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On the Cutting Edge of Design and Art in Denver By Keenan van de Boogaard

I first met Rebecca Peebles at ‘Hooked on Colfax,’ a cafe located on East Colfax, between Steele and Adams St., where she works as a barista. When I got to the counter I immediately noticed the dress she was wearing, a light grey, jersey piece, with the minimalism and detail of something I assumed she bought at a high end boutique somewhere. I asked her about it, and was surprised to hear that it was a creation of her own, whereupon, I complimented her eye for design and fit, given my limited experience with apparel design, I could recognize her talent immediately, for it is often hard for one to imagine a piece of clothing, let alone compose it and have it fit well. This was over a year ago, and in that time she has accomplished and evolved quite a bit as an artist and designer in the Denver area. From her functional art and installation shows at various art galleries, to selling her garments in popular boutiques, Rebecca Peebles has been steadily increasing her presence in the local art and fashion scenes, and is definitely someone to check out if you’re looking to please your visual senses. The first installation I got to see of Rebecca’s, “Milk,” was hung at the cafe where she works, and she described it as such, “Milk was an installation art project that took place in January 2010, where, over the course of the 4 months prior we collected the translucent/white 1 and 1/2 gallon milk jugs from Hooked on Colfax. After we had collected the jugs, we then cut those down into pieces that could be reapplied over a surface as a translucent/white texture. We built that surface as a light box so that the texture would be lit from behind. There were 2 panels and each was 4 feet wide, 8 feet long, and about 6 inches deep,” she says. I had the pleasure of seeing this opening in person, and I can tell you myself that this was no small feat. The 4 by 8 foot light boxes she described above, were each covered in literally thousands of these small strips of clear, whitish plastic, and backlit by 4 foot white, fluorescent bulbs, giving them a shimmering, iridescent effect. When I viewed these pieces, I immediately contemplated the work that went into its composure and completion. “How many pieces did you use? How long did this take you?” I asked. “We probably used around 400 milk jugs, cut down into thousands of pieces on the surface. It took 4 Photo by Robert Podrasky

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