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WHARF HILL AND CHESIL

This town hasn’t always been prosperous by a long way. They were all working class at one time down places like Water Lane and Wales Street. Hard to tell how people survived, especially with some of these little old houses where there were eight or nine children in a two-bedroomed house. Or one bedroom, some of them. I know where the missis’ mother lived, opposite the mill in Wharf Hill - they only had one bedroom there and a landing. There was six of them and there had been twins as well who’d died. I don’t know where they slept. There was only one room downstairs. One up and one down. How the devil they used to sleep, I don’t know. Must have been one on top of the other. I never had nothing when I got married. I never had any money hardly at all. I just had enough to get a bit of furniture together, and when I got married what did they do? One of my brothersin-law belonged to a band in Winchester. He got half the band come down. Another one goes up the boozer and brings down the beer. There’s one made the sandwiches and another one made something else. That was our wedding breakfast. That was down Wharf Hill. That was where the band was. There must have been forty or fifty houses round there then. They haven’t half pulled a lot down. We had a good old sing song, a proper old jamboree down there. Well that’s what they used to do. All work together. If one was down they looked after the one who was down. Today if one’s down they tread on top of them. Victor Gough in Winchester Voices

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THE BUTTERCROSS

CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

The Eclipse Inn, in common with many other buildings now put to a commercial use, was once a rectory, belonging to the Church of St. Lawrence, which stands hidden behind it. There is a pleasant story of how the inn obtained its name. Across the way from it, when it became an inn, was a rival hostelry, the Sun Inn. It was the ambition of the new innkeeper to steal the trade of the Sun. This he ultimately did and ‘eclipsed’ him. WITH AN ARTIST IN WINCHESTER,

J.L. NORTHEAST

the mid 16th Century (formerly a rectory)

tbc folk royalty Jon Boden, surrealist artist Robyn Hitchcock and Dame Alice Lisle 52

tbc

History gives us another and far less pleasant incident from the inn’s long life. In the seventeenth century Dame Alice Lisle, whose husband had been executed for regicide, gave hospitality to two men of Monmouth’s rebellion. She was arrested and stood trial before Judge Jeffreys’ ‘Bloody Assizes’ at Winchester, where she was sentenced to be drawn on a hurdle and burned alive. The Bishop of Winchester, however, went to the Judge’s Lodging and intervened. Nevertheless, she had to die and on September 2nd, 1685, aged and ill, she stepped from an upper window of the Eclipse and walked over the staging to the raised block and was beheaded. Today the memory of this is kept alive by the tablet on the wall, whilst the Eclipse is a happy, peaceful little inn nestling comfortably between its bigger and younger neighbours.

I spoke to one former landlord who knew nothing of the story of Dame Alicia until he took up the lease. On the first day he was there he entered into one of the upstairs rooms and had such a feeling of sadness and fear that he only ever reluctantly re-entered the room after then. If you should find yourself at the bottom of the stairs do not be too surprised if you feel somebody invisible brush past you or an odd chill pass through your body. HAUNTED WINCHESTER,

MATTHEW FELDWICK

WITH AN ARTIST IN WINCHESTER,

J.L. NORTHEAST

53


THE BUTTERCROSS

CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

The Eclipse Inn, in common with many other buildings now put to a commercial use, was once a rectory, belonging to the Church of St. Lawrence, which stands hidden behind it. There is a pleasant story of how the inn obtained its name. Across the way from it, when it became an inn, was a rival hostelry, the Sun Inn. It was the ambition of the new innkeeper to steal the trade of the Sun. This he ultimately did and ‘eclipsed’ him. WITH AN ARTIST IN WINCHESTER,

J.L. NORTHEAST

the mid 16th Century (formerly a rectory)

tbc folk royalty Jon Boden, surrealist artist Robyn Hitchcock and Dame Alice Lisle 52

tbc

History gives us another and far less pleasant incident from the inn’s long life. In the seventeenth century Dame Alice Lisle, whose husband had been executed for regicide, gave hospitality to two men of Monmouth’s rebellion. She was arrested and stood trial before Judge Jeffreys’ ‘Bloody Assizes’ at Winchester, where she was sentenced to be drawn on a hurdle and burned alive. The Bishop of Winchester, however, went to the Judge’s Lodging and intervened. Nevertheless, she had to die and on September 2nd, 1685, aged and ill, she stepped from an upper window of the Eclipse and walked over the staging to the raised block and was beheaded. Today the memory of this is kept alive by the tablet on the wall, whilst the Eclipse is a happy, peaceful little inn nestling comfortably between its bigger and younger neighbours.

I spoke to one former landlord who knew nothing of the story of Dame Alicia until he took up the lease. On the first day he was there he entered into one of the upstairs rooms and had such a feeling of sadness and fear that he only ever reluctantly re-entered the room after then. If you should find yourself at the bottom of the stairs do not be too surprised if you feel somebody invisible brush past you or an odd chill pass through your body. HAUNTED WINCHESTER,

MATTHEW FELDWICK

WITH AN ARTIST IN WINCHESTER,

J.L. NORTHEAST

53


CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

THE BUTTERCROSS

JON BODEN A few months ago I had a gig down Southampton way, so I got the train to Winchester and headed to my old local, The Eclipse. With an hour or so to kill, I went for a drink at the bar and it turned out that about seven people also sitting there had been at Peter Symonds and Henry Beaufort at more or less the same time as me. Not people I knew particularly, but we ended up having shared acquaintances, so that was nice. I felt a bit more reattached to Winchester after that. From the age of sixteen really, which I know is not um.... quite legal... Well actually, I remember my seventeenth birthday I had at the Eclipse and the landlord at the time gave a big speech about how it was brilliant that I was now legal, because he was under the impression it was my eighteenth! Someone had to take him aside and explain to him, but anyway, my A-Level years were pretty much all spent in the Eclipse. It was my first experience of a proper local... always the same people who drank there; a lot of people my age but there was an old guy in his seventies who had fought in the war who was a regular, who I’d be as likely to spend the evening talking to as anyone of my own age. So it was a great mix of people. It was lovely because it really felt part of Winchester; it didn’t feel just like it was my school or college, it was a good experience of being part of the town.

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55


CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

THE BUTTERCROSS

JON BODEN A few months ago I had a gig down Southampton way, so I got the train to Winchester and headed to my old local, The Eclipse. With an hour or so to kill, I went for a drink at the bar and it turned out that about seven people also sitting there had been at Peter Symonds and Henry Beaufort at more or less the same time as me. Not people I knew particularly, but we ended up having shared acquaintances, so that was nice. I felt a bit more reattached to Winchester after that. From the age of sixteen really, which I know is not um.... quite legal... Well actually, I remember my seventeenth birthday I had at the Eclipse and the landlord at the time gave a big speech about how it was brilliant that I was now legal, because he was under the impression it was my eighteenth! Someone had to take him aside and explain to him, but anyway, my A-Level years were pretty much all spent in the Eclipse. It was my first experience of a proper local... always the same people who drank there; a lot of people my age but there was an old guy in his seventies who had fought in the war who was a regular, who I’d be as likely to spend the evening talking to as anyone of my own age. So it was a great mix of people. It was lovely because it really felt part of Winchester; it didn’t feel just like it was my school or college, it was a good experience of being part of the town.

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55


THE BUTTERCROSS

CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

...it’s funny how these things work that people seem to just happen upon each other at the right moment. It’s quite a nice story that.

Did I ever hear tales of hauntings? I remember for a while the landlord was going out with a friend of mine, so we spent a couple of nights kipping on the floor upstairs. So, yeah, the whole haunted thing was certainly on our minds... Well, I didn’t hear anything myself, but I think a few of my friends were freaked out by it!

HENRY BEAUFORT I did play a bit at school. I was in a rock band - in fact it was quite shortlived - with Chris T-T. He was a few years above me at Henry Beaufort, and it was our first band... certainly my first band, also with Tom Edwards who now plays keyboards and percussion in Spiritualized. So yeah, we were in a trio and we played a few gigs in some community centre... where was it? It’s hilarious, I’ve got a recording of it... I wasn’t a bad rock guitarist aged twelve, Tom was a very good drummer and Chris was a very good pianist, also playing guitar as well. And we did a couple of Led Zeppelin covers which involved me singing Robert Plant’s line but before my voice had broken, so it was quite a strange comedic sound when you listen to it! We were basically a rock covers band, although we did write a few songs. We probably only lasted a few months, but it seemed longer at the time... I’ve not played on stage with either Tom or Chris since, but there’s a prospect of a weekend Apocalyptica Festival at the Southbank Centre which me and Chris are talking about co-curating. So we’re in contact quite a lot, and I saw Tom at one of the festivals I did last summer, Bestival, on the Isle of Wight. He was playing with Spiritualized just after us so that was fun, we had a drink. But it’s funny how these things work that people seem to just happen upon each other at the right moment. It’s quite a nice story that, it’s cool. I suppose we were all in different years at school, so maybe we just sort of gravitated towards each other ‘cos we saw something in each other that we recognised, I don’t know. But they carried on with the band... I mean we all fell out over a girl, as is often the case, so we steered off quite quickly! And they then had a band called ‘It Looks Alive’ who made an album, so anyway they did a lot more gigs and I’d become too much of a folky by that point so I think they decided I was probably not the person to be in their folly, which was fair enough. So I went off and did some more folky stuff from then on.

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THE BUTTERCROSS

CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

...it’s funny how these things work that people seem to just happen upon each other at the right moment. It’s quite a nice story that.

Did I ever hear tales of hauntings? I remember for a while the landlord was going out with a friend of mine, so we spent a couple of nights kipping on the floor upstairs. So, yeah, the whole haunted thing was certainly on our minds... Well, I didn’t hear anything myself, but I think a few of my friends were freaked out by it!

HENRY BEAUFORT I did play a bit at school. I was in a rock band - in fact it was quite shortlived - with Chris T-T. He was a few years above me at Henry Beaufort, and it was our first band... certainly my first band, also with Tom Edwards who now plays keyboards and percussion in Spiritualized. So yeah, we were in a trio and we played a few gigs in some community centre... where was it? It’s hilarious, I’ve got a recording of it... I wasn’t a bad rock guitarist aged twelve, Tom was a very good drummer and Chris was a very good pianist, also playing guitar as well. And we did a couple of Led Zeppelin covers which involved me singing Robert Plant’s line but before my voice had broken, so it was quite a strange comedic sound when you listen to it! We were basically a rock covers band, although we did write a few songs. We probably only lasted a few months, but it seemed longer at the time... I’ve not played on stage with either Tom or Chris since, but there’s a prospect of a weekend Apocalyptica Festival at the Southbank Centre which me and Chris are talking about co-curating. So we’re in contact quite a lot, and I saw Tom at one of the festivals I did last summer, Bestival, on the Isle of Wight. He was playing with Spiritualized just after us so that was fun, we had a drink. But it’s funny how these things work that people seem to just happen upon each other at the right moment. It’s quite a nice story that, it’s cool. I suppose we were all in different years at school, so maybe we just sort of gravitated towards each other ‘cos we saw something in each other that we recognised, I don’t know. But they carried on with the band... I mean we all fell out over a girl, as is often the case, so we steered off quite quickly! And they then had a band called ‘It Looks Alive’ who made an album, so anyway they did a lot more gigs and I’d become too much of a folky by that point so I think they decided I was probably not the person to be in their folly, which was fair enough. So I went off and did some more folky stuff from then on.

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57


THE BUTTERCROSS

CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

THE BIRTH OF BELLOWHEAD Winchester was not a hot bed of folk and traditional music. Certainly when I was there, there wasn’t really a folk club. There were bits and pieces going on at the Tower Arts Centre so I saw a few things up there. I went to see Liam O’Flynn, a great Irish bagpiper, and he passed on some details about some summer schools in Ireland. By good fortune, I was given a scholarship by a Winchester funding award to send me off to Ireland to learn about Irish music... they just wrote me a cheque and off I went to Ireland aged sixteen with a set of very unplayable bagpipes, which was great! I suppose the significant Winchester link - I mean, it’s jumping on a few years - but, when I came back from University, my mum used to work at the Oxfam in Jewry Street is it? Don’t know if it’s still there. Alison Flood was the manager and my mum was the deputy manager, I think, and they used to talk about their sons who wanted to be musicians, and they’d sit around saying ,‘Oh, we should get them together, they should form a band’. That was Pete Flood who was Alison’s son, and so some years later we finally exchanged emails and set up Bellowhead. So that’s where Bellowhead came from.

“ 58

Pete was certainly a Winchester local boy at Peter Symonds. He was a few years above me, and no we never met until the first Bellowhead rehearsal, but it was through Oxfam bookshop in Winchester that we got together.

Pete was a local boy... we never met until the first Bellowhead rehearsal, but it was through Oxfam bookshop in Winchester that we got together.

The other strange thing though is the number of drummers that were at Symonds... there’s Andy Burrows, Will Champion from Coldplay, and then Pete from Bellowhead who were all at college within a couple of years of each other, and Tom from Spiritualized of course, although he’s more keyboards now, but it seems to be quite a fertile ground for drummers particularly. I don’t know why! But yeah, quite a lot of musicians seem to come out of Winchester, although it didn’t really feel like that at the time. I mean, certainly now living in Sheffield, you hear stories of periods in Sheffield’s history where all the pubs have just been crawling with A&R scouts from major record labels and people were getting signed. And certainly in my time in Winchester no-one actually got signed by a record label so it wasn’t like the scene had that sort of significance, but I think on reflection it was a good strong musical scene, it just didn���t have any kind of national follow on at that time. Coincidentally, Paul Sartin, the oboe and fiddle player from Bellowhead who I knew from when I lived in Oxford, had for many years has been a lay clerk at Winchester Cathedral, and sings at the Cathedral quite a lot. So Winchester has a lot to answer for! Interview, 17th January 2013

59


THE BUTTERCROSS

CHILDREN OF WINCHESTER

THE BIRTH OF BELLOWHEAD Winchester was not a hot bed of folk and traditional music. Certainly when I was there, there wasn’t really a folk club. There were bits and pieces going on at the Tower Arts Centre so I saw a few things up there. I went to see Liam O’Flynn, a great Irish bagpiper, and he passed on some details about some summer schools in Ireland. By good fortune, I was given a scholarship by a Winchester funding award to send me off to Ireland to learn about Irish music... they just wrote me a cheque and off I went to Ireland aged sixteen with a set of very unplayable bagpipes, which was great! I suppose the significant Winchester link - I mean, it’s jumping on a few years - but, when I came back from University, my mum used to work at the Oxfam in Jewry Street is it? Don’t know if it’s still there. Alison Flood was the manager and my mum was the deputy manager, I think, and they used to talk about their sons who wanted to be musicians, and they’d sit around saying ,‘Oh, we should get them together, they should form a band’. That was Pete Flood who was Alison’s son, and so some years later we finally exchanged emails and set up Bellowhead. So that’s where Bellowhead came from.

“ 58

Pete was certainly a Winchester local boy at Peter Symonds. He was a few years above me, and no we never met until the first Bellowhead rehearsal, but it was through Oxfam bookshop in Winchester that we got together.

Pete was a local boy... we never met until the first Bellowhead rehearsal, but it was through Oxfam bookshop in Winchester that we got together.

The other strange thing though is the number of drummers that were at Symonds... there’s Andy Burrows, Will Champion from Coldplay, and then Pete from Bellowhead who were all at college within a couple of years of each other, and Tom from Spiritualized of course, although he’s more keyboards now, but it seems to be quite a fertile ground for drummers particularly. I don’t know why! But yeah, quite a lot of musicians seem to come out of Winchester, although it didn’t really feel like that at the time. I mean, certainly now living in Sheffield, you hear stories of periods in Sheffield’s history where all the pubs have just been crawling with A&R scouts from major record labels and people were getting signed. And certainly in my time in Winchester no-one actually got signed by a record label so it wasn’t like the scene had that sort of significance, but I think on reflection it was a good strong musical scene, it just didn’t have any kind of national follow on at that time. Coincidentally, Paul Sartin, the oboe and fiddle player from Bellowhead who I knew from when I lived in Oxford, had for many years has been a lay clerk at Winchester Cathedral, and sings at the Cathedral quite a lot. So Winchester has a lot to answer for! Interview, 17th January 2013

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Eclipsed