is embarrassing,” says Chambers. “So what I’ve done with them since they were little is role play on things that happen in school and how to talk to people and how to respond to people. You have to build them up as kids. You have to give them that confidence.” For example, you can challenge your child to approach you as if you were a new kid, and have them guide the conversation from introductions to interests and finally an invitation to play. “Kids don’t know [how to

PHOTOS COURTESY OF PEEK N PLAY; SMALL WORLD BIG IMAGINATION

MOTHER KNOWS BEST

In North Texas, where many of us were raised on Southern hospitality, it’s likely you’ll find people more than willing to welcome you to the neighborhood. “Literally the day we pulled up, I look across the street, and there’s this precious mom coming out,” Meals says. “She was maybe around the same months pregnant, maybe two or three months behind me, and had a 2-year-old. Here we are, two moms in the same boat. You know how moms go: Within 15 minutes, she was like, ‘Here’s what you’re getting involved with; here’s who you’re going to meet; here’s my phone number.’” For kids who are shy, it can be helpful for Mom to make friends first—then it’s easier to schedule play dates and ensure the kids will see each other often enough to become close. When you have a friend, your child has a friend. It’s a win-win. Don’t be afraid to talk to other moms about where they were able to make friends, especially since a neighborhood mom is going to know a lot about the different mom groups in the area. (You can also visit dfwchild. com to find our list of local mom groups.) Joining a group that gets together for play dates is a convenient and fun way to introduce your kid to friends. In her new neighborhood, Meals found a play group, through which she also learned about a group for prekindergarten kiddos zoned for the local elementary school.


BE A JOINER

Get your kid (and you!) plugged into a new social scene at clubs and play hubs like these, and go to dfwchild.com to find mom groups near you. KIDS-ONLY HANGOUTS

Kids can hang out and make new friends during Parents Night Out at Fort Worth-area YMCA locations. Events are held on select Friday and Saturday evenings; sign up online. Multiple locations; ymcafw.org In addition to tumbling classes for ages 4 months–12 years, The Little Gym frequently hosts Parents’ Survival Night—kids socialize, make music and build with Legos. Multiple locations; thelittlegym.com

PLAY AREAS

The 4500-square-foot indoor play area at Peek n Play transports kiddos into a mini play town that has a tree house with a slide that dips into a ball pit. They also have cars to drive to the hospital and a house for some cooking. 2805 E. Grapevine Mills Circle, Suite 150, Grapevine; 214/222-5514 peeknplayarea.com While parents mingle in KidMania’s adult area, the kids can romp through the maze or challenge a new buddy in the arcade. There’s a toddlers-only space for children 3 and younger to play with others their own size. 9101 Tehama Ridge Parkway, Fort Worth; 682/703-8440 kidmania.com The two Play Street Museum locations in Tarrant County are perfect for play dates for ages 1–8 or meeting new friends as kids play pretend in the themed indoor spaces. 5925 Convair Drive, Suite 533, Fort Worth; 817/930-2577101 Town Center, Suite A109, Keller 817/779-3125; playstreetmuseum.com Take your tyke during open play hours at Small World BIG Imagination, where infants and older can go shopping at a mini Central Market or hop in a boat to fish. 280 Commerce St., Suite 125, Southlake 682/305-7924; smallworldbigimagination.com

SADDLE UP! IT’S FAIRTIME, Y’ALL! THIS IS HOW WE TEXAS

make new friends],” Chambers says. “Someone has to teach them.” Chambers has a 9-year-old son who is more reserved and was bullied in school. She believes that the bullying has made it more of a challenge for her son to come out of his shell and make friends. “My son worries what the world thinks,” she says. “He’s good when meeting people, but he fears rejection a lot.” Encouraging your little one to go outside of their bubble can give them the confidence boost they need to make new friends. When Chambers is at the park with her kids, she often tells them to ask other kids to play. For example, one time her son was playing basketball by himself. He wanted his mom to play with him, but she saw there was another child playing basketball alone as well. Chambers told her son to invite the other child to play; he did, and the kid agreed. If you’re looking for even more ways to help your kiddo, Meals suggests searching for play groups online, checking out a coffee shop or library for postings about mom groups, and getting involved in your kid’s school, even in a very small role. Also consider getting your kid involved with a sport or club. When your child is among others they share a common interest with, it can be easier for them to find someone compatible. Soon enough, your kid will be surrounded by a community of friends and be well equipped for a future of friend-making.

JOIN US

SEPT 27—OCT 20

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fortworthchild / august 2019

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kid culture /

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UNDER THE SEA

a birthday fit for a mermaid princess WORDS ELIZABETH QUINN

llment 2019/2020 Enro ! en op w is no

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august 2019 / fortworthchild

Y

OU DON’T HAVE TO

spend many months (or many thousands of dollars) to throw a party fit for a princess. Ahead of Mylah’s fifth birthday, mom DeAnna Acklin spent a month planning a mermaid-princess party for her Capricorn goddess with help from Pinterest and some clever thrifting. Six of Mylah’s closest friends and 10 parents came to celebrate with her at Flea Style in Deep Ellum. “Shell yeah!” read the party invites. As the guests arrived in the recommended party attire (sparkly mermaid dresses, of course), they received light blue denim jackets that Acklin had thrifted and used a Cricut to apply “Mermaid Vibes” on the back. Pampered like true mermaid princesses, the girls got their hair braided and glitter-fied courtesy of a hair and body glitter kit from Sephora. To add to the princess look, the girls decorated plastic crowns with real seashells from Galveston and pastel jewels to take home as souvenirs. The decorations were mostly created by Acklin, who pulled inspiration from Pinterest.

3

What she saw online was a mix of green and purple—Ariel’s well-known color palette—but she opted for a multitude of pink tones, from blush to dusty rose, that were incorporated into everything from the streamers on the wall to the flower arrangements to the vintage glassware Acklin found in Canton. The vintage vibes continued thanks to a rustic metal cart that held the gifts and desserts. While the littles munched away on seashell, starfish and mermaid-tail sugar cookies and a berry Chantilly cake that Acklin and her mother had decorated, the adult guests were treated to pink “mermosas” made with grapefruit juice instead of orange juice. When it was time to pop the confetti, the girls grabbed traditional poppers filled with gold, pink and blush sequins and gathered for a photo. But the poppers were pulled too early, so they threw the confetti up in the air. As it turned out, the confetti was Mylah’s favorite part of her big day—c’est la vie!

TRE A SURE CHEST PHOTOGRAPHY Alyssa Cates Photography @alyssacatesstudio alyssacatesstudio.com

INVITATIONS Maddon and Co. @maddonandco maddonandco.com

VENUE Flea Style 3009 Commerce St., Dallas; 469/520-3222 fleastyle.com

CAKE TOPPER Studio Noel Designs @studio.noel etsy.com/shop/studionoeldesigns

PLATES & NAPKINS Wild Child Party @wildchildparty wildchildparty.com

MYLAH’S PARTY DRESS Tutu du Monde @tutudumonde tutudumonde.com

ALYSSA CATES PHOTOGRAPHY

AGES

1 / Partygoers gathered at Flea Style to make princess crowns. 2 / Guests arrived in their pink and shimmery finest. 3 / The berry Chantilly cake from Whole Foods was decorated by DeAnna Acklin and her mother.


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fortworthchild / august 2019 JOB #: FWS-13131 COLOR INFO: 4C

TITLE: FW CHILD MAG JULY TRIM: 3.5 x 4.688

31


kid culture / T R A V E L

2

where to go in seattle, according to a local WORDS LISA SALINAS

T

HERE’S MORE TO SEE

in Seattle than Pike Place Market and the futuristic Space Needle—and who better to give a tour than a former Dallasite? Mom of two Beth Dotolo, whose home we featured nearly 10 years ago, has lived in Seattle for seven years now. We consulted the interior designer about her favorite Seattle spots to visit with her 5- and 9-year-old boys in tow— here’s their kid-friendly travel guide to the Emerald City.

FOR MINI EXPLORERS

The SEATTLE CENTER is a mustvisit. The Center, spread throughout 74 acres, is home to a multitude of attractions—all within walking

distance of one another. Set aside a full day to bask in the sites. Travel up 605 feet to reach the breathtaking sky views in the Space Needle. And once you’re back on land, explore the Chihuly Garden and Glass, featuring eight galleries, a glasshouse and garden filled with artist Dale Chihuly’s work. The garden showcases colorful glass structures in dreamy, curvaceous shapes—think an Alice in Wonderland aesthetic. The Museum of Pop Culture will also leave you and the kids breathless, with exhibits highlighting the essence of American culture. Introduce your littles to legendary artist Prince, the history and future of video games and, of course, local rock band Nirvana. Plus, check out the Artist at Play playground, equipped with a 52-foot-long slide, along with wide nets and loopy structures for kids to climb.

FOR NATURE LOVERS

4

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august 2019 / fortworthchild

According to Dotolo, MAGNUSON PARK is the summer spot (and Seattle’s second largest park). “This park is on Lake Washington, and it’s a family favorite for fresh water swimming, barbecue and lawn

1 3

games,” she says. “You can spend the day lounging and enjoying the views of the water and the Cascades. Just bring towels, swimsuits and an umbrella for shade.” Bring a ball for a game of soccer at the sports field, and wear your walking shoes to stroll along the park’s trails. In addition to the summertime activities, you’ll see over 20 brick art installations dating back to the ’30s and ’40s throughout the park’s 350 acres. But before making your way to the park, Dotolo recommends stopping by a famed restaurant for grub time. “Grab Ezell’s Famous Chicken (Oprah’s fried favorite) on the way for a delicious picnic,” she says.

FOR SHORELINE ADMIRERS

Home to the Seattle Aquarium, a grand Ferris wheel that lights up with 500,000 LED lights at night, plus restaurants and shopping galore, the SEATTLE WATERFRONT is a city treasure. Its Great Wheel is 175 feet tall—one of the country’s largest Ferris wheels. A light show usually takes place on the weekends. Dotolo’s favorite attraction at the waterfront is the Argosy Locks boat tour, given twice a day through Sept. 2, with a cruise through Ballard Locks at Salmon Bay. Pricing begins at $43 for adults, $20 for ages 4–12 and free for age 3 and under.

FOR A (LOW-KEY) WEEKEND STROLL

Large purple, red and yellow flags

1 / The Space Needle is a Seattle landmark—travel up 605 feet to see breathtaking views of the city. 2 / Chihuly Garden and Glass is filled with the colorful works of glass artist Dale Chihuly. 3 / The Seattle Waterfront is known for the Great Wheel, a 175-foot-tall Ferris wheel that is lit by hundreds of thousands of lights at night. 4 / The Museum of Pop Culture houses exhibitions about cultural movements and icons, from the rise of legendary artist Prince to hit band Nirvana.

mark the spot at the BALLARD FARMERS MARKET—a Seattle gem for 15 years. “This is a great little farmers market we love to go to each Sunday and grab lunch from one of the street vendors,” Dotolo shares. “You’ll see the best of local produce, but there are also street performers and balloon artists for the kids.” The market is home to 120 vendors, featuring farmers from all over the state, local artisans, businesses and boutiques. We hear that kids flock to the mini doughnuts and Seattle Pops ice cream bars. If your littles are still restless after their market stroll, take them to Marvin’s Garden or Bergen Place—two nearby parks. Restrooms are onsite at the market.

SEATTLE CENTER

206/684-7200; seattlecenter.com MAGNUSON PARK

206/684-4946; seattle.gov SEATTLE WATERFRONT

visitseattle.org BALLARD FARMERS MARKET

sfmamarkets.com

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF POP CULTURE; CHIHULY GARDEN AND GLASS; VISIT SEATTLE

EMERALD CITY VIEWS


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

After-school Activities D I R E C TO R Y

WANT MORE INFORMATION? FIND THESE AFTER-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES ON OUR WEBSITE, DFWCHILD.COM.

AGES

DESCRIPTION

Artistry Elite Dance Fort Worth • 817/726-5312 artistryelitedance.com

18mos–Adult

Classes start August 12. Register now! Classes for ages 3+ are offered in a safe and nurturing environment and offer performance opportunities at all levels. See ad on page 8.

Ballet Center of Fort Worth Fort Worth • 817/423-9888 balletcenterfortworth.com

3ys & up

Our goal is to provide integrated classes: encouraging physical, intellectual, and emotional disciplines.We introduce dance to children as young as 3, train youth performers for professional dance careers. See ad on page 45.

Camp Fire After School Programs Multiple locations • 817/831-2111 campfirefw.org/youth

PK–5th grade

Camp Fire after school programs provide a unique environment where youth are encouraged to create, think critically, follow their sparks and grow in a safe and accepting environment. See ad on page 28.

Clayton Youth Enrichment Fort Worth • 817/923-9888 claytonyouth.org

5–12yrs

Clayton Youth Enrichment provides before- and after-school enrichment activities that prepare children for great lives through our Social Emotional Learning Initiative and engaging fun academic activities. See ad on page 30.

Kids Who Care Fort Worth • 817/737-5437 kidswhocare.org

4–18yrs

Now enrolling. Musical theatre/vocal performance, actor's studio and dance classes. New toddler and me class, Tuesdays. Ages 12 months–2 years. For the serious performer, audition for the resident company! See ad on page 4.

Kinderplatz of Fine Arts Fort Worth • 817/207-0660 kinderplatz.org

2–6yrs

Mondays through Thursdays join us for afternoon enrichment classes in art, ballet, developmental gymnastics, hip hop, martial arts, Spanish and yoga. For more information go to kinderplatz.org. See ad on page 30.

Little Gym, The Multiple locations thelittlegym.com

3–12yrs

We give children a safe and inspiring space to burn energy, build confidence and develop skills. From gymnastics, dance and sports, age-appropriate curriculum designed to facilitate skill development and fun! See ad on page 15.

Margo Dean School of Ballet Fort Worth • 817/738-7915 margodeanballet.com

3yrs & up

Margo Dean School of Ballet for ages 3 and up, flamenco dance, jazz dance, adult ballet and the real barre fitness class. See ad on page 45.

Marina Almayeva School of Classical Ballet • Hurst 817/788-0818 • ma-balletschool.com

3–19yrs

Elite classical ballet program based on famous Russian Vaganova methos, combined with intensive strength and flexibility training. Classes include ballet, pointe, character, stretching-conditioning and modern. International competitions and annual Nutcracker productions. See ad on page 45.

Play Studio Fort Worth • 817/936-2865 playstudiofw.com

0–7yrs

Play Studio is a carefully curated space for children to explore, play and create. Tinkering, loose parts play, dramatic play, art and more are available.

River Legacy Living Science Center Arlington • 817/860-6752 riverlegacy.org

K–6th

Every month, students explore the plants, animals and habitats of their local riparian forest at River Legacy Park through outdoor explorations and indoor activities. See ad on page 13.

Stage West Theatre Fort Worth • 817/554-3613 stagewest.org/theatre-school

8–13yrs

Stage West offers weekly classes in Improv, Musical Theatre, and 1 or 2 day mini-courses on Saturdays. Professional teachers in a professional theatre inspiring creativity, expression, fun and confidence. See ad on page 28.

TCU Music Preparatory Division Fort Worth • 817/257-7604 musicprep.tcu.edu

Infant–Adult

TCU’s Music Preparatory Division offers music lessons on the TCU campus. Offerings include: Music Together for infants to age 8, private piano, voice, instrumental and string lessons for all levels. See ad on page 42.

Texas Ballet Theater Schools Fort Worth • 817/763-0207 texasballettheater.org/schools

3–18yrs

Be part of the official school of Texas Ballet Theater! Classes offered for ages 3–adult at both Dallas and Fort Worth locations. Professional teachers and staff in a safe environment. See ad on page 17.

Theatre Arlington Arlington • 817/261-9628 theatrearlington.org

3–18yrs

Theatre Arlington’s Adult and Children’s Theatre School (ACTS) offers a progressive curriculum for your student to reach their full potential in the performing arts, plus private voice, dance and piano! See ad on page 17.

fortworthchild / august 2019

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

PLANNING THE PERFECT VACATION SCHOOL IS SOON TO BE BACK IN SESSION, SO IT’S TIME TO PLAN A LAST MINUTE GETAWAY OR GET A HEAD START ON THE HOLIDAYS Take in an oceanfront sunset on the boardwalk, start your holiday season at the Christmas Capitol of Texas, shop local and sip on award-winning rosé in historic Grapevine or plan the ultimate Disney vacation. No matter what you decide to do or where you decide to go, our selected list of travel destinations and advisors will bring fun experiences for the whole family.

Shop, Sip and Explore IT’S A WHOLE

World OF Play!

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Exciting attractions including waterparks, Peppa Pig World of Play, LEGOLAND® Discovery Center, SEA LIFE Grapevine Aquarium, Grapevine Vintage Railroad, Nash Farm, PIRATES! A Whimsical Adventure exhibit and Grapevine Pioneers, a hands-on educational experience.

NOW THROUGH LABOR DAY WEEKEND *Subject to availability/rates vary by hotel property. See website for complete details. **Subject to cancellation or delays based on high water levels on Lake Grapevine. Please check website for updates.

For the full calendar of events, tickets and more information, visit GrapevineTexasUSA.com/Summer or call 817.410.3185

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august 2019 / fortworthchild

30403_GCVB_Child_Mags_SB_Aug_2019_Ad_v1.indd 1

6/28/19 12:24 PM

ENDLESS ACTIVITIES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY Historic Grapevine, Texas is your gateway to Texas fun! Hop aboard the Grapevine Vintage Railroad or unwind along Grapevine’s Urban Wine Trail. Play 81 holes of golf or take advantage of 8,000-plus acre Lake Grapevine. Check out the new attraction Peppa Pig World of Play or enjoy LEGOLAND® Discovery Center both located at Grapevine Mills. Enjoy seasonal fun at the New Vintage Wine and Gallery Trail, Main Street Fest and SummerBlast. Make time for great shopping, dining and more throughout Grapevine.

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PLANNING THE PERFECT VACATION //

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

A Disney Vacation Beyond Your Imagination USE THE EXPERTISE OF THOSE WHO KNOW ALL THE SECRET TIPS AND TRICKS Why use a Personal Travel Planner at Crazy Imagination Travel to help you plan your next Disney vacation? Save time. Save money and garner the expertise of Travel Advisors with more than 15 years’ experience planning the most memorable Disney experiences! Crazy Imagination Travel takes planning to the extraordinary by creating unique vacation experiences for each of their guests. “No two families are alike and no two vacations are alike,” they say. “It’s important to us that each family experience Disney as it fits their style. We help our guests create their Disney Wish List and then fold in our expertise. The result is an extraordinary vacation perfectly tailored to each family.” The best part? Their expertise and services are at no cost to guests who secure their Disney vacation reservations through Crazy Imagination Travel and with so much to know about Disney Destinations, those services guarantee the best vacation possible.

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L I V E YOU R A D V E N T U R E i n a g a l a x y f a r , f a r a w a y.

THE ADVENTURE BEGINS A U G U S T 2 9, 2 019. Come live your very own Star Wars ™ story in a whole new land where a galaxy far, far away unfolds all around you. Welcome to Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge. Wander the lively market, where you can build your own † droid and custom lightsaber and sample the curious concoctions of the local cantina. Then, gather your crew and take control of the fastest hunk of junk in the galaxy on Millennium Falcon: Smugglers Run. And opening later in the year, find yourself caught in an epic battle between the Resistance and the First Order in Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance—where the incoming laser fire of a towering AT-AT is matched only by the red crackle of Kylo Ren’s lightsaber.

†Reservations required. Disney’s Hollywood Studios®, Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge and its experiences are subject to capacity. Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance is not available at opening and will open later in the year. ©Disney © & TM Lucasfilm Ltd. 970911

To book your magical Walt Disney World vacation, contact us today! Crazy Imagination Travel Planning Magical Vacations Since 2004 817-307-9906 www.crazyimaginationtravel.com

fortworthchild / august 2019

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PLANNING THE PERFECT VACATION //

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Christmas Comes Early CHARLIE BROWN RETURNS TO THE CHRISTMAS CAPITOL

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas in Texas as Gaylord Texan Resort prepares for its 16th annual Lone Star Christmas event presented by Pepsi. Beginning November 15, 2019, families can celebrate the best time of the year in the resort’s magical winter wonderland. The decorations throughout the 125-acre property include two million twinkling lights where a 54-foot-tall Christmas tree glitters, over 15,000 ornaments, miniature train sets, two 25-foot tall toy soldiers and so much more! One of the best parts of Lone Star Christmas is Gaylord Texan Resort’s signature event, ICE!, sponsored by Lexus and DEI. This magnificent event will amaze guests with two-story ice slides and life-size hand-carved ice sculptures all made from two million pounds of ice. This year’s theme is from the beloved story “A Charlie Brown Christmas” carved into magical holiday scenes created by forty master artisans from Harbin, China all within a 30-day span. As guests explore this 17,500- square-foot attraction—which also includes an ice bar (ages 21 years and up)—they feel like they’ve arrived to the North Pole. In addition to ICE!, Gaylord Texan Resort includes other extraordinary holiday activities for the whole family to enjoy. For guests seeking a thrilling experience, there’s a giant 8-lane snow tubing hill made fresh each morning with real snow— two million pounds of it—where kids of all ages can race down in inner tubes. Gaylord Texan even brings ice skating under the Texas sky in their 14,000-squarefoot outdoor ice skating rink. The little ones get to enjoy story time with Mrs. Claus, where they get to sit around her comfy home to enjoy cookies and milk while she reads a favorite Christmas story. Other events include Breakfast with Charlie Brown and Friends, Merry Snoopy Christmas Scavenger Hunt, Santa Snow Throw, a Christmas carousel, photos with Santa, and so much more! You can make your family holiday memories and experience Lone Star Christmas at Gaylord Texan Resort from November 15, 2019–January 5, 2020. Book your holiday room packages and event tickets at christmasatgaylordtexan.com. As a special treat for Dallas CHILD readers, visit gaylordtexantickets.com to receive 50% off ICE! tickets by entering promo code SPIRIT. Restrictions do apply.

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august 2019 / fortworthchild


November 15, 2019 – January 5, 2020 This holiday season, Gaylord Texan Resort will present a winter wonderland with two million lights, a 54-foot tall Christmas tree and 15,000 ornaments! Family events will include Snow Tubing, Ice Skating, Gingerbread Decorating Corner, Breakfast with Charlie Brown™ & Friends, Build-A-Bear Workshop®, and our signature hand-carved attraction ICE! featuring A Charlie Brown Christmas.

Stay overnight to experience it all! Tickets and Packages on Sale Now.

ChristmasAtGaylordTexan.com | (817) 778-2000 Peanuts © 2019 Peanuts Worldwide LLC. © Build-A-Bear Workshop, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved. PEPSI, PEPSI-COLA and the Pepsi Globe are registered trademarks of PepsiCo, Inc.

GRAPEVINE, TX


PLANNING THE PERFECT VACATION //

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

An Oceanfront Oasis ADVENTURE AND R & R, ALL IN ONE PLACE

For a seaside escape located just 20 miles outside of downtown Houston, load up the car and head for Kemah Boardwalk. With 60 acres of waterfront fun, a trip to Kemah Boardwalk promises a wide array of amusements and activities. Stroll up and down the Midway for dancing fountains that shoot water up to 12 feet high—kiddos love splashing around these water jets, which are illuminated at night. You’ll also find Midway games for all ages and a double decker carousel boasting painted seals, horses and zebras to mount. If the Ferris wheel seems a little too tall for your little ones, head for the Wonder Wheel, a childsized version of the classic attraction. Be sure to schedule a visit to the Kemah Aquarium—between the rainforest exhibit with African elephant and lowland gorilla animatronics and the specialty-themed restaurant housing a 50,000-gallon tank filled with tropical fish, everyone in your crew is sure to be impressed. If you have little daredevils in tow, steer towards the Stingray Reef to touch (and even feed!) Southern and Cownose stingrays. If you’re looking to cover a lot of ground, hop aboard the C.P. Huntington, a gas-powered train that carries passengers around the property. Give your family a taste of history on this gas-powered train, which is a handcrafted replica of a Central Pacific Railroad train from 1863. Plan your trip for August 16th and take advantage of National Rollercoaster Day discounts for the Boardwalk Bullet, or you can enjoy Salsa Beats on August 24th where there will be free salsa lessons, dancing, special performers and plenty of kids activities that will keep everyone busy. Planning a trip in early September? If you’re a car fanatic you’ll want to catch the Mustang Car Show. Know you’re way around craft beer? Check out the annual Craft Beer Fest and sample over 72 unique beers from 24 breweries.

kemahboardwalk.com 38

august 2019 / fortworthchild


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Child Ca D

FEELING OVERWHELMED BY ALL THE LOCAL CHILD CARE

YOU’RE NOT AROUND. H

HOURS

AGES (PRIMARY CARE)

Academy Christian School

501 Academy Blvd., Fort Worth 76108

chapelcreeklife.com

7am–6pm

6mos–12yrs

Adventure Kids Playcare

Multiple locations

adventurekidsplaycare.com

Varies

6mos–12yrs

AuPairCare - Live-In Childcare

Fort Worth area

refer.aupaircare.com/share/lpinon

9am–5pm

3mos–18yrs

Bright Horizons

Multiple locations

brighthorizons.com/child-carelocator

7am–6:30pm

3 mos–5yrs

Camp Fire Child Development Center

2700 Meacham Blvd., Fort Worth 76137

campfirefw.org/youth

6:30am–6pm

Infants–PK

Carpe Diem Private Preschool

Multiple locations

carpediempreschool.com

7am–6:30pm

3mos–5yrs

Fort Worth Zoo

1989 Colonial Parkway., Fort Worth 76116

fortworthzoo.org

Varies

3–5yrs

Liberty Christian

1301 S Highway 377., Argyle 76226

libertychristian.com

8am–4pm

3–5yrs

Museum School at the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History

1600 Gendy Street., Fort Worth 76107

fwmuseum.org/about-us/ museum-school

10am–5pm

3–12yrs

Pantego Christian Academy

Multiple locations

pantego.com

Varies

18mos–PK

Primrose School of Fort Worth West

3777 Westridge Avenue., Fort Worth 76116

primroseschools.com/schools/ fort-worth-west

7am–6pm

6wks–5yrs

River Legacy Living Science Center

703 NW Green Oaks Blvd., Arlington 76006

riverlegacy.org

Varies

3–6yrs

Spanish Schoolhouse

Multiple locations

spanishschoolhouse.com

Varies

18mos–K

Trinity Lutheran Children's Center

3621 Tulsa Way., Fort Worth 76107

tlcfw.org

6:30am–6pm

6wks–5yrs

Xplor Preschool & School-Age

Multiple locations

xplortoday.com

6:30am–6:30pm

6wks–12yrs

40

august 2019 / fortworthchild


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Xplor provides excellence in preschool and school-age programs by helping children develop important academic, social and emotional skills. See ad on page 42. fortworthchild / august 2019

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august 2019 / fortworthchild

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FO

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WORDS ELIZABETH SMITH

2 0 F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY E V E N T S Y O U C A N ’ T M I S S I N

AUGUST SUMMER FIREWORKS

N R H 2 O FA M I LY WAT E R PA R K August 3 Why consign fireworks to only the July Fourth and New Year’s holidays? NRH2O celebrates its 25th anniversary summer with their own pyrotechnics over the pool. Purchase tickets online for all-day play and stay after dark to float in the wave pool or watch from the Splashatory during the fireworks show, beginning around 9:15–9:30pm. $19.99 for those under 48 inches tall; $24.99 over 48 inches. 9001 Blvd. 26, North Richland Hills; 817/427-6500 nrh2o.com

ARCADIA DARLING

PHOTOS COURTESY OF DC ENTERTAINMENT; JOHN CARLISLE MOORE; TEXAS LIVE!

AUGUST 10 // JOIN GRAPEVINE’S PLEASANT GLADE POOL FOR ITS LAST DINE-IN MOVIE OF THE SEASON STARRING JASON MOMOA IN AQUAMAN. ANNIE

T H E K I N G’ S UNIVERSIT Y August 1–11 Revisit the rags-to-riches story of the red-haired orphan and her dog Sandy, presented by Gateway Church’s Gateway Performing Arts. A local cast of adults and children star in this summer musical production, set in 1930s New York and on stage at The King’s University. Watch as Annie foils Miss Hannigan, befriends President Roosevelt and hits the jackpot with her adoptive father. Tickets from $10. 2121 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake; 800/569-7108 gatewaysummermusicals.com

FIRST FRIDAYS AT THE FARM

NA S H FA R M August 2 There’s nothing like a family recipe handed down from our parents and grandparents who knew their way around the kitchen and the kitchen garden. For example, homemade pickles. Come pick the last of the summer harvest cucumbers and learn how to make Meme’s Pickles during this heritage skills workshop at Grapevine’s historic farmstead. $3 per person; free for 3 years and younger. 626 Ball St., Grapevine; 817/410-3185 nashfarm.org

HIP POCKET THEATRE Through August 4 You’re familiar with Peter Pan but what about Pan, the Greek god of wilderness and fertility? Hip Pocket Theatre presents this play—with live actors and puppetry— that delves into J.M. Barrie’s creation of Peter Pan. Local musicians play live before and after the show, so come hear the music and grab a bite from the concession stand. And a warning: there is no late seating. $20 adults; $15 seniors, teachers and military; $5 students/children. 1950 Silver Creek Road, Fort Worth; 817/246-9775 hippocket.org

Children’s Film Festival Seattle. The Modern offers free screenings inside the auditorium. All-ages shows begin at 11am and shows for kids at least 7 to 8 years old (including Spanish-language films with English subtitles) begin at 2pm. Includes free admission to the galleries, so be sure to stick around and check out the exhibit David Park – A Retrospective. FREE 3200 Darnell St., Fort Worth; 817/738-9215 themodern.org

Stolen Shakespeare Guild takes a sidestep from the Bard to present the 1934 musical Anything Goes, about a love triangle on board the luxury ocean liner S.S. American en route from New York to England. Come see the sailors tap-dancing in their dress whites on stage in Sanders Theater for tickets starting from $16. 1300 Gendy St., Fort Worth; 866/811-4111 stolenshakespeareguild.org

FROZEN JR.

PLEASANT GLADE POOL August 10 Grapevine’s poolside movie series wraps up with the 2018 DC Comics action flick Aquaman starring mere mortal Jason Momoa and loads of underwater CGI creatures. Trade the couch for the beach to watch this underwater flick and drive out to the neighborhood Pleasant Glade Pool for an evening splash time before the movie begins after dark. $5 per person; free for season pass holders and babies under 12 months. 1805 Hall-Johnson Road, Grapevine; 817/410-3450 gograpevine.com

ANYTHING GOES

TEXAS LIVE! August 11 Bring the kids out for a Sunday funday afternoon

HA LT O M T H E AT E R August 8–10 Artisan Center Theater takes Haltom City by (snow)storm with this production starring Princesses Anna and Elsa. Follow the rollercoaster ride of their sisterhood in this shortened version of the 2018 Broadway musical featuring all of the songs from the animated film, plus five new ones. Tickets are $15. 5501 Haltom Road, Haltom City; 817/284-1200 artisanct.com F O RT WO RT H C O M M U N I T Y A RT S C E N T E R August 9–25

DIVE-IN MOVIE

DR PEPPER KIDDS DAY

MODERN KIDS SUMMER FLICKS

T H E M O D E R N A RT M U S E U M O F F O RT WO RT H August 7–8 Short attention spans, meet these animated short films straight from the 2019

AUGUST 11 // ENJOY BOUNCE HOUSES, A PETTING ZOO AND MORE AT DR PEPPER KIDDS DAY AT TEXAS LIVE fortworthchild / august 2019

43


AGENDA nonprofit Neuro Assistance Foundation. Wheelchairs and strollers welcome in the races. Registration from $20 in advance for kids’ 1-mile; free for those hand-cycling in the 5K or 10K. $15 bandana for dogs. 1425 E. Southlake Blvd., Southlake; 214/697-6922 playtri.com/hothatch

AMERICAN MINIATURE HORSE ASSOCIATION WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 15 // SEE ABOUT 60 AUTHENTIC WORKS OF CLAUDE MONET AT KIMBELL ART MUSEUM.

for kids of all ages at Texas Live! the new entertainment complex between the Rangers and Cowboys home stadiums. You’ll have the chance to throw strikes in the batting cages, experience virtual reality and enjoy bounce houses and a petting zoo. The day includes costumed princess and superhero appearances and a touch-a-truck with the real-life heroes of the Arlington Police and Fire departments. All donations at the door benefit Kidd’s Kids Foundation. FREE 1650 E. Randol Mill Road, Arlington; 817/852-6688 texas-live.com

PRESCHOOL DISCOVERY CLUB

F O RT WO RT H NAT U R E CENTER AND REFUGE August 16 and 23 Venture out with your littles who are knee-high to a grasshopper (specifically, 3 to 5-year-olds) to the nature center on these Friday mornings for games, crafts and educational programming made for them. The first day focuses on insects—where to find them in your garden, on trees, on TV—and the second is all about plants—their colors, shapes and why they’re central to life on Earth. Pre-registration is required. $8 per child, plus regular admission: $5 adults; $2 children 3–12 years. 9601 Fossil Ridge Road, Fort Worth; 817/392-7410 fwnaturecenter.org

BREAKFAST WITH THE BEASTS

F O RT WO RT H Z O O August 17 There’s nothing like bonding with family over Sunday lunch. Come bond with the animals at Fort Worth Zoo during this

monthly Saturday morning meal with the Animal Outreach staff in the education building where you’ll meet furry, feathered and scaled friends. Designed for kids 3–10 years and their parents. $30 per adult and $22 per child and includes day admission. 10 percent off for zoo members. 1989 Colonial Parkway, Fort Worth; 817/759-7555 fortworthzoo.org

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

BA S S P E R F O R M A N C E HA L L August 20–25 Make treating your kids to the Dallas Summer Musicals part of your family tradition, starting with this heartwarming story of Jewish farmer Tevye and his daughters. The Broadway production on tour features dancing from an Israeli choreographer, an orchestra and songs “Tradition,” “Sunrise, Sunset” and “If I Were A Rich Man.” But you don’t have to be rich to afford tickets. Seats from $44. 525 Commerce St., Fort Worth; 817/212-4280 basshall.com

HOT HATCH CHILE RUN, WALK AND ROLL

CENTRAL MARKET SOUTHLAKE August 24 Skip the sugary breakfast cereals and work up an appetite instead for Central Market’s breakfast tacos made with in-season and freshly roasted Hatch chiles, available after this annual charity run and roll benefiting Keller-based

F O R M O R E F A M I LY- F R I E N D LY F U N T H I S M O N T H , C H E C K O U R O N L I N E C A L E N DA R AT D F W C H I L D.CO M/C A L E N DA R.

44

august 2019 / fortworthchild

WILL ROGERS COLISEUM August 23–31 If while driving you’ve ever heard your child yell out from the backseat, “Look! Horses!” then don’t miss this opportunity to see lots of them, in one place, and all of them teeny tiny. All 34 inches or under, to be exact. Mini horse clubs from around the country descend onto Fort Worth for a week of classes and shows open to the public. Be sure to come on the first Saturday and Sunday to witness the allyouth classes where kids 5–18 perfect their skills in jumping and driving the minis. FREE 3401 W. Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth amha.org

BEDFORD BLUES & BBQ FESTIVAL

B E D F O R D C I T Y HA L L August 30–September 1 The secret sauce to a family fun weekend: good food and free admission. Get them both on Friday night when general admission and parking are free at the 11th annual Bedford Blues & BBQ Festival. Check out the complete music lineup online and come to smell what the pit masters have cooking. $15 weekend passes available online. Saturday and Sunday: $10 online and $15 cash only at the gate. Free for children 5 and younger with a paid adult. 1951 L. Don Dodson Drive, Bedford; 817/952-2128 bedfordbluesfest.com

SUNDAY FUNDAYS

PA N T H E R I S L A N D PAV I L I O N Through September 1 Got your own inflatables in the garage? Pump them up and float for free in the Trinity River along the shores of Fort Worth’s waterfront stage, or rent a tube for only $5 all day. Rentals available for other watersports equipment (kayaks, stand-up paddleboards, canoes and pedal boats). For maximum

fun, come back to dry land for food truck lunches. Be sure to wear your river shoes. FREE 395 Purcey St., Fort Worth; 817/698-0700 sundayfundayfw.com

MONET – THE LATE YEARS

K I M B E L L A RT MUSEUM Through September 15 Prepare yourself and your littles to stand in awe of approximately 60 authentic

works by French Impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840–1926). The exhibit, on view in the Piano Pavilion, includes more than 20 water lily paintings. $18 for adults; $14 for children ages 6–11; free for kids under 6. Halfprice tickets all day Tuesdays and after 5pm on Fridays. 3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth; 817/332-8451 kimbellart.org/exhibition/ monet

DUDE, THAT’S GROOVY

Level up on your viewing experiences with 3D glasses and laser lights at a Pink Floyd tribute show, infinity goggles that map out the stars and shaking in your seats to the Aussie stars of The Wiggles. (Google their groovy music videos with Wags the Dog on YouTube, and learn the dances for extra fun. Happy wiggling!) LASER SPECTACULAR FEATURING THE MUSIC OF PINK FLOYD

C A S A M A ÑA NA August 10 Why is listening to Pink Floyd better with laser beams and 3D glasses? Sit back, watch and listen to the original master recordings from the British psychedelic rock band choreographed to large-screen video projection and special lighting effects. The first half is the complete The Dark Side of the Moon album and the second half features the best of Floyd’s entire 50-plus-year repertoire. The show runs 2 hours and 5 minutes with one 20-minute intermission and is appropriate for all ages. Tickets from $25. 3101 W. Lancaster Ave., Fort Worth; 817/332-2272 casamanana.org

THE WIGGLES PARTY TIME TOUR

T H E T H E AT R E AT G R A N D P R A I R I E August 11 The Aussie children’s music group—now with first-ever female Wiggle, Emma—lands in the U.S. along with their jiggly crew Captain Feathersword, Dorothy the Dinosaur, Henry the Octopus and Wags the Dog. Dance and sing along to classics and songs from their new album as Emma dances ballet and Wiggle Anthony plays his guitar, banjo and bagpipes. All tickets are $44.75; free for children under 12 months. 1001 Performance Place, Grand Prairie; 888/929-7849 axs.com

INFINITY FESTIVAL

F O RT WO RT H M U S E U M O F S C I E N C E A N D H I S T O RY August 16–18 Friday night’s for 21 and up only, but bring the kids on the weekend days to experience the latest advancements in virtual reality and immersive tech. You’ll create your own virtual tour of the galaxy with astronomy software on Saturday. On Sunday chat with the museum’s in-house astronomers and go on virtual reality galaxy tours that were created the previous day. Friday: $20; $30 VIP. Saturday and Sunday: Free with exhibit admission: $16 adults; $13 youth ages 2–18. 1600 Gendy St., Fort Worth; 817/255-9300 fwmuseum.org

PHOTOS COURTESY OFKIMBELL ART MUSEUM; JOAN MARCUS; PARAMOUNT ORGANIZATION, INC.

kid culture / T H E


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45


confessions

MOM TRUTHS ILLUSTRATION MARY DUNN

COMPILED BY LISA SALINAS

THAT MY KINDERMOMENT GARTNER WEARS WHEN YOU When you drop off your son at your BLACK BASKETBALL THINK YOUR aunt’s house for a sleepover and realize CHILD IS OLD you have forgotten his ‘blankie.’ Whoops— SHORTS AND WHITE COMPRESSION TIGHTS ENOUGH TO sorry, kid!” EVERYWHERE, BUT WATCH IRONONE WEEKEND MAN, AND A I sent my petite “My son has two sets of HE ADDED GREEN DAY LATER 3-year-old to school first-day-of-kindergarten DRESS SOCKS. I TOLD photos because when in new size 3 pants YOU WALK HIM THEY DIDN’T we got to the school the I thought fit. Turns INTO THE MATCH. HE PULLED first time, we realized we out they were falling LIVING ROOM were one week early. We THE POCKETS OF all day. When my still laugh about it when AND SEE YOUR HIS SHORTS INSIDE husband picked her we see our ‘Real First 5-YEAR-OLD Day’ and ‘Fake First Day’ up from school, they OUT AND SAID, ‘MOM! photos.” THIS IS GREEN! I DO PLAYING WITH were at her ankles.” MATCH!’”  HIS TOYS WHILE SINGWhen my son was 4, he would take forever to get out of the ING ‘I’M ON A car. I kept telling him if he didn’t hurry up I’d go inside HIGHWAY TO Got a parenting confession without him. One day I decided to ‘teach him a lesson’ and went you’d like to share? We’d love to inside the house without him for less than a minute. He’s 14 now HELLLLLLL...’” hear from you. Send it to —AMBER, GRAPEVINE

—APRIL, ARLINGTON

—SARAH, DALLAS

—LINDA, GRAND PRAIRIE

46

august 2019 / fortworthchild

editorial@dfwchild.com.

and still is convinced I forgot him.”

—TIFFANI, MCKINNEY

—KIM, FLOWER MOUND


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FortWorthChild August 2019  

The Magazine Parents Live by in Tarrant County

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The Magazine Parents Live by in Tarrant County

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