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DECEMBER 2017

DEC 2017

SAY WHAT?! FEARLESS &

FUNNY SA WOMEN

THE SMART READ FOR SMART WOMEN

• GLYNNIS BREYTENBACH • ELANA AFRIKA-BREDENKAMP • JACKIE BURGER • OLWETHU LESHABANE • MARIANNE FASSLER • JENNY MORRIS • CLAIRE JOHNSTON • JANINE BINNEMAN • KAT VAN DUINEN • MISS H

50% OF WOMEN ARE IRON DEFICIENT ARE YOU?

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6 ED’S LETTER 8 YOUR SAY 114 MEGAXWORD 117 SUDOKU 118 BRAINTEASER 120 STOCKISTS 122 YOUR HOROSCOPE

56 FEELING TIRED EVEN AFTER A SOLID NIGHT’S SLEEP? Turns out one in two women is iron-deficient 60 HEALTHY LIVING Giving is good for you 61 ASK THE DOC Specialist surgeon and lecturer Dr Sarah Rayne answers your questions

10 SA CELEBS ’What makes me happy’ 16 ENTREPRENEURS Two jewellery designers share their startup stories 20 THE LAST STRAW All about the single-use plastic problem that’s killing our oceans – and our lifeblood 26 WHAT I’VE LEARNT Style icon Jackie Burger on growing older (and growing up) 32 GROWN-UP SEX Want a better sex life? Seven experts offer advice 36 COVER STORY The electric power of Naomi Watts 40 TRAVEL Road-tripping along the west coast of Ireland 44 BOOK EXTRACT: The DA’s Glynnis Breytenbach chats to us, PLUS an extract from her book 52 PROFILE Designer Kat van Duinen talks quality and legacy

62 BRIGHT LIGHTS, BIG CITY: IT’S TIME TO PARTYYYY! Sparkle and shimmy in these special party looks that our fashion and beauty editors put together

74 A BUSH CELEBRATION A festive menu, including roasts, side dishes and desserts 84 SPECIAL TREAT Chef Kenneth Ngubane’s grilled Norwegian salmon with deep-fried pap 85 COCKTAILS Four recipes for festive tipples 88 CONFECTIONS Bakes from Sweet, the gorgeous new cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh COVER: AUGUST

95 FASHION Celestial-motif jewels 96 BEAUTY Covetable goodies 98 HOME Irresistible accessories 100 FOOD Must-haves for foodies 101 GARDENS Green-fingered friends will love these 102 PETS Treats for furkids 104 DRINKS Top tipples and tipplerelated paraphernalia 106 BOOKS Good reads for the word people in your life 108 WIN 12 great prizes, from bubbly to fab fragrance hampers 110 TEST HOUSE The best gammon, mince pies, Christmas cake and more

116 SUBSCRIBE TO FAIRLADY And you could win 1 of 30 Yardley hampers, worth R821,70 each!

39 WIN A one-night stay for two in the Penthouse at the Palazzo Hotel, worth R50 000!


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AQUARACER DIAMONDS Bella Hadid, the new generation’s favourite, has everything going for her. She’s beautiful, vivacious, luminous and free-spirited. She glides through pressure so #DontCrackUnderPressure is the perfect motto for her.


Christmas camp!

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f it’s the Christmas holidays, it must be camping. Over the years it’s turned into a tradition for us – together with a bunch of family and friends (so close they’re basically indistinguishable from family), we always spend some time on the banks of a beautiful black river in the middle of an indigenous yellowwood forest, and it’s fantastic. But it’s also quite hard work. My husband, who is of the view that there is nothing more relaxing than

dirt being tracked in. When we wake up, we open the mosquito net and head to the ‘kitchen’ area, where we make excellent freshly ground espresso with warm real milk, and we dunk our artisanal rusks in it while sitting peace­ fully in sturdy camping chairs before heading down to the river to swim. OK, even I am hating me at this point. But I’ve done plenty of my husband’s kind of camping in my long and happy life. And I am old enough now to accept the fact that, as Jackie says, ‘I’d rather not have coffee than have poor coffee.’ So the hard work is really all in my head. I am happy to accept that. As is my husband, I’d like to point out, whom I occasionally spot frothing the warmed milk for the espresso with a special camping frother before adding it to his coffee. But he leans on his Venter to do it, so that’s alright then. Happy Christmas to you all, no matter how you spend it! Be happy, be kind and be safe, and we’ll see you in the New Year.

Love, Suzy 5

1 L’OCCITANE’S ULTIMATE PAMPERING COLLECTION Not only because the products are gorgeous, but also because for every collection sold, R50 is donated to improving access to quality eye surgery in under-served communities. It’s a cause close to my heart. 2 THE #METOO CAMPAIGN Within days of actor Alyssa Milano suggesting that anyone who’d been sexually harassed or assaulted use #MeToo as their status, millions did just that. Alyssa did it to show that the problem goes way beyond Harvey Weinstein. Now, for the first time, action is being taken against those men. Could this be an actual sea change in what we as a society accept and expect? We hope so.

6 Fairlady/December 2017

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3 LE CREUSET SORBET COLLECTION RAMEKINS I love the new colours, and the ramekins are just the right size for some salt, or chopped chilli, or soya sauce… or (yay for Christmas!) brandy butter. Mmmmmm.

BABYLONSTOREN SPRANKEL 2012 Local, lekker and lovely-looking (both the bottle and the box are beautifully designed), I love this bubbly. And it’s a great way to add some luxurious fizz to the festivities.

RAPID FIRE: REMARKABLE MISCELLANY BY JOHN MAYTHAM I find I spend an embarrassing amount of time trying to think up a general knowledge question that would confound John Maytham. So far – nothing. But in the meantime I’m loving his book, a collection of some of the most interesting questions he’s been asked over the years, and their even more interesting answers.

CADBURY’S LIMITED EDITION 6 WHISPERS SNOWBALLS OK, chocolate in pretty much any form will do, we can all agree. But little festive snowballs of it? With honeycomb inners? They lasted about as long as it would take a real snowflake to dissolve in a South African summer. We’re literally talking seconds…

PHOTOGRAPHS: LIZA VAN DEVENTER, SUPPLIED

Editor Suzy Brokensha

heading out into the boondocks with a sleeping bag and his Venter trailer, of which he is very fond, has never been able to understand how I can think that. And, until I read the illuminating interview with Jackie Burger on page 32, I never really understood how he could possibly not think it. But thanks to Jackie, this is my epiphany: If I weren’t with him, my husband would be perfectly happy to sleep outside, no tent or mattress or pillow, on top of a puff adder and in a cloud of mosquitoes. In the morning, feeling well rested, he’d lazily reach for a tin of something that he may or may not have already opened the previous day, possibly eating any ants that had managed to crawl in overnight. If he felt like it, he might make some instant coffee with long­life milk in a tin mug and drink it squatting next to the fire. When I am with him, we have a tent you can stand up in (not some­ thing that is ever very hard for me, it is true, but he is tall), a stretcher, a double mattress with good quality white linen, duvet and pillows, and a little woven rug outside to stop any


Your say

FAIRLADY Emilia OCT 2017

putting emphasis on balance and BORN TO RULE GENES happiness rather ‘ Food for thought TRENDS FORECAST than succumbing to ’ the pressure of the WHAT TO HORROR I picked up the latest STORIES WEAR FAIRLADY (October ‘do more, be more, WIN NOW! SUMMER 2017) because of Emilia excel’ mentality. FASHION FINDS Clarke. (I should confess Thank you for ✱ I’m a bit of a Thrones fan.) a great issue. It And once I got into it, was truly thoughtI truly enjoyed the issue, provoking. especially ‘The Upside Nicci Wiggishoff of Average’ – it GoT me thinking… Ed: Thanks, Nicci. It was definite food for hehe, see what I did there?) I comthought, I agree; there’s so much pressure pletely agree that the word ‘mediocre’ to ‘be the best you can be’ and to strive is perhaps problematic, but its essence constantly for perfection. I loved the idea speaks to me. I truly believe that to be of just living your life… It doesn’t mean extreme in anything is bad, and for a slacking off; it just means you’ll be more content. That works for me! happy life one needs balance. Yes, in my mind, diet and chocolate can and should live in the same sentence. Women of the Future I’m not saying it will be easy, but it I wanted to thank you for the should be a possibility, right? FAIRLADY/Santam Women of What’s wrong with being average? the Future awards event in August. And are we really doing ourselves any A friend invited me to go with her favours by pushing ourselves and our to the lunch, and I went not knowing kids the way we do? Is it so bad to what to expect. choose mediocre? It was such a special day and This issue has really made me take I came home very inspired by the stock of my life and relax a little, businesses those women had started. How to outsmart your

Clarke

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A Chloé Love Story fragrance hamper, worth R3 000 Chloé Love Story is a continuation of a tale told through magical scents: the story of a woman who dares to step into love freely and confidently. Fresh and floral mingles with dew, and the poetry of the connection evokes an alluring sensuality. Chloé Love Story comes in a glass jewel, a lucky charm that the Chloé woman always carries with her. YOUR HAMPER INCLUDES: Chloé Eau de Parfum 75ml and Chloé Love Story Eau de Parfum 50ml

8 Fairlady/December 2017

☞ WRITE TO letters@fairlady.com

Tiffini Wissing Hein is congratulated by colleagues after being named Woman of the Future 2017.

It made me think about my own life. I haven’t had the courage to leave my job yet, but it is something I think about, and that lunch moved me further along the road to independence. Joanne Fisher Ed: The Woman of the Future lunch is always one of the highlights of my year. Every single woman in that room is a powerhouse! It always makes me believe, as Dr Zeus says in Oh, The Places You’ll Go!, that we can move mountains.

You marry the family I have been a FAIRLADY reader for 50 years and this is the first time I’ve been prompted to write to you. I had a good laugh reading your article on mothers-in-law from hell. I can’t believe that women still haven’t learnt that to be happy in your marriage you need to start by choosing a nice m-i-l. I did, and I smiled for 38 years. Fareeda Sale Ed: Smart thinking, Fareeda! That’s very good advice. I was also very lucky in the m-i-l stakes, as that story reminded me once again. Some of those women… yikes!

• facebook.com/fairladymag • twitter.com/fairladymag • instagram.com/fairlady_magazine/ • pinterest.com/fairladymag • letters@fairlady.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: E.L.S.K.E PHOTOGRAPHY, SUPPLIED

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SA celebs

Compiled by Liza van Deventer & Lucinda Dordley

We spend our lives chasing happiness, and sometimes we’re looking so hard for it we don’t see what’s right under our noses! We asked five of South Africa’s favourite women to share where they find their happiness.

JENNY MORRIS, CELEBRITY CHEF AND RADIO PERSONALITY ‘Watching people enjoy my food!’ says Jenny Morris, aka the Giggling Gourmet. She believes that food should be properly touched – even stroked and caressed – to be completely enjoyed. What really gives her pleasure is to watch people eat her food with their fingers. ‘Somehow, that’s the biggest reward!’ December 2017 /Fairlady 11


ELANA AFRIKABREDENKAMP, TV AND RADIO PRESENTER ‘Singing,’ says Elana. She loves to sing, but very few people know about this passion of hers. As a child Elana hated being forced to sing and play the piano in church, but as she grew up she realised how good it was for her soul. Not only that, but it also helps her to articulate better. At home, she sings to her children. ‘It makes mundane tasks more exciting!’


SA celebs CLAIRE JOHNSTON, SINGER AND SONGWRITER ‘My two rescue dogs,’ says Claire, the lead singer of the popular band Mango Groove. ‘I love coming home to the wagging of tails and shrieks of happiness.’ (Yes, her pug shrieks!) After her divorce Claire wanted a companion and found not one, but two. When she looks into the eyes of her ‘angel dog’, Patch, she sees the love, she says.

December 2017/Fairlady 13


MARIANNE FASSLER, FASHION DESIGNER ‘My relationship with the people I work with.’ Marianne treats her employees as family. ‘Working with people with whom you have a personal connection makes it easier and more creatively productive… It’s a little bit like a well-oiled machine,’ she says. ‘All the pieces come together and work in perfect sync. There are no bad vibes; everything’s harmonious. I love that.’

In front: Francois, Miriam, Marianne, Aldené and Lizzie. At the back: Leah, DaisieJo, John, Jeanette, Lezanne, Sarona, Elizabeth, Albertina, Sergio and Thato.


SA celebs

PHOTOGRAPHS: LIZA VAN DEVENTER, WALDO SWIEGERS, HERMAN VERWEY, ALET PRETORIUS. MAKEUP: SAM SCARBOROUGH OF ONE LEAGUE CREATIVE MANAGEMENT, MELINDA DE WET. ACCESSORIES: COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN, ACCESSORIZE

OLWETHU LESHABANE, DIGITAL STRATEGIST AND ACTIVIST ‘Blogging,’ says Olwethu, ‘because it unites us when we realise that we have similar experiences and world views.’ She believes that selfexpression is a way of validating that we’re not ‘as weird as we think’. Blogging has taught her that it’s okay to express your thoughts and opinions on a platform where others can interact with them; it brings us all together – and that’s really what makes her happy. ✤

December 2017/Fairlady 15


Entrepreneurs

Sparkle &Shine

Every piece of jewellery tells a story, both about its designer and its wearer. These two designers take their creations to another level as they fashion their inspiration into the most unusual and covetable pieces.

By Shireen Fisher

MISS H JEWELLERY DESIGN Owner: Hildegard Benninghoff Startup costs: My initial startup costs were around R35 000. I spent this on tools and equipment, raw materials, business branding and boxes, product photo shoots and my website. I saved up most of this money while still at my previous job. I am very lucky to have a home-based studio, so I don’t have studio rent as an added expense at this stage. Turnover: It varies from month to month, with each month better than the last. Last month I sold about 70 pieces of jewellery. Website: misshjewellerydesign.com

16 Fairlady/December 2017

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o Hildegard, a look only really works when there’s a lot of jewellery involved. Her love of creating things began when she was very young – even then, she was constantly busy with various arts and crafts. ‘I knew I wanted a creative career. My father actually suggested I study jewellery design, but I opted for a course in textile design. After working in the textile industry for a few years, I did a part-time course in jewellery design… I went to class once a week for about two years while also working part-time as a silversmith for a year or so to gain experience.’ Hildegard finally took the plunge and opened Miss H Jewellery Design in January 2017. She has since launched her website and online store. She describes the brand as a representation of her own style: fresh, original, interesting and different. Her range is small but quite varied in style, with some everyday pieces, some elegant and feminine jewellery, a bolder range and quirkier creations. Most of the jewellery is made of silver, brass and copper, and some of recycled paper and beads. She loves to use tumbled stones. Hildegard runs the business on her own and has an assistant come in once a week. She doesn’t hesitate to call in help when she needs to, though: ‘My father, who is retired, lends a hand,’ she says. ‘I gave him a crash course in the cutting and sanding of metal. His work is


‘I would have struggled to achieve what I have without the internet. In business, having an online presence is essential.’


Entrepreneurs so neat; it saves me valuable time. And my boyfriend is my go-to guy when it comes to building tables or displays for markets.’ She credits much of her success to the internet. ‘In business, having an online presence is essential. Most sales are generated through social media and my online store, so I work on this part of my business on a daily basis. My online store allows me to sell my product 24/7/365. A few retail stores discovered my work through social media, so I now supply them with jewellery too!’ Hildegard says she occasionally becomes overwhelmed by the fact that a day is only 24 hours long. ‘I have a huge amount of work to get through and often work evenings and weekends. I have to source materials, design, manufacture and photograph jewellery, do marketing, take care of client relations and package and post orders.’ She finds pricing a difficult task. ‘You don’t want to charge too little. Making anything by hand takes time, and the raw materials are expensive. On the other hand, you cannot charge too much, as you still want people to buy your product. It’s hard to find a balance between the two.’ Hildegard plans to launch ranges for men and children, and eventually wants a retail store. ‘It’s a dream at this stage – but I am working hard towards it.’

18 Fairlady/December 2017

JANINE BINNEMAN JEWELLERY Owner: Janine Binneman Startup costs: I sold my second-hand car to buy the basics from a friend’s mom who used to make jewellery as a hobby. I think it was about R15 000. Turnover: R2,5 million – R3 million. Websites:: jbjd.co.za and janinebinneman.co.za

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fter spending a gap year in Italy, Janine submitted a portfolio to the graphic design department at Stellenbosch University – which was when someone advised her that she would be better suited to jewellery design. ‘I was not impressed, but for once I actually listened,’ she remembers. ‘And it’s the best thing I ever did. I found my passion without even knowing it was destined for me.’ She completed her honours in Jewellery Design in 1996. Janine’s business celebrates its 20th year in operation this year. It is split into a fine jewellery collection – Janine Binneman Fine Jewellery – and a ready-to-wear range, the JBJD Collection, which features personalised and inspirational text. ‘I thrive on working with my clients and telling their stories through jewellery,’ Janine says. ‘My fine jewellery is heavily inspired by vintage design. I love the rich detail that highlights the incredible beauty of the gemstones we use in our pieces – gems I often find myself on my travels. I like to push clients to think outside of the “diamond engagement ring” box. I want to create one-off pieces for each of my clients, and if I can get them to open up to the idea of using precious and semi-precious gemstones that are out there in an incredible array of colour, I am a happy blue-haired creative!’ Because she believes so strongly in personalising her pieces, Janine builds a strong relationship with her clients, so she spends a lot of time ensuring that she reads them correctly. ‘We have fabulous women and sometimes panic-stricken men who desperately need something,’ she says. ‘We did a detailed survey of our clients and found that there are generally four personalities: Boho Chic, Loyalist, Sentimentalist and the A-Type Achiever. We are a combination of all these.’ Constantly designing individual pieces takes a lot of creativity. Travel is her biggest source of inspiration, says Janine. ‘Just to be taken out of my normal surroundings makes me see things I am normally too busy to notice,’ she explains. ‘The flowers I saw, smelled and touched when I was abroad recently have inspired a new range.’ She is also obsessed with the sea, which she claims is the reason for her blue hair (she also thinks she’s a mermaid). ‘I love the reflections and colours of the sea. I often start off my day at a local tidal pool, filling up my creative buckets and calming my busy mind.’ Janine’s design studio offers a variety of special services. ‘Each client can literally wear the name of their child, husband or pet on their hands,’ she says. ‘We have made rings with inspirational words to give


PHOTOGRAPHS: LIZA VAN DEVENTER, THEANA BREUGEM. MAKEUP: TIFFANY DYASON

‘I thrive on working with my clients and telling their stories through jewellery.’ our clients their daily affirmations. I have also made bracelets in the hand­ writing of someone a client loved who has passed on, engraved the heartbeat of a baby on a pendant and made a special piece with a beloved pet’s footprint. The children’s drawings are a total winner!’ The JBJD team, which produces the more whimsical pieces, consists of five women who do everything from production to social media and man­ aging the office. ‘We work like elves from the North Pole,’ says Janine. ‘We all ‘get’ each other.’ She finds creating job opportunities for creative women very satisfying. ‘My studio’s been the launch pad for five independent goldsmiths who all run their own businesses now,’ she says. Along with running her two studios, Janine currently also conducts very popular ring­carving workshops, where clients make a wax ring that is then cast in silver. ‘It started as a media and influencer promo; I wanted to do something really interactive where there would be a syn­ ergy between me, the act of creating and the individual personalities.’ That idea of authentic communi­ cation is a critical part of what she does: ‘I plan to maintain steady growth in our business by constantly staying one step ahead of the rest,’ she says. ‘My brand stands for excellence – and the belief that we are telling our clients’ stories with our pieces.’ ✤

December 2017/Fairlady 19


Greener living

THE LAST STRAW

Our big fat single-use AND 22 SMALL CHANGES YOU CAN MAKE RIGHT NOW TO SOLVE IT ♥

By Marli Meyer

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here is giant mass of microscopic plastic pieces floating in the South Pacific. Discovered earlier this year, it’s about twice the size of South Africa – but it’s not the only one. Plastic is a rapidly growing problem: a worldwide study published in Science Advances earlier this year predicts that over the next 30 years we’ll produce four times more plastic waste than ever before. The same study found that, of the plastic waste we’d produced by 2015, only 9% was recycled. Those are depressingly huge and shockingly low numbers. But you’re a committed recycler, right? Surely as soon as everyone is persuaded to do the same, the problem will disappear? Wrong. The thing about plastic is

20 Fairlady/December 2017

that it cannot be recycled back into its original form; it can be recycled only into lower-grade plastic – essentially downcycled – and that becomes more and more difficult to do. Single-use plastics (those created for only one use, like straws, bottles, utensils, shopping bags and disposable cups) are difficult to recycle and, in most cases, they don’t even get to that point. Most end up in landfills where they take hundreds of years to degrade and scarily, when they eventually do, the tiny disintegrated pieces of plastic disperse into the earth and sea. On top of all this, we just aren’t recycling as much as we should to keep up with the rapidly growing mass production of plastic. That’s why it’s time to refuse the plastic shopping bag, stop with the bottled drinks and say no to the straws in our margaritas or for our kids’ parties – starting now. In August this year, Kenya banned plastic bags, with a hefty penalty if you break the new law: US$40000 or up to four years in jail for anyone producing, selling or even using plastic bags. It joined a list of 40 other countries, including Rwan-


plastic problem

da, Tanzania, Italy and France, that have implemented a ban. Where there’s no outright prohibition, different types of levies and taxes have been put in place – for example, Germany’s deposit system, where consumers return plastic bottles (and cans and glass) to supermarkets and receive a deposit of €0,25 per plastic bottle, and slightly less for cans. In South Africa, a bag levy was introduced in 2004, but it has failed dismally. Most consumers have become used to paying for a bag at the till. ‘One of the big challenges is that with the taxation on plastic bags in South Africa, the government essentially gets money for every bag that’s sold,’ says Dr Harriet Davies-

Mostert, Head of Conservation at the Endangered Wildlife Trust. The government makes money from our use of plastic bags, and there’s not much urgency to ban them. ‘We

‘We’ve heard the adage “reduce, reuse, recycle” but there needs to be a “refrain” in front of that: don’t just reduce it; simply don’t buy it.’

need innovative ways of disincentivising the use of plastic that will still provide money for government, but not in an environmentally degrading way.’ Plastic shopping bags are just the tip of the single-use plastic iceberg. The classifications for different plastics are complicated (see box on page 35) and although some can be recycled, they often aren’t, which means they still end up in landfills. Microbeads – small plastic particles, usually about 1mm in size, used for cosmetics like soap, toothpaste and washing powders – are another problem, because they find their way into the sea, where they’re ingested by (and eventually kill) marine life.

December 2017/Fairlady 21


Greener living EVERYDAY ITEMS THAT MOST OF US TOSS AFTER ONE SHORT-LIVED USE: • Drinking straws • Plastic packaging and film for convenience foods, like multilaminated plastic foils used as packaging for bacon, pet food pouches or soup pouches • Silvery packets (like crisps packets) • Polystyrene takeaway boxes • Plastic bottles for beverages • Disposable utensils • Disposable cups (even though some are cardboard, they’re often sprayed with a plastic layer for waterproofing, which can’t be separated from the cardboard and thus cannot be recycled) • Microbeads in scrubs and cosmetic products • Disposable plastic lighters • Cling wrap

Evaluating your plastic use after looking at this list is eye-opening: you realise that single-use plastic is everywhere. So why don’t manufacturers stop using unnecessary plastic packaging? ‘It’s good hygiene; it keeps things fresher for longer; it’s good storage; and it’s cheaper than anything else,’ says Dr Davies-Mostert. Individual action is important, but it will take more than that to make the difference we need. ‘One of the dangers of punting individual action alone is that people think, “I don’t buy bottled water; I use reusable bags”, and think that’s changing the world. But a small handful of people are doing that. There has to be legislative change down the line: there are many countries and cities that have banned the use of bags, and it’s made a massive difference. We need to lobby government to make these kinds of changes. It’s not just about one organisation; it needs to be a strong multi-sectoral fight. And this isn’t just about the environment, but also about our health and wellbeing.’ For example, the microbeads ingested by marine life go into the animals’ flesh, so if you’re eating fish,

22 Fairlady/December 2017

22 SMALL CHANGES YOU CAN START MAKING NOW! 1

Buy a beautiful reusable takeaway coffee cup Choose a material that is not plastic: bamboo, ceramic, glass or stainless steel are best. Ecoffee has a beautiful range available on Yuppiechef. If you’ve forgotten it, try to buy your coffee from a café that uses compostable disposable cups (like EcoPack). And if you do take a cardboard cup, skip the plastic lid. Say no to straws! Ask for a cocktail stirrer instead or use a knife to mix your drink. Once you say no it becomes second nature to sip without a straw. If you can’t go without, buy a reusable glass, stainlesssteel or bamboo straw and carry it around with you in your handbag in a pouch – find them online at www.faithful-to-nature.co.za. Don’t take plastic disposable cutlery from retailers with your takeaway Carry your own set, or choose disposable cutlery made of biodegradable products. Take reusable shopping bags to the supermarket Stop forgetting them at home: put sticky notes at the door and keep a stash in your car and at the office. Make a rule for yourself: if you forget to take one, you have to buy an expensive reusable one. Buy loose fruit and veggies Don’t put them in the thin single-use bags to weigh them:

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put them on the scale and keep the various stickers. You’ll also find loose fruit and vegetable options at local farmers’ markets. Try to choose products in glass, cans and cardboard packaging Buy in bulk and go for refills Buy large quantities to use less packaging, and try to choose packaging that is not plastic, such as glass dispensers, which are much prettier than plastic anyway. Ditch chewing gum Or swap it for mints. Most chewing gum has plastic in it (yikes!). Take your own Tupperware to restaurants Have your own container handy for takeaways or when you know you’ll get doggybags. Many restaurants are switching to cardboard, but always ask first. Switch to matches Disposable plastic lighters are not worth it. Use an epilator Instead of buying disposable razors, switch to an epilator or waxing. Buy a menstrual cup Instead of using pads or tampons, especially the ones that come in single-use plastic wrappers, use a silicone cup like the Mooncup. Don’t buy bottled water Rather buy your own refillable glass bottles.

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Cut out & stick on your fridge SYMBOL

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1

PLASTIC TYPE

EXAMPLES

RECYCLED INTO

POLYETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE

Water, soft drinks, juice, detergents and oil bottles, as well as a variety of food product containers and packaging

Hollow-fibre filling for jackets, duvets, pillows and sleeping bags; green bottles become building insulation

HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

Milk bottles, cleaning products, cosmetics, toiletries and thin plastic bags

Bins, buckets, detergent containers, fencing, pipes, plastic timber, plastic toys and plastic chairs

POLYVINYL CHLORIDE

Considered ‘difficult’ plastic – it is currently being phased out and replaced with PET

Unlikely to be recycled

LOW-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

Rubbish bags, frozen vegetable bags, sliced bread bags, squeezable bottles, cosmetic tubs and bubble wrap

Bin liners, pallet sheets, irrigation piping, yoga mats, containers and building film

Bottle lids, tubs for icecream, yoghurt, margarine, and feta, microwave dishes (ready-made meals), lunch boxes, garden furniture and packaging tape

Pegs, bins, pipes, pallet sheets, oil funnels, car battery cases and trays; uncommonly recycled in SA

High impact: coat hangers and yoghurt cups

Picture frames, curtain rails, skirting boards, stationery; uncommonly recycled in SA

PET SOURCE: ENDANGERED WILDLIFE TRUST’S POSITION STATEMENT ON SINGLE-USE PLASTIC. PHOTOGRAPH: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

Stop using a plastic toothbrush They keep for only a couple of months and then have to be discarded. You can buy an ecofriendly bamboo one from faithfulto-nature.co.za. Recycle all plastic Find out where the nearest drop-off site is and make it a regular mission to drop off your recyclable plastic. Visit mywaste. co.za if you’re unsure where your nearest drop-off is. Look for ‘poly’ in cosmetic products Look for polyethylene, polypropylene, polymethyl methacrylate, polyethylene terephthalate or polystyrene in the list of ingredients. SA has no legislation stating that manufacturers need to clearly identify products containing microbeads, so it’s tough to make an informed decision. It’s best to opt for ranges that are organic and natural. Rain offers refills from bulk decanters at its stores. Swap single-use plastic nappies for cloth ones Use resealable containers instead of cling wrap Treat yourself to a cone The cups and tubs that ice-cream come in are often made of single-use plastic, so go for the waffle or sugar cone. Buy bread in paper bags instead of thin plastic Say no to frozen foods in plastic bags Unfortunately, even cardboardboxed foods often come lined in plastic. Rather make your own bulk meals and freeze them. Stop and think: do I have to buy this item?

TYPES OF PLASTIC, AND RECYCLING POTENTIAL IN SA

2 HDPE 3 PVC 4 LDPE 5

POLYPROPYLENE

PP

6

POLYSTYRENE

Foamed: meat and vegetable trays

PS

7 OTHER

VARIETY OF OTHER PLASTICS

Silvery packets like crisp packets

Uncommonly recycled in SA

Unmarked plastics with no logo – like multi-laminated plastic foils used as packaging for items such as bacon, pet food pouches and soup pouches – are generally not recycled in SA

you’re almost certainly eating plastic. In a country as stratified by wealth as ours, plastic recycling is a luxury worry for most South Africans. ‘When you’re living from hand to mouth and you don’t know what you’re going to eat the next day, you are not worrying about plastic,’ Dr Davies-Mostert says. ‘A grassroots movement needs to start happening.’ And one of the first places to start that is with the retailers. ‘Individual life choices are impor-

tant,’ she says, ‘but they’re not going to achieve what we have to achieve unless we make changes across the board, and all the way to the top tiers of government. We need much tighter control on the way retailers operate.’ Even small adjustments that will work towards changing consumer culture in the retail sector can make a big difference: ‘When you go to a supermarket they always ask, “Would you like a bag?” instead of saying, “Have you brought a bag?” It’s a subtle shift,

December 2017/Fairlady 23


Greener living but an important one. I get strange looks when I put my loose fruit and vegetables in a basket and not in the little bags they provide. That culture needs to change.’ The effective running of industry bodies is also important. PETCO (petco.co.za) is the industry body for PET (polyethylene terephthalate – the bottles water, milk, juice, sports or energy drinks come in) recycling in SA. They do not manufacture, buy or sell any material themselves; their contracted recyclers take PET plastic bottles (identified with a number 1 polymer code on or near the bottom) for recycling into a host of other products. PETCO also provides information, support and guidance for those who want to start their own recycling businesses – there’s a lot of opportunity for that in South Africa.

T

here are signs of slow change. Some restaurants no longer provide straws, and coffee shops are encouraging people to bring

their own takeaway cups. Woolworths made recycling symbols on its packaging clearer and provides an online guide to the symbols. In November, Cape Town saw the launch of the first plastic-free grocery store: Nude Foods shoppers can refill bulk pantry items and household products, and buy loose vegetables and fruit to take home in reusable packaging. At the time of going to print, Shop Zero was running a crowdfunding campaign on Thundafund for its zero-waste, zero-plastic store, which is set to open in Cape Town towards the end of the year.

‘It’s never too late! We don’t have to end up living in a world that’s drowning in plastic. We can halt this,’ Dr Davies-Mostert says. And it’s not just about taking responsibility for your own plastic waste by recycling, she adds, but also about minimising plastic in your life: ‘We’ve heard the adage “reduce, reuse, recycle” but there needs to be a “refrain” in front of that: don’t just reduce it – simply don’t buy it. Once you’ve bought it, even if you recycle you’re still adding to the amount of plastic that needs to be absorbed by our environment.’ ✤

VISIT THESE SITES FOR MORE INFORMATION ON PLASTICS AND RECYCLING • thelastplasticstraw.org • petco.co.za • mywaste.co.za (to find the correct recycling drop-off site for different materials) • recycling.co.za • cleanup-sa.co.za

• recyclingday-sa.co.za • plasticsinfo.co.za • polystyrenepackaging.co.za • theglassrecyclingcompany.co.za • collectacan.co.za • prasa.co.za • ewasa.org

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What I’ve learnt

strength

Style icon, former magazine editor and salonnière Jackie Burger on life, love and everything in between. ♥

By Liesl Robertson Photographs by Liza van Deventer

26 Fairlady/December 2017


I’m a minimalist.

Less clutter serves me well, because all you need to do is be. We tend to live a lot in the past and the future, and we don’t really honour the present as much as we should. For me, our biggest challenge in the world right now is to find contentment within ourselves, because there is just more and more on offer every day, and it taxes the mind. I think living more simply is very generational. My parents were post-war babies and it was a time of deprivation, so for them it was very important to be surrounded by whatever their perception of wealth or luxury was. We grew up with that mindset, thinking you must have a house, you must have a car and you must have a degree. Indirectly, we were socialised to believe that that was what gives you stature. And that’s what’s great for me about this cycle of my life: I can honour that and understand the sociology of it, but I know now that I can make my own choices.

magazines and read. The women I discovered there – Katharine Hepburn, Coco Chanel and Simone de Beauvoir – had this mystery about them. They always looked a certain way; they always had red lips. Is it a weapon, that crimson pout? Is it a swipe of assertion of the woman you are? I just think it’s something very alluring. It has certainly become my defence mechanism.

My dad was a farmer, so I went to a little farm school. We didn’t wear

uniforms, and on sunny days we’d walk in the veld instead of sitting in the classroom. For a long time, I felt that my circumstances growing up didn’t equip me well, but reflecting on it now, those authentic experiences that you don’t necessarily appreciate when you are there are the ones that shape your very existence. As a child, you never really pause to try to understand things, but it stays in your DNA and your frame of reference. My mother taught me simplicity and resourcefulness. She always

I never had a maternal instinct

Deciding to age naturally is a difficult journey to take, because we are conditioned to judge the external.

practised some kind of craft, whether it was knitting or sewing or cooking. Looking back, I didn’t really value her skills then. It was the late ’50s – an era when women were kind of housebound – and I always associated her crafts with being a hausfrau. Over the years I’ve come to realise that she was actually very mindful in the way she did things, and she was a great creative. What stands out for me is the fact that she never discarded anything without understanding that it had something else to offer. And that she made the best of her situation – she was a young woman, married with children and living on a farm, and she created a beautiful world for us from what was available to her. Growing up I wasn’t really allowed to wear makeup.

In those days the library was the only place where I could explore the world, so I’d sit for hours and page through

28 Fairlady/December 2017

or a need to get married and have a house and a dog. It was very tough for a very long time, because of friends and family and society at large. There are times when you feel that maybe you should succumb to the pressure, but I’ve never been able to do something just for the sake of it, just because it’s the norm. And I’ve never had any regrets. Ever, ever, ever. But it was tough for a long time. My parents were distressed about my unconventional life choices.

‘Why do you have to be so different?’ is a refrain I heard a lot over the years. ‘Why can’t you just be like other people?’ That caused a lot of… not problems, really, but a feeling of being alone. Even when I was a little girl, I didn’t want to wear pink frilly dresses, because I didn’t like the fabric; I didn’t like the fact that it was the norm.

My partner Deon and I have been together for 29 years. We are complete opposites and two fiercely

independent human beings – that’s the attraction. We acknowledge each other’s individuality, and space is of the utmost importance in our relationship. I think that’s how we’ve been together for so long – we acknowledge that. Deon also calls me out on things. It hurts and it makes me angry, but I need that – somebody who knows me so well that they will not be kind and who knows that I can handle the truth.


What I’ve learnt THIS PIC (far right): A frilly blouse Tiaan Nagel designed for Jackie came with a line drawing he’d sketched of her on the brown paper packaging. Jackie was so taken with it that it found its way onto her Salon 58 wall.

December 2017/Fairlady 29


Jackie outside the PJ Olivier Art Centre in Stellenbosch, where she has her Salon 58 office.

Deon has an old Land Rover. Every now and then the two of them go camping, because I’m not good with camping. I love nature, but Deon needs to go into the heart of nature… I’m not saying I’m materialistic, but he could happily live out in the veld with just his Leatherman; he can survive on hardly anything. And that’s his idea of adventure. As minimalist as I am, as much as I try to practise conscious, mindful living, my Achilles heel is… I need very little, but I want the best of what is available, within my means. For me it’s important to have beautiful bedding, amazing chocolate, good Champagne… I’d rather not have coffee than have poor coffee. Deon appreciates those things too, but he can also stoke a fire in the middle of nowhere and sleep on the ground – that makes him very happy.

30 Fairlady/December 2017

If I don’t make time to be quiet, I can’t operate.

I practise yoga, I do Pilates, I walk – but that’s not for exercise; it’s a form of meditation. I do my morning pages. I think the beautiful thing about age is that you filter better and start accepting things about yourself. I am an introvert, but growing up it was seen as a negative. But after reading Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, I’ve embraced the fact that that’s who I am and I’ve adopted a routine to support that. I know that I can only exude so much energy, and then I need a ritual to recharge and to ground myself again. I can only tolerate busyness for so long, and it’s getting worse the older I get. I think I will probably be a monk living on a mountaintop somewhere in a few years’ time. That sounds wonderful.


What I’ve learnt

The Karoo is my place of solace.

suade me – apparently ‘there’s nothing that ages you more than long grey hair’. But I feel that I’m moving into a new cycle as a woman, and it’s just where I am.

their lack of people loving them and being kind to them. Especially in a Western culture – we don’t respect age. Ageing is inevitable. That’s the reality of life. But deciding to age naturally is a difficult journey to take, because we are conditioned to judge the external. My friend had her hands done and my first thought was, ‘Maybe I should hide my hands.’ Vanity is part of my shadow side and I’m hard on myself. ‘Look at all my wrinkles’, I’d think, but I’m working on practising self­love and I know that it’s okay. It’s really okay. It’s the next phase for me and we all have a higher purpose. But every shift in my appearance becomes another battle in this journey of acceptance. There are so many voices out there, but there are almost no women who have a voice on ageing in an empow­ ering way. Maybe instead of resenting wrinkles or blemishes or whatever, it’s about understanding what they signify and appreciating how they came about. When it comes to personal style, women tend to get stuck in the era that they felt most beautiful or most comfortable in. So they latch onto the trend of that time, whether it’s miniskirts or coiffed hair. I think you should be kind to how your body changes. The notion of dressing in a way that is ‘age­appropriate’ can also give us the licence to let go – it’s the easy way out. Often it’s attached to fear; everybody in this age bracket is dressing like this and if I’m different, then I will stand out. Women can be fiercely competitive, to our own detri­ ment, but we also have this incredible ability to be sisters. So on the one hand it’s this wonderful community, nurturing and reaching out, and on the flipside it’s the complete oppo­ site: competing, one­upmanship, judgment… I think when women entered the workplace they felt they had to separate and move away from the sisterhood because they entered a very masculine world, and the ’80s were all about money and power. But what goes up must come down, and I think now there’s a softness and an embrace of femininity again.

My mom is part of the reason I live in the Strand. After my dad passed away,

The advice I would give my younger self is to be more forgiving. To not push so hard. We don’t always afford

her wish was to be close to the sea, so we bought a flat for her there. She isn’t in the best health, so it’s now my turn to be there for her. We respect the fact that we could not live under the same roof – we would drive each other to drink – but she knows I’m there for her. In a way we become children again as we age, and that’s where I am with my mother. I need to take care of everything for her: her finances, her shopping, her everything. Sometimes I get angry about it; the fear makes me angry. On the one hand it’s knowing that I have so little time left with her, and on the other hand I think it’s fear that I am going to be in her position one day, and what will my behaviour be like? I don’t have children; what support structure will I have? I am turning 60 next year. And I am a lot more aware of older people, their lack of mobility and their vulnerability,

ourselves time to love and enjoy life as much as we can. I was quite the career girl in my late twenties, early thirties. But I have no regrets. I don’t know if I’ll ever ‘retire’. The moment you imprison yourself with the thought of ‘This is the end; I’m not useful any more’, you retire your soul as well. I hope I will continue to evolve in spirit.

It’s where I feel most at home because it reminds me of how I grew up. I try to go there at least every six to eight weeks, and I try to stay for at least a week. Being in the sun makes me happy. I won’t lie in the sun, but if I’m in the Karoo and the sun is shining and I’m walking in the veld it does so much for my soul that the odd freckle doesn’t bother me. I wear sunscreen, but sometimes I forget a hat. I’ve got my dad’s exact features: his hair, everything. In his late twenties he

already had this mop of silver hair. I went through all the stages with my hair: my natural hair colour, which was sort of a honey blonde; then I experimented with red; and in the ’90s it was peroxide white, of course. And then, when I was in my late thirties, my dad passed away. It was so unexpected that I felt I had to react physically, so I shaved my head as a kind of mourning. And when my hair start­ ed to grow back, it was the colour it is now. And that was it; it was kind of like, ‘Thank you, Dad.’ It felt like a kind of inheritance. I’ve experimented with hair­ cuts – a shaved head and undercuts and things – but I have never ever coloured my hair since then.

MAKEUP: SAM SCARBOROUGH OF ONE LEAGUE CREATIVE MANAGEMENT

Now I am growing my hair into a long silver plait. People keep trying to dis­

What scares me at the moment is our disrespect for our planet. I know we have the intelligence to create, but

there’s too much superficiality, too much greed, too much ownership. I think it’s very arrogant to think you can just discard something and create something new. We have all the answers. We’re just not brought up knowing how to tune into them. We are conditioned to take our cues from the external instead of listening to ourselves. ✤

December 2017/Fairlady 31


SEX

Want a better sex life? Seven sexperts share their best advice. ♼

Compiled by Anna Rich

32 Fairlady/December 2017


Let’s talk about sex

JUST START, EVEN IF YOU’RE FEELING NEUTRAL It’s okay to have sex even if you don’t feel a physical desire for it right from the start. It’s com­ pletely normal to allow foreplay to cause arousal, which only then triggers desire. Think of it like chocolate… Some women crave chocolate spontaneously and would drive to the shops late at night to buy it. It’s the same with sex: Some crave it spontaneously and access it assertively. Then there are women who never have chocolate, mostly because they have had a bad experience with it or have a medical condition. Likewise, some women never want to have sex. It’s not only that they never feel like doing it (a normal low libido), it’s that they actively avoid it because it has negative consequences (physically in the form of pain, or emotionally due to previous abuse or traumatic experiences). Between these opposites there are all those normal women who don’t crave chocolate, but if you were to offer it to them they would happily take a bite. Those are the women who say yes to sex to be sociable, basically. It’s the right (and nice!) thing to do. (Of course, I’m talking about consensual sex in a loving relationship. You should never feel forced into sex.) But remember, you can also initiate sex because it is the right and nice thing to do in your relationship.

December 2017/Fairlady 33


Let’s talk about sex

DR ELNA RUDOLPH, medical doctor, sexologist and clinical head of My Sexual Health, www.mysexualhealth.co.za

FLIRT!

CATRIONA BOFFARD, sexologist, cognitive-behavioural therapist and sexuality researcher, facebook.com/ catrionaboffard

34 Fairlady/December 2017

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We all flirt at the beginning of a relationship to captivate our partners. It’s exciting and sexy. But as a relationship progresses, we forget this. As our responsibilities increase, we have less time for our partners and ourselves. Women are much more emotionally driven, so we need to feel just as close to our partners out of the bedroom as we do during sex. Work on increasing emotional intimacy if you’re looking to feel like sex more (and to feel more satisfied in the relationship overall). Doing small things for each other can make a big difference: send sexy WhatsApp messages or emails, cook a romantic meal or simply dance together in the lounge. Think back to what you did for each other at the start and do some of these things now. If you’re flirting a bit more, you’ll increase intimacy too. Most people think of intimacy only in terms of physical acts. But true intimacy means showing your partner your light and dark sides, and sharing your vulnerabilities with them.

Women are often socialised to think of sex as something we have to give to a man: it comes with a sense of obligation – something we do to serve or to keep the man, rather than something intrinsic to who we are as women. The problem with this sense of service is that it gets entangled with what’s going on in the relationship and becomes something you can choose to give or withdraw. When you own your sexuality and see that you, too, are a sexual being with needs and desires, your approach changes to seeing sex as serving you first and your partner second. It’s not about being selfish; it’s about being self-serving in order to be other-serving. Another thing that often gets in the way is that we are bombarded by images of unrealistic and often unattainable perfection that we can’t live up to. When we take this sense of ourselves not being good enough through to our intimacy, we become self-critical, which means that that’s where our energy goes instead of towards what we are doing. As women, we need to remind ourselves that men are not aware of or concerned about some of the things we are preoccupied with. If it were a major issue for him, he wouldn’t want to get intimate with you. So the fact that he does is enough reason for you to give yourself permission to let go of these issues and be fully present, especially in that moment.

KHOSI JIYANE, clinical psychologist

It all comes down to your relationships – with yourself, too…

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What I’d most like to say to women is, your sexual desire and arousal are rooted in your relationship, not your genitals. The best way to optimise sexual desire, arousal and orgasmic capacity is to be honest about what you want sexually and communicate that to your partner or partners – and to be honest about your relationship. We need to move away from the idea that all women have no interest in being sexual. In the right circumstances, women love being sexual. In my research on cyber-infidelity, the most surprising thing that emerged was how predatory women are, and not only online. The state of the relationship is the core reason women present with sexual difficulties. They’re functional on their own or when they’re online, chatting to a stranger. It’s only within the intimacy of a  relationship that there is a lack of communication around what they really desire sexually and emotionally. Then they appear to have a sexual dysfunction, when they don’t really. Women also need to look at their relationship with themselves. Many, many women have experienced violence and abuse, which definitely affects their ability to be functional and requires therapeutic intervention. And if a woman is not comfortable with her body, that’s going to interfere with her sexuality too.

DR MARLENE WASSERMAN, AKA DR EVE, clinical sexologist, sex therapist and author of Cyber Infidelity: The New Seduction

PHOTOGRAPHS: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES, SUPPLIED

Once you get going, you will start to enjoy it and desire will follow. You’d be surprised to hear how many women actually have sex like that. It’s much more empowering than waiting for a spontaneous craving for sex. If you don’t respond physically to foreplay, there’s probably something hormonally wrong (especially with your testosterone level), and you can have it tested and treated. 


Embrace change

Over the years, in a committed relationship, it becomes more difficult to get a balance between the domestic and the erotic. The biggest problem is that we expect sex to be blissful and spon­ taneous every time. Many women visit our consulting rooms complaining about a boring and less frequent sex life. As their domestic responsibilities lessen as

{

the kids become more independent, women are often confronted by the lack of intimacy. This may trigger questions about the quality of the relationship. If the couple cannot resolve this, emotional and relationship problems develop, usually through escalating conflict, insecurities about being loved or an extramarital affair. We all go through different developmental phases and need to adapt to the demands of each new phase.

If you try to apply what worked before, you might be surprised to find those solutions no longer work. As we mature in our relationships, we become more entrenched in our separateness and our careers. If you don’t realise this, and celebrate it, loneliness and emotional insecurity set in. Don’t qualify your identity only in relation to your partner. Support each other so that you keep intimacy alive.

Eroticism is numbed through repetition. It thrives when you start feeding the mysterious or the unexpected. Often just a change of scenery from where you usually have sex makes a difference. Try to find a new sexual position. Make erotic suggestions to your partner. It will make him feel sexually attractive and affirm his value as a lover in the relationship.

DR EUGÉNE VILJOEN, clinical psychologist, certified sexologist

PUT YOURSELF FIRST

Do not put yourself second. Do not deny yourself pleasure or sacrifice yourself and your needs for your partner – or any other adult for that matter. Not when it comes to love and relationships, and certainly not when it comes to sex. It is the biggest con­ ceptual and practical step women must take when it comes to asserting their desire for a more satisfying sex life. And I say ‘women’ specifically, because for thousands of genera­ tions we have been taught that good girls don’t make a noise, don’t make demands, put other people’s needs first, are sexually neutral objects, and are primarily valuable only to satisfy men’s needs, whether that’s for pro­ creation or recreation. If a woman puts her needs and desires first, if she defines herself beyond the roles of mother/wife/sister/ daughter, if she steps outside this paradigm towards self­ empowerment, if she moves from object to subject, she

is branded selfish. Yet we are told repeatedly that great sex and better relation­ ships are based on good communica­ tion. And this is true. But good communication, where you convey your needs and desires clearly, and where you can hold another person’s needs and desires without feeling put upon, is only possible if you believe that what you want is allowed and what you have to say is worthwhile. So before you can start creating the sex life you want with someone else, you have to start with you. You have to give yourself permission to get Self­centred. What do you need? What do you want? More time during sex? Less of a particular kind of touch? More dirty talk? More exploring? Do you know? Can you practise telling your partner(s)? Are you able to walk away from partners who are not able to meet you sexually? Respect your sexual energy, how­ ever it expresses itself. If this means getting ‘selfish’, then by all means step into that with purpose.

DOROTHY BLACK, author and columnist, @dorothyblack

The pelvic floor muscles form a sling at the base of the pelvis, supporting the pelvic organs and controlling bladder, bowel and sexual function. Their shape influences your experience of sex. Though sex is pleasurable for most of us, for some women it is too painful to tolerate. This could be down to a dys­ function in the pelvic floor muscles. When they’re too tight or hyperactive (often not under your control), you might feel pain during penetration. If they’re too weak or hypotonic, they may also contribute to a less pleasurable sexual experience. Research has proven that better pelvic muscle strength is associated with a more pleasurable sexual experience. If the muscles attached to the clitoris are stronger, it can improve their involuntary movement, which increases arousal and your experience of orgasm. As women, we’re encouraged to do as many Kegel exercises as possible. This may be beneficial to some women, but it isn’t a recipe for everyone. Kegel exercises involve contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, which can increase muscle spasm or aggravate pain in women who struggle with painful intercourse. POONAM HARIA, physiotherapist ✤

December 2017/Fairlady 35


Cover story

B ❛

eing an actress was always a girly dream of mine. My mother was an actress and I remember watching her on stage – in My Fair Lady – when I was about four or five years old. I kept waving to get her attention and finally she snuck a wink at me. In that moment I got it: I was transported into that world of make-believe.’ Naomi lights up as she recalls this pivotal memory in a New York Times video interview: ‘Definitely a world I wanted to be a part of.’ Born in England to quirky couple Myfanwy (affectionately known as Miv) and Peter Watts, who was a sound engineer for Pink Floyd, she’s a bit of a ‘citizen of the world’, she says, because the Watts family also lived in Australia for a while and she is deeply connected to both countries. Partly because the family moved around so much, Naomi changed schools often as a child. As a result, she’s a queen of reinvention – and the variety of characters she’s played is testament to that. She now has two Academy Award nominations under her belt, but it took persistence and determination to become one of Hollywood’s leading ladies.

Powerful Wattage ♥

By Marli Meyer

36 Fairlady/December 2017


She’s acing sought-after roles in major productions, she’s got a BFF girl gang to be reckoned with, and she’s the very proud mom of two fabulous boys. At 48, Naomi Watts is at the top of her game. And… no one wears white better than she does!


A late bloomer, she got her big break at 32, when David Lynch chose her for his neo-noir mystery, Mullholland Drive, picking her photo from a huge pile of head shots. The famous director explains: ‘Head shots are one thing, then sometimes we get them to talk on video; I never have auditions for a scene – ever. I like to talk to people or see them talking, then I get a feeling about them and I can see if they can make it through the film. That day I said Naomi would be perfect – and she did turn out to be perfect.’ Lynch has remained her mentor, and they share a close friendship. They’ve collaborated once again on the new Twin Peaks, a reprise of the cult classic murder mystery drama of the ’90s in which Naomi plays the intriguing Janey-E Jones. After 15 years, it’s clear Naomi and Lynch are still a powerhouse partnership. The show opened to critical acclaim, no doubt partly down to the synergy of a great team – Twin Peaks also features Laura Dern, who’s worked extensively with Lynch and is one of Naomi’s best friends. Naomi has taken on challenging roles in many of her films. ‘I have times when I feel full of courage and times when I feel full of fear. So it’s nice when someone recognises I’ve made courageous choices,’ she says. She gave moving portrayals of motherhood in 21 Grams, by director Alejandro González Iñárritu; in The Impossible, in which she plays tsunami survivor María Belón, and most recently, as Jeanette Walls’s mother in The Glass Castle, based on the latter’s bestselling memoir. When you hear her talk about her own kids, it’s crystal clear why

38 Fairlady/December 2017

‘I have times when I feel absolutely full of courage and times when I feel full of fear. So it’s nice when someone recognises that I’ve made courageous choices.’ she’s so brilliant in these roles. ‘They make you laugh; they make you cry – there’s nothing more extraordinary than watching these people grow up from the day they were born,’ she says. Her Instagram feed shows many precious moments with her boys. Samuel Kai Schreiber (9) hopes to be a creative writer, she says. ‘He’s always

writing stories.’ Alexander ‘Sasha’ (10) loves sport and nature. Her caption to a pic of Sasha while they were in Kenya earlier this year reads: ‘His love and understanding of nature is everything. So lucky to be his mummy.’ But Naomi isn’t just big on family, she’s big on friends, too. She’s effusive about her long friendship with BFF Nicole Kidman, captioning a pic of them embracing on Nicole’s birthday with the words, ‘A remarkable human …. My friend, I am so happy to have shared incredible experiences with you over the last three decades.’ They first became friends while co-starring in Flirting, one of Naomi’s early films. ‘We’ve gone through a lot together and over a significant amount of time – that history binds you. We’ve got strong respect, feelings and love for one another, and our kids are the same age.’ Her girl squad also includes Stella McCartney, Reese Witherspoon and, as mentioned, Laura Dern. We love Naomi’s take on ageing, too – instead of fearing it, she feels getting older makes her a better actress. ‘People ask me every year, “Is it scary getting older?”’ she said in her speech at the Palm Springs International Film Festival. ‘I say: “What, because I feel my face sliding closer and closer to my navel? Yes, that’s hard, but seriously, I feel truly blessed by the extraordinary roles I’ve played so far – and maybe it’s age itself that gives me this blessing, for it offers me the chance to play women who have really lived. Women who have loved, lost, suffered and fought. All of them extraordinary.”’ Spoken like a legend, Naomi Watts – shine on! ✤

PHOTOGRAPHS: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

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December 2017/Fairlady 39


Travel

50 GREEN Picturesque seaside towns, witty banter with friendly folk down the pub, secluded views of rolling greens and ancient landscapes to awaken the imagination all made for a romantic rollick of a honeymoon on the Wild Atlantic Way in Ireland.

By Maya Morgan-Skillen

The Dark Hedges, an enchanting avenue in County Antrim, has become a popular tourist attraction since its brief appearance in Game of Thrones.


Travel

Above: One of a series of largescale murals in Bogside, Derry that depict key events during the ‘Troubles’. Above left: The dramatic scene at the foot of the Cliffs of Moher, a designated Unesco Global Geopark. Left: The rolling hills of the Irish countryside. This pic: The River Corrib in Galway at dusk.

For our honeymoon, we chose the, crisp air and undulating hills of Ireland over the blues and warm waters of the more traditional tropical island destination.

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he fiddlers, banjo player and flautist seated around a table strewn with halfdrunk pints of Guinness shot irate glances at the guitarist who had joined the evening’s jaunty session of traditional Irish music at Fealty’s bar. The jig’s closing note rang out and we applauded eagerly, though my husband’s uncle was less enthused. ‘Thoan’s desperate,’ he said as he set his banjo down. It was my first night in Northern Ireland in a large coastal town called Bangor, where my recently

acquired Irish spouse, Ronan, was born. ‘Thoan… isn’t that a character in Game of Thrones?’ I thought. ‘That one is desperate,’ Ronan whispered by way of ‘translation’. And so began the first of many incomprehensible and comical encounters on our honeymoon, road-tripping around Ireland. The guitarist didn’t know the songs well enough and was, well, desperate. He was duly asked to leave the session; Irish music is, among other things, weighted in history and tradition, and taken very seriously. For our honeymoon, we had chosen the verdant countryside, crisp air (read: bad weather) and undulating hills of Ireland over the blues and warm waters of a more traditional

December 2017/Fairlady 41


Travel tropical island destination. Our plan was to visit Northern Ireland, partly so I could meet Ronan’s family, before doing the Wild Atlantic Way, a breathtaking drive along Ireland’s west coast. We basically got hold of a map and drove, booking accommodation along the way. The route was well signposted, and on the odd occasion that we did get lost, the affable Irish were only too happy to steer us back onto the path.

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outh Africans require a UK visa for Northern Ireland. The partition of Northern Ireland from the Republic persisted for three decades, and the first tangible reminder of the ‘Troubles’ was in Belfast, about 15km from Bangor, where striking murals depict the conflict. Along the length of Falls Road, massive paintings pay tribute to Irish Republican leaders, and others draw a parallel to nationalist struggles around the world, including South Africa. In contrast, the murals in Shankill Road depict the UK ‘loyalist’ cause. Rather than a bustling European capital, Belfast appeared to be a city yet to come into its own, particularly the centre, having seemingly been given a lick of paint to divorce itself from its troubled past. We noticed a few small strongholds of defiance, though, such as Maddens Bar, where the sign at the entrance read: ‘Broken Irish is better than clever English.’ On to County Antrim, which has seen a boost in tourism for its many filming locations for Game of Thrones, through Ballycastle, where boat trips promised sightings of the ‘harbour’ where Theon Greyjoy was welcomed home (Theon, that was his name!). We were headed for the Dark Hedges, an avenue of 150 towering beeches planted in the 18th century, which tourist offices punt heavily as the Kingsroad in GoT. Downright spooky at night – when the gnarly branches seemed to close in on you – it felt like a natural cathedral during the day. The Giant’s Causeway had sim-

42 Fairlady/December 2017

This pic: This building was demolished this year, which means this mural of the brilliant WB Yeats is no more! Right: Kids performing Irish traditional music at the Fleadh music festival in Sligo.

ilar otherworldly appeal, with its mystical rock formations, dramatic cliffs, ocean mist and thrashing sea. Legend has it that mythical warrior Fionn mac Cumhail (pronounced Finn McCool) created the Causeway so he could walk over to Scotland to pick a fight with the giant Benandonner. The other explanation is that the hexagonal basalt columns were formed as a result of volcanic activity some 50 million years ago. We lingered a bit, but by now the chill had set in and it was time for a dram of whisky at Old Bushmills, one of the oldest licenced distilleries in the world. We crossed the border at Derry and worked our way up to Malin Head, the northernmost tip of Ireland, to begin the Wild Atlantic Way. The rugged coastline was a tantalising taste of what was to come. The Wild Atlantic Way is 2500km long and traverses cities, towns, villages, landscapes and seascapes. The roads are excellent, although the narrow, high-hedged country lanes can get tricky when you need to squeeze past another vehicle. We did a fair bit of the route in

two weeks, setting off for long walks through woodlands and up foothills, regularly stopping to take in the shifting moods of the Atlantic. The grey skies in County Donegal left us feeling let down: it was August, summer in Ireland! But the fertile countryside made up for it: lush green plains, iridescent pastures and heathery moorland. In peaceful Dunfanaghy, we strolled along unspoilt beaches and ambled beyond the well-kept village as sheep tailed us. The Horn Head peninsula’s impressive cliff face had nothing on our next stop, Slieve League – at 610 metres, the highest sea cliffs in Ireland. From designated viewpoints, a jaw-dropping panorama stretched out: rolling mists, soaring gulls and the crashing Atlantic – and sheep grazing precariously on sheer craggy rock faces. You can hike the cliffs, but book a guide if you’re not an experi-


PHOTOGRAPHS: MAYA MORGAN-SKILLEN

This pic: This limestone wall in the Burren contains no mortar but has held up against the elements for centuries. Right: Maddens in Belfast is a popular spot for Irish traditional music sessions.

enced hiker – it’s a bracing walk! We stopped over in Killybegs. At a watering hole, a local asked: ‘So you’re going to the Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann then?’ Our vacant expressions prompted him to fill us in. The traditional Irish music competition, known as the Fleadh (pronounced flaah), in which young and old compete in various categories for the title of all-Ireland champion, was being held in Sligo. The town was filled with music: on stages, in pubs, on the streets and along the Garavogue River. It was brimming with people – wait, did the guy from Westlife just walk past me? (He did.) A little boy with a shock of orange curls caterwauled his way through a fiddle solo, smiling broadly to rapturous applause, and around the corner two kids played the complex uilleann pipes with earnest dexterity. What was really on display was generations of pride and a determination to uphold musical traditions. Westport, a popular stop on the Way, offers plenty to do, especially for outdoorsy types. But the effects of the full Irish breakfasts served at our homely guesthouses were making themselves felt, so we focused on the nightlife, particularly Matt Molloy’s. Owned by a member of Irish band The Chieftains, the small pub was packed with locals and tourists. It’s a magnet for top-notch musicians, so worth the squeeze. The following day we made for Galway via Louisburgh, arguably the most magnificent stretch of road on the route, passing serene lakes and the

blue Sheeffry Mountains. Bohemian Galway was abuzz with buskers and street theatre, and we were glad for a bit of city life and diversity. In Quay Street you’ll find Irish pubs, artisanal coffee shops, kitsch tourist traps and flamboyant shopfronts. Remnants of Galway’s medieaval heritage pepper the city, among them Lynch’s Castle, a 16th-century Gothic structure that’s now home to a bank. The River Corrib is a great hangout. We sauntered along its banks where people were reading, daydreaming or having a snack, all while a ferocious kayak water polo match was underway.

A

bout an hour’s drive out of Galway, the abundant green gives way to the grey limestone of the Burren in County Clare. Shaped underwater hundreds of millions of years ago, the rock rose to the surface after a geological cataclysm, giving the landscape a lunar appearance and stark, magical quality. The coastal road brought us to the Cliffs of Moher, which reach 8km out to sea. Its 300-million-year past is palpable in the strata of the rock face. It’s a tourist hotspot, but worth braving the crowds and brisk walk along the top, 214 metres up. We caught a ferry to Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, which locals had encouraged us to visit. And it’s no wonder – every truism about small

Every truism about small seaside resorts sprang to mind while we walked the picturebook port town, passing quaint craft shops, chic cafés and cosy pubs. seaside resorts sprang to mind while we walked the picture-book port town, passing quaint craft shops, chic cafés and cosy pubs. The peninsula is best explored via the circular Slea Head drive, along which friendly farm animals seemed willing to pose for pictures, enchanting mountains like the Three Sisters and Sleeping Giant came into view, and the jagged thrust of the haunting Skellig Islands could be seen in the distance. We cut through the peninsula via the twists and turns of the (sometimes) hairraising Conor Pass to enter the Ring of Kerry, yet another loop of infinite vistas and tranquil beauty. You’re seldom far from the next town or lookout point, and your senses are always engaged by the changing terrain. Sheep’s Head in County Cork was our final stop. It was balmy, thanks to its proximity to the Gulf Stream, and we meandered the quiet country roads and empty footpaths of Kilcrohane, passing only cows and donkeys, relishing the sun and last moments of space, silence and solitude to reflect on the journey that had been, and the one that was to come. ✤

December 2017/Fairlady 43


Profile

A fighting chance ♥

By Anna Rich

I look stressed?’ The Honourable Glynnis Breytenbach looks as cool as cool can be. In her office in the parliamentary precinct, Glynnis has one of those chairs that reclines almost to the horizontal, and she’s leaning right back with her feet resting on the desk drawers. She’s a member of parliament for the DA, and shadow minister for justice – a position she’s held since 2014. (Former FAIRLADY editor Dene Smuts was her predecessor.) This is not the reason she’s in the public eye, though. Glynnis first hit the headlines towards the end of her tenure at the National Prosecuting Authority, where she’d worked for 26 years. It was ‘the best job in the world’, she says. There, she earned a reputation as a formidable state prosecutor. But then she bumped heads with the NPA head honchos. When she told them she’d take them to the High Court on review for dropping the charges of fraud and corruption against former police crime intelligence head Richard Mdluli, she was suspended – ‘for madeup shit’, she says. This was followed by a disciplinary hearing, which was opened to the media at the behest of Glynnis and her legal counsel, as they felt this was the best way of ensuring that it would be fair. She was cleared of all 16 charges. The NPA announced that it would appeal. This time, she’s being charged with having unauthorised access to, and modifying, the official contents of her work computer. Under cross-examination in the Magistrate’s Court in October, Glynnis responded that she’d had the hard drive duplicated as she believed that the NPA

44 Fairlady/December 2017


MP Glynnis Breytenbach is being prosecuted – by her former employer, the National Prosecuting Authority. Yet she still believes in South Africa and our justice system. ‘I’ll never leave. Never. I’m not here because I have nowhere else to go. I’m here because there is nowhere else I want to be.’

While Rafi (the German Shepherd) and Frisco play, Glynnis and Keiko have a chat.


Profile was not above tampering with, and manipulating, its contents after she had handed it in. And that’s where Glynnis is at today. Reason enough to feel a bit anxious, we’d say. ‘The trial doesn’t bother me in the least,’ she says. ‘I hold the view now, as I did then, that I’ve done nothing dishonest or criminal. My standards are so much higher than theirs, and I have no difficulty with my own standards. I believe we have a great justice system and I believe in the outcomes of our justice system. I fully expect to be acquitted.’ Glynnis says the law is a good equaliser, because it works the same for all of us. ‘The law is there for everybody. I am not above it, nor is anybody else.’ So she’s quite happy to submit to the legal process, and takes issue with the general tendency to take the easy way out. ‘People often say, “This corruption is dreadful. What are you doing about it?” But most of them, to my horror, have either paid or are willing to pay a bribe to get out of a traffic fine. And that is nothing but corruption.’ Glynnis argues that if we take care of the ‘little acts’ of corruption, corruption on a larger scale will die out. Her logic is simple: ‘If you stop paying bribes, then nobody can accept the bribe. If you take away the market, then the dealer has no place to offload his goods. We all have to say: “It stops here. It stops with me.”’ And if that means you get schlepped to your police station rather than getting off with a bribe? ‘Then be schlepped to the goddamn police station, put in the shit time. Sit in your cell and deal with the crap. But to pay the 50 bucks, that’s wrong.’ She’s right. And I’m starting to understand why she says her standards are high. I ask her if she’d call someone out for something relatively minor, like throwing a cigarette out of the car window, or dropping a chip packet on the pavement. Litterbugs probably don’t really think they’re doing anything wrong, I say. But, says

46 Fairlady/December 2017

Glynnis: ‘Do you see anybody dropping chip packets in their own home? Why not? Because then they have to clean it up. Why do they do it? They do it because they think they can get away with it. Of course it’s wrong!’ And she’d definitely call them out – ‘I do it all the time!’ she says. This brings to mind one of the anecdotes from her memoir, Rule of Law, which her publishers persuaded her to write. Her condition was that someone else do the actual writing, and that fell to Nechama Brodie, freelance reporter and head of TRI Facts, the research

‘If you stop paying bribes, then nobody can accept the bribe. If you take away the market, then the dealer has no place to offload his goods. We all have to say: “It stops here, it stops with me.”’ and training division of independent fact-checking agency Africa Check. ‘I sat on my pool deck, drank vast quantities of wine and answered her questions, basically,’ says Glynnis. The book is interspersed with perspectives from various people who know Glynnis well – ‘all Nechama’s idea’. One of her former colleagues at the NPA, Jan Ferreira, said Glynnis’s office in Pretoria afforded her a good view of the street, so she could easily see when people skipped off early. And she’d call them out, of course. She says she dislikes having to discipline people but is, unsurprisingly, a big fan of discipline. ‘I knew who the culprits were. You always do. And from around 3.30ish, when I knew people would start going home, I’d watch them drive out,

give them five minutes, then phone and say, “There’s a dreadfully urgent matter we need to discuss, if you could come and see me.” And they were all quite scared of me, so they’d never have said, “Shit, I’m already halfway home.” You only do it once or twice and then they stop.’ Here in Cape Town, she has a much better view from her office. It’s a bluesky day today, and the view over to the main Parliamentary buildings, Table Mountain, and Lion’s Head is framed by leafy oaks. ‘I must say, I often look at that mountain and say, sjoe, it’s a really nice day to not be in the office!’ But she doesn’t give in to the temptation, unlike many of her fellow parliamentarians: unfortunately, there are plenty of slackers at Parliament too. ‘As an MP, you can either do the job properly or you can get away with doing very little at all, if you’re so inclined.’ If you miss 30 consecutive days, they start docking your pay, Glynnis explains. ‘There are many MPs – 10s of them – who have missed that number of days. The taxpayer pays you to be there every time the National Assembly sits. That is, after all, your job. But they just don’t pitch.’ lynnis has a work ethic second to none, and doesn’t seem to relate to doing things in slow-mo (let alone not at all). ‘I can’t imagine why you’d want to spend eight or 10 hours a day sitting doing bugger all,’ she says. So how does parliamentary work compare to her previous job, where 18-hour days were the norm for her? ‘I loved absolutely every second of prosecuting. But I don’t miss it. I love this job.’ Having said that, she does find aspects of it ‘soul-destroyingly boring’. ‘Anyone who watches the National Assembly in session on the Parliament channel can understand that. There’s no joy in that kind of work.’ But there’s more to it than that.


Glynnis with Keiko (back) and Frisco.

‘There’s a lot of legislative work to be done, and it’s a big challenge and a huge privilege to be able to attempt to ensure decent legislation is passed.’ Done properly, this takes a lot of reading. ‘Just the preparation for this week’s work is probably five or six lever arch files like that one,’ she says, pointing to the bulging file between us on her desk. [Perhaps a hint for me to get going so she can get on with it?] They have parliamentary researchers who do the research. ‘You get it on Friday, or over the weekend. You don’t have to read it, you can wing it, but then you’re not getting in-depth engagement with the subject matter. You really need to

‘If people don’t perform, punish them. You don’t have to suck up all this nonsense for 22 years. You know what you want. Make it happen.’ do your own independent research to prepare properly and make sure that you master it.’ And that’s just the legislative work. She’s also the chairperson of the federal legal commission for the DA. ‘So I do all the disciplinary work – not on my own – I’m in a committee of 30.’ (These are disciplinary issues within the party. Strikes me they’ve got the right person for the job.)

Then there’s the constituency work. Glynnis explains that all MPs are constituency heads somewhere. ‘You can do a lot for people. It’s a great platform for trying to help people. You can’t help everybody all of the time, but you can certainly help a lot of the people a lot of the time.’ Glynnis serves the area of Moot, in Pretoria. ‘There’s always something on: information tables, meetings to

December 2017 /Fairlady 47


Profile

Posing in front of Parliament.

engage with voters.’ Her constituency cuts across different classes, all with different needs. ‘Some people don’t have proper basic services yet. We’re trying to get those installed. So there’s lots to do.’ iving in Cape Town, serving a Pretoria constituency – how does that work? ‘I go on the early flight on a Saturday and I come back on a late flight, and on Monday I go on the early flight and come back on the late flight.’ That’s not logistically optimal, but having read her memoir I think I know the reason. Sure enough: ‘Because my dogs are here.’ (The second chapter of Rule of Law is titled, ‘Animals are nicer than people.’) Glynnis has pics

48 Fairlady/December 2017

In Rule of Law, she describes the ANC as a one-man kleptocracy: ‘They have sold their soul to the devil, and the devil is Jacob Zuma.’ of ‘the three most beautiful dogs in the world’ in her office. ‘That German shepherd there, the big one, is Rafi. She’s nine. And the Australian cattle dog is Frisco, like the coffee. I didn’t name him; he was a gift. And this German shepherd is eight months old and her name is Keiko.’ They’re unusual names… ‘Rafi is

named after Rafael Nadal, but she’s a girl, so she’s Rafi. Keiko is named after Kei Nishikori, the number one Japanese player and number 14 in the world [at the time of writing].’ Glynnis loves her tennis. Chapter 18, titled ‘Sixteen-love’ is about the disciplinary hearing. When the first witness – ‘a self-important creep who thought that the world revolved on his little axis’ – stood up and introduced his unit as the custodian of ethics in the NPA, Glynnis said she wanted to throw up her breakfast: ‘It was so pompous and, of course, utter rubbish.’ Right then, she stopped listening. ‘It was clear that if I continued to pay attention to the testimony I would either misbehave horribly or have a stroke, because it was all so dishonest and unbelievably stupid.’


Making a Difference

Maybe we could volunteer somewhere ewhere over the weekend?

I wish I could do a bit more though, it seems like there’s never enough time. I should take some soup over to Claire’s, she hasn’t been well. Is she a vegetarian? I’ll phone and check.

I’m sure we can donate some money this month – I should research some causes.

I should clear out my closet; I don’t need all those pairs of jeans, I should donate them.

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Profile Fortunately, the US Open was on, so she live-streamed it on her computer. And sixteen-love refers to the number of charges against her, with not one holding up. ‘I like Rafael Nadal and Kei Nishikori because they are good sportsmen, they are tenacious, and they always try their best. They win well and they lose equally well, which is important.’ What about Serena? ‘She’s great. But I’m not going to call my dog Serena. I don’t like the name. But she’s a superstar in every respect.’ Weekends taken up with flying up and down for work, fat files to plough through – none of this makes for the work-life balance many of us aspire to. ‘That’s just crap. If you have a real job, then there is no me-time. And if you have a real job that you enjoy, that is your me-time.’ She does find time for the gym. ‘I go at five in the morning and then it’s done; you’re awake. And the whole day is waiting to be dealt with. It beats the hell out of lying in bed till 10 o’clock!’ Sounds like the kind of civil servant we need. And in 1994, the ANC had her vote. So why is she now working for the DA? ‘I may vote for the ANC in the future, if they become a party worthy of my vote,’ she says. ‘But when I joined the DA, the ANC was not.’ Rule of Law, she describes the ANC as a oneman kleptocracy. ‘They have sold their soul to the devil, and the devil is Jacob Zuma. There are many people within the ANC who are wonderful people and for whom I have high regard. There are others, though, who don’t have the interests of South Africans at heart. When they shout at us in parliament, “It is our turn to eat!” they mean that literally. They don’t mean ordinary South Africans. That spirit of the ANC, of sacrificing everything for the communal good, is gone. I am not sure they can ever get back to where they were.’

50 Fairlady/December 2017

Glynnis concedes that no political party is perfect: ‘In general, the DA embodies the values I believe in. It stands for the defence of the Constitution; it doesn’t just talk the talk.’ Just as we tend to defer responsibility for large-scale corruption while engaging in those ‘small acts’ ourselves, she is vehement that change starts with us, that we have the power to effect it. And it lies in the right to vote. ‘We don’t have a salubrious background as a country. And we had an opportunity in 1994 to change it. We haven’t fully made use of that opportunity. The only way we can is if every single South African understands the immense power of their vote. If people don’t perform, punish them. You don’t have to suck up all this nonsense for 22 years. You know what you want. Make it happen. If you have a driver who drives poorly, you’re not going to keep them. So why is it any different with a government?’ But many people feel there’s nobody they want to vote for. ‘People died so we could vote. People endured immense hardship so that we could have the privilege of voting, and of a constitutional democracy. If you don’t know who you want to vote for – I suppose that’s entirely possible – look around for a set of values that is as close to your own as possible. And vote for those people,’ she says. ‘With by-elections several times a year, and local and national government elections every five years, you have the opportunity to get rid of those who don’t do the job. Politics isn’t a popularity contest. You don’t have to like me to vote for me. You have to believe that I’ll do the right thing. The ANC results are based on emotion and it shows, because look where we are: down the plughole with no plug.’ But down the plughole or not, Glynnis is totally vested in South Africa. She’s had many job offers, here and abroad. ‘I didn’t take them, because I believe in this country. I believe we can make it work. And I’ll never leave. Never. I’m not here because I have nowhere else to go. I’m here because there is nowhere else I want to be.’

RULE OF LAW: A MEMOIR by Glynnis Breytenbach with Nechama Brodie (Pan MacMillan) In the memoir, Glynnis’s chapters are interspersed with that of various people who know her. This one is from author and journalist Mandy Wiener.

I

never witnessed Glynnis as a prosecutor. My first encounter with her was covering her disciplinary enquiry in Pretoria in 2012. Often the media can’t cover a full enquiry because our resources are so stretched, but in this instance, because there had been such a fight for media access at the beginning, I thought we needed to take advantage of the fact that we were allowed to cover it, and I made a point of being there. The enquiry was held at the NPA’s building in Silverton, which, at that stage, was a [Nomgcobo] Jiba stronghold. It was so weird because you would walk in and Glynnis would be there, and she would be greeting everyone. A lot of people were scared to be seen to be greeted by her, because it was ‘enemy’ territory. Glynnis is one of those people


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PHOTOGRAPHS: LIZA VAN DEVENTER, SUPPLIED

Girls’ Road Trip Time

who remembers everyone. By name. And she always has a story, or can tell you a story, about someone. It’s not just superficial; she really drills down and gets to know people. She makes a point of it. I saw it with her colleagues, and she did this with the press who were covering her enquiry. We got to know her in the same way she got to know us. She was always very considerate of everyone she encountered. Glynnis hasn’t had children, and she clearly doesn’t want to. But the way I’ve heard her talk about her animals, and about other people’s children… she is very caring and considerate. She is also very self-deprecating in person, but I find it quite frustrating, actually. It’s not necessary. I think a lot of it is a facade – the self-deprecation and the whole ‘rough, tough’ exterior. To her credit, Glynnis made it through that entire disciplinary enquiry without crying. I kept expecting her to. I would have been blubbing – either out of rage or sheer frustration. But she just kept on trucking on. I often wondered if she went home and had a cry at the end of the day. She went through a period when her mother died, and then her father died – all during the enquiry. Even at the time, I thought she must be going through hell. I do think she’s a lot more sensitive than people realise. I think [her tough exterior] is a defence mechanism. My view is that she cares so deeply about her work, about her cases and about the law, that she almost projects that feeling – which most people would experience in their everyday domestic lives – onto those inanimate things, onto the law, onto her cases. One thing I remember her talking about: she gets very fucked off if people violate other people. She’s definitely a bit of a crusader in that sense. She’s a great defender of humankind when it comes to justice. She wants to protect the little old ladies. And I think that’s why society needs people like her, because she’s got the capability to do it.

‘Glynnis can also really vloek. She’s probably the most creative vloeker I’ve ever met. But it’s usually done with affection.’ Glynnis can also really vloek. She is probably the most creative vloeker I have ever encountered. But it’s so descriptive and apt and, often, it’s so accurate. And it’s usually done with affection. I still have a lot of questions, which is the nature of a journalist. But I know that Glynnis has massive integrity, and I know she would lay down her life if she knew it was going to help someone she loved. Or an animal. She has this deep affection for animals. I was a little surprised when Glynnis decided to go into politics, especially for the Democratic Alliance. I realise she saw it as an opportunity to continue her work in one way or another; I just never thought she would have the tolerance for politics. She doesn’t suffer fools. I thought she would never put up with what would come her way in parliament, and that she would get frustrated. But, having endured the NPA for so long, she probably thought she could endure anything, really. And I think politics is a good platform for her advocacy – although I can’t help but dwell on the fact that the NPA lost someone with so much expertise, who was so committed to her job. Glynnis was so specialised and she was dealing with so many high-profile commercial cases. As a result of her enquiry, she spent a year or two in the backwaters of the organisation, sitting in some office with nothing to do, when she had all these cases and all these capabilities. It was so petty. All those cases were just lying dormant – and most of them still are. It’s an absolute travesty and it makes no sense to me. It’s politics that got in the way of the rule of law. ✤

What if I lock my keys in the car? I should get a spare, spare key. Keep that big water bottle. In case my car overheats, or I find a thirsty dog.

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Pole position

The

AristoKat ♥

By Shireen Fisher Photographs by Liza van Deventer

Kat van Duinen has made a name for herself in the world of luxury goods. Her brand provides discerning lovers of luxe with fine handbags and ready-to-wear collections that express the African spirit through a minimalist aesthetic.

‘I

just completely fell in love with this country,’ says Kat, who visited for the first time in 2000 and moved here permanently in 2006. ‘South Africans tend to take the light for granted; in Europe one can never experience the same brightness, even on the most beautiful summer’s day. ‘The lifestyle in Cape Town is so different; South Africans seem to smile even though many of them have no reason to. Europeans really guard their privacy and avoid small talk – perhaps due to the fact that the cities are so densely populated.’ Kat has a background in PR and experience as a diamond grader, but becoming a fashion designer is something she feels was her destiny. Born into the last generation of communist Poland, she comes from an era where making things was a natural extension of how people lived, having had to make everything themselves. ‘I grew up with custom-made clothes

52 Fairlady/December 2017

and limited access to mainstream luxury garments and accessories,’ she says. ‘It’s certainly a different reality to what my children will ever know. Growing up in a country where private property was non-existent is very difficult to explain to anyone who is not familiar with the concept. ‘I was an only child. Growing up without the internet and having to occupy myself in creative ways really formed me as a person. So it was only natural that I would be attracted to the arts and to creating things.’ Kat found inspiration in fashion magazines, whenever she could get her hands on them. ‘We were resourceful! You would hear stories of someone swapping their postcard collection for a much-desired pair of Levi jeans. ‘It’s difficult to explain to people who grew up in a capitalist country, but I think South Africans understand, because there was the same isolation during apartheid, where you really had to be resourceful in order to be well


‘Nothing happened as I’d planned. I read my business plan a year later and just laughed.’


Pole position dressed or have beautiful books or the latest copy of Vogue. I’m grateful for that experience, because I never took anything for granted.’ Kat says that when she started out, she didn’t have a clear idea of where the business was going, being in a country where everything was different to what she’d known in Europe, including the culture and the way people dressed. It wasn’t just the market that was different – the manufacturing sector was too, which made Kat’s entry into the South African fashion market far from easy. She is quite open about her difficulties, which is refreshing in an industry where many emphasise the glitz and glamour rather than the sheer hard work it takes to succeed. ‘I made every mistake in the book,’ she says. ‘I made a career of doing the exact opposite to what people told me. If I knew then what I know now, I would be light years further ahead with everything. But it was a necessary learning curve, although there were times when I doubted my ability to suceed in this industry. Nothing happened as I had planned: I read my business plan a year or two later and just laughed, because everything I didn’t want to do, I did. I developed a range of cashmere for winter and the supplier disappeared with the entire container.’ Kat was always more interested in design than she was in retail – in fact, she had no intention of getting into retail and had initially planned to sell her ranges on the internet. But all that changed in 2010, when she started looking for a studio at The Old Biscuit Mill in Woodstock, Cape Town. ‘I used to go to the market at The Old Biscuit Mill every Saturday, so I thought it would be amazing to have a little working space there. There wasn’t any studio space available, but there was a shop. I took it without having anything to put in it!’ Just seven years later, the Kat van Duinen boutique and studio at The Old Biscuit Mill has just been renovated, and Kat has opened her

54 Fairlady/December 2017

flagship boutique in the super-trendy Silo District neighbouring The Silo Hotel and Africa’s newest icon, the Zeitz MOCAA. ‘We started out small and outgrew our space six times,’ Kat says. ‘I feel like the space at the Silo District was built for me. The V&A Waterfront was always my dream location, but I didn’t want to be inside the mall with the air conditioning. Light is really important to me and I appreciate it when a store has access to natural light. Being surrounded by art was on my priority list for the new boutique – I am passionate about art. Having Africa’s largest contemporary art museum next door is truly a gift.’ Kat describes her brand as the result of blood, sweat and tears. Her mission is to make things that last, to use real materials, to manufacture in a transparent way and to really answer the needs of the modern woman. ‘Women are not just mothers any more, or just businesswomen. We have to be all those things, so I’m always looking for the most contemporary, unpretentious way of

‘The whole throwing away of things, the trendiness of things and temporariness of things, from art to relationships and clothing… we should invest in them and make them last.’ putting looks together that are always elegant. A curated wardrobe should have the basics as well as certain fabulous pieces. Doing simple things well is the biggest challenge, and that’s what I try to do. We are not in the fast-fashion market.’

The use of exotic leathers for her handbags adds another degree of complexity to the brand, as production is quite a complicated process. Every skin is legally and ethically sourced from authorised farms. Kat uses ostrich, python and crocodile skins, and proudly supports the humane production of exotic skins, which forms an important part of South Africa’s economy. ‘Every piece of leather has to be seen for what it is – for its size, its unique scale and pattern, and the way it needs to be prepared. Ostrich skin has to be prepared manually, which is a lengthy procedure. What surprises me is that in South Africa the most luxurious materials haven’t really been utilised. You rarely see a South African woman with an ostrich leather bag. It’s seen as something outdated. I’d like to bring ostrich skin out of the eighties.’ Kat believes that art inspires fashion. She has acquired quite a collection over the years, and considers herself an art snob, having visited ‘possibly the majority of art museums in the world’! This great love of art reached another level when she first


HAIR: CARLIN MULLINS OF THE SET UP (021 712 1391). MAKEUP: SAM SCARBOROUGH OF ONE LEAGUE CREATIVE MANAGEMENT. DRESSED BY RUFF TUNG (WWW.RUFFTUNG.COM)

saw a painting called The End by artist Kelly Gough. ‘I was mesmerised by the painting I saw in a gallery. A very intense and sad piece, as the title suggests,’ she says. ‘I was uncertain whether it was really an oil on wood or if the artist had used another technique. I was unable to read the signature and it took a while for the gallerist to share the details with me. I was convinced it was a female painter, as Kelly isn’t a typical male name. I hoped to commission something of a more positive nature perhaps, but the artist refused to meet me for the longest time.’ Kat and Kelly John Gough are married today. Her admiration for her husband’s work runs deep, and the two remain each other’s muses. Kat describes her two children, Charlotte (11) and Frederic (10), as her biggest pride and joy. ‘I never thought that parenting would be my thing. I must say it really is incredible when young people reflect things back at you and you realise that you’re learning from them as much as they learn from you, if

CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT: Kat in her boutique at The Silo District. Frederic, Kat, Charlotte and Kelly. Kat and Kelly originally formed a bond through art, and continue to inspire each other.

not more. It is the best thing that has happened to me in my life.’ Kat is a firm believer in only acquiring possessions that will have multiple lives; heirlooms to pass from one generation to the next, something that today’s fast-paced production and consumer society rarely makes possible. ‘I have always loved beautiful objects,’ she says. ‘One should aspire to obtain the best one can. And that includes buying only the best. You can rather wait until you can afford it or even obtain it second-hand, but buy something that will last you forever. ‘The whole throwing away of things, the trendiness of things and temporariness of things, from art to relationships and clothing…we should

invest in them and make them last. I believe in things that last.’ In line with this vision, Kat has no intention of going into mass production. She plans on always being involved in every aspect, in order to meet her own demanding standards. ‘We are one of only a few African premium luxury labels, and the decision-making is shared among a small team,’ she says. ‘We don’t follow trends. We rebel against them. Our pieces have no expiry date. That’s part of my mission.’ What Kat does plan to do is perhaps expand internationally. She hopes to see clients start to buy differently, rather than just buying the big labels. ‘We would love to create more employment opportunities and offer skills training to help expand the South African fashion industry,’ she says. ‘I’d really like to work with more local talent – expand our operations, bring in people with traditional skills, and collaborate with other designers and artists.’ Kat is determined to give back to the country that has become her home. ‘I feel blessed that this country has taken me in, and I feel it’s my responsibility to give back. I wake up feeling grateful to be living in Cape Town. And every time I travel abroad, I am reminded of how unique and special South Africa’s offering is.’ ✤ For more information, go to katvanduinen.com

December 2017/Fairlady 55


By Anna Rich

Hands up if you’re feeling tired even after a solid night’s sleep? Join the club! It could be an iron deficiency: a recent study shows that about one in two women are deficient in iron.

IRON RULES

Which metal is more precious: gold or iron? For the functioning of the human body, there’s no contest – iron, of course. It’s an essential trace element, which means it’s indispensable, as in, you cannot live without it. Testament to its importance is that scientists have long known the effects of its deficiency. Iron is called a ‘trace’ element because the amounts we need of it (and the 13 others identified so far) each day is minuscule.

THE JOB DESCRIPTION FOR IRON

It may just be present in the tiniest of traces, but it’s hard-working, and its list of tasks is long. Number one on that list is helping carry oxygen round your body. Iron is a key component of haemoglobin, the protein found in your red blood cells. Haemoglobin attaches to the oxygen you breathe in and takes it from the lungs to the rest of your body. Too little iron means too few red blood cells, which in turn means too little oxygen. One telltale sign is


Health

tiredness. When the number of red blood cells drops below a certain level, it’s called iron deficiency anaemia, though you can have anaemia without having an iron deficiency. Two knock-on effects of a lack of oxygen are lowered immunity (so you get sick more often) and a lowered ability to concentrate. The lack of iron – and oxygen – also affects your body’s ability to regulate its temperature. Iron also helps our muscles to store and use oxygen, and forms part of enzymes that help to digest food, among other functions. Pregnant women have a heightened need for iron, and a severe deficiency could mean a preterm or a smallerthan-normal baby. These too-tiny tots are sadly at greater risk of health problems or death before they’ve even reached a year.

SO WHERE DO YOU GET IT?

Oysters! And chocolate! Yes, really. The US Institute of Medicine says the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for iron ranges from 18mg for women aged 19 to 50, to 8mg for men. Just think: there’s a thousand of

those millis in just one gram! Once women are over 51, the amount they need drops to the same level as that for men. (It’s down to iron loss in menstruation, obv.) The thing is, even though your body needs only traces of iron, you need to eat far more than a few milligrams of the food it’s in to get enough. For a food to qualify as a great source of a nutrient, the US Department of Agriculture (who’ve done extensive research into all this) reckons it should give you about 20% of that nutrient’s RDA. And according to their nutrient database, oysters and chocolate tick that box better than most other foods, with just 85g of each giving 44% and 39% of your daily value. An important proviso on the quality of choc: it should be dark and contain 45–69% cocoa solids. A couple of other foods deserve special mention. It wasn’t for nothing that your mum tried to feed you beef liver as a child: at 28% of what you need in a day, 85g of pan-fried

liver is right near the top of the list. And a rather surprisingly great source is white beans, which, along with those oysters, top the ranking. (With beans, things aren’t quite that simple, though.) Close contenders for the ‘great source’ label are half a cup each of lentils and spinach. And after that, kidney beans, sardines (bones in), chickpeas, tomatoes, beef, potato and cashew nuts are reasonably good sources. There’s a cautionary note for vegetarians from the National Institutes of Health: your recommended daily allowance is 1.8 times higher than for meat-eaters. How so? They explain that heme iron from meat is more bioavailable than non-heme iron from plant-based foods, and meat, poultry, and seafood increase the absorption of non-heme iron. Bioavailability, as you probably know, is the degree to which what you eat is actually absorbed by your body. The problem

Iron deficiency is the most common and widespread nutritional disorder.

December 2017 /Fairlady 57


Health

ALL GOOD, THEN?

We tend to think of nutritional deficiencies as a problem associated with poverty, but the World Health Organisation found that the one nutritional deficiency that is completely democratic is iron deficiency. They say it’s the most common and widespread nutritional disorder, describing it as an epidemic. Over 30% of the world’s population – 2 billion people – are anaemic, many of them as a result of iron deficiency. Here at home, an article published last year in the journal Clinica Chimica Acta, ‘The iron status of a healthy South African adult population’ found that 56.6% of the ‘healthy’ women they assessed were iron-deficient. The WHO goes as far as saying that the health consequences of iron deficiency are ‘stealthy but devastating, invisibly eroding the development potential of individuals, societies and national economies’ – and this includes poor performance at school. Do a quick poll round your office: how many of your colleagues complain of being so tired that they just can’t work as productively as they’d like to? The WHO says timely treatment of iron deficiency anaemia can restore personal health and raise national productivity levels by as much as 20%. And, as they add, we know the causes and we have inexpensive and effective solutions.

58 Fairlady/December 2017

GO FOR A CHECK-UP

A balanced diet should give you all the iron you need. But women who are pregnant or whose periods are heavy have an increased need of iron, and might need supplementation. It’s also possible that bleeding caused by regular use of aspirin, or by ulcers, piles or cancer could be affecting your iron levels. And some of us just don’t absorb iron well. Check the chart below for signs that you may be iron-deficient. Some of the more off-the-wall symptoms are cravings for ice, ash or soil. Hold on a moment, though; if you think this might be your problem, don’t rush off and pick an iron supple-

ment off the shelf! Especially if you’re postmenopausal, as iron supplementation in this phase of life is not usually recommended. Just as too little iron is a problem, so too is too much. According to the Mayo Clinic, excess iron is stored in the internal organs, ‘where it doesn’t belong’. It’s particularly toxic to the liver, heart and pancreas, and can damage the joints. High doses of iron can be fatal, especially for children. See your doctor, and she or he will assess whether iron deficiency might be an issue, and will send you for the appropriate blood tests. That’s really the only way to be sure. ✤

SYMPTOM BROWSER FOR IRON DEFICIENCY • MENTAL FATIGUE Feeling mentally tired, irritable, dizzy or losing concentration

• HAIR LOSS Losing clumps of hair or more hair than normal

• HEARING LOSS Difficulty with hearing or sudden hearing loss

• HEADACHES Repeated headaches

• MOUTH ULCERS Sore white patches on the inside of the mouth or sore flaky red cracks at one or both sides of the mouth • CRAVING FOR ICE Compulsively and repeatedly chewing on ice • INFECTION May cause more infections than usual, such as coughs and colds • SHORTNESS OF BREATH Reduced physical capacity • CRAVING NON-FOOD Craving to eat non-food items such as clay, dirt, ash, and starch • RESTLESS LEGS A disturbing need to move legs even when resting

• SORE THROAT Affects the surface of the tongue, making it feel sore or giving dry mouth • PALENESS Most noticeable on the face, nails, inner mouth and lining of the eyes • PHYSICAL FATIGUE Feeling physically tired • BRITTLE NAILS Chip and crack easily • EASY BRUISING Unexplained blood spots under the skin • COLD INTOLERANCE Cold hands and/or feet may mean that there is not enough oxygen being delivered in the blood

PHOTOGRAPHS: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES. INFOGRAPHIC: SUPPLIED BY FERRIMED. TEXT: WWW.WHO.INT/NUTRITION/ TOPICS/IDA/EN/, MEDLINEPLUS.GOV/ENCY/ARTICLE/003645.HTM, WWW.ELSEVIER.COM/LOCATE/CLINCHIM, EN.WIKIPEDIA. ORG, WW.NCBI.NLM.NIH.GOV/PUBMED/7022654, /WWW.WEBMD.COM/VITAMINS-AND-SUPPLEMENTS/FEATURES/IRONSUPPLEMENTS#1, ODS.OD.NIH.GOV/FACTSHEETS/IRON-HEALTHPROFESSIONAL/, WWW.NHS.UK

with spinach, legumes and some other plant-based foods that are good iron sources is that the iron in them is not particularly bioavailable because they contain iron-absorption inhibitors, like polyphenols. And the beans? It’s the phytates in them that downgrade their iron status – also by inhibiting the absorption of iron. An aside: dairy, antacids, tea, coffee and wine interfere with iron absorption too. You can swing the degree of nonheme iron absorption back in your favour a little by making sure you also choose foods high in vitamin C.


Wellbeing

living BY ANNA RICH

For the sake of your health, focus on giving more than on getting. Happy holidays! And here are two interesting effects of too little sleep: during childhood, it ‘significantly predicts’ early onset of drug and alcohol use when the child is a teen, and across your adult life, it ups your risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

BRAIN A BIT FOGGY?

A LITTLE (or a lot)

We’ve often heard that it’s better to give than to receive, but if you’ve dismissed that as cold comfort for not getting what you want, you might be interested to hear that it really is true! Last year, researchers published a study that proved – using brain scans – that giving support reduces stress-related activity in the brain and increases reward-related activity. If you usually exchange gifts at Christmas, perhaps the adults in the family could agree to make a donation to a favourite charity. Take a look at www.forgood.co.za; it gives you the option to donate goods or time.

60 Fairlady/December 2017

I’LL SLEEP WHEN I’M DEAD! Well, you’ll get there sooner if you skimp on sleep, says Professor Matthew Walker, director of the Centre for Human Sleep Science at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of Why We Sleep: The New Science of Sleep and Dreams (Allen Lane): ‘The shorter your sleep, the shorter your lifespan.’ He says the WHO has declared a lack-of-sleep epidemic among industrialised countries, and he’s advocating for doctors to prescribe sleep for health (not sleeping pills, though – they’re contra-indicated). A SOLID NIGHT’S SLEEP HELPS: • boost your immune system: it fights malignancy and prevents infection • regulate insulin balance, glucose circulation, and your appetite • keep your ticker on track • gut biome maintenance

WORKS FOR ME If you don’t think you’ll be able to retire at 60, especially given that life expectancy is increasing, take heart: a study published in the Journal of Occupational Health says if you keep working to some degree, you’re less likely to take ill with a major disease. The Health and Retirement Study followed 12189 people between 51 and 61 years old, looking at blood pressure, diabetes, cancer, lung and heart disease, stroke and mental issues.

PHOTOGRAPHS: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES

Give

Neurologist Dr Joel Salinas offers three tips to help those neurons along: 1. SAY THAT AGAIN If you’re trying to recall someone’s name, or whatever information you want to remember, repeat it aloud. Dr Salinas says this gives your brain a chance to encode the piece of info. 2. WORK THE NEW FACT INTO A (SILLY) SEQUENCE Dr Salinas says our brains are good at sequences, and the more ridiculous the better. ‘I needed to buy eggs, milk and butter on the way home last night. But typically, when I get to the shop, I miss one thing. Create a silly story, and it will stick.’ How’s this? Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, drinking a glass of milk. He hopped off and slipped on a pat of butter. It really does work! 3. SPLIT WODGES OF INFO INTO MANAGEABLE BITS Say you’ve got to give a speech. Instead of memorising the whole thing, take a couple of sentences at a time.


Great advice

Q: My husband always complains that his ears are

itchy. He tries very hard not to use earbuds to relieve the itch, but eventually gives in. What is causing this, and how can he stop the itch in the long term?

BY DR SARAH RAYNE

Specialist surgeon and lecturer Dr Sarah Rayne answers your questions. This month, they’re about multivitamins, itchy ears and fibroids. Q: I am now over 30 – should I be taking a

PHOTOGRAPH: THEANA BREUGEM

multivitamin, or any other supplement in particular? Or would it be better to focus on making sure my meals are healthy and contain all the nutrients required?

A: I think you’ve answered your own question! Research recommends that nutritional needs should be met primarily through foods in a nutrient-dense form (i.e. healthy foods). I’d add that the money you save on packaged multivitamins can rather be used for natural vitamins like those found in fruits, smoothies and other foods. More than 40% of people use some kind of multivitamin regularly, making their manufacturers a booming R2.9 billion every year in South Africa alone. Health-conscious people often believe that vitamins can make them healthier, but actually, most scientific studies of diet and vitamin intake have shown that more than 75% of participants have adequate vitamin intake from food alone. The US Preventative Service Task Force found that taking multivitamins did not reduce cancer or heart disease either. Where vitamins are useful is in specific groups of people who need a little help: folic acid and iron in pregnancy; calcium and vitamin D to assist with bone density; and older people may benefit from vitamin B12. If you think you might not be getting everything you need from your diet, talk to your doctor, or a dietician who will advise you on a healthy (and cost-saving!) complete diet.

A: Itchy ears are a common irritation, and usually due to skin irritation inside the ear canal. The most common reasons can be a lack of wax (or too much), an irritation due to water in the ear, or dry skin. The problem with putting earbuds in there is that they continue to dry out the canal and remove the lubricating wax the body produces (it does have a purpose!) Earbuds can also damage the skin, which can lead to infection, which can be severe. If there is pain associated with the itching, your husband could have an infection and should see his GP or an ENT specialist. Simple good measures to help with itching are to soothe the ear with a natural oil like olive oil, or over-the-counter ear drops. Avoid too much water in the ears by covering them in the shower or when swimming. Ear sprays with acetic acid in them can also be useful as an antibacterial. If none of these help, steroid eardrops can be prescribed to reduce the inflammation. Q: I’ve been diagnosed with fibroids. What are they,

and what can I do about them?

A: Fibroids are a non-cancerous growth in the womb that unfortunately cause pain and increased menstrual bleeding. They’re a common problem for women as we get older, particularly black women. There’s an old adage among gynaecologists that goes: ‘First children, then fibroids, then hysterectomy.’ But nowadays, because women often delay having children, they can suffer from fibroids before they ever get pregnant. Fibroids themselves do not increase your risk of cancer, although they should be monitored. If you have no symptoms you don’t need to do anything about them – they can stay where they are. In some, fibroids cause pelvic pain or heavy bleeding, or the womb to grow abnormally large. In these cases they can be medically controlled with hormones to limit their growth, or they can be removed surgically. Surgery either leaves the womb intact, which is an option for women who still want children, or women can choose to have a hysterectomy if their family is complete and their symptoms are bad. A new option is a keyhole technique to stop the blood supply to the fibroid, which causes it to shrink, though fibroids can recur. Most gynaecologists see loads of women with fibroids, so Send your questions chat to your gynae about the to letters@fairlady.com best way to manage your individual diagnosis. ✤

December 2017/Fairlady 61


BIG CITY Summer’s here! With the festive season upon us, it’s time to invest in something sparkly, like a new cocktail dress (or jumpsuit, for that matter), a pair of dangly earrings or a shimmery eyeshadow palette. FASHION EDITOR CARA-LEE HERR BEAUTY EDITOR KELLI CLIFTON PHOTOGRAPHS LIZA VAN DEVENTER

62 Fairlady/December 2017


Fashion & Beauty

GILTY PLEASURE

Be bold and wear a jumpsuit instead of a dress. Pleats and beadwork add touchable texture to your night-time look, shimmering and shining as you dance the night away. ADEOLA: Jumpsuit (R399) Style Republic, Spree; heels (R189,99) Mr Price LAURA: Slip dress (R629) H&M; embellished dress (R2700) Ruff Tung; heels (R659) Zara; earrings (R599) Country Road, Woolworths


Fashion & Beauty

A NIGHT IN SHINING ARMOUR

Don’t be afraid to look like a magpie’s dream. ’Tis the season for metallic tones and sparkly sequins – if not now, when? ADEOLA: Blouse (R629) H&M; skirt (R2 999) Gavin Rajah; heels (R699) Madison; earrings (R199,55) Colette by Colette Hayman LAURA: Wrap gown (R4 500) Ruff Tung; heels (R499) Miss Black, Spree; earrings (R149) H&M

64 Fairlady/December 2017


MAKE YOUR MAUVE

If you’re keen to shift out of neutral on the eye, a mauve-toned eyeshadow with a hint of copper is the most wearable ‘out there’ shade. Apply a little bit to the lower lash line as well (for dramatic effect, of course) and layer on a few coats of black mascara. And if you really want to make your eyes pop, match with a dark berry lip.


Fashion & Beauty

SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

If you feel a little selfconscious in something too fitted, a draped, strappy sheath is your go-to cocktail number. But if you’re looking to show off your curves, try the fabric of the season: body-hugging velvet. LAURA: Dress (R329) and earrings (R179) H&M; heels (R699) Madison ADEOLA: Dress (R399) Brett Robson, Zando; heels (R1399) Steve Madden, Zando; choker (R199,50) Colette by Colette Hayman


1. Dolce & Gabbana The

3

Eyeshadow Quad in Amore 145 R1000 2. Gosh 9 Shades Metallic

Shadow Collection in 005 To Party in London R280 3. Heels (R999) Zara 4. Urban Decay Afterdark Eyeshadow Palette R850 5. Wet n Wild Megaglo Highlighting Powder in Precious Petals R89,95 6. Bag (R799) Witchery, Woolworths 7. Lancôme La Vie Est Belle L’Eclat EDP R1499 for 50ml 8. Elie Saab Girl of Now EDP, R1330 for 50ml 9. Clarins Limited Edition Palette

4

2

4 Colour Eyeshadow Palette R560 10. Maybelline Master Blush Color & Highlighting Kit in 10 R249,95

1

6

8

10

5

7 9

December 2017/Fairlady 67


GOLDEN EYE

Going for gold? Choose the right shade for your skin tone: metallic brown coppery shadows for olive skin tone and a yellowy gold for dark skin tone. Apply a black liquid liner to the upper lash line for some definition and to prevent the eyeshadow from making your eyes look washed out.


GARDEN PARTY (opposite)

Shades of green look fantastic on all skin tones – just pick the one that works best for you. For the festive season, go for a luxe, shimmery fabric. LAURA: Top (R4200) Klûk CGDT; earrings (R199) Poetry; rings (R399 each) Country Road, Woolworths ADEOLA: Dress (R799) Poetry; earrings (R199,50) Colette by Colette Hayman

FANCY FOOTWORK (this page)

If you don’t want to invest in a new occasion dress, just wear your favourite LBD and spice it up with some indulgent new accessories in velvet and crystal. Heels (R599) Footwork, Spree; earrings (R799) Mimco, Woolworths

December 2017/Fairlady 69


Cheeks, lips

lashes

BIRDS OF A FEATHER (opposite)

1. Sisley Phyto-Lip Twist in 4 R576 2. NYX Professional Makeup Cosmic Metals Lip Cream in 02 Fuchsia Fusion R154,95 3. Black Radiance Brilliant Effects Lip Gloss in Star Struck R99,95 4. Smashbox Be Legendary Liquid Metal in Crimson Chrome R330 5. NYX Professional Makeup Bright Idea Illuminating Stick in Rose Petal Pop R134,95 6. Chanel Rouge Coco Gloss in 756 R540 7. Dolce & Gabbana The Lipgloss in Shimmer 55 R525 8. Smith & Cult Lipgloss in Life in Photographs R436 9. Dior Addict Ultra Gloss in 676 Cruise R515 10. Lancôme Monsieur Big Mascara in Black R350 11. Clarins Wonder Perfect Mascara in 01 Black R330

This is no costume party boa – the fringelike feathers act as an accessory to jazz up an otherwise simple garment, adding a soft, playful touch to your night-out look. ADEOLA: Dress (R6 800) Klûk CGDT; earrings (R799) Mimco, Woolworths LAURA: Shirt (R629) Zara; trousers (R2 999) Gavin Rajah; earrings (R169,50) Colette by Colette Hayman

10

5 1

11

2

6

7 8

9

4

3

70 Fairlady/December 2017


BOLT FROM THE BLUE

This showstopping peacock-inspired eye looks absolutely amazing on darker skin tones. Mix cobalt blue eyeshadow and emerald green – and remember to blend upwards to prevent the eyeshadow from looking too solid. Choose a lip shade with a metallic finish to show off all the textures.

INTERN: DANIEL GELDENHUYS. MODELS: LAURA SCOTT OF FUSION MODELS AND ADEOLA ARIYO OF BOSS MODELS. MAKEUP: MELISSA VAN ZYL. HAIR: SUAAD JEPPIE OF ONE LEAGUE CREATIVE MANAGEMENT


Advertorial

BELOW: CRYSTAL GLAZE PORTUGUESE CROCKERY RANGE, FROM R99

LEFT: FRAGRANCE CARD A GIFT FOR YOU, R55 BELOW: VIRGIN TERRITORY OLIVE OIL 200ML, R90

PUT A BOW ON IT

RIGHT: SWEET GRACE HANDCREAM, R250

LEFT: PETRA PATTERNED MINI BOWL, R99

BELOW ALICE LEATHER POUCH SET, R699

Spoil the special people in your life with a gift, carefully considered and chosen for the lucky recipient. And there’s no need to trawl the teeming malls – Poetry has something to fill everyone’s gift bag this season!

BLUSH ROSE SHORT PYJAMAS, R450 ABOVE: GOLD TWIG SALAD SERVER R299 RIGHT: BELVOIR ELDERFLOWER CORDIAL, R99

ABOVE: STATEMENT TASSEL EARRINGS, R150 RIGHT: LEATHER TOTE BAG R1799, AND PRINTED SCARF, R225

Items available in Poetry stores and online at www.poetrystores.co.za

ABOVE: DAZY LEAF AND FLOWER PRINTED SCARF, R199

LEFT: BLUE & GOLD STRIPE MUG, R180


A bush celebration

Two scrumptious roasts bursting with flavour, a trough of lemony potatoes and a gooey macadamia and fig pudding make this a truly South African feast.

MACADAMIA AND FIG STEAMED PUDDING FOR RECIPE, TURN TO PAGE 82


Festive cheer!

BEEF RIB ROAST WITH HERB MUSTARD CRUST FOR RECIPE, TURN TO PAGE 80

December 2017/Fairlady 75


LEMON HASSELBACK POTATOES


Festive cheer! Smoked oysters and smoked trout on pumpernickel bread Makes 24 Prep and cooking time: 15 min (+ cooling time) • • • • • • • •

/3 cup (80g) crème fraîche 1 tbsp horseradish cream 4 slices pumpernickel bread 1 x 859g packet (10) smoked oysters 1 medium-sized (140g) lemon 4 small pickled onions, quartered lengthways 50g smoked trout, cut into 14 pieces fennel fronds or dill sprigs, to serve 1

1. Place the crème fraîche and horseradish cream in a small bowl; stir until just combined. 2. Toast the bread and leave to cool. Cut each slice into six squares. 3. Divide the crème fraîche mixture between toast squares. Top 10 of the squares with an oyster. Finely grate lemon zest over the oysters; top with a little freshly ground black pepper. 4. Top the remaining squares with a pickled onion quarter wrapped loosely in a piece of the smoked trout. Garnish with the fennel or dill and season to taste.

Lemon hasselback potatoes Serves 10 Prep and cooking time: 1hr 45 min • • • • •

60g butter 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp finely grated lemon rind 1 tbsp lemon juice 10 (2kg) medium potatoes, peeled

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C (160°C fan-forced). 2. Heat the butter, oil, rind and juice in a small saucepan over low heat until the butter has melted. Remove from heat.

3. Place the potatoes on a chopping board. Working with one at a time, place two chopsticks on the board along the longer sides of the potato. Slice the potato thinly, cutting through to the chopsticks to prevent cutting all the way through; you’ll need to stop higher at the ends to avoid cutting through. Repeat with the remaining potatoes. 4. Place the potatoes cut-side up in a large, shallow baking dish. Brush half the butter mixture over the potatoes; sprinkle potatoes well with lightly crushed sea salt. Roast for 1 hour. Brush again with the butter mixture. Roast for a further 30 minutes or until deep golden brown and tender.

TIP If you are cooking the potatoes with a roast at a higher temperature, reduce the cooking time of the potatoes.

Sweet carrot, spinach and currant salad Serves 8-I0 Prep and cooking time: 25 min For the honey dressing • 40g butter • ¼ cup (90g) honey • 2 tsp sherry vinegar • 1 tsp orange flower water • 1 tsp lemon juice • ¼ cup (40g) dried currants

SMOKED OYSTERS AND SMOKED TROUT ON PUMPERNICKEL BREAD

• 3 bunches baby carrots, peeled and trimmed • 100g baby spinach leaves • 2 cups loosely packed fresh flatleaf parsley leaves • ¾ cup (100g) shelled pistachios 1. For the honey dressing:

Heat the butter in a small saucepan over medium heat until it turns brown; add the honey, vinegar, orange flower water and lemon juice. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 1 minute. Continued on page 80

SWEET CARROT, SPINACH AND CURRANT SALAD

December 2017/Fairlady 77


Festive cheer!

PIMM’S AND PUNCH FOR RECIPE TURN TO PAGE 80

78 Fairlady/December 2017


PLUMS FROM ROAST PORK RECIPE FOR RECIPE TURN TO PAGE 80


Festive cheer! Remove from the heat and add the currants. Season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. 2. Add the carrots to a large saucepan of boiling salted water and boil, uncovered, for 2-3 minutes or until just tender. Drain, and transfer to a bowl. Drizzle the carrots with some of the honey dressing; leave to cool. 3. Toss the cooled carrots with the spinach, parsley and most of the pistachios. Arrange on a serving platter; drizzle over the remaining dressing and scatter pistachios on top. TIP Orange flower (or orange blossom) water is available from some delicatessens. You can omit it, if you prefer.

Pimm’s and punch Serves 10 Prep time: 5 min • 2 cups (500ml) Pimm’s No.1 • 1.25 litres (5 cups) ginger ale • 1 Mediterranean cucumber, sliced thinly lengthways • 1 orange, sliced thinly • 1 lemon, sliced thinly • 1 lime, sliced thinly • 4 cups ice cubes 1. Combine all the ingredients in a

large jug or punch bowl, and serve immediately.

Roast pork loin with plums and garden herbs Serves 8-10 Prep and cooking time: 2 hrs (+ overnight refrigeration and standing time) • 2.5kg boneless loin of pork, rind on and scored • 1 small bunch fresh rosemary • ½ bunch bay leaves • 1/3 cup (80ml) extra-virgin olive oil • 1 tbsp coarse cooking salt • 4 medium (600g) red onions, quartered • 8 medium (1.2kg) plums, halved and pips removed

80 Fairlady/December 2017

For the chestnut stuffing • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil • 200g pancetta (or bacon), chopped finely • 2 medium (300g) onions, chopped finely • 4 cloves garlic, crushed • 425g tin whole chestnuts, rinsed, drained, chopped coarsely • 1 cup finely chopped fresh curly-leaf parsley • 3 cups (200g) stale breadcrumbs • 2 tsp finely grated orange rind • 2 eggs, beaten lightly 1. Pat the pork rind dry; place the

pork on a plate. Refrigerate uncovered, skin-side up, to allow the rind to dry out overnight. 2. For the chestnut stuffing:

Heat the oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Cook the pancetta, stirring, for 3 minutes or until lightly browned. Reduce the heat to medium; toss in the onion and garlic, and cook, stirring, for about 5 minutes or until lightly browned and softened. Transfer to a large bowl; add the remaining ingredients. Season well, and cool. 3. Preheat the oven to 240°C (220°C fan-forced). 4. Place the chestnut stuffing down the centre of the pork loin. Roll the pork to enclose the stuffing and secure with kitchen string at 2cm intervals. 5. Arrange the rosemary and bay leaves in the base of a shallow medium-sized baking dish. Place the pork on top of the herbs. Rub 1 tablespoon of the oil over the pork rind and rub with salt. Roast uncovered for 30 minutes or until the rind is blistered and browned. (There may be smoke in the oven from the fat at this stage.) Turn the heat down to 180°C (160°C fan-forced) and roast the loin for another 25 minutes. 6. Meanwhile, line an oven tray with baking paper. Place the onion and plums on the tray. Drizzle with the remaining oil. Place in the oven and roast, with the pork, for a further 30 minutes or until the pork juices run clear when a skewer is inserted into the side of the roast. If you’re using a meat thermometer, it should

register 70°C-75°C in the centre. Remove the pork from the oven; leave to stand, covered loosely with foil, for 10 minutes. 7. Slice the pork and serve with the plum and onion. TIP The stuffing can be prepared the day before roasting. Ask the butcher to score the rind about 5mm apart; you will need a Stanley knife if you do it yourself.

Beef rib roast with herb mustard crust Serves 10 Prep and cooking time: 2 hrs (+ standing time) • 3kg beef standing rib roast • ¼ cup (60ml) extra-virgin olive oil • 10 cloves garlic, skin on • 1/3 cup (80ml) red wine • ¼ cup (60ml) extra-virgin olive oil, extra • 1 medium (140g) lemon For the herb mustard crust • bunch sage • 1/3 cup (95g) English mustard • 1½ tbsp brown sugar • 2 tsp fresh thyme leaves 1. Preheat the oven to 220°C (200°C fan-forced). Take the beef out of the fridge 1 hour before cooking to bring to room temperature. 2. For the herb mustard crust:

Thinly slice 12 sage leaves; reserve the rest for serving. Place the sliced sage and the remaining ingredients in a small bowl; stir to combine. 3. Line a shallow baking dish with baking paper. Place the beef on the paper, rub the herb mustard crust over the beef and season well with sea salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper. Drizzle with 2 tbsp of the oil. Roast the beef for 20 minutes or until lightly browned. Reduce the oven temperature to 180°C (160°C fanforced) and roast a further 20 minutes. Add the garlic to the dish, then roast the whole lot for another hour or until


RUM BALLS FOR RECIPE TURN TO PAGE 82

MACADAMIA AND FIG STEAMED PUDDING FOR RECIPE TURN TO PAGE 82 MANGO AND GRANADILLA PAVLOVA FOR RECIPE TURN TO PAGE 82

December 2017/Fairlady 81


Festive cheer! cooked to your liking and the garlic is soft and caramelised. 4. Remove the baking dish from the oven. Spoon the wine over the beef and drizzle with the remaining oil. Wrap the beef in two layers of foil, then a dry tea towel. Leave to stand for 30 minutes. 5. Heat the extra oil in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the reserved sage leaves; cook for 2 minutes, stirring, until they take on a darker green and crisp up. Remove from the pan with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel. 6. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the zest from the lemon and cut into long, thin strips. Place the beef on a serving platter; scatter with the crisp sage and lemon zest. Drizzle with some of the pan juices and serve with the garlic. TIP: Insert a meat thermometer in the centre of the thickest part of the meat without touching the bone. It should reach 60°C for rare, 65– 70°C for medium and 70–75°C for well done.

Macadamia and fig steamed pudding Serves 10 Prep and cooking time: 4 hrs (+ overnight soaking time) • 2/3 cup (100g) dried currants • 1½ cups (250g) sultanas • ¾ cup (150g) chopped soft and juicy figs • ½ cup (125ml) dark rum • 125g butter, softened • ½ cup (110g) firmly packed dark brown sugar • 2 tbsp maple syrup • 3 eggs • ½ cup (75g) self-raising flour • 1 tsp mixed spice • 1¼ cups (85g) stale white breadcrumbs • ¾ cup (100g) macadamias, toasted, chopped FIG AND NUT TOPPING • ½ cup (110g) firmly packed dark brown sugar

82 Fairlady/December 2017

• 2 tbsp maple syrup • 125g butter, chopped • ½ cup (100g) chopped soft and juicy figs • 1/3 cup (50g) macadamias, toasted, chopped coarsely • 2 tbsp dark rum 1. Combine the currants, sultanas, figs and rum in a large bowl; cover, and leave to stand at room temperature overnight or for several days until the rum is absorbed. Stir occasionally. 2. Grease a 2-litre (8-cup) pudding basin with a little melted butter. Line the base with a round of baking paper. 3. Using an electric mixer, whisk the butter, sugar and maple syrup in a small bowl until just combined. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well between additions until incorporated. The mixture may appear curdled at this stage. Stir the butter mixture into the fruit mixture, then fold in the combined flour and spice, breadcrumbs and nuts. Mix well. 4. Place a 30cm sheet of foil on the countertop; spray with cooking oil. Top with a 30cm sheet of baking paper. Fold a 5cm pleat crossways through both layers. Place the sheets baking-paper-side down over your pudding basin. Secure around the basin with string or a lid. Make handles using string tied across the top. Trim away excess foil and paper, leaving about 4cm. Crush the excess foil around the string or lid to help form a good seal. 5. Carefully lower the pudding basin into a large saucepan filled with enough boiling water to come halfway up the side of the basin. Cover the pan with a tight-fitting lid and boil for 3 hours, or until a skewer inserted into the centre of the pudding comes out clean. Replenish with boiling water as needed to maintain boil and water level during cooking.

down a little (it must still be warm). 7. Leave the pudding to stand for 5 minutes before turning out onto a serving plate. Pour half the fig and nut topping over the pudding; serve the rest with the pudding. Decorate the pudding with leaves and flowers, if desired, but remember to remove before serving. TIP: The pudding can be made 1 month ahead; store covered in the fridge, or freeze for up to 6 months. Serve with custard, cream or ice-cream. To reheat: If frozen, thaw for 2 days in the fridge, then stand pudding at room temperature for 12 hours before reheating. Return pudding to basin; cover and cook as per the recipe for 1½ hours. To microwave: Reheat the room-temperature pudding (see above) on a microwavesafe plate on medium for about 10 minutes or until hot. Reheat 4 single servings at a time on high for about 1½ minutes or until hot.

Rum balls MAKES 40 Prep time: 20 mins • 250g plain biscuits (such as Marie) • 395g tin sweetened condensed milk • 1 cup (80g) desiccated coconut • ¼ cup (25g) cocoa powder, sifted • 1 tsp finely grated orange zest • ¼ cup (60ml) dark rum • ½ cup (40g) desiccated coconut, toasted, extra

6. For the fig and nut topping:

1. Blitz the biscuits to fine crumbs. 2. Transfer the crumbs to a large

While the pudding is steaming, combine the sugar, syrup and butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat; stir until the sugar is dissolved. Add the figs; simmer uncovered for 3 minutes or until thickened slightly. Stir in the nuts and rum. Leave to cool

bowl; add the condensed milk, coconut, cocoa, zest and rum. Stir well to combine. 3. Roll the mixture into walnut-sized balls, then toss the balls in extra coconut. Place on a tray; cover and refrigerate until firm.


TIP: Coconut can be toasted in a frying pan; stir occasionally over medium heat till golden. Leave to cool before using. Balls can be made 1 month ahead, but keep refrigerated.

Mango and granadilla pavlova Serves 8-10 Prep and cooking time: 2 hrs (+ cooling time) 6 egg whites pinch cream of tartar 1½ cups (330g) castor sugar 1 tbsp cornflour 1½ tsp white vinegar 600ml thickened cream 2 tsp vanilla bean paste 1 tbsp icing sugar 2 large (1.2kg) mangoes, peeled and sliced thickly • 4 fresh granadillas • nasturtium or mint leaves PHOTOGRAPHS: JOHN PAUL URIZAR. STYLING: DAVID MORGAN. TEXT: BAUER SYNDICATION / WWW.MAGAZINEFEATURES.CO.ZA

• • • • • • • • •

1. Preheat the oven to 120°C (100°C fan-forced). Grease an ovenproof serving platter with a little softened butter; dust with a little cornflour and shake away the excess. (Or draw a 22cm round on baking paper and invert the paper onto a lightly greased large oven tray.) 2. Using an electric mixer, whisk the egg whites and cream of tartar on high speed until soft peaks form. Gradually add the castor sugar, whisking well between additions until the sugar dissolves. Continue whisking until the sugar is completely dissolved. Reduce the speed to low and whisk in cornflour and vinegar until just combined. 3. Spoon the meringue onto the prepared platter to make a 22cm round; the mixture will spread slightly. Use the back of a spoon to shape the circumference of the pavlova. Make a slight indent in the top. Bake uncovered for about 1½ hours, or until dry to the touch. Turn the oven off and leave to cool in the oven with the door slightly ajar. 4. Just before serving, use an electric mixer to whip the cream, vanilla and icing sugar in a small bowl until soft

ROAST PORK LOIN WITH PLUMS AND GARDEN HERBS FOR RECIPE TURN TO PAGE 80

peaks form. Spoon the cream over the pavlova. Top with mango, granadilla pulp and the leaves. TIPS: If you’re cooking the pavlova on the serving platter, make sure it’ll fit into your oven before you start. Don’t use delicate bone china or highly decorated platters;

there are many inexpensive strong porcelain serving platters available. This recipe can be prepared to the end of Step 3 up to two days in advance – keep the meringue in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. In humid weather, make it a day ahead. Decorate close to serving. ✤

December 2017/Fairlady 83


Festive cheer!

Super salmon We were so impressed by his delicious salmon that, as a special Christmas treat, we asked chef Kenneth Ngubane if he would share his recipe with us. Enjoy it – we certainly did!

• a pinch of sugar • 2 tbsp finely grated lemon zest • 2 tbsp finely grated orange zest • 120g Norwegian salmon • 1 tbsp olive oil • 10g chopped onion • 1 clove garlic • 30g frozen peas • 1 small butternut • a knob of butter • about 1 tbsp sugar • a pinch of ground cinnamon • 50g maize meal • 1¼ tbsp cake wheat flour • 3 eggs • 20g breadcrumbs • 1 fresh fennel bulb, sliced lengthways

Kenneth Ngubane of Tsogo Sun’s Punchinello’s at Montecasino in Fourways.

84 Fairlady/December 2017

Grilled Norwegian salmon with deep-fried pap, pea purée, cinnamon butternut & grilled fennel • a pinch of black kosher salt • a pinch of freshly ground black peppercorns • a pinch of freshly ground coriander seeds • a pinch of fennel seeds • a pinch crushed red pepper flakes

spices, sugar and lemon and orange zest in a bowl. 2. Cook the maize meal. When cooled, shape it into a log and slice into discs. Dust with flour, egg wash and breadcrumbs, then deep-fry. 3. Heat the oil; sauté onion and garlic. and add the peas. When cooked, purée until smooth. Scoop out the butternut using a melon baller, and blanch, then sauté in butter, sugar and cinnamon. 4. Grill the salmon to medium-done, and the fennel until charred. To serve, drop a dollop of pea purée onto a serving plate, top with the salmon, spread the lemon zest mixture evenly over the fish and add rounds of deepfried pap. Garnish with grilled fennel.

PHOTOGRAPHS: CINDY ELLIS PHOTOGRAPHY

Don’t be put off by the long list of ingredients – if you look closely, you’ll see they’re all easily available, and Kenneth assures us this recipe is deceptively easy to make. It’s a hot favourite at Punchinello’s, the restaurant he heads up at the Southern Sun Montecasino precinct in Fourways, and what we really liked about it was the imaginative combination of imported Norwegian salmon with local pap: fusion at its best. Plus, the pap is deep-fried! Indulgent, innovative and satisfying – perfect for a proper South African Christmas…

1. Combine the salt, pepper,


Santé!

COCKTAILS The Rose Garden You’ll need: • 50ml Hendrick’s gin • 15ml rose syrup • 25ml lemon juice • 5 slices of cucumber • soda water

To garnish: crushed ice and rose petals

Shake until the ingredients are fully combined. 3. Prepare a glass (or a dainty watering can if you have one!) with crushed ice. 4. Pour the cocktail mixture into the glass through a cocktail strainer. 5. Top with soda water. Garnish with rose petals and enjoy!

If it’s summer, it must be gin, obviously. And of course a bubble or two. And maybe a touch of tequila… Cocktails are breezy, delicious and fun – basically, a holiday in a glass.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LIZA VAN DEVENTER, GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES. ALCOHOL NOT FOR SALE TO PERSONS UNDER THE AGE OF 18.

How to do it: 1. Prepare the cucumber by

removing the skin and the seeds, then add it to the cocktail shaker, and muddle. 2. Add the gin, rose syrup and lemon juice to a cocktail shaker.

MOUTHWATERING MARGARITA

You’ll need: • fresh lime juice • coarse salt • tequila • Cointreau • crushed ice • cocktail shaker

How to do it: 1. Chill a glass (any glass will do, but a

CULTURED KIR ROYALE You’ll need: • Crème de Cassis • Champagne or sparkling wine

• 30ml elderflower liqueur • 150ml Fever-Tree Tonic Water • 3 thinly sliced rounds of cucumber

How to do it:

How to do it:

Add a finger’s width of Crème de Cassis to a champagne flute, then fill the flute with chilled bubbly.

Fill a highball glass with pieces of ice. Combine all ingredients and give a gentle stir. Garnish with 3 thinly sliced rounds of cucumber.

ELDERFLOWER POWER

cocktail glass is always pretty). Dip the rim of the glass in lime juice and then in coarse salt. 2. Fill the shaker with crushed ice, then add one part Cointreau and one part lime juice to two parts tequila. 3. Shake well to mix, then pour the chilled drink (without the ice) into the prepared glass. ✤

You’ll need: • 50ml Hendrick’s Gin

December 2017/Fairlady 85


Advertorial

FESTIVE

Entertaining has never been easier or tastier than with fantastic SA pork!


ROAST PORK BELLY WITH ROAST POTATOES AND SWEET APPLES Serves 6-8

• 2kg boneless pork belly, • 2 tbsp coarse salt • 2 tsp white pepper • 2 tbsp olive oil For the potatoes • 1kg floury potatoes • vegetable oil for deep-frying • sea salt and black pepper

RECIPES & STYLING: JUSTINE KIGGEN. PHOTOGRAPHS: LIZA VAN DEVENTER.

For the sweet apples • 2 tbsp butter • 3 tbsp honey • 2 red apples, quartered • 3 tbsp frozen cranberries, defrosted • fresh mint to garnish 1. Preheat the oven to 190ºC. Place the pork on a board. With a sharp knife, score the fat, making sure not to cut all the way through to the meat. Sprinkle the scored fat with salt and pepper and rub with oil. 2. Place the pork skin-side down on a roasting tray, roast for 50 minutes, then turn it over and continue to roast for an additional 40 minutes or until the crackling is crispy and the pork is cooked through. 3. For the potatoes: Put the potatoes in a pot, cover with cold water and parboil for approximately. 10-15 minutes or until softened but not cooked all the way through. Drain and cool, then remove the skin and cut into quarters. Heat the oil in a small, deep pot; add the potatoes and fry until golden and cooked through. 4. For the apples: Heat the butter and honey in a pan, add the apples and cook until softened. Toss in the cranberries and continue to cook until the cranberries are soft and coated with the honey butter mixture. 5. To serve: Slice the pork and serve with the roast potatoes and apples. Garnish with mint.

This super-easy weeknight meal has a twist to make it extra special without much effort. BACON-WRAPPED MEAT LOAF Serves 6

• 800g pork mince • 2 tsp fennel seeds • 2 tsp each salt & white pepper • 1 tbsp oregano, dried • 1 tbsp whole grain mustard • 5 asparagus spears, blanched • 5 baby carrots, blanched • 500g streaky bacon • parsley to garnish and baby gherkins to serve 1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC. Put the mince in a bowl, add the fennel seeds, seasoning, oregano and mustard; stir well to combine. Line a loaf tin with bacon strips, allowing them to overlap

and hang over the edge of the tin. 2. Pack half the mince mixture into the base of the tin, top with asparagus and carrots, then top with remaining mince. Fold the overhanging bacon strips over the mince to cover it. 3. Place in the oven and bake for 5055 minutes or until cooked through. Then unmold from the tin onto a serving platter. 4. To serve: Slice, and serve with baby gherkins. Garnish with parsley. Tip: This dish is delicious served hot or cold with mustard, pickled onions and crusty French bread.


SWEET! Yotam Ottolenghi and Helen Goh share three of the best bakes from their gorgeous new cookbook – just in time for Christmas!

MONT BLANC TARTS RECIPE ON PAGE 91

88 Fairlady/December 2017


Book extract

CINNAMON PAVLOVA, PRALINE CREAM AND FRESH FIGS RECIPE ON PAGE 93


There’s a metaphor in there, we’re sure, about ❛ things tasting all the sweeter when you’ve had to work just that little bit harder to earn them. ❜


Book extract Mont Blanc tarts Named after the snowy mountain they resemble, Mont Blanc tarts – with their white meringue, whipped cream and tan-coloured chestnut purée – can often taste more fabulous than they look, with all that beige and white. We wanted to see if we could improve their visual appeal – bring in some contrast by playing around with the colours, for example – but after various experiments (dark chocolate pastry, a lighter-coloured purée) we were beginning to think that the tried-and-tested route up this particular mountain was the only winning one. It was a moment of pure synchronicity, then, that at one of our weekly pastry meetings there were various things lying around which came together in a flash: some empty tart shells, candied pecans, an open can of chestnut spread. At the same time, Helen and Yotam both grabbed an empty shell, filled it with chestnut spread, spooned over smooth whipped cream and added the element that had been missing – the candied pecans- which brought the crunch and look needed. There’s a metaphor in there, we’re sure, about climbing mountains, and not giving up, and things tasting all the sweeter when you’ve had to work just that little bit harder to earn them.

Makes 8

Flaky pastry • 200g plain flour • 120g unsalted butter, fridge-cold, cut into 1cm dice • 30g castor sugar • ¼ tsp salt • ½ tsp white wine vinegar • 3 tbsp ice-cold water Candied pecans • 1 tbsp maple syrup • 1 tbsp liquid glucose • 1 tbsp castor sugar • 120g pecan halves • 1/8 tsp flaky sea salt Filling • 60g dark cooking chocolate (70% cocoa solids) • 320g sweetened chestnut spread (we use Clement Faugier; whichever brand you use, just

make sure that it is not the unsweetened variety) Vanilla whipped cream • 300ml double cream • 1 tbsp icing sugar • 1 tsp vanilla extract • ½ tsp brandy 1. For the pastry, place the flour,

butter, sugar and salt in the bowl of a food processor. Blitz a few times, until it is the consistency of fine breadcrumbs, then add the vinegar and water. Continue to work for a few seconds, then transfer to your work surface. Shape into a ball and flatten into a disc, wrap in clingfilm and set aside in the fridge for at least 1 hour (or up to 3 days). 2. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/180ºC fan/Gas Mark 6. To line the tart cases, allow the dough to set at room temperature for 30 minutes (if it has been in the fridge for more than a few hours) and placed on a lightly floured work surface. Roll out the dough to about 3mm thick and cut out 8 circles, 14cm wide. Re-roll the dough, if necessary, to get eight circles. Transfer one circle at a time to 8-9cm wide and 2-3cm deep fluted tins and gently press the pastry into the corners of the tart tin: you want it to fit snugly and for there to be a decent amount of pastry hanging over the edge of the tart case, as the pastry can shrink a little when baked. Place in the fridge for 30 minutes to rest. 3. To blind bake the tart cases,

line the pastry bases with baking parchment or paper liners and fill with baking beans. Bake for 18 minutes, until the pastry is golden brown at the edges. Remove the beans and paper and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the base is golden brown. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool completely in the tray. Once cool, trim the pastry (so that it can be removed from the tray) and set aside until ready to fill. 4. Increase the oven temperature to 210ºC/190ºC fan/Gas Mark 6. Line a baking tray ( with a lipped edge) with

TOOLS & TIPS

• You will need eight minifluted tins, about 8-9cm wide and 2-3cm deep. • The pastry can be made up to 3 days ahead and kept in the fridge (wrapped in cling-film) until ready to roll. It can also be frozen for up to 2 months. This candied pecans can be made up to five days in advanced and kept in an airtight container. • Once assembled, the tarts are the best eaten on the day they are baked.

baking parchment and set aside. 5. To make the candied pecans,

put the maple syrup, glucose and sugar into a small saucepan and place over a low heat. Stir gently until the sugar has melted, then add the pecans and salt. Stir so that the nuts are coated in syrup, then tip the nuts on to the lined baking tray. Place in the oven for about 8 minutes, or until the syrup is bubbling around the nuts. Remove the tray from the oven and set aside until completely cooled. When the nuts are cooled, the glaze should be completely crisp; if not, return them to the oven for a few more minutes. Once cooled, break or roughly chop the nuts into 0.5cm pieces and set aside until ready to use. 6. Make the filling when you are ready to assemble. Place the

chocolate in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water, making sure that the base of the bowl is not touching the water. Stir occasionally until melted, then use a pastry brush to line the inside of each case with the chocolate. Set aside for about 30 minutes to set, then fill with enough chestnut spread so that it rises about halfway up the sides of the tart cases. 7. For the vanilla whipped cream, pour the cream into the bowl

of an electric mixer with the whisk attachment in place. Add the icing sugar, vanilla extract and brandy and whisk on a high speed for 1 minute, or until medium-soft peaks form.

December 2017/Fairlady 91


8. Divide the whipped cream

between the tarts, so that it is slightly domed on top of the chestnut spread. Sprinkle the candied pecans generously on top – you might have a tablespoon or two left over, but these can be saved to munch on, to sprinkle over your next bowl of breakfast granola or porridge, or to use in the Knickerbocker Glory [not included here] – and serve.

Belinda’s flourless coconut and chocolate cake Every month or so we gather in the test kitchen with our pastry chefs. It’s an open forum, with the chefs presenting their offerings, which we then taste and discuss. It’s always exciting, as ideas are constantly being improved and implemented. This cake was a product of one of those meetings, brought to the table by Franceska Venzon, herself inspired by Belinda Jeffery’s version of the cake. We’ve played around with the shape – baking it in a loaf tin – and added a chocolate ganache, but the base is all Belinda’s. There’s something about a cake showcasing its flourless-ness or gluten-free nature which can often make its sound a little bit worthy. Unfairly so, in a case like this, where the feeling of eating it is the very opposite of ‘freefrom’: it’s utterly buttery and decadent.

92 Fairlady/December 2017

Serves 8

• 200g unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus extra for greasing • 250g castor sugar • 60g desiccated coconut • scraped seeds of 1 vanilla pod • ¼ tsp salt • 4 large eggs • 180g ground almonds Water ganache • 60g cooking chocolate (70% cocoa solids), roughly chopped into 1cm pieces • 25g castor sugar • 25g liquid glucose • 3 tbsp water • scraped seeds of ½ vanilla pod • 200g unsalted butter, at room temperature, cut into 2cm cubes 1. Preheat the oven to 180ºC/160º fan/Gas Mark 4. Grease the base and sides of 900g loaf tin or 2cm round springform tin and line with baking parchment, then set aside. 2. Place the butter, sugar, desiccated coconut, vanilla and salt in an electric mixer with the paddle attachment in place. Beat on a medium-high speed, until pale and fluffy: about 3 minutes. 3. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Reduce the speed to low, add the ground almonds and mix until just combined. 4. Scrape the mixture into the cake tin

and bake for either 40 minutes if using the loaf tin, or 50 minutes if using the round tin, or until the cake is golden brown on top and a skewer inserted into the middle comes out clean. 5. Remove the cake from the oven and set aside to cool in the tin before inverting onto the serving plate. Set aside until completely cool. 6. Make the water ganache when you are ready to serve. Place chocolate in a medium bowl and set aside. Put the sugar and the glucose in a saucepan and place over a medium-low heat. Stir to combine and, when the sugar has melted, increase the heat to medium and bring to a boil, stirring gently from time to time. Continue to boil for about 7 minutes, until the colour is a pale amber. Remove from the heat and carefully pour in the water. Don’t worry if the mix seizes: just return the pan to the heat, add the scraped vanilla seeds and stir gently and continuously until it returns to the boil and the sugar has melted again. Remove from the heat and wait for a minute before pouring the water-caramel over the chocolate. Allow to stand for about 3 minutes, then whisk to combine. 7. Add the butter, a couple of cubes at a time, whisking after each addition. 8. Continue until all the butter has been added, whisking to combine until the consistency is that of golden syrup.


Book extract

9. Spread the ganache over the top of the cake, letting a little run down the sides.

TOOLS & TIPS

• This can either be made in a regular 900g loaf tin or in a 23cm round spring form tin. • It will keep well for up to 5 days in an airtight container. It can be eaten on the day of making, but we think it tastes even better served at room temperature the following day.

Cinnamon Pavlova, praline cream and fresh figs

EXTRACTED FROM SWEET BY YOTAM OTTOLENGHI AND HELEN GOH (EBURY PRESS) PHOTOGRAPHY BY PEDEN + MUNK

This is a really stunning dessert for a special occasion. It also has a nice element of surprise, as the meringue base is not quite what you might expect: gooey – almost toffee-like – rather than dry and crispy. This is due to the brown sugar in the mix. Combined with the praline cream and fresh figs, it’s absolutely delicious. Pavlova is the dessert to make when you have a bit of time and are feeding people you adore. The recipe calls for flaked almonds but you can easily substitute those with chopped pistachios, as photographed.

Serves 10-12 (It’s quite rich, so the slices are not too big.)

• 20g flaked almonds • 50g dark cooking chocolate (70% cocoa solids), finely chopped • 600g fresh figs, cut into 1cm discs • 3 tbsp honey

Meringue • 125g egg white (from 3 large eggs) • 125g castor sugar • 100g dark muscovado sugar • 1½ tsp ground cinnamon 1. Preheat the oven to 170ºC/150ºC fan/Gas Mark 3. 2. Spread out all the almonds (for both

the pavlova and the praline, 70g) on a baking tray and toast for 7-8 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from the oven, divide into two piles (20g for the pavlova, 50g for the praline) and set aside to cool. 3. Reduce the oven temperature to 120ºC/100ºC fan/Gas Mark ½. Cover a large baking tray with baking parchment and trace a circle, about 23cm in diameter, on to the paper. Turn the paper so the drawn-on side is facing down but still visible. 4. First make the meringue. Pour enough water into a medium saucepan so that is rises a quarter of the way up the sides: you want the bowl from your electric mixer to be able to sit over the saucepan without touching the water. Bring the water to a boil. Place egg whites and sugars in the bowl of an electric mixer and whisk by hand to combine. Reduce the heat under the saucepan so the water is just simmering, then set the mixer bowl over the pan, making sure the water doesn’t touch the base of the bowl. Whisk egg whites continuously by hand until they are warm, frothy and the sugar is melted, about 4 min, then transfer back to electric mixer with the whisk attachment in place and whisk on high speed for about 5 min, until the meringue is cool, stiff and glossy. Add the cinnamon; whisk to combine. 5. Spread the meringue inside the drawn circle, creating a nest by making the sides a little higher than the centre. Place in the oven and bake for 3 hours, then switch off the oven but leave the meringues inside until they are completely cool: this will take about 2 hours. Once cool, remove from the oven and set aside. 6. Place the chocolate into a small heatproof bowl and set it over a small saucepan of simmering water, making sure the base of the bowl is not touching the water. Stir occasionally until melted. Cool slightly, then brush the chocolate inside the meringue nest, leaving the top and the sides bare. Do this gently, as the meringue is fairly

delicate. Leave to set for about 2 hours. 7. Make the praline. Place 50g toasted almonds on a parchmentlined baking tray (with a lipped edge) and set aside. Put the sugar and water into a small saucepan and place over medium-low heat, stirring until the sugar has melted. Cook, swirling the pan occasionally, until it turns a dark golden brown. Pour the caramel over the nuts (don’t worry if they’re not all covered) and leave until completely cool and set. Once cool, transfer the praline to the small bowl of a food processor and blitz until fine. 8. Place the cream, mascarpone and blitzed praline in a large bowl and whisk for about 1 minute, until stiff peaks form. Be careful not to over-whisk here – it doesn’t take much to thicken up – or it will split. If this begins to happen, use a spatula to fold a little more cream into the mix to bring it back together. Refrigerate until needed. 9. To assemble, spoon the cream into the centre of the meringue and top with the figs. Warm the honey in a small saucepan and stir through the 20g almonds (or pistachios, as pictured). Drizzle these over the figs, and serve. ✤

TOOLS & TIPS

• The praline (after blitzing but before it’s mixed with cream) can be made up to 3 days in advance and stored in an airtight container. • The meringues need to be made in advance as they take 3 hours to cook, 2 hours to cool in the oven, and another 2 hours to set, so you’re forced to get ahead by at least this much – but they will also keep for up to 3 days loosely wrapped in foil. • Once assembled, the pavlova should be eaten as soon as possible. It will hold for a couple of hours, but won’t look as good after that.

December 2017/Fairlady 93


GIFT IDEAS! FOR YOU

&

94 Fairlady/December 2017

everyone else

PHOTOGRAPH: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMMAGES

250 FAB


(R1690) SWAROVSKI

(R344 300) ROLEX

Christmas gifts! (R199) ACCESSORIZE

(R199,50) COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN (R1 599) PANDORA

(R299) ACCESSORIZE

(R290) BLACK BETTY

(R500) MATTER OF FAKT

(R199) ALL HEART, ZANDO

Fashion Add a bit of sparkle to your festive ensemble with celestial-motif jewels that twinkle and shine like the night sky.

(R1 299) PANDORA

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

(R114,50) COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN

FASHION EDITOR CARA-LEE HERR (R79) MISS MAXI, ZANDO

(R1 290) FOLLI FOLLIE (R1390) SWAROVSKI

(R114,50) COLETTE BY COLETTE HAYMAN

(R1 390 FOR SET OF TWO PAIRS) SWAROVSKI

(R1 590) FOLLI FOLLIE

December 2017/Fairlady 95


Christmas gifts! DIORIFIC MATTE FLUID IN 006 GLORY (R635) CRABTREE & EVELYN FROSTED SPICEWOOD REED DIFFUSER (R950)

CRABTREE & EVELYN CHRISTMAS BAUBLE TRILOGY (R850)

DIORIFIC PRECIOUS ROCKS GOLDEN GLOW LOOSE POWDER IN 001 (R940)

ELIZABETH ARDEN CERAMIDE OVERNIGHT FIRMING MASK (R685)

DIPTIQUE PHILOSYKOS EDP (R1930 FOR 75ML)

PERRICONE MD CHLORO PLASMA, (R1 350)

BENEFIT TRAVELSIZE GOGO TINT IN BRIGHT CHERRY (R175)

Beauty Fingers crossed that one of these gorgeous beauties lands up in your Christmas stocking this year!

DIORIFIC KHÔL LIPSTICK IN 341 PURE TOPAZ (R650)

BY KELLI CLIFTON LA PRAIRIE WHITE CAVIAR ILLUMINATING PEARL INFUSION (R8 200)

BENEFIT CHEEK PARADE BRONZER & BLUSH PALETTE (R895)

SISLEY INSTANT GLOW PRIMER (R1 025) SMASHBOX O-GLOSS (R340)

96 Fairlady/December 2017

CHANEL N°5 LIMITED EDITION FRAGMENTS D’OR (R1 530)


M. MICALLEF BESPOKE PERFUMES (R1 199-R3495) DIOR J’ADORE L’OR EDP (R2 200 FOR 40ML)

CHANEL N°5 LIMITED EDITION L’EAU 100ML BOTTLE AND 20ML SPRAY (R3060)

ELEMIS FRANGIPANI MONOI SALT GLOW (R995)

NIKEL NIKELIFT FACE CREAM (R995)

SISLEY EAU DU SOIR LIMITED EDITION 2017 EDP (R3135 FOR 100ML)

BLACK-UP FLASH COLOUR PALETTE (R855)

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

NUXE PRODIGIEUX LE PARFUM SET (R750)

CRABTREE & EVELYN RED BERRY & FIR POURED MINI CANDLE (R450 FOR 65G)

LA PERLA LA MIA PERLA EDP (R1650 FOR 100ML)

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JO MALONE GREEN ALMOND & REDCURRANT SCENTED CANDLE (R2 600) TANGLE TEEZER COMPACT HAIRBRUSH IN GLITTER GEM (R290) BOBBI BROWN HIGHLIGHTING POWDER IN PINK GLOW (R740)

ZADIG & VOLTAIRE JUST ROCK! EDP FOR HER (R1 110 FOR 50ML) & HIM (R845 FOR 50ML)

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FRUIT BOWL (R89,99) MR PRICE HOME CHAMPAGNE GLASS (R139) ZARA HOME

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AMBER RED WINE GLASS (R49,99) MR PRICE HOME

MARBLE & BRASS PESTLE & MORTAR (R299) POETRY

Home

FAUNA CUSHION COVER (R450) HANDMADE BY ME @ PEEK.ORG.ZA

Still on the hunt for the perfect gift? We have a few ideas… because who doesn’t want beautiful home comforts? BY LIESL ROBERTSON

BORROWED SPOONS TEA TOWEL IN SPRUCE (R145) SKINNY LAMINX

GOLD AND WHITE SALT AND PEPPER SHAKERS (R59,99) MR PRICE HOME

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HEX CHAMPAGNE BUCKET (R3 739) TOM DIXON, CRÉMA

LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE TRAVEL MUG (R129) WILD & WOLF @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

HOUSE TEALIGHT HOLDER (R139) ZARA HOME

98 Fairlady/December 2017

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SWIM GIRL SCATTER COVER (R369) DESIGN TEAM @ YUPPIECHEF.COM


BREW CAFETIERE (R3 356) AND ESPRESSO CUPS (R2 011) TOM DIXON, CRÉMA

MINI BLACK AND WHITE STOCKINGS (R39,99 EACH) MR PRICE HOME MARBLE & BRASS INLAY BOARD (R299) POETRY

DECORATIVE GLASS & PLASTIC MARBLE TRAY (R379) @HOME MINT & GOLD CERAMIC COASTER (R60) POETRY MEDIUM CHOLA CUBI VASE (R1395) WEYLANDTS

INFLATABLE SWAN CUP HOLDER (R129) COTTON ON

MISTLETOE PRINT NAPKINS (R429 FOR 4) ZARA HOME

CACTUS FRUIT BOWL (R1 629) ALESSI @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

SOAP DISH (R49,95) CLICKS

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

METAL HEARTSHAPED HOOK (R49,95) CLICKS TRIVET (R359) ZARA HOME

WOODEN TIME-OUT CLOCK (R350) MINIMA

PATTERNED COOL BAG (R229) H&M

LA BELLE ÉPOQUE MASSAGE CANDLE (R399) GAVIN RAJAH, @HOME PLUM TONGS (R741) TOM DIXON, CRÉMA BLUEBIRD MARBLE MUG (R210), SOUP BOWL (R280), SIDE PLATE (R260),DINNER PLATE (R320) LIAM MOONEY

CLASSIC HEADPHONES IN PLUSH PINK (R299) COTTON ON

MOTHER OF PEARL SALAD SERVER SET (R350) POETRY NALEDI SCATTER CUSHION (R480) LULASCLAN @ PEEK.ORG.ZA

TOLVE ROUND BEACH BLANKET (R249) COTTON ON MEMPHIS CRYSTAL WHITE WINE GLASSES (R80) LIAM MOONEY

December 2017/Fairlady 99


Christmas gifts!

LIVING THE HEALTHY LIFE BY JESSICA SEPEL (R325) @ FAITHFUL-TONATURE.CO.ZA

GEOMETRIC TEARDROP STORAGE CANISTER (R99,99) MR PRICE HOME

BREW STOVETOP (R2 946) TOM DIXON, CRÉMA

METAL CHRISTMAS COOKIE CUTTER SET (R99) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

QUARRY MERLOT IN WOODEN PRESENTATION BOX (R389) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

SILICONE FRENCH TRIVET (R189) LE CREUSET LINDOR GOLD RANGE PILLOW BOX 100G (R59,95) MAJOR RETAILERS

WOOLWORTHS INDULGE DARK CHOCOLATE SELECTION (R49,99)

Foodies METALLIC FLAMINGO PLATE (R49,99) MR PRICE HOME

POISON MARRON GLACÉ MINI PANETTONE,100G (R59) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

Think Christmas and you think delicious food, family & friends – so best keep that foodie in your life happy. Here are some terrific gifting ideas…

POISON CLASSIC PANETTONE IN FLORAL GIFT TIN 750G (R529) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM BEECHWOOD BOARD (R375) WEYLANDTS

COMPILED BY FOOD ASSISTANT MONICIA HORNE ECOFFEE CUP (R199) FAITHFUL-TONATURE.CO.ZA

WOOLWORTHS CHOCOLATEFLAVOURED SOETKOEKIE FUDGE (R42,99)

LINDT TEDDY ADVENT CALENDAR 172G (R159,95) MAJOR RETAILERS

BALEIA EXTRA VIRGIN COLD PRESSED OLIVE OIL 375ML (R88) BALEIAWINES.COM

LOVE MILO ANTS PEBBLE BOWL AND SPOON (R235) FAITHFULTO-NATURE. CO.ZA

100 Fairlady/December 2017

KITCHEN KULTURE BY KAMINI WOK (R199-R289; 2028CM) GAME

LOVE MILO FERN MILK JUG, (R155) FAITHFULTO-NATURE.CO.ZA

LILLE GLASS MUG WITH INFUSER (R149) MAXWELL & WILLIAMS @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

AMBER CHAMPAGNE GLASS (R49,99) MR PRICE HOME

THE SORBET COLLECTION SET OF 6 CAPPUCCINO MUGS (R1320) LE CREUSET

CLASSIC SPICE RACK (R679) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

OXO GOOD GRIP SILICONE EGG POACHERS (R199) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM


BURGON AND BALL POC-KIT GARDENER’S UTILITY BELT (R469) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

STANDING PLANTER (R299) WOOLWORTHS

POTTING SIEVE (R439) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

MIST SPRAYER (R389) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

Christmas gifts! EDIBLE GARDEN NASTURTIUM MIX & SEEDS (R79) @ MICRO GARDEN.CO.ZA

MERVYN GERS LARGE JUG (R369) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

GOLD PLANTER (R399) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

Gardens

GARDEN GLOVES (R379) @ BURGON AND BALL RHS BORDER YUPPIECHEF.COM GARDENING SPADE (R1 099) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

HUMBLE & MASH VINTAGE COMPOST BIN (R359) @ TAKEALOT.COM

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED. PRICES CORRECT AT THE TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

4 POCKET HANGING PLANTER (R289) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

ROUND METAL CUT OUT LANTERN (R299) WOOLWORTHS

Your green-fingered friends will absolutely love you if you come bearing one of these. Be sure to treat yourself, too! COMPILED BY TIFFANY DONSON

OUTDOOR CANDLE (R89,95) WOOLWORTHS

BRASS BALL LANTERN (R349) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM FIRE GLOBE FIREPLACE (R3 999) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

MIA MELANGE SMALL POT PLANT HOLDER (R249) @YUPPIECHEF. COM

VALENCIA DAYBED (R8900) PATIO WAREHOUSE

LECHUZA DELTA 10 SELF-WATERING TABLE PLANTER (R295) @ TAKEALOT.COM

LE CREUSET VASES (R490 EACH) LE CREUSET

December 2017/Fairlady 101


Christmas gifts!

CAT CHASE BALL (R49,99) MR PRICE HOME

SHWESHWE BANDANAS FOR BOTH CATS AND DOGS (FROM R200) @ KWEZIDOG.CO.ZA

BEST FRIEND CHICKEN STRIPS DOG TREAT (R31,99 FOR 50G) WOOLWORTHS

BEST FRIEND FREE RANGE BEEF KITTY STICKS (R31,99 FOR 80G) WOOLWORTHS

KONG GYRO (R280) @ SHINGAVET.CO.ZA

ORANGE FOX CORNER PROTECTOR (R59,95) @ PYLONES.CO.ZA

TASMANIA TIPI, M-PETS (R460) @ SHINGAVET. CO.ZA

DOG BOTTLE OPENER (R249,95) @ PYLONES.CO.ZA

Pets

DOG SUCTION HOLDER (R99,95) @ PYLONES.CO.ZA

ROGZ POP-UPZ, SMALL–LARGE IN 5 COLOURS (FROM R95) AT PET SHOPS AND VETSHOPS

It’s that special time of year to show your loved ones how much they mean to you, so we’ve chosen some pawsome gifts for your furkids as well as your animal-crazy friends and family.

JENNY MORRIS COCONUT BISCUITS 200G (R28) @ VONDIS. CO.ZA

COMPILED BY JANINE NORTJÉ pets@fairlady.com OWL GLASSES HOLDER (R249,95) @ PYLONES.CO.ZA FOX COTTON TOTE BAG (R230) @ ZANA PRODUCTS.CO.ZA

PRIDE BITES FIRE HYDRANT TOY (R129) @ TAKEALOT.COM ANIMAL PHONE HOLDERS (R149,95) @ PYLONES.CO.ZA

HUNTER CONVENIENCE RANGE COLLARS: NEON COLLARS (FROM R190) @ HUNTERSA.CO.ZA

102 Fairlady/December 2017

MUCA ORGANIC VALERIAN ROOT LUXURY JAR (R125) @ APETSLIFE.CO.ZA

VONDI’S SPECIAL CHICKEN 500G (R18,50) @ VONDIS.CO.ZA


BLACK CAT TOILET PAPER HOLDER, (R299,95) @ PYLONES.CO.ZA

KAYTEE FIESTA MANGO YOGURT DIPPED TREATS (R89) @ SHINGAVET.CO.ZA

TREAT TWISTER OUTWARD HOUND (R355) @ SHINGAVET.CO.ZA

PET PLACEMAT (R29,99) MR PRICE HOME

CRISPY SNACK FIBRES, VERSELELAGA (R95) @ SHINGAVET. CO.ZA

HILL’S STEWS (FROM R15) AVAILABLE FROM VETS

DUKE & GINGER ARTISAN 2-IN-1 SHAMPOO AND CONDITIONER, 250ml (R75, 5 VARIANTS) @ HUNTERSA. CO.ZA

PET FOOD STORAGE CONTAINER AND SCOOP (R149,99) MR PRICE HOME

CRAZY BALLS GIGWI (R110, COMES IN 3 COLOURS) @ SHINGAVET.CO.ZA

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED. PRICES CORRECT AT THE TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

MUCA SILVERVINE CHEW STICKS (R150) @ APETSLIFE. CO.ZA

CAT BOWLS (R19,99) MR PRICE HOME

CRAZY PUG LADY FABRIC POUCH (R140) @ ZANA PRODUCTS.CO.ZA

CRAB SOAP DISH (R299,95) @ PYLONES.CO.ZA PRIDE BITES PIZZA TOY (R129) @ TAKEALOT.COM

HUNTER COUNTRY TRAVEL BAG (R1470, HOLDS UP TO 8KG) HUNTERSA.CO.ZA

HUNTER CAT DENTAL TREATS (R150) @ HUNTERSA.CO.ZA

EXTRA-LARGE DOG BED (R399,99) MR PRICE HOME

ALLEY CAT GPS CAT TRACKER (R1 385) @ APETSLIFE.CO.ZA

LIVING WORLD GUINEA PIG TUNNEL (R395) @ SHINGAVET. CO.ZA

VONDI’S BUCHU ANTI-BACTERIAL SOAP SCRUB, 110G (R60) @ VONDIS.CO.ZA

December 2017/Fairlady 103


Christmas gifts! CARROL BOYES FACE-OFF COASTERS, SET OF 2 (R499) @Â YUPPIECHEF.COM

RIEDEL HAPPY O STEMLESS GLASS TUMBLERS, SET OF 4 (R699) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

LUDDITE SHIRAZ 2013 (R530)

BROAD VALLEY PINOT NOIR 2014 (R195)

HENDRICKS GIN GIFT SET WITH TEA CUP (R399)

MOLESKIN WINE JOURNAL (R299) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

VRIESENHOF UNWOODED CHARDONNAY (R95)

WOODEN WINE HOLDER (R299,99) MR PRICE HOME

METAL BOTTLE OPENER (R129) H&M

Drinks

CHROME BOTTLE STOPPER (R39,99) MR PRICE HOME

A selection of top tipples and tipple-related bits and baubles to give to your more high-spirited friends and family. BY SUZY BROKENSHA

CORKPOPS WINE GLASS MARKER PENS (R229) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

BORGO BELLO GOLD PROSECCO BRUT (R139,99)

WARWICK TRILOGY 2014 (R393)

FLAGSTONE TRIBUTARY CHENIN 2015 (R135)

104 Fairlady/December 2017

STANLEY ADVENTURE STAINLESS STEEL SHOT GLASS SET (R859) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

LAGUIOLE STAINLESS STEEL CORKSCREW (R375) WOOLWORTHS

PRINTED GLASS JUG (R229) H&M

MYSTIC BOER CAPE POTSTILL BRANDY (R219)

FLEUR DU CAP UNFILTERED CHENIN BLANC 2016 (R130)


CARROL BOYES BAOBAB RED WINE GLASSES, SET OF 4 (R699) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM PLASTIC RED WINE PICNIC GLASSES, SET OF 4 (R394) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM DARLING SWEET RED WINE & CHOCOLATE TOFFEES (R59) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

THE COMPASS BOX WHISKY TUBE GIFT SET (R699) @ YUPPIECHEF.COM

BOTTEGA BACÛR DRY GIN (R425)

BADSBERG PINOTAGE 2016 (R72)

NACHTMANN CRYSTAL ROYAL GOLD-RIM WINE GLASS (R599) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

MARBLE COASTERS, SET OF 4 (R545) WEYLANDTS

WINE TOTE BAG (R1199) @ ARROWLEATHER GOODS.CO.ZA

PHOTOGRAPHS: SUPPLIED. ALCOHOL NOT FOR SALE TO PERSONS UNDER THE AGE OF 18. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT

STEENBERG SPARKLING SAUVIGNON BLANC SPECIAL GIFT PACK (R94)

STEMWARE IN GIFT BOX, SET OF 4 (R335) WEYLANDTS

DIEMERSDAL EIGHT ROWS SAUVIGNON BLANC 2017 (R160)

STRIPED HORSE BEERS (R70 FOR A PACK OF 3)

OAK BARREL CORKSCREW (R595) WEYLANDTS ECO WICKER PICNIC BASKET SET FOR 4 (R1 099) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM KITCHEN CRAFT LUXE LOUNGE DOUBLE WALLED STAINLESS STEEL WINE COOLER (R729) @ YUPPIECHEF. COM

TEXTURED JUG (R199) H&M

BAR BOTTLE OPENER SET (R399) WOOLWORTHS

BLAAUWKLIPPEN CABRIOLET, 1.5L (R220) COMTESSE ALEXIA ROSÉ BRUT FRENCH CHAMPAGNE (R379,99)

December 2017/Fairlady 105


I HEAR SHE’S A REAL BITCH BY JEN AGG Highly recommended by that rude and lovely chef, Anthony Bourdain: a true story about the equally rude and lovely Jen Agg’s struggle to make her way in the boytjie world of Toronto’s restaurants. Smart and savage.

Books Lovely bookie ideas for the curious, poetic, creative, horn-rimmed word-guzzlers in your life. COMPILED BY SUZY BROKENSHA

Because it is proudly SA and won an international gold medal in 2017,

BAINS CAPE MOUNTAIN WHISKY (ABOUT R260)

and because widower, single parent and renowned writer JG Ballard would have a stiff glass of whisky before starting to write: ‘I used to have my first whisky at 9am, after I’d taken the children to school,’ he said, in order to shift from domesticity to writing. ‘Then I’d have a glass on the hour, every hour. I was never drunk, but I would have a glow all through the day.’

WHAT WE LOSE BY ZINZI CLEMMONS The debut novel of the year, says American Vogue: Thandi, like Zinzi, is half South African (mother) and half African American (father). Raised in the US, she feels adrift. When her mother dies, she looks at identity through short, raw, heartfelt vignettes. Moving, honest and unusual.

PRIESTDADDY: A MEMOIR BY PATRICIA LOCKWOOD Patricia Lockwood’s father converted to Catholicism while watching The Exorcist on a submarine (‘all around him men in sailor suits were getting the bejesus scared out of them, and the bejesus flew into my father like a dart into a bull’s eye’). And that’s the tone of her book about their lives: irreverent and hilarious… but there is always the sense of something darker left unsaid. Really fascinating.

WINNER OF THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2017

LINCOLN IN THE BARDO BY GEORGE SAUNDERS George Saunders’s short stories are unusual and deeply compassionate. This, his first novel, is about Abraham Lincoln mourning the death of his beloved 11-year-old son, Willie. In Tibetan Buddhism, the Bardo is the space between death and rebirth, and while Abe clings, Willie is tempted to stay… but the graveyard is full of funny and profane spirits determined to see him on to his next life. Quirky and brilliant.

THEFT BY FINDING – DIARIES 1977–2002 BY DAVID SEDARIS David Sedaris’s essays about his life are hilarious, and the diaries he’s kept for years are the source of most of them. He ferrets away overheard comments, cultural observations and chance encounters, and these are those moments in raw form. It’s like rummaging through an attic: a total mess and a total delight.


Christmas gifts! You never know... SPIER CREATIVE BLOCK 5 (R149)

THE RULES DO NOT APPLY BY ARIEL LEVY ‘Thinking we should get everything we want in life isn’t the thinking of a feminist, it’s the thinking of a toddler,’ says journalist Ariel Levy, who is insightful and clever, and whose remarkable life story (up to now) this is. Fierce and compelling, it’s about her realisation that competence, control and choice are very thin veneers, and easily lost.

IQ BY JOE IDE Sherlock Holmes will never die (thank God), and IQ is one of his most interesting incarnations. Isaiah Quintabe may be ‘Unlicensed and Undaground,’ but he is also an extremely smart, sometimes criminal investigator with a fasttalking sidekick, Dodson. They live in South Central LA, right in the thick of gangster town, where he’s the last hope for victims – or families of victims – who feel unheard by the LAPD. Original and slick: a fabulous read.

WE ARE NEVER MEETING IN REAL LIFE BY SAMANTHA IRBY A hilarious, raunchy, sweary and frank collection of essays/blog posts about reality TV, race, modern dating, being fat, cats and strap-on sex. But it also covers the pain of depression, the death of parents and growing up poor. Definitely one for the stout of heart.

Best response to an invitation when you’d rather stay in and read than go out (borrowed from Phoebe, in Friends):

PHOTOGRAPHS: GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES, SUPPLIED

‘Oh, I wish I could! But I don’t want to’. Just in case... THINGS THAT HAPPENED BEFORE THE EARTHQUAKE BY CHIARA BARZINI Newly transplanted from Italy to LA, Eugenia feels as restless and experimental as the post-riots city itself. She’s a teen – she tries to fit in in various ways: clothes, gangs, drugs and, most importantly, her friendship with Deva. She’s on shaky ground (literally)… but things get rebuilt after earthquakes; maybe not quite as perfectly as before.

FLAGSTONE WRITER’S BLOCK (R250)

THE ARRIVAL BY SHAUN TAN A brilliant, wordless graphic novel about the world as seen through an immigrant’s eyes – but the images have subtle shifts in what you expect to see, and you become that immigrant. It is profound.

GOODBYE, VITAMIN BY RACHEL KHONG Ruth’s relationship over, she goes home to her parents for the holidays. But she is 30 and feeling like a failure, her father has Alzheimer’s and she ends up staying for a year. Touching, funny and offbeat.

DARK MATTER BY BLAKE CROUCH Unputdownable thriller: Jason wakes up in a strange world to find himself a hero for managing to come back to this world from another time and life. But which life is the real one, and what if he prefers the other one?

THE BREAK BY MARIAN KEYES Marian Keyes is genius at applying lightness to heavy issues. When Amy’s husband of 17 years asks her for a six-month Time Out from their marriage, does that mean she can also take a break? What about the kids? And what happens after the six months? Easy, witty, wise.

December 2017/Fairlady 107


The 12

DAYS OF CHRISTMAS WIN! MRP HOME PREMIUM RANGE BEDDING, WORTH R3000, INCL. EGYPTIAN COTTON TOWELS! This premium range duvet set is made from 100% cotton percale with a classic woven matelassé front. The 200TC duvet is breathable by nature, making it crisp and cool for the hot summer days ahead.

WIN! A LE CREUSET SORBET COLLECTION HAMPER, WORTH R3060 Le Creuset’s The Sorbet Collection evokes a summer­ time palette of sweet sorbets and soft candy floss. It’s everything you need to set your imagination on a delicious retro­ styled journey with a collection of whimsical stoneware gift sets. Includes ice­cream bowls, cappuccino mugs, mini bowls and more. 

Keyword: SORBET

For Issey Miyake, water is a key element; his first fragrance was called L’Eau d’Issey. Now, 25 years on, it is a true classic. In 1994, Miyake launched his first mens fragrance, L’Eau d’Issey Pour Homme and in 2016 he reinvented the classic with the launch of L’Eau d’Issey Pure. ‘Eau’, is French for water, and yet Miyake’s fragrances are sensual, with a generous trail.

WIN! AN ISSEY MIYAKE PURE HAMPER WORTH R3685!

Keyword: MRPHOME WIN! A R3000 ONLINE LIPAULT PARIS VOUCHER The Lipault lady changes bags and cases to match her mood and coordinate with her outfit. From handbags to travel bags, briefcases to suitcases and elegant handbags, Lipault has established itself as the colourful Parisian bag brand. www.houseofsamsonite.co.za

Keyword: ISSEYMIYAKE WIN! A CRABTREE Nurture your skin with & EVELYN HAMPER, four mineral­enriched WORTH R3110 Crabtree & Evelyn La Source marine blends containing antioxidant­rich Green Seaweed Extract. Each blend (Refreshing, Hydrating, Restorative and Rejuvenating) provides specific, targeted benefits, drawing inspiration from the restorative scent of the sea. Keyword: CRABTREE

108 Fairlady/December 2017

Keyword: LIPAULT WIN! ONE OF THREE PLUSH SUPREME HOUSEHOLD HAMPERS, WORTH R1000 EACH

Keyword: PLUSH

Summer’s the perfect time to entertain. Give your home a refreshing make­ over with Plush Supreme’s advanced household cleaning range! Now you can confidently invite guests over to a refreshingly clean home. Add to your Plush Supreme range with three new products: Toilet Cleaner, All Purpose Cream and Dishwashing Liquid.


Festive fun

My true love gave to me… one of these amazing prizes. Enter now so you don’t miss out! WIN! ONE OF THREE CASES OF BOSCHENDAL MCC, WORTH R900 EACH Good things take time, and Boschendal’s bubblies are no exception! Their MCCs have a long list of accolades testifying to their exceptional quality and craftsmanship; the effervescent elixirs take years to perfect,with an intensive process that starts in the vineyard.

PHOTOGRAPHS: FREEPIK, SUPPLIED

Keyword: BOSCHENDAL

WIN! ONE OF TWO HENDRICK’S GIN TEA SETS, WORTH R1500 EACH Traditional tea time is turned on its head with Hendrick’s rose and cucumber-infused gin. This gorgeous gift set includes a Secret Order gift pack, full tea set and tray. Keyword: HENDRICKS

WIN! A MUGLER ALIEN HAMPER, WORTH R3360 Inspired by the profound beauty of the night sky, the parfumiers of Mugler Alien have created a fragrance for a celestial goddess. Encapsulated in a bottle the colour of a sacred stone, it is enchanting and mysterious. With notes of jasmine, Cashmeran wood and white amber, it is soft on the skin yet unforgettably powerful. Keyword: ALIEN

WIN! ONE OF THREE MILADYS SHOPPING VOUCHERS, WORTH R1000 EACH! At Miladys, we think women are fabulous and you deserve to look and feel your best. We put style, comfort and versatility at the heart of everything we do. We’re passionate about beautiful, well-made clothes. We also know that sometimes all you need is a good tee, and that clothes should work for your shape, not against it. What we’re saying is, we get women. Keyword: MILADYS

The structured microfibre and tulle mesh design of the Wireless Bra from Wonderbra’s Refined Glamour Range combines lift and comfort. It comes in black and white (R399,95, in sizes 32A–38DD). Style may vary according to availability and the winner’s size. At Foschini and Edgars. Or visit Keyword: WONDERBRA wonderbra.co.za. WIN! A R3000 LINGERIE ‘REVAMP’ FROM WONDERBRA

WIN! A CLARINS HYDRAESSENTIEL HAMPER, WORTH R3245 Hydra-Essentiel quenches the skin’s surface with moisture-packed organic Leaf of Life extract – boosting your skin’s natural hydration for hours with multi-level care. Indoors or out, in rain or shine, your skin exudes radiance and vitality. Dive into a range of refreshing textures for every skin type. Contains Clarins Anti-Pollution Complex. Keyword: CLARINS

HOW TO ENTER: SMS the keyword of your choice (SORBET, ISSEYMIYAKE, MILADYS, MRPHOME, CRABTREE, HENDRICKS, CLARINS, ALIEN, PLUSH, WONDERBRA, LIPAULT OR BOSCHENDAL) along with your full name, physical or postal address, and email address to 37174. SMSes cost R1,50 each, and free SMSes don’t apply. Or visit www.fairlady.com to enter online. CLOSING DATE: 31 December 2017. For competition rules, see page 121.


Christmas gifts!

Test house

WE TESTED: BONELESS GAMMON

BONE-IN GAMMON

TEST HOUSE EDITOR TASNEEM LARNEY

CHRISTMAS IS HERE! We’re here to help you sift the best from the rest.

❋❋❋❋ READY-TO-COOK MEDIUM GAMMON R79,99/kg; Woolworths

Good shape, colour and marbling. The meat was succulent, just slightly chewy, and had a good balance of smoke and seasoning. It held its shape well, carved effortlessly and lost the least amount of weight during cooking.

❋❋❋ UNCOOKED BONELESS GAMMON R79,99/kg; Pick n Pay

Juicy, with a good balance of salt. Some tasters would have liked more smokiness com through. It held its shape well after cooking and carved effortlessly.

❋❋❋❋ READY-TO-COOK TRADITIONAL BEECHSMOKED BONE-IN GAMMON R74,99/kg; Woolworths

Succulent, with a perfect balance between salty and smoky. Our tasters did, however, find the meat a bit chewy. It fell apart when carving, and lost quite a bit of weight during cooking.

❋❋❋ BONE-IN GAMMON R73,99/kg; Checkers

The meat was marbled with quite a bit of fat. Some tasters liked the subtle flavour; others thought it lacked smokiness. It was juicy, and didn’t lose much weight during cooking.

COOKED GAMMON

❋❋❋ BONELESS GAMMON R76,99/kg; Game

Neatly packaged, and it held its shape well. Our tasters were divided: for some, the meat was flavoursome, juicy and tender, with a lovely colour; others found it a little too salty.

110 Fairlady/December 2017

❋❋❋❋❋ READY-TO-EAT BEECHWOOD-SMOKED GAMMON, 3,7KG R499,99; Woolworths

Lovely colour, beautifully juicy and well seasoned. It carved easily, had a good texture and was smoked to perfection.


CHOCOLATES

FESTIVE HAMPERS

❋❋❋❋❋ LINDT MINI PRALINES, 75G

❋❋❋❋ CLASSIC FESTIVE HAMPER

❋❋❋ FESTIVE HAMPER

❋❋❋ PICK N PAY MULTIPACK

R79,99/kg; Woolworths

R84,99/kg; Pick n Pay

R79,99/kg; Woolworths

Box contains: beech-

Box contains: Boneless

Box contains: beech-

smoked gammon, corned beef and black pepper smoked pork belly Gammon: Traditional in appearance and subtle in flavour. Some tasters found it bland, dry and chewy. Corned beef: Good shape but pale colour. Tasters felt it lacked flavour and seasoning, and was dry and chewy. It sliced easily. Pork belly: Lovely golden colour and a good ratio of fat to meat. Tender and full of flavour, though some tasters found the black pepper too dominant.

gammon, pickled beef and pickled tongue Gammon: Lovely colour and appearance. The fat-to-meat ratio was good and the tasters loved the flavour: subtle, with a welcome saltiness. It was juicy and tender, and sliced beautifully. Pickled beef: Most of the tasters found the meat bland and dry, but it carved nicely. Pickled tongue: This was a beautiful pink colour. The meat was juicy, but didn’t have much flavour.

R99,99; major retailers

Beautifully packaged, and popular for their richness and melt-in-the-mouth texture. The chocolate is rich and creamy on the outside, with a decadent smoothness inside.

❋❋❋❋❋ WHITE CHOCOLATECOATED WHOLE ALMONDS, 100G R42,99; Woolworths

Our tasters found these chocolates to be creamy, crunchy and delicious. The chocolate, infused with pure vanilla extract, has a smooth texture.

smoked gammon, corned beef and corned tongue Gammon: Generous size, good shape and colour, though slightly pale on the inside. Good meat-tofat ratio. The flavour was a perfect combination of salt, smoke and sweetness, and the meat was juicy. Corned beef: Good colour and it carved beautifully. It was slightly too mustardy, needed salt and was dry. Corned tongue: Lovely colour, full of flavour, juicy and tender.

DESSERTS

❋❋❋❋ LUXURY PASSION FRUIT AND WHITE CHOCOLATE ENTREMET, 820G ❋❋❋❋ BELGID’OR CLASSIC COCOA-DUSTED TRUFFLES, 200G R34,99; Checkers

The packaging is elegant and pretty. The silkytextured truffles have a good balance of flavour, with a rich chocolatey taste. Some tasters found them too sweet.

R159,99; Woolworths

A decadent French-style layered dessert with a velvety chocolate finish, this is a classy festive choice. The flavours are fresh and summery – well balanced and not too rich. The combination of textures is just right. This dessert is a good option for hot weather.

❋❋❋❋ CHRISTMAS FESTIVE CARROT GATEAU, 1KG R129,99; Woolworths

Carrot cake is a classic. This attractive triple-layer carrot cake is sandwiched with cream cheese mousse and decorated with a rosemary and pecan nut garland. The sponge was moist and the cake tasted delicious, although the cinnamon flavour was quite strong. The texture was lovely and the cake sliced easily.

❋❋❋❋ LUXURY BELGIAN CHOCOLATE MOUSSE AND CARAMEL TRIFLE, TOPPED WITH CHOCOLATE GANACHE, 1,1KG R169,99; Woolworths

The perfect ratio of chocolate, cake and caramel, and a good balance of flavours. It’s quite rich – the ganache is very chocolatey but not overly sweet. It’s not particularly festive-looking, but a great addition to your table for the chocoholics.

December 2017/Fairlady 111


Christmas gifts! ICED CAKES

PLAIN FRUIT CAKES

❋❋❋❋❋ RICH & DARK BRANDY FRUIT CAKE, 390G

❋❋❋❋❋ FRUIT CAKE SLICE, 430G

R89,99; Woolworths

R42,99; Food Lover’s Market

This cake is not only beautifully packaged but also absolutely delicious! It is spicy and rich, and contains a generous amount of fruit and just the right amount of marzipan.

This traditional fruit cake has a rich colour and is packed with juicy fruit. Sweet and spicy flavours are well balanced. Our tasters were impressed with the soft texture and moistness of the cake.

❋❋❋❋ ICED FRUIT CAKE, 1KG R99,99; Food Lover’s Market

JEWELLED FRUITCAKES

❋❋❋❋ LIMITED EDITION LUXURY FRUIT AND NUT CAKE, 800G

MINCE PIES

❋❋❋❋❋ 6 FRUIT MINCE PIES R34,99; Woolworths

Beautifully packaged, this cake is soft, moist, light and deliciously spiced. It contains a generous amount of nuts and fruit, and slices easily.

These mince pies are traditional-looking and neatly packaged. The pastry is soft and short. The filling is moist and the pies have a classic flavour – just the right sweetness to balance the tangy filling. Lovely!

❋❋❋❋ BRANDY FRUIT CAKE, 800G

❋❋❋❋ FRUIT CAKE WITH REDUCED SUGAR, 1KG

❋❋❋ 6 LIMITED EDITION FRUIT MINCE PIES

R99,99; Pick n Pay

R129,99; Food Lover’s Market

R32,99; Checkers

This cake is moist and has a delicious dark crumb. Overall, the flavour combinations are good, as is the ratio of marzipan to icing.

With its understated design, this cake is rich in colour and has a wonderfully soft, moist texture. It’s flavourful, but was too sweet for some.

❋❋❋❋ ICED BRANDY FRUIT CAKE, 300G

R184,99; Checkers

This cake is moist with a lovely texture. The flavours are well balanced, but it has too little fruit and nuts.

The texture of the filling is good, but the flavour is too subtle; they could do with a bit more spice. The pastry is dry, a little floury and not crisp enough.

❋❋❋ LIMITED EDITION FESTIVE FRUIT CAKE, 800G

❋❋❋❋ LUXURY CHERRY & ALMOND CAKE, 800G

❋❋❋ 6 LUXURY FRUIT MINCE PIES

R49,99; Pick n Pay

R89,99; Checkers

R149,99; Pick n Pay

This rich cake delivers a good balance of sweet and spicy, and although it is moist, it’s still crumbly. The icing layer tastes pretty good, but could have been presented more neatly.

The cake has neat, simple packaging and is crammed with a good variety of fruit. It is lightly spiced, with very little citrus flavour coming through. Rich in colour, beautifully juicy and easy to slice.

R29,99; Food Lover’s Market

112 Fairlady/December 2017

Gorgeously packaged, this cake is delicious too. It contains a good amount of nuts and fruit, and is nicely glazed. It has a subtle spiciness, but some found it a tad too sweet. The texture was a little sticky.

The pastry could be a little shorter and thicker. The cases are packed with filling and although the flavour is good, some tasters felt it lacked depth. The star looks Christmassy.


CHRISTMAS PUDDING

FYI

Your festive guide!

PREPPED TO PERFECTION

❋❋❋❋ LUXURY CHRISTMAS PUDDING, 900G R169,99; Pick n Pay

A traditional, beautifully packaged pudding. It has a lovely glaze and a generous amount of fruit. It is very moist and crumbly in texture, and a sharp spiciness adds to the lovely authentic taste.

DRINKS Chill drinks quickly by wrapping the bottles in damp paper towels and popping them in the freezer for 10 minutes.No room in the fridge for beer and wine? Fill a bucket with ice and water, and add some salt. Put your cans and bottles in the bucket. Salt reduces the freezing point of water, melting the ice and making the water and drinks super cold. COOK TURKEY EVENLY Turkey

breasts cook quickly, so they tend to be drier than the rest of the bird. About 30 minutes before roasting, put ziplock bags filled with ice over the breasts, then wrap them in foil. If your turkey is too dry, heat some chicken stock and pour it over.

STUFFING Cook the onion, celery and herbs before adding to the breadcrumb mixture for the turkey stuffing. ❋❋❋❋ RICH & DARK PUDDING, 450G

PHOTOGRAPHS: LIZA VAN DEVENTER, GALLO IMAGES/GETTY IMAGES. PRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT. SOURCES: BBCGOODFOOD.COM, TELEGRAPH.CO.UK, TESCOLIVING.COM, HUFFINGTONPOST.CO.UK, HOMELIFE.COM.AU, DESIGNER-CAKES.COM

R99,99; Woolworths

A beautiful dark colour, a good amount of fruit and a lovely moist texture. Its superb flavour is rich and decadent, with the perfect balance of alcohol and spice.

❋❋❋ CHRISTMAS PUDDING, 450G (NO ALCOHOL) R64,99; Food Lover’s Market

The flavours of this Christmas pudding are well balanced, although it was a tad spicy for some. It doesn’t contain a lot of nuts, and the texture is crumbly and slightly grainy.

CRANBERRY SAUCE Star anise gives cranberry sauce an aniseed flavour. Make your sauce three days in advance and refrigerate to allow the flavours to develop. THE ULTIMATE ROAST POTATOES

Parboil potatoes and drain in a colander, giving it a few knocks to fluff them up. Sprinkle with flour or cornflour. Preheat the oven and pop in the pan with plenty of butter or duck fat in it to heat up. You want the pan scalding hot, as this will crisp up the potatoes. Don’t salt the potatoes until halfway through their time in the oven. If you season them too soon, the salt draws out all the water and they’re more likely to stick to the pan.

MASHED POTATO The trick to fluffier

mash is baking powder: activated by the heat from the mashed potato, the raising agent in baking powder expands and creates air pockets.

GRAVY Add a splash of soya sauce to give your gravy some zing. KEEP SEAFOOD FRESH Pack fresh

prawns, oysters and fish in ice, then place on the bottom shelf of the fridge.

JUST DESSERTS

• Put the ice-cream tub in a ziplock bag before putting it in the freezer; this way it will be frozen but soft enough to scoop out with ease. • Use a potato peeler to get elegant chocolate curls for garnishing cakes and desserts. • Add some flavour to whipped cream by adding two to three drops of vanilla essence to it. • For a pavlova with that perfect chewy texture, add a teaspoon of white vinegar once you’ve whipped the egg whites and sugar.

TAKE THE CAKE

• Cakes too dry? You may be overbaking the cake or not using enough liquids or eggs. Too much raising agent also results in a dry texture. • Heavy, with a rubbery texture? Over-mixing acts on the gluten in flour and makes cakes hard. Also, not creaming the sugar and eggs enough gives the cake a tight texture because too little air is trapped in the mix. And adding too much liquid makes a cake dense and puddinglike. A Génoise sponge becomes heavy if you add the melted butter when it’s too hot and if you don’t fold it in evenly. • Storing biscuits: Unless the directions say otherwise, don’t store biscuits in the fridge; cool air removes moisture, making them taste bland. Store at room temperature or freeze: soft biscuits in an airtight container and crispy biscuits in one that breathes or in a bag with small holes. ✤

Find reviews of all the Christmas products tested: gammons, cakes, puddings, mince pies, chocolates, desserts, cheeses and more on our website (testhouse.fairlady.com) or subscribe to the Test House newsletter at fairlady.com to receive them in your inbox.

December 2017/Fairlady 113


DIGITAL ENTRY

☞ TURN TO PAGE 119 FOR SOLUTION TO MEGAXWORD NO 136 AND PAGE 121 FOR XWORD WINNERS

114 Fairlady/December 2017

© COMPILED BY LOVATTS CROSSWORDS WWW. LOVATTS. COM. AU. PHOTOGRAPH: SUPPLIED

Compiled by Christine Lovatt

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54. Playing-card jack 55. Begin shooting, ... fire 57. Large showy flower 59. Racial 63. Refrains 66. Estimated 67. Heedless 68. Country, Saudi ... 70. By itself (2,4) 71. Draw out 73. Souped-up car (3,3) 74. Saturate 76. Punctuation marks 80. TV news compere 82. Rushed 85. Net fabric 88. Pops in 89. Small dot 90. Garment glitter spots 91. Blood disorder 94. Dressed to the ... 97. Quotes 104. Cotton tops (1-6) 105. Aussie cattle herder 106. Fluid units 107. Ex-stables housing 108. American wild cat 109. Consent 111. Ploy 112. Croupier 113. ... & shares 114. Socially refined 120. Entices 121. Logos 123. Sheltered 124. Showed indignation

127. Minimum voting number 128. Poured 135. Toastmaster 136. Swollen (6-2) 139. Pisa or Venice natives 140. Build 141. October birthstone 144. Viral internet item 147. Stool pigeon 148. Bar accounts 150. Israel’s Tel ... 153. Male red deer 155. Direction change (1-4) 158. Permeate 160. Fibs 162. Additionally 164. Mountain tree 165. Fun object 166. Public reading 167. Yielding 169. Smartphone program 170. Neither fish ... fowl 172. Fable 173. Hands-on-hips position 174. Narcotic 175. Harness (oxen) 177. Was not (4’1) 178. Colloquial saying 179. Cathedral, ... Dame 180. Actress, ... Davis 182. Endures 184. From Baghdad 185. Gathers (crops) 186. Duelling swords 187. Brusque 189. Swill

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December 2017/Fairlady 115


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DEC 2017

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December 2017/Fairlady 117


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118 Fairlady/December 2017

DEMOCRACY & DELUSION BY SIZWE MPOFU-WALSH

Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh sets out to show 10 ‘self-evident truths’ in the SA political landscape that are not so inarguable, like the fact that free education is far from impossible, and the media is not free. Informed and incisive…

A TIME TRAVELLER’S GUIDE TO SOUTH AFRICA IN 2030 BY FRANS CRONJE

In this book, leading scenario planner Frans Cronje analyses the latest political, economic and social trends and presents four new scenarios for the country’s future.

☞ TURN TO PAGE 120 FOR ENTRY DETAILS


Brain food

43. 44. 46. 48. 49. 50. 51. 53. 55. 56. 58. 61. 63. 65. 69. 71. 72. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 84. 87. 91. 93. 94. 97. 100. 101. 103. 105. 106. 107. 108. 109. 110. 111. 113. 115. 117. 120. 122. 124. 127. 129. 131. 133.

Lavish Stalactites & ... Feeblest Notions Unhealthily overweight Consumption Naming words Hank of wool Granted Raise a glass to Festival, ... Gras Fill suitcase Viewed Yellowish-brown pigment Create on loom Every day Fierce light Sri Lankan robe Game Of Thrones actress, Dame ... Rigg Motor vehicles Uncluttered Biblical ark builder Lovelier Semi-solidifies Amongst Cable support Book of maps US Mormon state Sadden Unfavourable Surfboard blade Time delay W Canadian province Flee Besides Frontages Model, ... Hurley Harem guards Overturned Apprentice Dented inwards Needle hole Slow discharge Inferior Rocky Proverbs Uncle Sam (1,1,1) Thick ... brick (2,1) Schedules Atlanta is there 7th month Stoneworker Bravery badge Outlaw, Robin ... Actor, ... Neeson Gradually stop, ... out String toy (2-2) Also, as ... Chivalrous Tranquillity Stiff cap brim Matter of concern Rested (on) Mountain range top Cavalry spear Disgusting Ocean’s flow Grind down More recent Elevated flat region

134. 136. 137. 138. 139. 140. 141. 142.

Oak nut Ran in neutral Emerged Obstetric delivery Desk Excessive Corners the market Outlines

DOWN 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 18. 20. 26. 28. 30. 32. 34. 35. 36. 37. 39. 41. 45. 47. 49. 52. 54. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 62. 64. 66. 67.

68. 70. 71. 73. 75. 82. 83. 85. 86. 88. 89. 90. 92. 94. 95. 96. 98. 99. 101. 102.

Puzzles Belonging to them Down Under native Plant, ... vera Sports stadium Twist (nose) Dessert, ... split Of the Middle Ages Fasteners, press ... Ease off Zone Trusted adviser ... is stranger than fiction Possible culprit Two-footed animal Dinner bells Shrink Flower necklace, daisy ... Surplus Criticise harshly Urgently (1,1,1,1) Move to music Becomes liable for Enclosures Beers Meant Adjust Heavily promote Carnival Stupid louts Roman garment Gene acid (1,1,1) Devious Has bearing on Job opening Redrafted Chill Window shelters Slavery David Attenborough’s brother Responds Senior Ancient Mexican File a suit against Moray ... EU currency Slump Battery size (1,1,1) Howling wind Mistreat Perfect Luncheon meat Invasion fleet Leave, go ... Useless person (2-5) Smell Throw out Bumbling Cohesive collection Swedish prize for medical achievement

103. 104. 109. 110. 112. 114. 116. 118. 119.

Florida city Burden Swiss hero, ... Tell At no stage Upright Goalies Lampoon (4,2) Passes (legislation) Sibling’s daughters

121. 123. 125. 126. 127. 128. 130. 132. 135.

Tender Synthetic fabric Clothes pressers Duelling swords Toothpaste containers Actress, ... Hannah Circle (planet) Partition Kentucky’s neighbour

☞ Solution to brainteaser no 135

1. 9. 15. 16. 17. 19. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 27. 29. 31. 33. 35. 38. 40. 42.

☞ Solution to megaxword no 136

ACROSS

December 2017/Fairlady 119


Little black book

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120 Fairlady/December 2017

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stores, 083 3878 451 Skinny laMinx skinnylaminx.com Smashbox available at selected Woolworths stores, smashbox.com Smith & Cult quintessentiallyyours. co.za Spree spree.co.za Swarovski 021 551 3811, swarovski.com Tangle Teezer available at Clicks, tangleteezer.com Tom Dixon tomdixon.net, cremadesign.co.za Urban Decay 086 100 1085, urbandecay. com, foschiniforbeauty.co.za Vondi’s vondis.co.za Wet n Wild available at selected Clicks stores, wetnwildbeauty.com Weylandts weylandts.co.za Woolworths woolworths.co.za Yuppiechef yuppiechef.com Zadig & Voltaire available at selected Foschini and Edgars stores, zadig-etvoltaire.com Zana zanaproducts.co.za Zando zando.co.za Zara 021 446 8700, zara.com Zara Home zarahome.com/za

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December 2017/Fairlady 121


Your horoscope by Angela Barry

Sagittarius Capricorn Aquarius

Pisces

22 Nov – 21 Dec

22 Dec – 19 Jan

20 Jan – 18 Feb

19 Feb – 20 Mar

If you’re generally chipper and on top of things, there’s little chance of tripping yourself up at year’s end. But you could probably use some help anyway. Rope in anybody who knows more about a particular situation or issue than you do, then ask for advice. More importantly, listen and take note, rather than filing it away with a ‘thanks, but no’. You’re ready to learn something very useful.

A lick of independence streaks through, giving you chutzpah to make it happen – do it now, get it sorted and so on. It’s rare for the path ahead to be as clear as it is now, meaning that staying in the moment and taking action is vital. Be a warrior of time, commitment and planning – at least for a couple of weeks. Great results emerge as you plod through each step of whatever it is you’re focused on.

Dealing with minor hiccups on the home front isn’t likely to bury your bouncy determination to end 2017 on a high note – and you’re in for an excellent time. Bear with any bolshie types orbiting your happy space, as they’re there because you are. So be liberal with hugs – we all need a little lovin’ after 12 months of global drama. Be the bringer of good tidings, which is easypeasy for you.

It’s not all good news – some of it is even better than that, actually. While challenges still come and go, you’re in pole position for better money opportunities and career or bucket list goals. Topped with a dollop of Christmas cheer, you’re unlikely to be a grumpy elf as the year draws to a close. Be sure to spread the love, though – people need and want you more than ever, you lovely thing.

Aries

Taurus

Gemini

Cancer

21 Mar – 19 Apr

20 Apr – 20 May

21 May – 20 Jun

21 Jun – 22 Jul

Your mind is at its mercurial best, leading you to happy places and people relevant to your cause. Be bold and resolute – circumstances are firmly in your favour. Could it get any better? Probably. That’s the beauty of being you over this period: perspicacious, focused and downright fabulous. Make hay while your sun shines, and think about money, too – there’s some to be made.

You’ve peaked the mountain of your year in good time. Stand back to admire the well-deserved view. With strands of loose ends to tie up before January, there’s still work to be done. But a real-time rest period is just reward – and needed, as energy reserves may run low. Take exercise and sleep more than usual, and avoid too many late nights celebrating your awesomeness.

Faking it till you make it may be a winning shortcut, but in the long run, an honest, steady ascent suits you better during this ambling, syrupy period. Things may seem stuck at the best of times, but truly, they’re not. Life’s waiting room is a wise pit stop now – TLC, rather than tenacious achievement, is key. Give serious thought to next year’s goals. There’s good stuff on the way.

A more circumspect, objective approach in social matters will yield better results than losing your cool. Emotions are temporarily stretched, but don’t push the button just yet. People are a little woolly-headed now, that's all, and things will improve dramatically as the pendulum swings in your favour. Avoid making major decisions over this period; eat chocolate and shrug instead.

Leo

Virgo

Libra

Scorpio

23 Jul – 22 Aug

23 Aug – 22 Sept

23 Sept – 22 Oct

23 Oct – 21 Nov

With a Leonardo da Vincilike influence prowling your subconscious, out-of-the-box thinking peppers every move – a relief from the humdrum of day-to-day list ticking. Paint, potter with clay, rent arty films about arty people, and dress dramatically (a cerise scarf, at least). Connecting with your inner genius guarantees fun times and friendlier friends. Plus, you get to play.

Swap rampant individuality for a shoulder-to-shoulder attitude this festive season. Your penchant for practical solutions and level-headed advice are admired by those who matter – but success flourishes in a team environment rather than through lone pursuits. Focus on binding threads between people. Pitch in and enjoy the glow of common goals reached.

Being sent from pillar to post in the rush to wrap things up could leave you feeling frayed around the edges, but all’s good in Libra land – as long as you keep your wits about you. Avoid the temptation to multi-do and mega-task. At some point, something’s going to snap, and why should it be you? Delegate with gay abandon and lose the guilt.

They all want a piece of you – but how many pieces are you prepared to hand out? It’s up to you as to how much energy you’re willing to spend on people, presents and parties. Magic as your mojo is, resting up is wiser, at least between engagements. On the work front, you’re closing deals or wrapping up projects. Do that, then take a break, please. ✤

122 Fairlady/December 2017


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