Page 1

Novi | FoxRunNovi.com

thejewishnews.com $

200 Feb. 14-20, 2019 / 9-15 Adar I 5779

UNDER THIRTY-SIX

CLASS OF 2019 See page 22.

13305182

Fox Run has EVERYTHING YOU NEED to enjoy a vibrant retirement

Fox Run features fabulous amenities, stylish apartment homes, health and wellness services, and a smart financial structure. Request your brochure at 1-800-917-8169.


JU ST LIS TE D PHENOMENAL IN-TOWN HOME

TREMENDOUS CURB APPEAL

2.25 ACRES ON ENDICOTT LAKE

City of Bloomfield Hills | 330 Lowell Ct.

BR 4 | BATHS 4.1 | SF 2,533 | $824,900

BR 4 | BATHS 3.2 | SF 3,084 | $850,000

BR 5 | BATHS 5.2 | SF 5,879 | $2,795,000

2018 COMPLETE RENOVATION

Franklin | 27740 Lakehills

STUNNING 11.47 ACRE ESTATE

Bloomfield | 7420 Inner Circle Drive

LOWER LONG LAKE FRONTAGE

BR 4 | BATHS 3.2 | SF 5,045 | $1,099,000

BR 6 | BATHS 4.4 | TOTAL SF 17,056 | $7,495,000

BR 3 | BATHS 4.1 | TOTAL SF 5,571 | $1,898,000

BUILDER’S OWN CUSTOM HOME

Bloomfield | 1265 Club Drive

PE ND IN G

NE W

PR IC E

Bloomfield Village | 390 Waddington St.

PE ND IN G

Birmingham | 587 Stanley Boulevard

Southfield | 22700 Coventry Woods Lane

Birmingham | 544 Wallace Street

BEST OF IN-TOWN

CONTEMPORARY ON 1.68 ACRES

BR 5 | BATHS 3.1 | SF 3,966 | $409,000

BR 3 | BATHS 3 | SF 1,986 | $550,000

BR 4 | BATHS 4.3 | TOTAL SF 14,046 | $1,695,000

Bloomfield Hills | 1375 Scenic Court


Detroit Jewish News

n

inside Feb. 14-20, 2019 9-15 Adar I 5779 VOLUME CLV, ISSUE 2

VIEWS 5-10

JEWS IN THE D 12 Love Birds! Shining a spotlight on loving couples at JSL and JARC.

16 A ‘Presidential’ Achievement Daughter completes father’s presidential letters collection, on display now at the Detroit Public Library.

18 Celebrating Eight

EPIC Years Young Jewish philanthropists step up at NEXTGen Detroit’s annual fundraiser.

20 30 Years! Grosse Pointe Jewish Council celebrates a milestone.

36 UNDER 36 22-32 Meet The 36 Under 36 The Well and JN partnered to honor young people impacting the community.

ERETZ 38 Anti-Semitism Envoy Finally Appointed Trump’s new anti-Semitism monitor comes with diverse skills.

ARTS&LIFE 40 Want to See Hamiton? Get tickets and benefit one of these local fundraisers

42 Close to Home The Goldbergs writer Aaron Kaczander uses his dad’s experiences for Feb. 20 episode.

44 Celebrity Jews

ON THE GO 45 Events/Editor’s Picks ETC. 49 The Exchange 51 Soul 57 Raskin 58 Looking Back

34 Faces & Places

DAILY HEADLINES

35 Moments

• Sign up for JN daily headlines at thejewishnews.com/newsletter

36 Sports

SPIRIT 37 Torah portion

34

SHABBAT LIGHTS Shabbat starts: Friday, Feb. 15, 5:46 p.m. Shabbat ends: Saturday, Feb. 16, 6:49 p.m. * Times according to Yeshiva Beth Yehudah calendar.

Cover Design: Michelle Sheridan

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The Jewish Federation of Greater Toledo seeks an energetic leader for this closely-knit Jewish community. With stable leadership and a sound financial base, we seek an Executive who has the vision and drive to build on our strengths and implement a plan for future services and programs consistent with findings from our strategic planning initiative. For complete job description, go to www.jewishtoledo.org/career-center. For more information and to apply, please submit a cover letter and resume by January 31, 2019, to: Tina Stieben, Interim COO, Jewish Federation of Greater Toledo, 6465 Sylvania Avenue, Sylvania, OH 43560

MID CENTURY MODERN-RETRO FURNITURE 31505 GRAND RIVER AVE. AT CORNER OF ORCHARD LAKE

FARMINGTON 48336 In the Historical Winery Building BY APPOINTMENT ONLY We Carry

)&3."/.*--&3t"%3*"/1&"34"--t,/0--t8*%%*$0.#t%6/#"3 +&3&t%"/*4)U.0%&3/t1"6-&7"/4t.*-0#"6()."/ mad4mod.space vette028@aol.com

248-514-5858

8F#VZ4FMM5SBEF‰$BMMGPS"QQPJOUNFOU

jn

February 14 • 2019

3


The Robert Sosnick Family Life Center

CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP JOIN US FOR ONE OR ALL CLASSES!

#(.(/ %")"%!('! (%58$5< ?(%58$5<  $5&+ ?$5&+ ?$5&+  Adult Health and Fitness is a program that will focus on improving balance, mobility, coordination, flexibility and overall Wellness. Through a structured low impact exercise program performed from both seated and standing positions. Cost is $5 per class ()'$#!#))"%!('!$'0)#(( $'$#))))

   Class led by NSCA certified trainer Matt Leonard. The class will run for a one-hour session starting with a warm up and finishing with a cool down stretch. We encourage you to wear athletic clothing and shoes. &*'"#)($')%'$'",!!$)$'( #$)())#)).$*#%')%)#!$,"%) -'(,+!'. .$*'#$) )'(#$#)$%'$+#$)'$#

When helping you is hurting me... Taking care of someone else as well as taking care of you?

 1  

Tuesday, February 26 7 - 9 pm at Temple Israel Join us for a wonderful evening featuring Annabel Cohen as she demonstrates springtime dishes with her special flair! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss this fun night including nosh, wine and Annabel. $22/Members $30/Non-members To RSVP online, go to temple-israel.org/sisterhood Questions? Contact Sari Roland at sarirsisterhood@gmail.com or 248-701-0298

 #    Give yourself respite â&#x20AC;&#x201C; join facilitator 2',($&2%6",1$6833257,9( (19,5210(17+$5,1*21(6(;3(5,(1&( within a group setting enables caregivers to recognize the commonality 2)7+(,5(;3(5,(1&(:+,/($/62'(@1,1* the uniqueness of their situation. 25025(,1)250$7,212572! &217$&7$7(20$1$7    or kate@temple-israel.org.

5725 WALNUT LAKE ROAD, WEST BLOOMFIELD, MI 48323 248-661-5700 TEMPLE-ISRAEL.ORG

4

February 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

jn


views

All We Need Is Love

for openers

With a Toothy Grin

A

fter a recent visit to my dentist (Hi, Dr. Krawitz!), I was struck by the number of idioms I found in our language that employ the reference to teeth or dental items. So, chew on this. A common weed, the dandelion, gets its name from the French dent de lion (tooth of the lion) for the shape of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;petals.â&#x20AC;? Dent in French is tooth; hence: dental, dentist, etc. Now you do not have to give your eye teeth to know that etymology. Are you at all aware of the absence of unicorns? They are as scarce as hensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; teeth. SY MANELLO When you are adamant about something, Editorial Assistant you may fight tooth and nail to get your point across. You may have to grit your teeth and remain strong in the face of an argument. You find, however, that once you sink your teeth in, you may win the argument by the skin of your teeth. Brace yourself when you find that you are on the cusp of a discovery. It may require you to bridge the gap caused by ignorance of others; then you may win a crown of superiority.

Have you noticed that protestors often come armed to the teeth with everything but reason? That realization can set oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teeth on edge. Having to explain yourself many times may make you fed up to the teeth. However, do not fly in the teeth of convention but rather, take time to re-explain. Yes, you may feel like approaching a truly stubborn person with a kick in the teeth; teaching someone can often seem like pulling teeth. One way to engender distrust is to be discovered to be lying through your teeth. Encountering such individuals may encourage you to put some teeth into a decision and to treat others with utmost care. When all is said and done, remember that if you are true to your teeth, they will never be false to you. â&#x2013;

guest column

Why Henry Ford Bigotry Story Matters Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note: This column was printed in the issue of The Dearborn Historian that Mayor John Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly ordered scrapped because it contained a report on Henry Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-Semitism that Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly said would hurt the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts at inclusion. McGraw wrote the column to explain to readers why the quarterly magazine was addressing the subject.

W

ith its growing AfricanAmerican community, a large Middle-Eastern population and immigrants from a variety of countries, Dearborn is growing increasingly diverse. The Dearborn of today is almost unimaginable from, say, the Dearborn of 1980. Such diversity is reflected in the public officials who represent all or large parts of the BILL city: State Sen. Sylvia MCGRAW Santana is an AfricanAmerican woman. State Rep. Abdullah Hammoud and Wayne County Commissioner Sam Baydoun are Arab Americans. Mayor John Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly is a white man and U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell is a white woman. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a varied cast of characters, and

a reflection of an evolving America in which women and minorities are increasingly visible in public life. The trend is further illustrated by Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib, from next door in Detroit, a person well known in Dearborn and one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress. Her 13th Congressional District is next to Dingellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12th District. The emergence of minorities taking their rightful places has come with a price, and part of that price is fear of demographic change among some white Americans and a nationalistic backlash around the world. And a big part of that backlash is a rise in anti-Semitism. The Anti-Defamation League recorded a 57 percent rise in anti-Semitic incidents in the United States in 2017, compared to the previous year â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including assaults, vandalism, bomb threats and anti-Semitic literature on college campuses. In 2017, neo-Nazis marched in Charlottesville, Va., chanting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jews will not replace us,â&#x20AC;? and one anti-Nazi protester died. In October, a gunman killed 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Growing Anti-Semitism Stuns American Jews,â&#x20AC;? read a headline in the

New York Times. That brings us to Henry Ford. In this issue, The Dearborn Historian carries a special report on Henry Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-Semitism. I wrote it. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a happy story. The magazine is running the report because of the current climate of anti-Semitism and because January mark[ed] the 100th anniversary of Ford buying the Dearborn Independent weekly newspaper, the platform for his attacks. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also publishing the report because we believe local history publications should strive to tell the whole truth about our past, no matter how unpleasant, and connect local events to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening in the greater world. While many people know vaguely that Ford had anti-Semitic beliefs, I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair to say most people have no idea that, as the article details, his anti-Semitic publishing effort was so vast in scope and had such a powerful impact, or that his publications from the 1920s are enjoying a renaissance today among extremist websites and online forums. In general, Metro Detroit and its institutions tend to treat Ford gently when it comes to his dark sides. But historians and other experts have

When people spend time with their VLJQLĆ&#x201C;FDQWRWKHUVWKHLUEORRGSUHVVXUHV decrease-even if the relationship isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t perfect. Being in love is good for your heart. The decrease in blood pressure has to do with familiarity, sense of security and comfort between partners. Couples have lower rates of heart disease than their single counterparts. Being in love boosts your immune system. Everything from hand-holding, massage and frequent sex, leads to a healthier life style. Love can take many forms and is more than romance. The love between a parent and child, friends, siblings, love between humans and their animal companions, or love for oneself that develops after years of self-loathing is healing. We get annoyed by irksome habits of loved ones, but for better or worse, when you are in a relationship, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re agreeing to put up with peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schtick. Everyone has schtick. If you can both accept each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got magic! People in relationships live longer. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m convinced my father achieved ripe old age, because he was engaged in a senior community with the love of a good woman. He also exercised regularly, ate healthy foods and sipped a dry martini daily. Love is good for your mental health. The love hormone, oxytocin, plays a role in decreasing depression. Sleeping next to someone we love helps bond people to each other, feel safer, resulting in quality stress-reduced sleep. Jewish Senior Life is home to many loving couples who respect each other, support each other and care about quality of life. They tell me itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to laugh off the little things that happen. And with all the little things, they are laughing quite a lot. Laughter heals us body and soul. Love solves everything. Choose Love!

Living Your Best ... Jewish Senior Life Jewish Senior Life is far more than a place to live. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s six beautiful residences where older adults can embrace life and community in a secure and supportive environment. For information, contact Tracey Proghovnick

(248) 661-1836 jslmi.org

JSL is proud to provide inclusive residential communities, programs and services. We welcome all people without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, disability, gender, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, familial status and marital status.

continued on page 10

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

5


views guest column

The Political Trivialization of Trauma

T

he past few months, since the end of working through the Michigan midterm election cycle, I’ve had a lot of time for self-reflection. I have evaluated my role as the sole Republican Jewish voice and political organizer in the Michigan Republican Party aside from our chairman, Ronald Weiser. I built relationships with key stakeholders in Wayne Adar Rubin County by incorporating my own identity and talking about my experience growing up as a conservative AmericanIsraeli. The election outcome took an emotional toll on me, but I quickly overcame the anxiety. The turning point came when I revisited the memories of my participation on the March of the Living in 2013 with my high school graduating class. DEEP IMPRESSIONS In Auschwitz-Birkenau, I walked through the eerie silence of the crematoria, saw the prosthetics, shoes and hair of the deceased, and heard the loud screams of my murdered ancestors as I stood in front of the wall of death. In Treblinka, I held one of my

best friends while he cried his heart out on the bus after he read the mourner’s Kaddish for his family who had been murdered in the extermination camp. In Majdanek, I inherited what would eventually be my permanent mental scar when I saw Hell right before my very eyes. Hell is a giant mausoleum in Lublin that carries the blood, flesh and ashes of more than 18,000 Jews, murdered on that very spot. Hell is the outcome of real systemic oppression, the brutality of a dictatorship that sought nothing but global dominance through a regime built on ethnic cleansing. In Birkenau, I wrote a letter to myself where I promised to always remain strong no matter the situation, to educate people of other faiths and backgrounds on this experience, and to carry and embrace my identity wherever I go. Two years later, on my 20th birthday, I received that letter in my dorm at Michigan State University. I collapsed in the hall and burst into tears upon seeing it, but the fact that I had honored the promise I made to myself two years ago on the frigid train tracks of Birkenau gave me a sense of pride. Flash forward four more years, in the midst of the political divide, and I only feel a sense of confusion. It is the year 2019, and it is with great disappoint-

ment that I still have to remind people — sometimes even of my own faith or my own party — about how truly evil the Hitler regime was. TRIVIALIZATION OF THE HOLOCAUST When people call someone a “Nazi” or “Hitler” out of a petty political disagreement — or draw historically inaccurate parallels about the Holocaust to current events to score political points — they are cheapening the severity of what millions of Jews endured. Although I was distinctly critical of the Obama administration due to its mistreatment of Israel, I would never compare him or his actions to Hitler or the Holocaust. Trivializing the Holocaust is the most damning form of demagoguery. This disgusting habit of fear-mongering is practiced by both sides of the aisle and we can no longer deny it. Establishment Republicans have incorporated this tactic primarily in the “pro-life” argument. A county party delegate in the 11th Congressional District publicly compared the extermination of “helpless Jews” to the extermination of “helpless babies.” He added on a Facebook thread: “In fact, the argument can be made that the evil of abortion is actually magnitudes more evil than the Holocaust that was

brought against the Jewish people and other people groups by the Nazi regime.” I tried to explain to the candidate why such a polarizing comparison is deemed offensive to Jews and how it draws the line in terms of support and was threatened with political reprisal. Seriously, what do women’s reproductive rights have to do with the intended genocide of more than 6 million Jews? This is a question that radical, provocative groups such as the religious California-based Survivors of the Abortion Holocaust refuse to answer logically. Its strategies include sharing memes on Facebook of concentration camps with the “Planned Parenthood” logo written on the barracks and aggressive intimidation protests outside the facilities. To my conservative colleagues, if you choose to continue to advertise the pro-life cause, that is your legal right, but our scabs are not for you to peel.   The Democratic Party applies a more mainstream approach to marketing their platform under the Reductio ad Hitlerum fallacy (Latin for “Reduction to Hitler”), where it is sprinkled around like confetti. Members and leaders of the Democratic Party have linked Zionism to Nazism, Trump and Netanyahu to continued on page 10

Arthur M. Horwitz Publisher / Partner/Executive Editor ahorwitz@renmedia.us F. Kevin Browett COO/Partner kbrowett@renmedia.us | Editorial Managing Editor: Jackie Headapohl jheadapohl@renmedia.us Story Development Editor: Keri Guten Cohen kcohen@renmedia.us Digital Editor: Allison Jacobs ajacobs@renmedia.us Social Media Coordinator: Chelsie Dzbanski cdzbanski@renmedia.us Editorial Assistant: Sy Manello smanello@renmedia.us Senior Columnist: Danny Raskin dannyraskin2132@gmail.com Contributing Editor: Robert Sklar rsklar@renmedia.us Senior Arts Consultant: Gail Zimmerman gzimmerman@renmedia.us

OUR JN MISSION

6

Contributing Writers: Ruthan Brodsky, Rochel Burstyn, Suzanne Chessler, Annabel Cohen, Don Cohen, Shari S. Cohen, Julie Edgar, Shelli Liebman Dorfman, Adam Finkel, Stacy Gittleman, Stacy Goldberg, Judy Greenwald, Ronelle Grier, Lauren Hoffman, Esther Allweiss Ingber, Allison Jacobs, Barbara Lewis, Jennifer Lovy, Rabbi Jason Miller, Alan Muskovitz, Daniel Rosenbaum, David Sachs, Karen Schwartz, Robin Schwartz, Steve Stein, Joyce Wiswell, Julie Smith Yolles

| Advertising Sales Vice President of Sales: Keith Farber kfarber@renmedia.us

Account Executives: Martin Chumiecki, Annette Kizy

Sales Support: Courtney Shea, Ashlee Szabo

| Business Offices Billing Coordinator: Pamela Turner

| Production By FARAGO & ASSOCIATES Manager: Scott Drzewiecki Designers: Kelly Kosek, Michelle Sheridan, Susan Walker

| Detroit Jewish News Chairman: Michael H. Steinhardt President/Publisher: Arthur M. Horwitz ahorwitz@renmedia.us Chief Operating Officer: F. Kevin Browett kbrowett@renmedia.us Controller: Craig R. Phipps

| Departments General Offices: 248-354-6060 Advertising: 248-351-5107 Advertising Fax: 248-304-0049 Circulation: subscriptions@renmedia.us Classified Ads: 248-351-5116 Advertising Deadline: Friday, 12 p.m. Editorial Fax: 248-304-8885 Deadline: All public and social announcements must be typewritten and received by noon Tuesday, nine days prior to desired date of publication. Subscriptions: 1 year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $85 2 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$153 3 years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$204 1 year out-of-state . . . . . . . . . . .$125 2 years out-of-state . . . . . . . . . .$225 Per year foreign . . . . . . . . . . . . .$300 Detroit Jewish News 29200 Northwestern Highway, Suite 110 Southfield, MI 48034 ©copyright 2019 Detroit Jewish News

The Detroit Jewish News (USPS 275-520) is published every Thursday at 29200 Northwestern Highway, #110, Southfield, Michigan. Periodical postage paid at Southfield, Michigan, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: send changes to: Detroit Jewish News, 29200 Northwestern Hwy., #110, Southfield, MI 48034.

To make a donation to the DETROIT JEWISH NEWS FOUNDATION go to the website www.djnfoundation.org

The Jewish News aspires to communicate news and opinion that’s useful, engaging, enjoyable and unique. It strives to reflect the full range of diverse viewpoints while also advocating positions that strengthen Jewish unity and continuity. We desire to create and maintain a challenging, caring, enjoyable work environment that encourages creativity and innovation. We acknowledge our role as a responsible, responsive member of the community. Being competitive, we must always strive to be the most respected, outstanding Jewish community publication in the nation. Our rewards are informed, educated readers, very satisfied advertisers, contented employees and profitable growth.

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

jn

1942 - 2019 Covering and Connecting Jewish Detroit Every Week


Tickets available at

jewishdetroit.org/EPIC

$60/person* through February 24 $75/person* beginning February 25 Registration closes March 1

*In addition to the cost of a ticket, each EPIC guest is required to make a minimum donation of $100 to the Jewish Federationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2019 Annual Campaign. This EPIC evening would not be possible without the generosity of our sponsors and their commitment to a young, vibrant Jewish Detroit. Presenting Sponsors

comes l e w t i o ss, n Detr NEXTGe omedian, actre st ho pc stand-u d TV and radio r an produce

MARCH 9, 2019 8 PM THE FILLMORE DETROIT

Ben Gurion Society (BGS) VIP Reception Sponsor

jewishdetroit.org/EPIC Additional Sponsors (In formation)

Nikki has created and starred in shows and specials on &RPHG\&HQWUDO1HWĹ´L[ and XM Radio.

Andi and Larry Wolfe The Torgow Family Meyer & Anna Prentis Family Foundation

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

7


views guest column

I was Barred from Becoming a Foster Parent Because I am Jewish GREENVILLE, S.C. (JTA) —

W

hen my father was 7 years old, he was placed in an orphanage. His own father had died, and his mother’s mental illness prevented her from caring for him. Growing up, I heard his stories of “kid prison,” as he called it, and I dreamed of someday becoming a foster parent able to take children out of an institution and offer them a family. In the spring of 2010, my husband and I were Lydia Currie raising our three young biological children when we decided we were ready to foster. We had so much abundance and capacity: room in our house, enough money, a very stable relationship, supportive extended family and plenty of love. I also was inspired by the core Jewish value of tikkun olam, repairing the world. We knew that the number of children needing care had become a crisis in our state, South Carolina, and that older children were being warehoused in modern-day orphanages. Boys with a history in the system are hard to place in families because of the assumption that they might be violent, and we decided that we wanted to give one of them a home. My husband and I initially reached out to the adoption division of the state Department of Social Services office in Greenville County. However, the agency was backlogged, with expected wait times of about a year for a foster-adoptive license. The director suggested we work with a private agency, Miracle Hill, which had an orphanage full of schoolaged boys and would be able to move forward right away. But when I requested Miracle Hill’s application, I learned that we were barred because of our religion. The agency only accepts Protestant

8

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

Christian families. This publicly subsidized foster program is unwilling to place children with Jewish, Catholic, Muslim, Buddhist, Hindu, atheist and agnostic would-be parents. Their initial screening form, now available online, asks for the contact information of your pastor and that you testify to your salvation in the text box provided. Miracle Hill, which licenses foster families in 11 counties, is denying children access to loving families despite the fact the state is paying the agency to find families for children who desperately need them — and our president has decided that’s perfectly fine. On Jan. 24, the Trump administration granted a request by the governor of South Carolina to issue a waiver of federal regulations that prohibit federal funding for agencies that discriminate based on faith requirements. This means that agencies like Miracle Hill will be allowed to continue rejecting families — and they’re not alone. Some eight states have passed laws that permit state-contracted, taxpayer-funded child welfare agencies to use religious criteria to exclude prospective foster and adoptive parents, including Michigan. Other states are now considering similar measures. In Philadelphia, a government-contracted foster care agency sued the city, claiming a constitutional right to exclude families that don’t meet their religious criteria — specifically, same-sex couples. The district court rejected that claim, but the case is pending before a federal appeals court. There are thousands of children in foster care across our country who are and will be affected by the exclusion of good families based on religious requirements. For them, the time lost to an institution instead of spent with a loving family could alter the course of their lives. In 2012 — two years after deciding to foster — my husband and I were finally able to welcome an older child to our

family through Greenville County’s partnership with another private agency. We brought home a 9-year-old boy who had been living in an institution. In 2017, we began fostering a daughter, who also came from an institution. Even the best institution leaves marks. When he first came to us, our son would scrunch up into a tiny ball or chew his fist when presented with a routine sibling conflict. Our daughter would smack kids who were nearby when she was passed a plate of snacks and then gorge herself until her stomach hurt. In South Carolina, orphanages and foster parents have tremendous authority over the religious lives of the children placed with them. Foster children are expected to attend religious services and celebrate holidays according to the custom of the adults who are caring for them. For us, this simply meant that the children in our care attended our synagogue’s Sunday school rather than the Christian equivalent. They were not expected to become Jewish, only to participate fully in the life of their Jewish foster mom and siblings. Our daughter, who had been baptized Catholic in her infancy, was forcibly converted to the Baptist faith at age 7 and was sent to an evangelical orphanage. While she was living there, many special treats (McDonald’s, Easter baskets, Christmas parties, field trips) were provided only for the kids who agreed to attend “optional” church services and

vacation Bible camps. Our daughter is now at the age where she enjoys fantasy-planning her bat mitzvah party, but we still have not formally converted her to Judaism. She has been coerced so much in her short life by adults who thought that they knew God’s will for her. We would rather have a child who is not Jewish than a child who became Jewish as some sort of bargain — her soul for our love and protection. Our love and protection are freely given, no strings attached. All children in foster care deserve that same gift. Children are resilient — it’s amazing what a stable, loving home can do. Our son is now 15 and thriving; he loves sci-fi and video games and is training to become a professional dancer. Our family recently moved to Philadelphia so he could live with us while he attends the prestigious Rock School for Dance Education. After some homeschooling, our daughter has returned to public school and is making good progress. Slowly, with our consistent love and discipline, she is learning to trust. We have adopted both children. Unfortunately, Greenville County’s partnership with the agency we used did not last, and Miracle Hill is now the only private agency in the Greenville area to serve children without special needs. I adore my children and wouldn’t alter the path that brought them to us. But I think often about the other older children who were waiting for families, the ones in Miracle Hill institutions whom we could have loved if we had not been rejected because of our faith. I wonder what happened to them — and whether they are still waiting. ■ Lydia Currie spent a decade living in South Carolina, where she served as a foster parent. She now lives in Philadelphia, where she is a member of Congregation Kol Tzedek.


V G Ad a et t va rs he nt it ag y e!

#1 Globally

21 Years in a Row!** Find out why. Grand River at Wixom Road in Novi (800) 240-8730 | VarsityLincoln.com

Huge Savings Call For Details!

All-New 2019 Lincoln Nautilus Now Available!

Over 800 Vehicles to Choose From!

Michigan’s Premier Hybrid Dealer

SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS. CALL 800-837-5682 TODAY!

LOW FINANCING RATES!

Vladimir Aksenchik Sales and Leasing Consultant (800) 240-8685 View our huge inventory at

VarsityLincoln.com

Save Thousands! 2016 Lincoln MKZ FWD Certifi ifi fieed! • Rear Parking Sensors • Rear View Camera • Only 18,298 miles

NOW ONLY STK #: #: 47565 43886 STK

$19,995 +

2016 Lincoln MKX Select AWD

• Meticulous 200 point inspection by factory trained technicians

• Complimentary 24/7 roadside assistance

2016 Lincoln Navigator Reserve 4WD

• Rear View Camera • Rear Parking Sensors • Only 26,080 miles

NOW ONLY

$23,995+

STK #: 47806

2016 Lincoln MKC Premiere AWD

Certifi ifi fieed!

Certifi ifi fieed!

• Rear View Camera • Rear Parking Sensors • Only 43,145 miles

• Rear View Camera • Rear Parking Sensors • Only 30,467 miles

• Rear View Camera • Alarm System • Only 18,220 miles

NOW ONLY

NOW ONLY

NOW ONLY

$27,995 +

2016 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid FWD

STK #: 48005

$24,995+

STK #: 47842

2018 Lincoln MKT Reserve AWD

Certifi ifi fieed!

• Rear View Camera • Rear Parking Sensors • Only 48,459 miles

Certifi ifi fieed! • Rear View Camera • Navigation System • Only 9,712 miles

• Heated Driver Seat • Rear Parking Sensors • Only 27,182 miles

NOW ONLY

$18,995 +

$47,995+

2017 Lincoln MKZ Select FWD

Certifi ifi fieed!

STK #: 47834

Certifi ifi fieed!

• 6-year / 100,000-mile Complimentary Warranty on Every Certified Pre-Owned Lincoln

Certifi ifi fieed!

STK #: 47732

2015 Lincoln MKS AWD

NOW ONLY STK #: 47862

$24,995 +

NOW ONLY

$39,995+

STK #: 47148

**Based on 2018 Total New Vehicle & Certified Pre-Owned Sales and Service Customer Satisfaction per Lincoln Sales Report. +Price does not include tax, title, license and dealer fees due at point of purchase. Based on vehicle availability. See Varsity Lincoln for details.

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

9


views continued from page 6

Hitler, immigration detention centers and child separations at the border to the separation of families upon arriving to the camps, ICE agents to the Gestapo, the manipulation of the Jewish community into believing that the high Palestinian death toll should serve as a shameful self-reflection of our own casualties in the Holocaust, and so much more. Contextual and situational analysis are both long gone, replaced with the chilling normalization of the ugliest form of propaganda as a defensive tactic for voter pandering. Although I have no plans to run for office, if I did, I would go the extra mile to establish a series of unifying messages attractive to potential new voters across the aisle.

What Is Your Plan?..... Call Us. The Probate Law Firm of Thav, Ryke and Associates www.michprobate.com

24725 West 12 Mile – Ste. 110 Southfield, MI 48034

1-800-728-3363 10

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

WE NEED TO TAKE ACTION The language must change and, for our country to achieve ideological maturation, we must confront our own trauma and provide more educative incentives for both public and private schools. According to a Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany study, more than 22 percent of millennials never heard of the Holocaust, 41 percent of U.S. adults and 66 percent of millennials had never

heard of Auschwitz, and 80 percent of people surveyed had never been to a Holocaust museum. A lack of education is a factor that enables monsters like Robert Bowers, the man accused of murdering my aunt and uncle’s friends at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo recently appointed anti-terrorism expert and military officer Elan Carr as the U.S. Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism. Special Envoy Carr, I propose a fantastic challenge: Together, with the assistance of our colleagues across the aisle as well as the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, I call on you to adopt legislation that includes the devaluing or equating of the Holocaust for political gain, regardless of one’s true intentions, as a legally defined form of anti-Semitism. I also call upon the remaining survivors to speak out, lobby and condemn this custom. Let us do whatever it takes to adopt solutions to anti-Semitism, and it all starts with an honest conversation. ■ Adar Rubin was a political field organizer for the Michigan Republican Party during the 2018 election.

continued from page 5

delved into Ford’s anti-Jewish campaign and published books and articles, and my story seeks to pull together the important findings of their research. We’ve also provided a guide so readers can do their own reading. It should start, ironically, in the excellent Ford Collection of Dearborn’s Henry Ford Centennial Library. Among many other things, the collection carries a number of books and other media that contain information on the Dearborn Independent and The International Jew, the books Ford published that were collections of the paper’s anti-Semitic articles. The Dearborn library approaches this dark side of Ford in an honest manner. On another sensitive subject, the city’s longtime mayor, Orville Hubbard, Dearborn in general has become more open to dealing with his segregationist side in recent years. City Hall gradually downgraded the prominence of Hubbard’s statue and the Dearborn Historical Commission and The Dearborn Historian (under previous editor David Good) explored the issue forthrightly. Re-examining dreadful corners

of institutional histories has become a trend over the past two decades. Numerous banks, insurance companies, Ivy League colleges, media outlets, cities and religious denominations have studied their actions during the eras of slavery and Jim Crow, published their findings and, in some cases, issued apologies. The city of East Lansing apologized last year for the way it treated black citizens for much of the 20th century. Proponents of such transparency believe it contributes to racial healing. Henry Ford is legendary in his native Dearborn and around the world for good reasons, as the article makes clear. His legacy continues to loom large in the lives of residents of Metro Detroit. But his anti-Semitism is much more than a personal failing. Ford’s attacks on Jews were distributed around the world before and after World War II and, alarmingly, they influence budding neo-Nazis today. It’s a subject worth talking about in Dearborn. Let the discussion begin. ■ Bill McGraw is a veteran award-winning journalist who co-founded the news site Deadline Detroit. He lives in Dearborn.


jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;¢ 2019

11


in jews thed Valentine’s Day

Love Birds Shining a spotlight on loving couples at JSL and JARC. BARBARA LEWIS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

L

PHOTOS BY ANTHONY LANZILOTE.

ove is not just for Valentine’s Day. Love can happen when you least expect it, as in the case of these two couples who share their stories with us. Nancy and Manny Kalef are part of a love triangle. They love each other without reservation — and they love the Meer Apartments, a senior community in West Bloomfield managed by Jewish Senior Life, where they’ve lived for almost three years. Both Nancy and Manny married young. His first marriage ended after 27 years when he lost his first wife to cancer; hers ended after 22 years in divorce. Manny, 89, graduated from Cass Tech in Detroit and then earned a degree in accounting after attending night classes at Wayne State for 13 years. He worked for Domestic Linen Supply for 64 years, starting as a clerk and retiring as vice president for finance. Nancy, 85, graduated from Detroit’s Mackenzie High. She started nursing training at Grace Hospital but was forced to drop out after one year when she married. Her 60-year career included jobs in office management and human resources. Before she retired, in 2001, she ran her own information technology recruitment agency. She and her husband knew Manny and his wife, Joan, through Centennial B’nai B’rith. Nancy divorced soon after the wedding of their only child. About five years later, she ran into Manny at the grocery store and noticed how sad he looked. She asked about his social life, and he said he wasn’t dating much. She offered to go out to dinner with him to show him that it wasn’t difficult. They went to Steak & Ale on Northwestern Highway the next day, then watched a movie in her apartment. As they parted, Nancy asked Manny if she could give him a hug, and he started to cry; he hadn’t had a meaningful relationship with a woman since Joan died. They’ve been together ever since, marrying on June 3, 1979, at Congregation B’nai David. Nancy says the secret to their relationship is advice she

12

Febraury 14 • 2019

TOP TO BOTTOM: Nancy and Manny Kalef in their home at Meer Apartments; Manny and Nancy at their wedding, June 3, 1979.

recently passed on to a granddaughter before her wedding: Always try to please your partner at least 51 percent of the time. Nancy has one daughter, Judy Lipson, as does Manny, Ellen Feldman (another daughter, Andrea, died at age 34); the daughters have become good friends. Between them, the Kalefs have six grandchildren and nine great-grands. After marrying, the Kalefs lived in a small Southfield condominium complex for 37 years. She was president of the self-managed homeowners’ association and he was treasurer. By 2016, they were both tired of the responsibility. They looked at some other retirement communities but knew they wanted to live in a Jewish environment. When they saw their Meer Apartments unit for the first time and realized the dents in the carpet would fit their furniture, they knew they’d found their bashert (meant to be) home. Their two-bedroom, two-bath apartment can accommodate Manny’s treadmill and office space. Their small balcony overlooks a wetland. Meer, on the Jewish Community Campus, provides dinner five nights a week and a wealth of social programs for residents of its 198 units. The Kalefs didn’t know many of their neighbors when they moved in, but they’ve become an important part of the community; Nancy is secretary of the residents’ council, and the Kalefs coordinate the building’s recycling program. “We know this is the last place we are going to live together, and that one of us will be left alone,” Nancy said. “We are gung-ho on the building and on Jewish Senior Life. This is the place to be at our age.” CARRIE GILL & STEVE LUDWIG In many ways, Carrie Gill and Steve Ludwig are a typical married couple. They hold hands while they cuddle on the couch to watch TV in their Farmington Hills apartment. She tells him how to fold the sheets and where to put them away and makes sure his work uniform is on straight. But Carrie and Steve have developmental disabilities and need help from the state and JARC, a Jewish-founded agency, to live together. They met at a Halloween dance at the Troy Community Center. Carrie wore a bunny costume and Steve thought she was cute. Steve was continued on page 14

jn JN


Practice Self-Love with some pampering at Krystyna’s

nd e e h th eive g u o thr ry, rec w No ebrua of F ts duc o r re p up a c kin make- 8, 2019. s l l 2 a ary and ebru ned

ff o %

15

i F ntil omb od u ot be c ffers o g n ro er *Off Can th othe wi

Anti

Aging

Treatments

1

line at n o r o ne by pho e com s a h c nSpa. a Pur e p o r nasEu Krysty

Facials

1

Massage

1 Body

Treatments

1

Hand

and

Foot

Treat yourself or a loved one to some love and pampering at Krystyna’s European Spa. Krystyna’s European Spa integrates therapy for the body and treatments for beauty with relaxation for the mind and spirit. Enter an oasis of calm, elegant body treatment rooms including a Vichy shower, sauna room and relaxing steam shower, to make the perfect spa experience. Come in today for a make-over, or some much needed winter pampering for yourself or your loved ones. Gift cards are available in any denomination, or for any service.

www.krystynaseuropeanspa.com | 248.540.0600 31815 Southfield Road | Suite 32 | Beverly Hills, MI

JN - Valentine-Full PG-2019.indd 1

2019-02-11 2:21 PM


Feel the Joy

in jews thed Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day EXXODUS

at Fleischman Residence / Blumberg Plaza

Ask about our

PRYHLQ VSHFLDOV

Steve and Carrie

Experience our outstanding service and programming. Enjoy all the comforts of home in our assisted living community. Eugene & Marcia Applebaum Jewish Community Campus Fleischman Residence Č?:0DSOH5RDG:HVW%ORRPČ´HOG

5HVHUYH\RXUVXLWHWRGD\Č?&DOO-LOO%HQJOHČ?MVOPLRUJ

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a good team. We take care of each other. We love each other very much, and we have a great life. We hope to be together forever.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; STEVE LUDWIG

People of all faiths and beliefs are welcome.

TTY 711

continued from page 12

It Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Have to Cost A Fortune . . .

Only Look Like It!

Complete kitchen and bathroom remodeling along with furniture design and installation including quartz, granite, wood and many other materials.

IN DECORATOR WOOD & LAMINATES, LTD. 248.851.6989

Lois Haron, Allied Member ASID 000000

14

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

jn

dressed as a doctor and, at first, Carrie thought he was a real physician. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I said some silly stuff,â&#x20AC;? Steve said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how I got her.â&#x20AC;? Carrie and Steve, both 50, dated for a few years before they decided to marry in 2012. They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take out a license or register their status with the state, explained Steveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s JARC care worker, Bernie Tague, because that could have complicated the benefits they receive for their care. But, in all other respects, their Sept. 8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;life commitmentâ&#x20AC;? ceremony at the Grosse Pointe Community House was a real wedding: Carrie wore an embroidered satin wedding gown and carried a bouquet of roses. Steve wore a tux and gave his bride a ring. Carrieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cousin, Bryan D. Gill Sr., officiated, and eight witnesses signed the large document formalizing their commitment to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;partners in life.â&#x20AC;? More than 100 guests attended the lakeside ceremony and the party that followed. Steve is proud he helps support the couple by working as a bagger at the Kroger in West Bloomfield, a job heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s held for 28 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I bring home the money,â&#x20AC;? he said. They live in the Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ridge apartments near 14 Mile and Orchard

Lake, where theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re part of the community. They walk the dog for one of their neighbors and cat-sit for another. Another neighbor drives Steve home from work on Fridays. While Steve is working, Carrie takes care of the household chores â&#x20AC;&#x201D; shopping, cleaning, laundry â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with help from her JARC staffer Stephanie Lee. About once a month, they return to the Troy community center for a dance. They like to eat out and to socialize with other JARC clients and staff. They also enjoy traveling. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been to family gatherings in Seattle and Georgia and, at the end of January, they spent four nights with other clients and staff at a timeshare JARC owns in Kissimmee, Fla. Only a small number of JARC clients are married, although many have romantic relationships. Carrie and Steve â&#x20AC;&#x153;are a totally married couple,â&#x20AC;? said Tague, who has been with JARC for 30 years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you see Steve and Carrie together you know that they are just meant to be together.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a good team. We take care of each other,â&#x20AC;? Steve said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We love each other very much, and we have a great life. We hope to be together forever.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah, we will,â&#x20AC;? Carrie chimed in. â&#x2013;


jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;¢ 2019

15


COURTESY OF DETROIT PUBLIC LIBRARY

jewsinthed

A ‘Presidential’ Achievement

Daughter completes father’s presidential letters collection, on display now at the Detroit Public Library. ESTHER ALLWEISS INGBER CONTRIBUTING WRITER

A

ttorney Henry Meyers, a distinguished leader in the Detroit Jewish community, walked his daughter Joan down the aisle when she married her husband, Dr. Robert Jampel, on Oct. 2, 1952. Two months later, when her father died at age 57, city dignitaries attended his funeral service at Congregation Shaarey Zedek. Joan’s mother, Delia Imerman Meyers, missed the wedding entirely. She was 46 and the former president of Temple Beth El Sisterhood and several state-wide Jewish women’s organizations when she passed away in 1946. Throughout her life, Joan Jampel, 89, has honored the legacy of the parents she lost so early. Through her initiative, the main Detroit Public Library (DPL) on Woodward is exhibiting a sampling of donated letters written by U.S. presidents. Jampel said Henry Meyers, a former DPL president, started the collection because he was “interested in documents in all areas of American history.” “U.S. Presidential Autographs: An Exhibit of Letters from the Special Collections Department of the Detroit Public Library” features letters signed by Presidents Thomas Jefferson, Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George

16

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

W. Bush and Barack Obama. Meyers “managed to secure signed letters from each president, beginning with Washington through Truman, but then he [Meyers] passed away,” said Mark Bowden, DPL coordinator of special collections. “I’d long wanted to complete the collection of presidential letters,” Jampel said. Her introduction to Bowden came via Barbara Madgy Cohn, co-author of The Detroit Public Library: An American Classic (Wayne State University Press, 2017). The women met when Cohn was conducting a tour focused on library art and architecture for the Jewish Historical Society of Michigan. “Mark [Bowden] found the presidential letters, which are part of the Rare Book Collection, and we went through them,” Jampel said. Bowden, who has 23 years with DPL, oversees the five separate collections that comprise the main library’s special collections. The presidential letters are kept in two ornate boxes. The first “volume,” as Bowden called it, contains mounted letters starting with Washington to Eisenhower. The DPL collection’s longest letter, and Joan’s favorite, is Jefferson’s lengthy, handwritten letter that outlines his plans for the future University of Virginia. Most of the letters are typed.


Jampel purchased the library’s second box. That volume contains letters from more recent presidents. Through a dealer, she personally obtained a letter by George H.W. Bush and one of two letters from Carter. When retired U.S. Sen. Carl Levin heard about the project, he donated personal letters he’d received from George W. Bush, Clinton and Obama. The letter from Obama completes the collection. “I was raised in Detroit by parents who were active in Jewish affairs,” Jampel said. With them in mind, she’s dedicated her life to organizing and saving the archives at Temple Beth El in Bloomfield Township and the Henry and Delia Meyers Library & Media Center at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in West Bloomfield, which is celebrating its 60th year this year. “I focused on saving worthwhile projects that were in danger of being demolished,” she explained. On Feb. 6, Jampel and a few family members and friends attended the public opening of the library exhibit. She said she’s proud the collection of presidential letters is available because “my family believes in giving from generation to generation.” ■

details The presidential letters will be displayed through Tuesday, March 5, in Cass Hall, first floor of the Main Library, 5201 Woodward, Detroit. The free exhibit is open during regular library hours: noon-8 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Free parking is available Saturday and Sunday in the staff lot on Putnam Street. For information, call (313) 481-1401.

TOP LEFT: Joan Meyers Jampel. TOP RIGHT: Mark Bowden, coordinator of special collections at the library, shows the letters to patrons.

JOAN MEYERS JAMPEL Hometown: Bloomfield Hills Education: Highland Park High School and University of Michigan (economics major) Personal achievements: Library chair and coordinator of volunteer services at the JCC’s Henry and Delia Meyers Library & Media Center since 2000; Temple Beth El board member; a 2013 “Eight over 80” honoree for Jewish Senior Life. Immediate family: Husband, Dr. Robert Jampel, ophthalmologist and retired director of Kresge Eye Institute; four children, Dr. Henry Jampel, Delia Jampel, James Jampel and Emily Sherman; and 12 grandchildren.

HENRY MEYERS Lived: 1895-1952 in Detroit Education: Detroit College of Law Professional: Partner, law firm of Friedman, Meyers and Keys Synagogues: Congregation Shaarey Zedek and Temple Beth El Personal achievements: World War I veteran; JCC president, 1937-1941, overseeing the JCC’s move to Woodward and Holbrook; 32nd degree Mason; head of Detroit’s USO — largest in the U.S. — during World War II; Jewish Welfare Federation Board of Governors; Detroit Public Library Commission president, 1948-1952; Meyers and Curtis JCC names Henry and Delia Meyers Library for him and his wife, 1959, transferring to the West Bloomfield JCC Immediate Family: Wife, the late Delia Meyers; daughters, Joan Jampel and Elizabeth Meyers Klein.

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

17


jewsinthed

DETROIT IS BACK!

jewsinthed

MARCH 10, 2019 3 - 5 PM TEMPLE EMANU-EL

INFORMATION & REGISTRATION OPEN HOUSE

Celebrating Eight EPIC Years

Young Jewish philanthropists step up at NEXTGen Detroit’s annual fundraiser. BECKY HURVITZ SPECIAL TO THE JEWISH NEWS

N

REGISTRATION AVAILABLE ON SITE FOR VOLUNTEERS, HOST FAMILIES, ATHLETES & ARTISTS WWW.MACCABIDETROIT2019.COM @MACCABIDETROIT2019 MACCABI@JCCDET.ORG 248.934.0889 LEARN MORE ABOUT JCC MACCABI IN DETROIT!

18

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

EXTGen Detroit, the young adult division of the Jewish Federation, returns to The Fillmore in Detroit on March 9 for its premiere annual fundraiser, EPIC. The event, brought to the community by Sue and Alan J. Kaufman and Family, is a true celebration of the community’s time-honored tradition of taking care of our fellow Jews and the commitment of EPIC guests to carry on that tradition as the young philanthropists of today. “Our family has had the honor of being EPIC’s presenting sponsor for the last seven years,” said Alan J. Kaufman. “It has been nothing short of inspiring and exciting to watch EPIC grow over the years. It is very rewarding to see firsthand the generosity and enthusiasm that the next generation of proud Jewish Detroiters brings to our community.” This year, EPIC attendees are invited to a cocktail hour with live music from Your Generation beginning at 8 p.m. before taking their seats in the historic theater for the main event. Ben-Gurion Society donors of $1,000 or more also are invited to a VIP reception with an exclusive meet-and-greet with this year’s EPIC talent, Nikki Glaser. “We are thrilled to welcome Nikki Glaser to the EPIC stage,” said EPIC

Co-Chair Andrew Luckoff. “Nikki is one of the most sought-after young comics right now, and it’s especially exciting because she will be the first-ever female comic to headline this event.” Nikki Glaser is the creator, executive producer and star of the popular Comedy Central series Not Safe w/ Nikki Glaser. Her first one-hour standup special, Perfect, premiered on Comedy Central in April 2016. More recently, her half-hour Netflix special, The Standups, premiered in July 2017 to rave reviews. Nikki also has a Sirius XM morning show, You Up with Nikki Glaser on Comedy Central Radio. In addition, she’s hosted the MTV late-night talk show Nikki and Sara LIVE and co-hosted the popular podcast You Had to Be There. She’s also made appearances on Comedy Central’s @midnight with Chris Hardwick, Inside Amy Schumer, The Roast of Rob Lowe and has been on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon multiple times. “While the live standup show is always the highlight of EPIC, at the end of the evening it’s all about coming together to support the work of Federation and its partner agencies,” said EPIC Co-Chair Lesley Welwarth. “The funds raised each year at EPIC are critical in furthering the


mission of the Federation, which is to take care of the needs of the Jewish people and build a vibrant Jewish future here in Detroit, in Israel and around the world.” Over the last seven years, EPIC has contributed more than $1.5 million to the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan’s Detroit Annual Campaign, last year raising nearly $300,000. “Every year, the EPIC crowd is a mix of young people who have an Nikki Glasser understanding of the work of the Jewish Federation and those who may know very little about the impact this organization has on our community and communities across the globe,” said EPIC Co-Chair Adam Bleznak. “We want everyone to experience a fun and entertaining evening out, but we also take the opportunity to explain the importance of being a donor to the Federation because we want every young adult in that room to know the difference they are making.” The importance of giving has been presented in numerous ways over the

years. For the last two years, young Jewish Detroiters who have been impacted by the work of Federation and its partner agencies have addressed the room, sharing their personal and often poignant stories. And the EPIC message is hitting home, as the event welcomes an average of 100 new young adult donors to Federation’s Annual Campaign each year. “Some people will initially make a donation just to come to the event and see the show, and that’s fine,” said NEXTGen Detroit President Ryan Landau. “But we want every guest to leave EPIC with a better understanding of how this community takes care of one another and feeling really good about the gift they made.” Registration for EPIC is open until Friday, March 1, at jewishdetroit.org/ EPIC. Early registration is $60/person through Feb. 18 and general registration is $75/person beginning Feb. 19. All EPIC guests are required to make a minimum donation of $100 to Federation’s 2019 Annual Campaign. This is a 21+ event and dietary laws will be observed. ■

Subscription Renewal? Address Change? Vacation Start or Stop? You can now manage your subscription right from our website. Go to thejewishnews.com and click on the blue Subscribe / Renew button.

Subscribe/Renew If you experience issues, please email subscriptions@renmedia.us

PLUMBING?

SEWER? DRAIN PROBLEMS?

Ben-Gurion University Lecturer Wins Israel’s Top Literature Prize Etgar Keret, renowned Israeli author and lecturer in the Department of Hebrew Literature at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU), has received Israel’s most prestigious literary award, the Sapir Prize, for his collection of short stories, A Glitch at the Edge of the Galaxy. “I’m surprised … it’s the happiest thing in the world. But like love or gifts, it’s not something you can strive for. It just happens,” Keret said. “Israeli book prizes are much more important to me than literature prizes awarded overseas. This is the language I write in; this is where I live and that’s the most important thing.” The Sapir Prize carries a $47,000 cash award and support for the book’s translation into two languages: Arabic and a language of the author’s

choosing. A Glitch at the Edge of the Galaxy, published in Hebrew by Kinneretz Zmora-Bitan Dvir, features 24 short stories of varying lengths. The stories, written in clear, everyday Hebrew, touch on a range of emotional issues in Israeli society: Holocaust remembrance, euthanasia, loneliness and intellectual disability. Other selections tackle lighter subjects. One follows a goldfish who jumps out of his aquarium home in the middle of the night in order to watch television. Keret’s work has also been translated into French, Spanish, Italian, German, Russian, Norwegian and Swedish. He is married to artist Shira Geffen.

WE CAN HELP! FULLY STOCKED TRUCKS TO SERVE ALL YOUR PLUMBING NEEDS

$20 OFF

MASTER PLUMBER LICENSED & INSURED

AVAILABLE 24/7 EXPERT SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING CERTIFIED BACKFLOW TESTING

248-542-8022 www.waterworkplumbing.com

NEW CLIENTS ONLY. NOT TO BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFERS.

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

19


jewsinthed

Yo-Yo Ma: Culture, Understanding, and Survival Wednesday, February 27 // 7 pm Ann Arborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hill Auditorium When our world is challenged by change and division, culture is essential in shaping the next stage of our evolution. Cello phenom Yo-Yo Ma examines how culture can help us to imagine and build a better future in a special talk with musical illustration about his inspiring role as a citizen artist. This event will be followed by a Day of Action in Flint on Thursday, February 28, where Ma will work with community partners to champion cultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s power to transform lives and forge both a more connected world and a healthy and vibrant local community. Learn more at ums.org/dayofaction. Presenting Sponsors: 3JĆŞGISJXLI'LERGIPPSV9RMZIVWMX]SJ1MGLMKER*PMRX and 3JĆŞGISJXLI 4VSZSWX9RMZIVWMX]SJ1MGLMKER*PMRX Funded in part by:'LEVPIW7XI[EVX1SXX*SYRHEXMSR, 8LI,EKIVQER*SYRHEXMSR, and the 6YXL 1SXX*SYRHEXMSR

            Ĺ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x17E;  9 1 7  3 6 +

NOT T I N G H I L L of WEST BLOOMFIELD

HEALTH SERVICES Our caring, professional staďŹ&#x20AC; oďŹ&#x20AC;ers you or your loved ones a wide array of around-the-clock health care services that include but are not limited to: ' 24-hour Nursing Care ' Post-Surgical Care ' Dental, Podiatry and Psychiatry Services ' X-ray, Pharmacy and Laboratory Services ' Wound Care Management ' Care Management, Discharge Planning and Social Work Services ' Pain Management ' Physiatrist and medical Physician on site full time ' IV Therapy ' Registered Dietitian

24-Hour Nursing Care

6535 Drake Road , West Bloomfield , MI 48322 phone 248.592.2000 | www.cienafacilities.com

OPEN 24 HOURS Warm Up with Hot Sandwiches $9.49! YOUR CHOICE! Hot Beef  Hot Turkey Baked Meatloaf

OF SOUTHFIELD

Served with You r Choice o f Potato

0O.JMF3E&BTUPG/PSUIXFTUFSO)XZt

20

February 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

jn

30 Years! Grosse Pointe Jewish Council celebrates a milestone.

T

he Grosse Pointe Jewish Council (GPJC) celebrated its 30th anniversary around Chanukah with an extravaganza complete with music, food and entertainment. The GPJC has grown to 150 families and is an invaluable resource for the small but dedicated members of the Grosse Pointe Jewish community. Over the years, the GPJC has expanded to include a local Sunday school and adult education programming. It also provides the community with a place to celebrate Shabbat and holiday services, weddings, baby namings and bar and bat mitzvahs. Rabbi Joseph Klein, rabbi emeritus of Temple Emanu-El, is the GPJCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visiting rabbi. Bryant Frank is the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cantorial soloist. The 85 guests at the anniversary party were treated to a gourmet meal, the comedy of JN Contributing Writer Alan â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Alâ&#x20AC;? Muskovitz and musical entertainment by former Motown performer Les Williams. Dinner chair Janet Weingarten welcomed the guests and spoke about the history of the GPJC. Upon moving to Michigan and settling in Grosse Pointe 30 years ago, Janet, and her husband, Dr. Jeffrey Weingarten, hosted a Chanukah party to get to know their Jewish neighbors. As told to the JN by Jeffrey Weingarten in 1992, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I-696

ABOVE: Janet Weingarten, dinner chair and one of the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s founders. TOP: Some of the Grosse Pointe Jewish Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presidents from over its 30 years.

was completed, it was hailed as a time when east got to meet west. Our Chanukah party and meeting was for us an opportunity for east to meet east.â&#x20AC;? That initial gathering was so well received that a committee was formed, by-laws created and the GPJC was born. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the key was everyone knew there were Jews living in Grosse Pointe, but nobody knew that there was a Jewish community. As of Chanukah 1989, there became a Jewish community here,â&#x20AC;? Weingarten said. â&#x2013; Learn more about the GPJC by searching Grosse Pointe Jewish Council in the William Davidson Digital Archives at djnfoundation. org. Contact the GPJC at (313) 882-6700.


100% FOCUSED ON HELPING OUR PATIENTS AND OUR COMMUNITY. Celebrating the 2019 Honorees

Douglas Bloom

Cyma Carn

Irma Glaser

Rita Cohn Haddow

Harriet Saperstein

Merton Segal

Guy Stern, PhD

Arthur Weinfeld

With compassion, expertise and technology, Karmanos offers an A-team of cancer specialists, giving each patient access to the newest and most advanced cancer treatments. Because everybody deserves their best chance to beat cancer.

SUNDAY, MAY 19 Luncheon 11:30am Dietary Laws Observed

Adat Shalom Synagogue, Farmington Hills PLATINUM SPONSOR The Ravitz Foundation PRESENTING SPONSOR New Order Coffee Roasters GOLD SPONSORS Belfor Property Restoration Elaine J. Beresh Robin & Leo Eisenberg, Max, Anna & Louis G. Fisher Construction Yad Ezra SILVER SPONSORS +HQU\)RUG:HVW%ORRPÀHOG+RVSLWDO Deborah & Steve Rosenthal RSM Development & Management Star Trax Events

Sponsorships as of this date

Reservations required

For... Sponsorship Information Journal Ads (Deadline April 19th)

visit www.jslmi.org or contact Beth Tryon at 248-592-5026 or btryon@jslmi.org Proceeds Benefit Quality of Life Fund

jn

February 14 • 2019

21


Meet the AARON ROSENHAUS

of The Well and JN partnered to honor young people impacting the community.

O

nce again, the community came through with more than 100 nominations for The Well and JN’s 36 Under 36. The nominees were sent to a panel of impartial volunteer judges who had the difficult task of choosing only 36 names from the list of impressive nominees for this year’s cohort. Here they are, in no particular order.

22

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

Aaron L. Rosenhaus, 34, of Detroit is the COO of Uniland Corporation, a real estate development and construction company. He was recognized as 2017 Young Builder of the Year and 2018 Urban Builder by the Home Builders Association. Aaron prides himself as a dedicated champion for the continued growth and development in the city of Detroit. His ties to the Motor City date back to 1926, when his great-grandfather Sol Rosenhaus started their family business Downtown. When Aaron, a fourth-generation builder, joined Uniland Corporation, he made it a priority for Uniland to continue its investment in the city where it all began. As a result, Uniland is proud to have completed projects in 12 Detroit neighborhoods over the past five years, specializing in the restoration and renovation of multifamily properties, with many new projects on the horizon. Aaron, a proud member of Federation’s National Young Leaders, is able to use NYL to further his involvement with the Jewish community in local and global outlets. He is also a proud cheerleader of The Well and was recently acknowledged as one of the inaugural 36 Champions. This certainly is not the beginning for Uniland or Aaron in Detroit, but a continuation of a 92-year history, doing his part to improve a city and community that have provided so much to Aaron, Uniland and the Rosenhaus family.


2019 Class ABBY RUBIN Abby Rubin, 27, of Detroit is a children’s librarian for the Detroit Public Library at the Campbell Branch. She serves on the NEXTGen Detroit Board of Directors as the chair of the Volunteers Committee and is working on building the Social Justice Committee. She co-chaired NEXTGen’s Pitch for Detroit kickball tournament for the past two years as well. She is also highly involved with Chabad in the D. In her spare time, she works at Pages Bookshop in Grandmont Rosedale as the children’s book buyer. Abby grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. After getting her undergraduate degree from University of Michigan, she came to Detroit as an education fellow with Repair the World. As a founding resident, she spent three years building the Moishe House community and programming in Detroit. She strives to continue to build community and find ways to welcome newcomers to Detroit and help them navigate the many opportunities Jewish Detroit has to offer.

She likes to eat at Green Dot Stables and have a picnic and read a book on Belle Isle during the summer.

JOSHUA MOSS Joshua Moss, 28, is vice president of Advance Plumbing, a 99-year-old, fourth-generation family-owned-andoperated decorative plumbing supply company with two locations: Walled Lake and Detroit. Since his start in the business in 2012, he has made an impact not only in the company, but also as an authority throughout the decorative plumbing industry. He is very involved in many organizations such as the Forte Buying Group, Decorative Plumbing & Hardware Association, American Supply Association and North Central Wholesaler Association. Among his greatest accomplishments, Joshua had an instrumental hand in building the city of Detroit’s first decorative plumbing and lighting showroom — 5,000 square feet

of state-of-the-art working showers, tubs, toilets, lighting and faucets. The showroom recently received the 2018 Decorative Plumbing & Hardware Association (DPHA) Showroom of the Year Award and won UNESCO’s Commerce Design Award and People’s Choice Award. This award-winning showroom also lights up Cass Avenue, beautifying the historical block in Midtown Detroit. Joshua is a member of Temple Israel and has served on many Jewish Federation NEXTGen boards for Latke Vodka and EPIC events. His best restaurant recommendation? Lady of the House in Detroit.

ABI BERLIN Meet Abi Berlin, 28. Abi grew up in Franklin and now lives in Ferndale with her husband and their two dogs. Abi graduated from Central Michigan University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in political science and obtained her master’s degree in social work from Wayne State University in 2014. She works as a

social worker at Sinai Grace Hospital in the intensive care unit on all aspects of discharge planning, endof-life care options and advocating for her patients’ best interests. She also serves as a supervisor and mentor to student-interns in Wayne State University’s social work program. Outside of work, Abi is active in the Jewish community through her volunteer work and involvement with NEXTGen Detroit and The Well. She sits on the executive board of NEXTGen Detroit and participates in volunteer events with the NEXTGen Volunteer Committee and previously was a general board member for four years. She twice served as the chairperson for Latke Vodka and once as the chairperson for EPIC. Abi also participates with The Well in its shared interest Shabbat Dinner Group. Throughout all her roles and duties, Abi has been committed to fundraising, community building and volunteering to support and grow the Metro Detroit Jewish community. She’s a Harry Potter fan and loves binge- watching HGTV with her husband. continued on page 24

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

23


continued from page 23

AVI SNIDER

Brought to you by

Avi Snider, 30, of Oak Park, is chair of Oak Park’s Arts and Cultural Diversity Commission. He leads the city’s efforts to develop and implement city-wide programs and events that provide access to the performing and creative arts and celebrate cultural diversity. Avi was appointed as chair in 2017 after serving as chair of Oak Park’s Ethnic Advisory Commission in 2016. This fall, Avi also was appointed to Oak Park’s Zoning Board of Appeals. He takes pride in contributing to the richness of cultural diversity in Oak Park, including being an active member of the Oak Park Jewish community. At his synagogue, Young Israel of Oak Park, Avi is a founding member of the Millennials Committee, where he plans events and creates community for adults in their 20s and 30s. Through his work with the committee, he seeks to create shared Jewish experiences as an antidote for the isolation sometimes felt by members of his generation. An attorney by trade, Avi works in-house at Equian, specializing in healthcare subrogation law and correct risk allocation between insurers. He has a bachelor of arts degree in political science from the University of Michigan and a J.D. from University of Cincinnati, where he was the president of the Jewish Law Students Association.

ARI KATZ Ari Katz, 35, of West Bloomfield, is a financial adviser at Glanz Wealth Advisors, a private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial in Farmington Hills. He helps clients develop sound financial plans, investment strategies and insurance portfolios, which helps give them confidence that their goals are on track. He’s focused on providing an excellent experience for his clients and is driven by the progress they make toward their unique financial goals. Ari was motivated to become a financial adviser after his father passed away from ALS and his family faced subsequent financial challenges. To honor his father’s legacy, Ari supports ALS families and medical research by hosting awareness events and fundraising for the ALS Association Michigan Chapter. This year, Ari launched a new automotive enthusiast club called Cars and Kibitz at Temple Israel to connect members of the

Jewish community who have a shared passion for cars but may not otherwise interact. Ari and his wife, Julie, work to instill strong Jewish family values in their children, Sadie and Libby, by attending Temple Israel ECC, participating in The Well events and creating Jewish traditions at home. He’s been a lifelong Metro Detroiter and earned his undergraduate degree from Western Michigan University and his M.B.A. from Wayne State University. His favorite thing to do in Metro Detroit? Cruising Woodward Avenue.

BECCA FISHMAN Becca Fishman, 25, lives at Moishe House in Royal Oak. She obtained her bachelor of arts from Michigan State University and worked at Hillel of Metro Detroit as a program associate upon graduation. For the last 20 years, Becca has been a part of the Tamarack Camps family, holding titles such as camper, counselor and supervisor. Currently, she holds the title of Israel and marketing coordinator. Becca loves the Metro Detroit Jewish community and has been involved with many organizations. In 2016 and 2017, she took part in the NEXTGen Latke Vodka Planning Committee. In 2018, she was the teen mission coordinator for the Detroit community. This past December, Becca attended a service trip to Thailand with Partner’s in Torah. She is excited to continue her passionate involvement at Tamarack Camps and within this motivating community.

as the chair of the marketing committee. Carly’s passion for building community in Jewish Detroit drives her philanthropic efforts. In her free time, she loves to travel and cook.

CASEY DISKIN Casey Diskin, 32, has been working with children with autism and other developmental disorders since 2004. She received her undergraduate degree from Wayne State University, her master’s degree from Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, and completed her internship through Melbourne University. She is the director of applied behavior analysis at Oxford Recovery Center, which has centers in both Brighton and Troy. Casey’s responsibilities include designing training protocols for ABA therapists and BCBAs, providing support to families with children who present challenging behaviors, advocating for children in schools, helping families secure insurance coverage for therapeutic services, and contracting and negotiating rates with insurance companies. In addition, she promotes research and dissemination of evidence-based practices through the ARTS program at Oxford Recovery Center. Casey grew up in Huntington Woods and currently lives there with her husband, Joshua, and their son, Asa. She and her family belong to B’nai Moshe in West Bloomfield. Her guilty pleasure is traveling to Phish shows with her husband.

CLAUDIA HALPERN CARLY SCHIFF Carly Schiff, 31, of Birmingham is the digital account director and an associate at Brogan & Partners. She is responsible for planning, developing and managing clients’ digital strategies to improve their web presence, assist with the customers’ journeys to conversion and ultimately achieve client digital marketing goals. Carly holds end-to-end knowledge of all agency operations, including project management and client relationship management. Before coming to Brogan, Carly honed her account executive skills at MRM// McCann. There, she managed multi-channel marketing and advertising programs for the GM Card from Capital One. She is a graduate of Michigan State University. Carly is a member of the NEXTGen Detroit Board of Directors. She also sits on the Tamarack Camps Board of Directors

Claudia Halpern, 23, is the associate regional director at Michigan Region BBYO, where she focuses on building and strengthening Jewish communities each and every day. Claudia grew up in Farmington Hills, where she was active in BBYO, the Jewish Federation, Tamarack Camps and Temple Israel. She graduated from Eastern Michigan University with a B.A. in communications and a minor in nonprofit administration. She found a home interning and working at multiple Metro Detroit organizations. After graduating in 2017, Claudia moved to Ann Arbor to be the outreach and program coordinator at the Jewish Federation of Greater Ann Arbor. While there, she worked with the young adult cohort, Israel and Overseas, Women’s Philanthropy and Teen Engagement. She returned to Metro Detroit to work for BBYO, where she focuses on BBG chapters, expansion efforts and as Adviser RISE Fellowship. continued on page 26

24

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn


Congratulations to our attorneys Michelle Rubin and Joshua Borson for being selected to the Jewish News 36 under 36. Jaffelaw.com SOUTHFIELD • DETROIT ANN ARBOR • NAPLES

Need Help with an IRS or State Tax Problem?

As featured on:

Call the experts at

1-800-TAX-LEVY (829-5389) Ŕ Tax Liens Ŕ Collection Notices Ŕ Penalties Ŕ Unfiled Tax Returns Ŕ Audits

Let our team of Attorneys, CPAs, Tax Consultants and former IRS Revenue Officers provide you with immediate relief from IRS and State tax problems.

Why Choose Levy & Associates to help with your tax problems?

S.D.: Owed the IRS $207,214. With our help, the case was settled for $7352. D.D.: Client owed the IRS $110,203. Our firm negotiated an Offer in Compromise to settle the debt for $12,226. L.J.: With our assistance, client’s IRS debt of $1,014,078 was reduced to $100,490.

Ŕ

22 years of specializing in tax resolution and working with the IRS and State Taxing Authorities

Ŕ

We have helped thousands of clients nationwide to save tens of millions of dollars each year!

Ŕ

Unlike other firms, all work on your account is kept in-house

Ŕ

A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau

Sincerely,

Call us today to answer your questions or to schedule a meeting and say goodbye to those sleepless nights!

Lawrence B. Levy, President

We Listen …. We Care … We Help! HQ: 28400 Southfield Road., Lathrup Village, Michigan 48076

1 800 TAX LEVY jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

25


continued from page 24

When she is not working, Claudia spends her free time with family and friends, traveling and exploring the city of Detroit.

plays and participating in local film competitions.

ELI BOYER DANIEL WARSH

Brought to you by

Daniel Warsh, 32, of West Bloomfield, is an in-house corporate attorney at Robert Bosch LLC, where he advises several North American business units of the company on commercial legal topics. He is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan Law School. Daniel currently serves on the executive board of NEXTGen Detroit as a co-chair of NEXTGen’s Campaign; previously, he played a key role in planning and organizing hallmark NEXTGen programs such as Good Shabbos Detroit, among others, after joining the NEXTGen Board in 2013. Inspired by his participation in the Glass Leadership Institute, Daniel joined the AntiDefamation League’s regional board in 2014. He also has a long-standing involvement with the University of Michigan Hillel, first as a member of the governing board as a law student and now as a member of the board of trustees. Daniel is a member of Congregation Beth Ahm. In his spare time, you’re likely to find him under the hood of a car or participating in motorsport activities.

DAVID ZEMON David Zemon, 29, is a supporter and passionate advocate for the strategic redevelopment of the District Detroit. As the director of corporate partnerships for the NBA’s Detroit Pistons, David helps connect an energetic fan base of basketball enthusiasts to the world-renowned technology companies, startups, and local and national retailers who share a likeminded commitment to creating best-in-class experiences in and around the Motor City. Prior to joining the Detroit Pistons, David led strategic partnerships for Taubman Malls, a portfolio of boutique, luxury shopping malls in key markets across the United States. David’s commitment to social responsibility dovetails with his professional focus, as both an internal champion of and active participant in Pistons Summer in the City, Season of Giving and Basketball for All community initiatives. David and his wife, Elizabeth, live in Beverly Hills and are members of Temple Israel. He is a “Spartan for life” and co-captain of a consistently average intramural ComePlayDetroit basketball team. After hours, he enjoys traveling, writing screen-

26

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

Eli Boyer is owner/operator of the award-winning Voyager restaurant in Ferndale, as well as Lovers Only and Iggy’s Eggies in Detroit’s Capitol Park. A 33-year-old native of West Bloomfield, Eli, his wife, Kimberly, and their daughters, Joey and Charlie, live in Huntington Woods. From a young age, Eli was raised as an active member of Detroit’s Jewish community, He spent summers as a longtime camper and staff member at Camp Tamarack, was founding member of Kitzoni AZA Chapter #321 and graduated from Congregation Shaarey Zedek’s Hebrew High School. At the University of Michigan — where he graduated with degrees in economics and sociology — Eli held leadership positions as a brother of the Omega Deuteron chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi. After launching six restaurant concepts in a little more than four years with Chicagobased DMK Restaurants, Eli returned to his hometown in 2013 to make an impact on the growing hospitality scene. Since he opened his restaurant Voyager in early 2017, it has been named a Food & Wine magazine Restaurant of the Year and in Esquire magazine’s Best New Restaurants in America in 2018. In his free time, Eli enjoys exploring Detroit with his family and looks forward to a healthy and happy 2019. His recommendation for the best thing to do in Detroit during the winter is a steam session at The Schvitz.

EMMA WINE Emma Wine, 16, of Royal Oak, is a junior at The Roeper School. She has been an active member of Detroit Jews for Justice (DJJ) for the past three years and was recently elected to the steering committee. She is a member of the Water Campaign team, which works in coalition with People’s Water Board to fight for policies that protect clean, affordable water. DJJ has helped Emma connect to her Jewish identity through a social justice lens. As a regional youth intern for Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion, Emma works with peers from around Metro Detroit to create and facilitate workshops, addressing a variety of social justice issues. Emma’s education at Roeper and the Birmingham Temple, along with the time spent at DJJ and Michigan Roundtable, have taught her to think critically about the role she plays in perpetuating injustice and the part she can play in fighting it.

At school, she plays volleyball and soccer and participates in theater. She tries to live by the words: “Don’t be in a hurry to condemn because he doesn’t do what you do or think as you think or as fast. There was a time when you didn’t know what you know today.”- Malcolm X. Her favorite book is Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison.

LESLEY WELWARTH Lesley is in-house counsel for Credit Acceptance Corporation, an indirect auto finance company headquartered in Southfield. Prior to going in-house, Lesley was an associate at Pepper Hamilton LLP in the Corporate Bankruptcy and Restructuring Practice Group. A native New Yorker, Lesley, 34, is thrilled to call Michigan her home. She lives in Southfield with her husband, Jeremy, and her two children, Noah and Emma, who both attend Farber Hebrew Day School-Yeshivat Akiva. Lesley is an active second-year board member of the Jewish Federation of Metro Detroit’s NEXTGen Detroit and proud Ben-Gurion Society member. Lesley is honored to act as a co-chair of NEXTGen’s 2019 EPIC event and is involved in promoting many of NEXTGen’s events and initiatives. An active Farber HDS parent, Lesley will chair, for the third consecutive year, the Farber HDS 2019 annual dinner. In addition, Lesley is a Young Israel of Southfield board member and is engaged in strengthening the synagogue and Modern Orthodox Jewish community of Metro Detroit. In the summer, she loves to take short drives out of the city and visit the Great Lakes. Last summer, she kayaked to Turnip Rock near Port Austin.

GEORGE ROBERTS George Roberts, 28, is director of public spaces at the Quicken Loans Community Fund. In this role, George leads the Quicken Loans Family of Companies’ investments in the redevelopment, activation and operation of parks, streets, plazas, alleys, bike lanes, libraries and other civic infrastructure throughout Detroit. George’s accomplishments include the creation of the Woodward Esplanade and Spirit Plaza, revitalization of Capitol Park, and development of Cadillac Lodge and the Downtown holiday markets. Prior to joining Quicken Loans, George lived in New York City and worked for the national leader in public space redevelopment, Biederman Redevelopment Ventures. In this


role, George led the creation and redevelopment of award-winning public spaces across the country including Klyde Warren Park (Dallas, Texas), LeBauer Park (Greensboro, N.C.) and Occidental Square (Seattle, Wash.). George is an executive board member of NEXTGen Detroit, where he founded and chairs the Israel Engagement Committee, chaired Entrée and co-chairs the “Attract” focus area. George is also a board member of The Well, where he helps create inclusive Jewish community through shared interest groups like a monthly whiskey group Downtown and non-traditional Shabbat and holiday events, such as a Passover party in the Egyptian collection at the Detroit Institute of Arts. George is also a regular presence at Chabad of Greater Downtown Detroit and is involved in helping ChabaD with education efforts in Detroit’s Brush Park neighborhood. George is also a board member of the Founders Junior Council of the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Roosevelt Park Partnership, the Detroit Greenways Coalition and Project Evergreen. George attended the University of Michigan earning a bachelor’s degree in urban and metropolitan studies and a graduate certificate in real estate development from Ross School of Business/Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. He is originally from Birmingham and lives in Detroit’s Woodbridge neighborhood — about a 10-minute bike ride from Campus Martius. George is engaged to Sarah Reingold, who serves as legislative director for Congresswoman Haley Stevens from Michigan’s 11th District.

JACOB SINGER Jacob Singer, 25, discovered his passion for helping others when he began volunteering at the Friendship Circle at age 12. For more than a decade, he has dedicated countless hours to working with children with special needs, including as volunteer and program coordinator, positions he accepted following graduation from the University of Michigan.

Jacob’s time at the Friendship Circle inspired him to return to U-M to get his master’s degree in social work in order to build a career around community engagement and giving back. While studying for his master’s, Jacob interned at Jewish Family Services of Washtenaw County, where he helped to resettle refugee families, supported elderly adults and planned a variety of family events for community members. After graduating in December 2018, Jacob accepted a full-time position at JFS as the family life education and community events coordinator. He lives in Ann Arbor, sits on the board of the Jewish Young Professionals and enjoys playing intramural sports. His favorite place to eat in Detroit? Buddy’s Pizza.

s n o i t a l u t a r g n Co

d Josh Moss

On being honored in the Jewish News 36 under 36. Your ambition, hard work, accomplishments and leadership at ADVANCE PLUMBING SUPPLY are unparalleled. WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU!!! Love, Mom, Dad, Brittany, Justin, Rachel, Andrew and Molly

JEREMY FISHMAN Born and raised in Bloomfield Hills, Jeremy Fishman, 24, has long been passionate about his local community. After recently graduating from Wayne State with his M.B.A., Jeremy assumed his current role as director of the 2019 Detroit JCC Maccabi Games and ArtsFest, an international Olympic-style sporting and summer arts experience for Jewish teens ages 12-17, coming to Detroit, Aug. 4-9. At just 24 years old, he is the youngest to ever hold this position with JCC Maccabi, which carries a history of 37 years and 102 host cities. Jeremy’s enthusiasm and passion for the JCC Maccabi program are well fostered. Prior to his current role, he coached the Detroit JCC Maccabi Boys Basketball team for five years. In addition to his JCC Maccabi work, Jeremy serves as the head girls basketball coach at West Hills Middle School, as well as head junior varsity girls basketball coach at Bloomfield Hills High School. The goal of his JCC Maccabi work is to bring our vibrant and giving Jewish community together for an event that reaches far beyond the week-long teen program, instilling a lifelong love for Judaism in the minds of thousands of international teens.

Lindsay, We are so proud of you! You are a wonderful daughter, mother, wife, and photographer. Congratulations on becoming a member of the 36 under 36!!! Love you to pieces, Mom and Dad

continued on page 28

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

27


continued from page 27

JOSH SKLAR

Brought to you by

Josh Sklar, 27, is a Detroit native who is passionate about the city’s revitalization movement and has played a key role in both its Jewish community and startup ecosystem. Josh currently leads a team of engineers at StockX, a startup in Detroit he joined as the 20th team member and that now employs more than 500 people. Before StockX, Josh worked at many different startups around Detroit and has immersed himself in the entrepreneurial community. Josh serves as president of Chabad Young Professionals, Detroit, where he focuses on building a community of Jewish young professionals by hosting events in exclusive and eclectic venues in Detroit. Prior to living in Detroit, Josh graduated from the University of Michigan, where he was an active member at the Jewish Resource Center. He is one of four siblings and is the grandchild of Holocaust survivors, which has played a large part in creating his deep Jewish roots.

JOSHUA BORSON Joshua Borson, 31, of Huntington Woods is a corporate attorney at Jaffe Raitt Heuer & Weiss, where he dedicates his practice to empowering entrepreneurs to grow through effective business planning and solving everyday legal issues. He enjoys working with businesses of all shapes and sizes to provide a proactive, results-focused approach in order to achieve his clients’ shortterm and long-term goals. Josh is skilled in all areas of corporate law, including entity formation, contract review and negotiation, financing, mergers and acquisitions, and general corporate matters. Josh and his wife, Jenna, are native Detroiters who chose to stay in Michigan following graduate school to plant their roots and build a family. They love spending every waking moment with their daughter, Ava. Giving back to the Jewish community is what keeps Josh grounded. He is a member of the NEXTGen Detroit Board of Directors, where he works to build a vibrant Jewish community. Josh is a member of the Entree Committee, a leadership program that helps members understand and become involved with the Jewish Federation. He is also a member of the NEXTWork Committee, which helps organize networking events with keynote speakers for more than 450 young, talented professionals in the Metro Detroit area. Josh also sits on the board of Cause We Care, a Temple Israel social action committee that provides community service activities in the Metro Detroit area. He

is also a mentor for the University of Michigan Football Alumni Network.

KEITH SCHONBERGER Keith Schonberger, 31, of Troy is a patent attorney at Young Basile Hanlon & MacFarlane P.C. He specializes in patent prosecution for computer technologies, namely, in the areas of video coding, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and wearable devices. Keith works with global corporations and start-up enterprises alike to draft and prosecute patent applications before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Although he grew up in the Metro Detroit Jewish community, Keith first recognized his strong connection to Judaism while on the 2004 Teen Mission. He has been an active community member ever since. During college and law school, Keith led weekly Shabbat services at Michigan State University Hillel. After moving to Troy, he took on leadership roles in several Jewish organizations, including Tamarack Camps, where he spent two years as an ex-officio member of the board of directors and remains an engaged committee member; The Well, where he leads a monthly Tot Shabbat program and has assisted with other program development; and NEXTGen Detroit, where he is a third-year member on the board of directors and the chair of the interfaith couples affinity group. Keith met his wife, Tara, at MSU. They have been married for more than seven years and have two amazing sons, Eli and Adam, and an awesome dog, Kedzie. Outside of his family, career and community involvement, Keith enjoys spending his free time jamming on guitar with friends, trying new restaurants and fine whiskies, and sharing terrible dad jokes.

RYAN BAROUCH Ryan Barouch, 35, is the president of American Credit Restoration, which focuses on helping consumers correct errors and improve their credit. Founded by Ryan in 2005, it has helped more than 10,000 individuals improve their credit standing in order to qualify for auto loans, mortgages, credit cards, etc. Ryan and his wife, Lauren, live in Novi with their two children, Brody and Isla, who attend preschool at Temple Israel. They are active in the Jewish community and regularly attend family programming and monthly Shabbat dinners organized by The Well.

When Ryan is not holding a baby, he is holding a guitar. Ryan has been playing guitar for more than 22 years and also produces hip hop music. He enjoys spending his free time skateboarding with his son, visiting with family and friends, exploring new restaurants in Detroit and taking cruises with his family. Ryan supports many local Jewish organizations including the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit, Chabad, the Friday Boys of the International School for Chabad Leadership, The Well, Aish HaTorah and recently went on the JWRP Men’s Trip to Israel with Aish Detroit.

MATT KURZMANN Matt Kurzmann, 29, is a first vice president of investments at Affordable Housing Advisors (AHA) of Marcus & Millichap. Matt’s career in real estate brokerage began in 2011 and, since then, he has successfully brokered the sale of thousands of government-subsidized multi-family apartment units on behalf of owners across the country. Matt spearheaded the formation of AHA’s nonprofit platform five years ago, which provides professional brokerage services to nonprofit organizations, representing them in the sale of their affordable housing properties. He is particularly proud to have facilitated the longterm preservation of the affordable housing status for all the nonprofit-owned properties AHA has been involved in brokering, and the majority received substantial renovations via the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit program. Matt is a supporter of many charitable causes including The Well, JARC, the Frankel Jewish Academy and Camp Ramah in Canada. In his free time, Matt enjoys Indiana Hoosiers basketball and spending time with family and friends, particularly his wife, Katie, and their bernedoodle puppy, Noodle.

LAUREN HOFFMAN Lauren Hoffman, 25, spends her days building startup community and her free time building Jewish community. After falling in love with Detroit and its complexity through her undergraduate thesis research, she moved here from New York in 2016 to work for real-estate tech startup Castle, through a program called Venture for America. Prior to this, Lauren earned a bachelor’s degree in religion at Princeton University and subsequently served as a JDC Jewish Service Corps fellow in Germany, planning events for Jewish students and young professionals. Today, Lauren works at Rock Ventures continued on page 30

28

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn


Hope has a home: The University of Michigan Prechter Bipolar Research Program What causes bipolar disorder â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the dangerous manic highs and devastating lows? Our scientists and research participants are committed to ďŹ nding answers and eďŹ&#x20AC;ective personalized treatments.

Be a source of hope for bipolar disorder. Join us: Right now, gifts are being matched up to $5 million. PrechterProgram.org 734-763-4895

FROM THE SHOPS AT LINCOLN CENTER Advance AmerJDBt#MJOH#MJOH #PPL#FBUt#rFBE#BTLFU #rFOEBhT#FBOT(rFFOT $POTFrvBUJvF$VUT %PMMBS$BTUMFt%r. Lazar DPM FPVS4JTUFSTFBTIJPO -FF#FBVUZ4VQQMZ

Berkley High School

.FUrPQPMJUan DrZ$MFBOFST

Schools of Choice

.FUrP1$4 PBQFS(PPET WearIPVTF

Apply Now for the Berkley High School Scholars Program (9th Grade) Accepting Applications February 25 - March 15, 2019

PaZMFTT4IPFt3BJOCPw "QQBrFM

Oakland County residents only

WIJUF$BTUMF

Â&#x2021; BHS received a Silver Medal from US News & World Report for 2018 Best High Schools rankings Â&#x2021; %+6ÂżUVWLQ0LFKLJDQWRDGRSW Sources of Strength mental wellness program Â&#x2021; BHS graduates are accepted to top colleges across the nation

4OFBLer 7JMMBt4UFQJO4UZMF 4UrFFU$PrOFS.VTJDt TPQ 5IBU T/BJMTt 5IF4VJU%FQPU CIurcIhT$IJcLFOt.D%POBMEhT

Â&#x2021; BHS offers 26 AP courses Â&#x2021; 68% of Seniors, 57% of Juniors and 48% of Sophomores are taking at least one AP class. Â&#x2021; Berkley Schools is a 2012-18 Best Community for Music Education, designated by the NAMM Foundation

Questions? 248.837.8104 www.berkleyschools.org

engage. inspire. achieve.

Lincoln Shopping Center GREENFIELD and 10½ MILE

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

29


continued from page 28

Brought to you by

on special projects supporting the growth of Detroit’s startup scene. Lauren serves on the board of the Isaac Agree Downtown Synagogue and as a co-chair of Chabad Young Professionals for Chabad of Greater Downtown Detroit, working with them to spin up a series of dinner parties in unique locations around the city. She is a Moishe House Without Walls host, a member of Detroit Jews for Justice, and a regular presence at programs with The Well, Hazon, Moishe House and NEXTGen Detroit. Lauren also volunteers with the FATE high school mentorship program, supports local advocacy work surrounding transit justice and is the creator of Detropolitan.com, a website and newsletter about the best long-standing and new things happening in Detroit. She lives in New Center and is often sighted at art openings, John King Books, Belle Isle Beach and riding around town on her bright red folding bike.

LINDSAY COX Lindsay, 35, a lifelong resident of Metro Detroit, thought she would spend her career as a social worker. She has a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and a master’s degree in social work, and she worked as a social worker for several years at both a nonprofit welfare agency and a charter school in Ypsilanti. But after the birth of her two deliciously cute children (she’s not biased), she fell in love with photographing them. And, as it turned out, that love could also be lucrative — which is how Lindsay Jaye Photography got its start. Since its inception in 2014, Lindsay’s business has continued to grow at a pace that even surprised her, and today, she is the “go-to” photographer for children and families in the community. Whether working with clients at her small (but charming!) Farmington studio or on-site around town, Lindsay prides herself on capturing authentic, emotional and loving moments in every picture she takes. Starting in early 2019, Lindsay will be offering a new service she’s calling Mini Maternity Mondays for her clients who want to document their growing families and growing bellies in quick 10-minute sessions each month. Lindsay is also extremely passionate about child safety. After accumulating what some might call an excessive amount of knowledge about the car-seat market, Lindsay finally redirected her energy from writing semi-threatening Facebook posts to becoming a nationallycertified Child Passenger Safety Technician (CPST). She now volunteers around the community educating parents, grandparents and

30

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

caretakers on the safe installation and use of their children’s car seats. She is also one of four administrators for the Jewish Moms of Metro Detroit Facebook group, a social media site dedicated to supporting Jewish moms like herself. Through the site, Jewish moms have an opportunity to connect with other moms and seek out referrals for child care, jobs, housing, health care and so much more, all in a safe and supported environment. The group currently has more than 1,600 active members. Lindsay is a lifelong congregant of Temple Israel, an involved member of Temple’s sisterhood and an active parent in the synagogue’s Early Childhood Center. She lives in Farmington Hills with her husband, Jason, 5.5-year-old daughter, Sydney, 3-year-old son, Nathan, and 9-year-old pup, Charles.

MICHELLE RUBIN Michelle Rubin, 32, of West Bloomfield is an estate-planning attorney, who works closely with individuals and families to provide personalized solutions to their estate, financial and tax planning needs. Michelle works one-on-one with clients and their advisers to prepare and implement wealth transfer, business succession, charitable and estate planning strategies. She is dedicated to meeting each client’s personal and financial goals effectively and efficiently, while providing maximum flexibility for their evolving needs. In addition to her active legal practice and family life, Michelle devotes considerable time to the Jewish community, where she has engaged with organizations and committees that allow her to utilize her abilities to help others. She is especially passionate about serving Yad Ezra and Hebrew Free Loan as a board member. Additionally, Michelle recently joined the NEXTGen Connect Committee, where she is helping young adults within the Jewish community through mentorship, resume support and assistance finding new jobs by facilitating connections to her industry peers, colleagues and network. In her free time, Michelle enjoys spending time with her husband, Eddie, daughter Beatrice, and their very large dog, Penny Lane.

MIMI MARCUS Mimi Marcus, 25, of East Lansing is the director of engagement at the Lester and Jewell Morris Hillel Jewish Student Center at Michigan State University. During her undergraduate career, Mimi

formed the first Hillel at Saginaw Valley State University (SVSU) with the aim of bringing together students of all backgrounds to share their love of Judaism, build positive relationships and increase cultural awareness on campus. During her senior year, she had not only created an active and thriving Hillel group (under the guidance of the Hillel Campus Alliance of Michigan), but also brought together more than 650 students, faculty and community members to hear Holocaust survivor Martin Lowenberg speak. Mimi now continues her passion for Jewish life by working with college students at MSU to empower, inspire and engage them to become Jewish student leaders. Her goal is to help them continue their Jewish journeys through one-on-one engagement and immersive experiences, including Taglit-Birthright Israel, which create supportive environments for students to explore and strengthen their Jewish identity. In addition to her professional work, Mimi is studying to receive a master’s degree in Jewish studies and nonprofit management at the Spertus Institute for Jewish Learning and Leadership.

RACHEL TAUBMANGLICKFELD Rachel Taubman-Glickfeld, 32, is the founder and owner of Taubman Events, which provides full-service event production and coordination for mitzvahs, weddings and other events throughout the Detroit community. Her clients include American Friends of Magen David Adom and the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit. From planning a visit for the Israeli ambassador to the United States to coordinating a wedding, no two days are the same, which keeps Rachel inspired by her work. A consistent theme in Rachel’s life has been her involvement in Detroit’s Jewish community. She served as a Michigan Region BBYO adviser for seven years, which helped her discover her passion for community building and organizing. She then moved on to work at the Jewish Federation and became its first associate director of events. Among her community involvement, Rachel participates in The Well’s Tot Shabbat programs with her 3-year-old son, Gabriel. She is also a member of the Well’s Rosh Chodesh group, participates in young family programming at Congregation Shaarey Zedek, is active in Chabad of Greater Downtown Detroit and serves on the BBYO Adult Commission.


Rachel lives with her husband, Greg Glickfeld, and their son in Huntington Woods. She looks forward to expanding her repertoire of events and continuing to serve the Jewish community.

RICKI FRIEDMAN Ricki Friedman, 30, is a life coach, motivational speaker and founder of BREAK the Weight, where she coaches people to BREAK the Weight in their lives — physically, mentally and emotionally. She teaches people how to shift their mindsets and create positive coping skills to live stronger, healthier and happier lives. She attends many different Jewish events, especially Downtown, where she’s big fan of the Chabad house and its lovely Shabbat dinners. The Pinson family has a special place in her heart. She’s also designing and teaching a six-week mental health course at Temple Israel for the Monday night school kids and is “excited to keep moving forward in my career with speaking, coaching, writing and figuring out ways to continue helping people transform on all levels. We all need reminders that we have the inner strength to change our lives and skills to do so. “That’s what I’m here for: I’ll teach, push and remind you.”

ZEEESY SILBERBERG Since moving from New York 10 years ago, Zeesy Silberberg, 34, co-director with her husband, Rabbi Shneur, of outreach at Tugman Bais Chabad of West Bloomfield, has not stopped moving. With boundless energy and enthusiasm, this talented rebbetzin raises six children and directs the Jewish Women’s Circle (JWC), a growing network of women who have monthly learning and recreational gatherings. Her average Shabbat dinner will draw close to 30 people, monthly young adult Shabbat dinners attract

about 100. (The crowd favorite is, without a doubt, her sushi salad). Zeesy runs a mommy-and-me music program, art classes for children, weekly Torah classes for women and is planning a Family Ski Shabbaton. Zeesy engages thousands of Jews from all walks of life by spearheading Jewish community-wide events including Shofar Factory, Chanukah Wonderland and the Passover Matzah Factory. Zeesy explains her inner strength this way: “So much of how I react to life’s joys and oys is related to the six sisters I was lucky to grow up with and the seven sisters-in-law I was gifted with upon marriage. We live all over the U.S., but we continue to be a support system for each other. But what helps me do what I do on a community level is, without a doubt, the fabulous women in my shul. They are constantly applauding, encouraging and rolling their sleeves up to get involved with every project we do. I do not take this for granted!”

SCOTT WASSERMAN Scott Wasserman, 24, of Royal Oak first made his mark on the Metro Detroit Jewish community in the summer of 2013. Though you might not have known his name, Scott was Tamarack Camps’ first agency photographer and videographer, tasked with capturing and sharing the pictures that parents so desperately crave. Today, Scott’s work has a global reach through Flow Video (formerly Visioned Media), where he is a founding partner. Scott’s cinematic breakthrough came in 2015, when he won the Spartan Film Festival’s Best Picture award. The next year, he teamed up with his AEPi brother, Alex Scharg, to capture the Festival’s Best Documentary. Later in 2016, the pair launched a video marketing and production company headquartered in Troy, with recent growth into the New York area. Flow Video works with organizations to tell their story — from Michigan State University’s

too Upscale Consignment & Auction House

ICONIC 20th CENTURY FURNITURE, FINE-ART, HOME DECOR & LIGHTING NOW ACCEPTING FINE ART, SCULPTURE, CERAMICS, GLASS CONSIGNMENT FOR MARCH 31st ONLINE AUCTION. 100% of SALE TO SELLER!

NOW BUYING AND ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS Tues-Sat 12-6, Sun 12-4 3325 Orchard Lake Rd, Keego Harbor, MI

248-481-8884 WWW.LESHOPPETOO.COM

CHANGING HANDS ESTATE SALES We specialize in mid-century modern estate sales

Let our experienced team handle all of your estate needs: ǵLjǵHands free-hassle free estate sales Call Leslie Weisberg today for a free consultation

248-709-9648 changinghandsestates.com

JOIN US ON WEDNESDAYS FOR APPRAISALS WITH TERRI STEARN!

DFAA: 248-672-3207 DetroitFAA.com DetroitFineArtAppraisals@gmail.com

continued on page 32

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

31


continued from page 31

annual Give Green Day to recent Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit campaigns. Flow Video’s portfolio also includes Wayne State University, Jaffe Raitt Heuer & Weiss P.C., Bloomfield Hills Schools, Level One Bank and other businesses, schools and nonprofits. He especially loves working with local Jewish organizations such as Friendship Circle, Hillel Day School and Jewish Community Center of Metro Detroit. His favorite place to shoot a sunset is at Camp Maas, and if he can’t get there, Belle Isle.

YIFAT CLEIN

Brought to you by

Yifat Clein, 33, is an intake coordinator and therapist at Kadima, where she helps individuals make their first (courageous) step in seeking mental health services and provides trauma-informed counseling to her clients. Since graduating with her M.S.W. in 2015, Yifat has been dedicated to improving mental health access and educating the community about the crucial role mental health plays in overall well-being. She is grateful that at Kadima she is able to promote an integrated, holistic approach to mental health. A native of Kibbutz Sasa, Israel, Yifat moved to the U.S. 11 years ago. She earned her B.S.W. from the University of Washington in 2013. Yifat’s passion for social justice led her to the University of Michigan School of Social Work in 2014. She has volunteered and worked at the Women’s Center of Southeastern Michigan, Development Centers and Jewish Family Service. Yifat belongs to the Downtown Synagogue and B’nai Israel Synagogue. She is an active volunteer with Limmud Michigan and encourages everyone to attend the day of learning on March 31. She lives in Detroit with her husband, Ruby Robinson. At home, she enjoys yoga, reading, watching The Great British Baking Show and cooking vegan food.

SHIMON LEVY Capt. (Res.) Shimon G. Levy, 33, has been proudly calling Detroit home since November 2014. In Detroit, he previously served as principal at Secret Sauce Capital and as the senior strategic adviser at the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit. His most recent venture, as the managing principal of Northend Capital, was acquired in November 2018. Before coming to Michigan, Shimon

32

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

founded the Student Led Trips Initiative, a project where top-tier university students lead their peers on thought-provoking, multi-faceted journeys to Israel. It merged into iTrek in 2015 as a well-financed initiative and, in 2018, brought more than 2,000 students to Israel. Shimon often consults, writes and speaks on entrepreneurship, the Middle East, millennial engagement challenges and leadership. Shimon attributes his passion for the Jewish people and Israel to his parents’ life of service and his personal experiences as a career IDF combat naval officer and a former government diplomat. He is involved in numerous NGOs, locally and globally, that build communities, support Israel, Jewish peoplehood and combat anti-Semitism. He recently married his longtime sweetheart, Jennie, and they love renovating (while complaining about) their 1925 German Tudor. They also love people, traveling and big ideas that make an impact. Shimon is a proud graduate of the University of Haifa, IDC Herzliya and Harvard Kennedy School, where he was fortunate to represent his class as the 2014 commencement speaker.

JAMIE IDEN STRASBERGER Jamie is a true leader in the Metro Detroit Jewish community by taking risks as an entrepreneur and leading by example with her commitment to tzedakah in her business ventures. Jamie, 35, started Because of a Case, one of the leading charitable phone case brands. Her passion for mental health (as she struggles with anxiety), led her to donate a portion of each sale to Minding Your Mind. Minding Your Mind is an education-based nonprofit that provides training to teachers and staff on improving mental health through strategies like meditation and yoga. Eventually, Because of a Case expanded to many other causes and partnered with celebrities to promote their causes and cases. These include Operation Warm, providing coats to those in need, and the Wildlife Conservation Fund, helping save and protect elephants. By creating a global brand with a social mission, she is showing the awesome things that can happen within the confines of the Jewish community in Metro Detroit. The Strasbergers enjoy Shabbats with their 4-year-old son, Ezra, and enjoy being a part of the family programming put on by The Well.

RACHEL FRANK Rachel Frank, 33, is an inspirational youth-services leader, having worked in the field for many years. As a member of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Oakland and Macomb Counties’ team, she has been named Professional of the Year for the club and received an award for the Michigan and Ohio region. Chesed sums up her approach and action. Rachel is the unit director for the Jack & Annette Aronson Boys & Girls Club-Ferndale Unit. This location serves dozens of youth ages 6-18, where she is responsible for the staffing as well as programming. She was employed as a religious school teacher at Temple Emanu-El and inspired her students, served on the Temple Board of Trustees, as well as on the Kol Limud Education Committee and Educator Search Committee. Rachel plays a role in strengthening the Jewish community by exposing teens to places outside their own community. It gives the students a foundation to build upon. Rachel lives in in Ferndale with her pup, Khaya.

RABBI YARDEN BLUMSTEIN Whether at his full-time job as teen director at Friendship Circle of Michigan or leading his minyan class at Frankel Jewish Academy or on the phone with a concerned parent or troubled teen, Rabbi Yarden Blumstein, 34, can be found listening intently, with patience and full presence of mind and spirit. As Friendship Circle’s teen director/teen mentor, he has focused on suicide prevention and served as a teen mentor through UMatter, an organization of Friendship Circle that creates awareness surrounding teen mental health and empowers teens to support one another in school and elsewhere. He also worked to bring ASIST (Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training) to Metro Detroit’s Jewish community, facilitating workshops for local teens and adults interested in learning practical intervention skills and developing a community-wide support network. He combines spirituality with support systems by inviting teens into his home for Shabbat dinners. Last year, Yarden and his wife, Bayla, hosted more than 1,000 teens on Friday nights. Yarden and Bayla have six children and live in West Bloomfield. ■ Compiled and edited by Managing Editor Jackie Headapohl.


jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;¢ 2019

33


jewsinthed | faces&places One of the

Dr. Cory Rubin

World-Class Faces in OUR Places

%RDUG&HUWL¿HG Dermatologist

Immediate Appointments New Patients Welcome

26400 West 12 Mile Rd., Suite 150 Southfield, MI 48034

248.353.0818

36700 Woodward Ave. Suite 203 Bloomfield Hills, MI 48304

248.647.5750

AdvancedDerm.com HILLEL DAY SCHOOL, ECC GROUNDBREAKING Farmington Hills Jan. 16, 2019

BATES STREET SOCIETY DINNER Community House, Birmingham Feb. 2, 2019 PHOTOS BY DERRICK MARTINEZ

Hillel Day School past presidents David Feber, Bob Canvasser, Steve Margolin and Jim Berger, Head of School Steve Freedman, past president Nancy Adler and Ellen Folbe, current board president at the groundbreaking Jan. 16 for a 6,000-square-foot expansion to the school’s Early Childhood Center. Lead gifts are from the Samuel and Jean Frankel Jewish Heritage Foundtaion and the William Davidson Foundation.

Amy and Stevie Goldhaber and Becca and Lincoln Schostak

Author/journalist Mitch Albom waits his turn to receive his award.

Pillar Society inductee Dr. Jeffrey S. Fischgrund with Birmingham Mayor Pro Tem Pierre Boutros

2019 Pillar Society inductee Arthur Horwitz, Detroit Jewish News Foundation president and publisher/executive editor of the JN, receives his award at the Fourth Annual Bates Street Society Dinner at the Community House.

Ilana Liss and Emily Hunegs

Director of Early Education Robin Pappas, Head of School Steve Freedman, Hillel President Ellen Folbe, and Ethan Davidson and Darin McKeever of the Davidson Foundation

34

February 14 • 2019

jn

Liv Madvin and Nathan Parker, ECC 4 students — as ECC Director Robin Pappas said, “One generation plants the trees so the next generation enjoys the shade.”

Gina Horwitz chats with patrons before the award ceremony, where Cynthia Ford was the keynote speaker.

Arthur Horwitz at the reception


moments

Come party with us at Troy Gymnastics & our *NEW* INDOOR Ropes Course!

Segel-Kim

C

athy and Mark Segel of West Bloomfield are thrilled to announce the engagement of their son Joshua Baron Segel to Bora Kim, daughter of Weekyung Hwang and Shinsop Kim of Seoul, Korea. Bora graduated from Columbia University, majoring in financial engineering and is an investment associate at Perella Weinberg Partners. Joshua graduated from University of Michigan with a business degree and is a vice president at Allianz Capital Partners. The couple reside in New York City and will be married in Michigan in May.

Rosenzweig to Head Milwaukee Federation Miryam Rosenzweig, who helped innovate NextGen Detroit and grow the number of young Jewish adults in Metro Detroit Rosenzweig supporting the Federation and currently serves as Federation’s chief development officer, is set to leave in March to become the president and CEO of the Milwaukee Jewish Federation. NextGen Detroit is national success story. A division of Detroit’s federation, it was created to Jewishly engage people ages 21-45. NextGen Detroit grew from 1,500 participants to 6,000 in a threeyear period and has maintained that. Its donor base grew from 1,000 to more than 3,300 people. But most impressive may be the results of a 2018 demographic study sponsored in part by Detroit’s federation. Detroit’s young Jewish adult population more than doubled in the last 10 years. Detroit, as far as is known, Rosenzweig said, is the only com-

munity in America where young adults are giving at the same rate as their older peers. “With her bold and innovative approach to outreach, engagement and leadership, Miryam created a dynamic model that has influenced communities across the country in the engagement of young adult populations,” said Scott Kaufman, Deroit Federation CEO. “Miryam is leaving a lasting positive imprint on Jewish Detroit, as her ability to see ‘what could be’ without being limited ‘by what is’ led to the creation of many great and transformative things for our community. Jewish Detroit’s transition from a city that young people were leaving in droves less than a decade ago, to now being a destination for young Jews is in no small part due to her visionary leadership.” She’ll be moving to Milwaukee with her husband, Matt Buchi. She starts as the new CEO and president of Milwaukee Jewish Federation on March 13.

Troy Gymnastics is a state-of-the-art facility-incorporating THREE buildings and FIVE gym areas!

IRC@TG3 Climb the largest indoor ropes course in the Midwest! t40 elements tState-of-the-art high ropes t4 zip lines t2 rappelling stations tRock walls & more

Use our indoor ropes promotion code JN35OFF for

35% off EVERYTHING including parties, open climb, etc. (ONLY valid for www.irctg3.com)

Located at 1921 Northwood Dr. Troy, MI 48084

: @irctg3

www.irctg3.com

Call for more information or head online to book your event TODAY!

248-816-8496 www.troygymnastics.com TroyGymnastics

Marvin & Betty Danto Health Care Center 6800 West Maple Road West Bloomfield, MI 48322 248.788.5300

IChoseHeartland.com

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

35


sports

Hockey Event Benefits Jamie Daniels Foundation STEVE STEIN CONTRIBUTING WRITER

K

Keyes Real Estate Throughout South Florida, Including Boca, Boynton, Delray, Broward and Miami-Dade Counties

Let Old Friends be your Michigan-Florida Connection Nina Spinner-Sands

Rita Morse

NinaSpinner-Sands@keyes.com

RitaMorse@keyes.com

(954) 290-8293

(305) 609-7559

BUY â&#x20AC;˘ SELL â&#x20AC;˘ INVEST Estate Property Sales from Listing to Clean-Out!

MEL DRYMAN Raised in Detroit, Experienced in Arizona

Your Professional & Dedicated  ARIZONA REALTOR

Mobile: (480) 239-8686 mel.dryman@azmoves.com

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

COME TO FLORIDA IN THE NEW YEAR Fort Lauderdale to Jupiter and beyond!

Now selling Valencia Bay

Houses, Condos, and Rentals in Active Adult, Country Club and Beachside Communites Advantage Plus 4'FEFSBM)XZt#PDB3BUPO '-

Elly & Ed Lepselter (561) 302-9374

ÂŽ

36

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

jn

en Daniels has been the voice of the Detroit Red Wings for 22 seasons, calling games as the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play-by-play announcer. In the past few years, Daniels has become a voice for something that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a game. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fighting the scourge of opioid addiction in the country that has claimed thousands of lives including his son Jamie Daniels, who died in 2016 at age 23 from an overdose of heroin laced with fentanyl. Last year, the same year Ken Daniels was inducted into the Michigan Jewish Sports Hall of Fame, he launched the Jamie Daniels Foundation. The foundation raises money to help families afford the intensive rehabilitation thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needed for a loved one to beat an opioid addiction. It also provides education, resources and guidance. The foundation will benefit from an outdoor hockey event from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at On the Dunes at 2005 Haggerty Road just south of North Pontiac Trail in Commerce Township. The Jamie Daniels Outdoor Hockey Classic is a day of hockey, camaraderie, fundraising and awareness. The event is sponsored by GLP & Associates, a Farmington Hills-based firm that focuses mainly on helping educators achieve their financial goals, and Detroit Sports Media. One reason for the GLP & Associatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sponsorship of the Jamie Daniels Outdoor Hockey Classic is the company is celebrating its 50th year in business this year. Another reason is the relationship between Ken Daniels and company director Adam Szlamkowicz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a big year for our company. Fifty years in business is no small milestone,â&#x20AC;? Szlamkowicz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always giving back to the community, but we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t publicize it. For our anniversary, we wanted to do something special and invite the community.â&#x20AC;? Szlamkowicz said he got to know Ken Daniels when he was an intern and later an associate producer at Fox Sports Detroit in the early 2000s.

With Ken Daniels (center) are Alex Kocoves (left) and Matthew DeSantos, CEO and president of GLP & Associates.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kind of person Ken Daniels is,â&#x20AC;? Szlamkowicz said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I took a job in Dallas after I left Fox Sports Detroit and after about a year there, in 2007, I get a call one day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ken. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there to broadcast a Red Wings-Dallas Stars game. He says grab a nice pair of pants and a nice jacket because heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s taking me out to dinner. He knew I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any family there, and he wanted to make sure I had a nice evening. We had a great dinner.â&#x20AC;? After he heard about Jamie Danielsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; death, Szlamkowicz said, he gave Ken Daniels a call to offer his condolences, thoughts and prayers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know Jamie very well, but some people at our company did from playing hockey with him,â&#x20AC;? Szlamkowicz said. GLP & Associates has a hockey team â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Szlamkowicz says heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the â&#x20AC;&#x153;old guyâ&#x20AC;? on the team at age 39 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and it will wrap up the Jamie Daniels Outdoor Hockey Classic with a game against the Detroit Red Wings alumni team at 5 p.m. Open skating and other games also are on the schedule. Check out the eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page for more details. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for children, with proceeds benefiting the foundation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also raise money through 50/50 drawings, raffles and sponsor ads from area businesses on the rink dasher boards,â&#x20AC;? Szlamkowicz said. Send news to stevestein502004@yahoo.com.


spirit

Appropriate Appearance

I

often find people come to anytime one is in the temple me to express their belief or synagogue building. These that much of Torah is irrelexpectations by the community evant in their life, that it is outare often expressed differently dated. That Jews in the modern based on whether one identifies world, without a Mishkan or as male or female. Yet, we also Temple, have little to learn recognize that for many the Rabbi Simone policing of dress is complicated, from much of the Torah. Schicker This week’s portion appears, especially regarding policy and at first glance, to be one of our youth. these sections. Tetzaveh disMore and more we have Parshat cusses four main things: the seen articles come out that the Tetzaveh: eternal light, the priestly gardress code policies in schools Exodus ments, ordination of the priests 27:20-30:10; (and then taken on by congreand the burning of incense. Yet, gations) are disproportionately Ezekiel if we allow ourselves to delve about what young female 43:10-27. deeper into the text, we can identified individuals may or surprise ourselves by the depth may not wear. We write policy of meaning we can discover. that says a skirt or shorts must pass In the discussion of the garments their fingertips or that shirts must have the priests are required to wear, we straps that are at least three fingers read, “You shall also make for them wide. Things may not be too tight, and linen breeches to cover their nakedoften an explanation of what pants are ness; they shall extend from the hips to allowed is included. All these things the thighs.” [Exodus 28:42] According are subjective and may cause young to other verses of Torah, it was not female-identified individuals to feel common for men to wear breeches. there is something wrong with their Rather, most people wore long robes bodies, which there is not. We are all or garments we may consider dressmade in God’s image according to es today. The addition of the linen Genesis 1:27. breeches by the priests was another What can we learn then from this layer of modesty being requested by week’s portion? We can note that we God. In a time and place where the need to be careful of our words and question of appropriate dress at work, actions. That one’s clothing choices school and play is constantly being need to be appropriate for the setting, questioned, our Torah has an importbut what is appropriate for one person ant lesson to teach us. may be completely wrong for another. Traditionally speaking, modesty is That we need to teach ourselves not to an important aspect of Jewish practice. judge others based on their appearance I grew up being told that it was disrebut rather on their merits. We can and spectful in temple for my shoulders to should have community expectations, be bare, and it is expected in many of but we must also recognize that those our congregations that people dress expectations must be shared in a way with a certain level of modesty in that is compassionate and caring, not services. This modesty is interpreted judgmental or demeaning. ■ differently in various congregations Rabbi Simone Schicker is rabbi at Temple B’nai but often extends to wearing a kippah Israel in Kalamazoo. on the bimah, in the sanctuary or

Congratulations!

Shout out to our Junior Rebbetzin Zeesy Silberberg on being included in JN’s 36 under 36 for being an inspiration to so many in Metro Detroit. With your devotion to Torah values, combined with your Ahavat Yisroel, you truly embody the message of the Lubavitcher Rebbe obm, and are a source of great pride to all of us. Sara Tugman Bais Chabad Torah Center Stephen Sobczak - President Elya Silfen - Vice President Binyomin Trager - Treasurer Natalie Lipnik - Secretary

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

37


eretz

Anti-Semitism Envoy Finally Appointed Trump’s new anti-Semitism monitor comes with diverse skills. RON KAMPEAS JTA.ORG

E

WIKIPEDIA

lan Carr’s career, until now, has been equal parts prosecutor, policy wonk, politico and performance artist. That makes him perfect for his new job as the State Department’s special envoy to monitor anti-Semitism. He was appointed last week. Ira Forman, Carr’s predecessor, who has been leading calls for President Donald Trump to fill the position — unfilled since Forman’s departure two years ago — said Elan Carr Carr’s CV speaks well of the skills he brings to the post. “His political skills should serve him well because part of the job is the art of the possible,” he said. Forman cited his successor’s background in the U.S. Army, his leadership of a Jewish fraternity, his day school background, his mixed Mizrahi-Ashkenazi heritage and his fluency in Arabic and Hebrew. Forman said the community should be grateful now that Trump and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo have filled the job. “We’ve all been complaining it hasn’t happened, and we should now be happy it’s happened,” said Forman, who now works with Human Rights First, an NGO, to monitor and combat anti-Semitism. Indeed, some of the organizations that have been leading the criticism of Trump for the delay could barely contain their pleasant surprise: There were rumors that Trump might fill the slot with an unqualified donor or, worse, someone linked to the far-right elements that helped propel Trump to power and have influenced some of his policies, particularly on immigration. Instead they are getting Carr, an affable, cross-the-aisle type of

38

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

Republican who has gotten down and deep combating anti-Semitism and anti-Israel activity on campuses. The statement by Anti-Defamation League CEO Jonathan Greenblatt, perhaps Trump’s most outspoken critic among the large mainstream Jewish groups, notably focused on Carr’s biography in “enthusiastically” welcoming the pick. “Carr knows all too well the scourge of hate,” Greenblatt said. “His grandfather was imprisoned after an anti-Semitic show trial in Iraq, where Elan later served as a U.S. Army judge advocate. He has been a leader in the fight against anti-Semitism on college campuses and has long advocated for working across the aisle to craft thoughtful compromises, including in support of Israel.” The American Jewish Committee said it was “grateful” for the appointment and also noted in its statement the intensive lobbying by the Jewish community and others to fill the congressionally mandated job. Jewish Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives welcomed the appointment, but also emphasized the long wait. The Wiesenthal Center said Carr “brings to the Special Envoy position boundless energy and a keen legal eye.” B’nai B’rith International called the appointment “outstanding,” and the Israeli American Council said there is “nobody more qualified” than Carr. Carr is plunging into his work, last week he went to a conference on anti-Semitism in Bratislava organized by Slovakia, which currently holds the chair of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, and then a European Union conference on anti-Semitism in Brussels. “He sees this as a nonpartisan job,”

said Matt Brooks, the executive director of the Republican Jewish Coalition who has known Carr for decades. Carr, 50, has since 2004 served as a criminal prosecutor in Los Angeles County, specializing in gang violence. His approach has been holistic, focusing on the circumstances that drive youths to crime and not just on the crimes. The big picture emphasis could serve him well in the job of anti-Semitism monitor, where he will be expected to take officials to task for specific anti-Semitic acts in their countries or even in their governments, while also gently encouraging larger fixes in education and rhetoric to roll back bias. Carolyn Normandin, regional director of the ADL in Michigan, welcomes the appointment. “We have repeatedly called for the administration to fill this position, and Carr has a deep breadth of knowledge and experience to bring to this critical role,” she said. “Carr has been a leader in the fight against anti-Semitism on college campuses and has advocated for thoughtful bipartisan work in this area.” Normandin added that the ADL is also deeply committed to the support of H.R. 221/S. 238 — the Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat AntiSemitism Act, which would give Carr the rank of ambassador and ensure that, in the future, the position be appointed by the president with the advice and consent of the Senate. The law would impose a legal limit of 90 days for how long any administration could leave the job unfilled. “The House passed this important bill several weeks ago by a vote of 411 to 1,” Normandin said. “This act would help make up for lost time when the envoy position was vacant. We urge the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and full Senate to take swift action on the bill, and we urge the full-funding of Carr’s office to ensure success.” ■ Managing Editor Jackie Headapohl contributed to this report.

May Detroit Community Birthright Trip Now Open There’s no better way to dethaw from these freezing temperatures than to do it in Israel. Registration for Federation’s Detroit Community Birthright trip, May 8-20, is open. Anyone who has ever gone on a Birthright Israel trip will tell you it is the experience of a lifetime. A free trip to Israel, traveling from the south to the north, seeing all the iconic sites and hidden gems. You ride a camel, sleep in a Bedouin tent, climb Masada, swim in the Dead Sea, touch the Western Wall, walk the stone streets of Jerusalem, explore the mystic city of Tzfat, and eat all the hummus your heart desires. Ten, non-stop days in the Holy Land on a bus full of your peers has all the makings of an incredible adventure — but Detroit Community trips offer some special extras that transform 10 days of travel into years of memories, such as Israeli travel mates from Federation’s partnership region for the full 10 days, a fullday visit to the partnership region and Home Hospitality Night where you are invited into Israeli travel mates’ homes to share a local meal with their families. The adventure isn’t over when the trip ends. Traveling with fellow Detroiters means that you can meet up, hang out and build real community connections when you get back to Michigan and reconnect with the Israelis you met on your trip in August for a Mifgash, a week-long reunion. Know someone 22-26 who hasn’t gone on Birthright yet? Have them register at jewishdetroit.org/ nextgen/birthright or email Nikki at baron@jfmd.org with questions.


START YOUR JOURNEY. HEAL YOUR LEGS. Varicose veins may result in painful leg symptoms. Allure Medical can heal your legs with a non-invasive treatment with no downtime. Treatments are covered by most insurance plans, including Medicare.

OTHER SYMPTOMS MAY INCLUDE: Ulcers Itching BULGING

Swelling Numbness DISCOLORATION

Bulging Veins Heaviness SWELLING

ULCERS

We believe in curing the problem or disease, not just managing its symptoms. Dr. Charles Mok, Allure Medical Founder

FREE VEIN SCREENING To book, call by February 21st (24 8) 266- 8 82 2 www.alluremedical.com Beverly Hills/ Birmingham 32804 Pierce Street Beverly Hills, MI 48025 :HVW%ORRPÃ&#x20AC;HOG 6900 Orchard Lake Road, Ste 215 :HVW%ORRPÃ&#x20AC;HOG0, (Located in the Beaumont building)

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;¢ 2019

39


S

JOAN MARCUS

arts&life theater

Julia K. Harriman and Austin Scott

o many tickets, so few left. If you didn’t purchase the Broadway in Detroit subscription by the time Something Rotten opened at the Fisher Theatre in September, you were basically SOL (Severely Out of Luck) at being guaranteed a Hamilton ticket. “When we announced last year that Hamilton was going to be in our season, our subscription orders spiked. In fact, having Hamilton as part of our seven-show series helped us double our subscription base,” said Scott Myers, director of corporate sales and marketing at Broadway in Detroit, a division of Nederlander Detroit. Your next chance came when Ticketmaster ran a Verified Fan Lottery that sent selected buyers a special code that allowed them to buy tickets online Jan. 25. If you didn’t get a code, you had to head to the Fisher Building tat 7:30 a.m. to enter the wristband lottery for a chance to buy tickets that day. “Our staff came together to make sure more than 600 people were able to buy Hamilton tickets,” added Myers, who said the last number was called around 3:30 p.m. “It was an incredibly busy day with an overwhelmingly patient, gracious and very excited group of theater fans.” So, what about those still clamoring to get a ticket? Here is your guide to supporting a worthy charity and getting your shot at seeing Hamilton. For Amy Nederlander, it’s beshert that the first fundraiser for L!fe Leaders Inc., the Detroit-based nonprofit she co-founded three years ago with Michaela Murphy, will be held March 28 at the Fisher Theatre. “It really means the world to me that Amy our inaugural gala is being held at one Nederlander of the theaters that’s been run by my family since it opened over 50 years ago in Detroit,” said Nederlander, a Detroit native now living in New York City. Leadership! Fueled by Entrepreneur-ISM (L!FE)

Want to See

ways in which we can improve the country and the world when we invest in our promising students.” In that same mission of supporting Detroit’s youth, the Seller-Lehrer Family Foundation, founded by Seller and his partner Josh Lehrer, a prominent documentarist and photographer, donated a $1 million grant to fund Mosaic Youth Theatre’s Summer Camp and Middle School Programs at the end of December 2018. Mosaic Youth Theatre’s Hamilton Benefit will be on April 9. Tickets for the show only range from $289-$840. Hillel of Metro Detroit (HMD) held its own Hamilton ticket lottery for current HMD students in January. HMD has Jewish student chapters at Wayne State University, Oakland University, Oakland Community College, University of Michigan Dearborn, Lawrence Technological University and University of Detroit Mercy. Students entered to win one, non-transferable ticket to the HMD pre-glow and show April 4. Students paid $50. “This fundraiser is an amazing opportunity for our students, many of whom are work-study and have never seen live professional theater and could never afford to see a show like Hamilton,” said HMD Endowment Campaign Director Illana Greenberg. She says the fundraiser, chaired by Lou Goldhaber and Fern Kepes, will give Hillel donors an opportunity to mingle with the students at the preglow, which includes cocktails and kosher appetizers. Tickets for the pre-glow and Hamilton show start at $400; tickets are limited. If you want to see Hamilton on opening night, Tuesday, March 12, you can purchase tickets that will support three nonprofits: Congregation Shir Tikvah in Troy, Upland Hills School in Oxford and Congregation Beth Shalom of Traverse City. The event also will celebrate Shir Tikvah’s Double Chai (36th) anniversary. “I first met Jeffrey Seller at Shir Tikvah when he was back in Detroit for a family bat mitzvah,” said

Hamilton?

Get tickets and benefit one of these local fundraisers. JULIE SMITH YOLLES CONTRIBUTING WRITER

SHANE BURKE

provides career and leadership development programs for middle school and high schoolers in Detroit, empowering students to find their voice, and establish skills and goals using theater-based techniques, marketing, branding and network etiquette. Nederlander Detroit is sponsoring 24 L!FE students and teachers for the March 28 Gala that includes an elegant dinner curated by Chef Marcus Samuelsson (The Red Rooster, Harlem) at the Fisher Theatre, orchestra seating for Hamilton, champagne and dessert reception with a postperformance conversation with members of the cast and Hamilton producer Jeffrey Seller, who grew up in Oak Park and graduated from the University of Michigan. Seller, along with Sen. Debbie Stabenow, Mayor Jeffrey Seller Mike Duggan and Lori Maher, are honorary gala hosts. “Jeffrey and I are both very passionate about Detroit and empowering youth, so we collaborate when we can. I will do anything I can do to help the city and its revitalization and its future leaders,” said Nederlander, who introduced her close friend, Seller, at the Jewish Expats gathering as part of Crain’s Detroit Homecoming event in 2016. Seller met firsthand with L!FE students at the University Prep Academy in Detroit and said, “The impact L!FE programs have had is inspiring. The story of Alexander Hamilton, an orphan from St. Croix with incredible potential and drive who went on to change the world, is a great lesson about the

continued on page 41

40

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn


arts&life continued from page 40

Rabbi Emeritus Arnie Sleutelberg. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We became friends over the years. I had the privilege of officiating the baby namings of their two children in Rabbi Arnie New York and was Sleutelberg invited to the Tony Awards the year Jeffreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show Avenue Q won Best Musical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twenty years ago, Jeffrey arranged for Shir Tikvah to purchase the premier night of Rent when it came to the Fisher Theatre as a fundraiser. He was pleased Shir Tikvah was open and inclusive of all who wished to seek Jewish

spiritual connection. For several years, he and I had been discussing creating another fundraiser when Hamilton comes to Detroit. I realized a huge undertaking like this would be more feasible if several nonprofits could share the initial financial commitment and ticket sales promotion, so I approached Upland Hills School, where I serve as chair of the board of trustees, and Beth Shalom of Traverse City, where I currently serve as their rabbi, to see if each would consider partnering with Shir Tikvah on Hamilton. Thus, all three nonprofits are beneficiaries of the Hamilton premier fundraiser.â&#x20AC;? Tickets are limited. â&#x2013; 

Details Shir Tikvah, Upland Hills School, Beth Shalom of Traverse City 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 12 (Opening Night) $339-$699 shirtikvah.org/hamilton hamilton@shirtikvah.org (248) 581-4080

L!FE Leaders Inc. Gala Thursday, March 28 6 p.m. dinner, Fisher Theatre, curated by Chef Marcus Samuelsson 8 p.m. performance Champagne & dessert reception Valet parking Post-performance conversation with Jeffrey Seller & cast members $1,250-$100,000 $500 ticket and valet parking only www.fueledbylife.org

STAR DELI

â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;Śone of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest carryout-only delicatessens! Starâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reputation has never wavered!â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny Raskin

COMPARE OUR LOW PRICES WITH ANY DELICATESSEN IN TOWN! MEAT TRAY

DAIRY TRAY

SALAD TRAY

$12.99 per person

person $22.99 per

$13.99 per person

SALAD TRAY W/ LOX & CREAM CHEESE

$17.99

per person

Order from Star for the Best Deli Trays in Town!

Hillel of Metro Detroit Thursday, April 4 6 p.m. pre-glow with cocktails, kosher appetizers 8 p.m. performance Tickets start at $400. Call (313) 577-3459 or email hillelcampaign@wayne.edu.

Mosaic Youth Theatre 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 9 $289-$840 hamilton@mosaicdetroit.org

5 OFF

$ )0634.0/4"5".1.t46/".1.

24555 W. 12 MILE ROAD +VTUXFTUPG5FMFHSBQI3PBEt4PVUIGJFME

248-352-7377

On Starâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful already low-priced trays Expires 3/06/19. One Per Order. Not Good Holidays. 10 Person Minimum. With this coupon.

www.stardeli.net

DELIVERY AVAILABLE

Prices subject to change

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

41


AARON KACZANDER/ABC

arts&life tv

Close to

Home

Aaron Kaczander in the kitchen on set for The Goldbergs, for which he is a writer and co-producer

The Goldbergs writer Aaron Kaczander uses his dad’s experiences for Feb. 20 episode. SUZANNE CHESSLER CONTRIBUTING WRITER

S

ome Michigan men with grown children could very well be reminded of the kind of friendship group they shared in their younger years as they watch an upcoming episode of The Goldbergs. Bruce Kaczander will definitely be one of them. His grown son, Aaron Kaczander, a writer and co-producer for the ABC sitcom, has taken elements from his dad’s stories of fun experiences with lasting buddies and added them to the mix as writers were working on a related fictional episode. Tentatively titled “The Highlander Club,” the episode airs at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 20. “My dad’s group of guys called themselves The Jokers,” explains Aaron Kaczander, who has worked on the series since its pilot episode and has been employed by its creator, Adam Goldberg, for nine years. “I heard about The Jokers here and there. Adam’s dad had a similar group that he heard about. “The idea behind the episode is that one son, Barry, has this really close-knit group of friends who have been characters on the show for five years, and they’re really funny together. “Barry is going to be graduating, and the prospect makes him wonder if he’s going to lose his best friends because they’re all going to different colleges. Barry discovers that his dad had an old

42

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

group of friends, much like my dad did, and he thinks if he gets them back together for great times, then there’s much more of a chance they’ll stay together.” The series, set in Pennsylvania, is narrated by a grown son remembering his family during the 1980s. The family is recalled through videotapes the son made as a youngster. “I’m a very nostalgic person,” says Kaczander, 35, who grew up in West Bloomfield, graduated from Groves High School, attended Temple Beth El and spent summers at Camp Tanuga in Kalkaska. “I was born in the 1980s, but I wouldn’t necessarily consider it my decade. “I love the idea of one person talking about his childhood and watching himself grow up through videotapes. I just love that we can have fun and do lots of jokes in episodes that also end with a lot of heart. I think that’s really important. I love coming to work and joking around.” Achieving this work goal followed a longtime interest in television and comedy. At the University of Michigan, Kaczander had a double major in English and film and a minor in screenwriting. After accepting temporary jobs for film festivals in Utah and New York, Kaczander decided to seek opportunities in California.

FINDING OPPORTUNITIES “When I moved to Los Angeles in 2007, it was the beginning of the writers’ strike to make sure they could be properly compensated for streaming services like Netflix and Hulu that are so huge today,” Kaczander recalls. “It was pretty ironic because I moved right down the street from where all these writers were picketing. I used that as an opportunity to meet them. “I picked up a picket sign and started talking. Through that, I got my first internship for Scott Free Productions started by Ridley Scott. I met a few more people, and a friend pointed me toward a job at a literary agency, where I got a real crash course in how agents work and how the business side of TV works — all the time knowing I still wanted to be a writer.” While taking improv and sketch classes with the Upright Citizens Brigade comedy troupe, Kaczander moved on to become a production assistant for Sean Smith, who created a show called Greek for the ABC Family Network. Next came working his way up for Adam Goldberg. “We don’t go out of our way for specifically Jewish storylines on The Goldbergs, but viewers might find a Jewish tone in the show,” Kaczander says. “The grandfather character, played by George Segal, uses Yiddish words.”

Kaczander also brought his own experiences into a Chanukah episode with a suggested scene related to his Michigan years. It has to do with a game of pennies, Chanukah gelt, played at holiday gatherings attended by Kaczander family friends. “The episode was about Beverly Goldberg desperately trying to keep her son celebrating Chanukah even though he is going to marry someone who is not Jewish,” Kaczander explains. “She does everything she can to make him continue to celebrate the holiday, and he assures her he will do that while starting his own traditions.” Besides impacting Kaczander’s professional life, The Goldbergs has had a strong impact on his personal life. “I have Adam Goldberg to thank not only for this part of my career, but also for meeting my wife, too,” says the writer/co-producer who visits family and friends in Michigan about three times a year and has built a collection of Piston T-shirts. “I met Maggie Lyons while working on the pilot for the series, and we were married last October.” ■

Details The Goldbergs airs at 8 p.m. Wednesdays on ABC.


AARON KACZANDER/ABC

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;¢ 2019

43


arts&life CHINESE PEOPLE

grandpa). So, until I saw the program, I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure whether his Jewish ancestry would be covered at all. I am happy to say it was. Silvermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;basicâ&#x20AC;? ancestry NOTEWORTHY TV story is not that exciting because it is so AND STREAMING PROGRAMS similar to the family history of so many Starting on Feb. 15 on Fox (9 p.m.) is the Jews whose grandparents came from legal drama Proven InnoEastern Europe. But it is cent. It stars Rachel made much more personal Lefevre, 39, as Madeline when Silverman learns Scott, a fierce attorney who about the hard road her leads a team to exonerate maternal grandmother the wrongly convicted. The trod as a youngster fleeing back story is that Scott was to America â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and that the defendant in a high-prohardship may explain file case, was wrongly conmuch about her grandmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s victed, spent 10 years in jail, personality. Silverman is and eventually was proved eloquent when she talks Rachel Lefevre innocent. In court, she about what it was like to be frequently jousts with the the only Jewish kid (besides prosecutor (Kelsey Gramher sister) in the small New mer) who put her in jail. Hampshire town where she Leferve, a Montreal native, grew up. is the daughter of a Jewish Meyers, by coincidence, mother and a non-Jewish also grew up in New father. While sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secular, Hampshire. In the last few she identifies as Jewish. years, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s often said that Her stepfather is a Canapeople assume he is Jewish dian rabbi. By the way, the because of his â&#x20AC;&#x153;look,â&#x20AC;? his series is shot in Chicago last name and because he and filming of episodes was Sara Silverman is a comedian. Years ago, halted on Jan. 30 due to the his brother, Josh Meyers, incredible cold wave. It has 46, also a comedian, said resumed. something that anyone Sammy Davis Jr.: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve would understand that he Got to Be Me, is the title of was referring to himself as a new American Masters Jewish. I followed Joshâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series program about the lead and described Seth late Sammy Davis Jr. as Jewish in print. Well, his It will premiere Tuesday, publicity people contacted Feb. 19, at 9 p.m. (PBS). me via email and said, His multi-faceted life and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seth is not Jewish.â&#x20AC;? This career will be covered, is the only time that has Sammy Davis Jr./1972 including his conversion to happened to me. Judaism. American Masters, Well, since then, life has in my opinion, is the best intervened. Seth is now as biographical series on TV or Jewish as a non-Jew can on any other outlet. be. He married his wife, The Feb. 19 (Tuesday, 8 attorney Alexi Ashe, in a p.m.) episode of the PBS Jewish ceremony and they ancestry show, Finding Your are raising their two kids in Roots, titled No Laughing his motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s faith. Maybe Matter, traces some of thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why Jake Tapper the family lines of three wished him a â&#x20AC;&#x153;happy Chacomedians: Tig Notaro, nukahâ&#x20AC;? on-air last DecemJake Tapper Sarah Silverman, 48, and ber and Seth just returned Seth Meyers, 45. I just had the greeting. Now, via Roots, an opportunity to view this Seth knows that his Jewish program in advance. great-grandfather came to America with As I have noted before, Meyers had nothing, settled in Pittsburgh and did just one Jewish grandparent (his paternal amazingly well. â&#x2013; NATE BLOOM COLUMNIST

MIDTOWN 4710 Cass Avenue Detroit, Michigan 48201

UPTOWN 6407 Orchard Lake Road (15 Mile & Orchard Lake)

313.974.7669

248.626.8585

DAILY DIM SUM & SUSHI

DAILY DIM SUM

 

2IIHUQRWYDOLGZLWKDQ\RWKHUFRXSRQGLVFRXQW 2QHFRXSRQSHUSHUVRQSHUWDEOH ([SLUHV-1

 

2IIHUQRWYDOLGZLWKDQ\RWKHUFRXSRQGLVFRXQW 2QHFRXSRQSHUSHUVRQSHUWDEOH ([SLUHV -1

31646 Northwestern Hwy., Farmington Hills 248.855.4600 $QQ$UERUÂ&#x2021;$XEXUQ+LOOVÂ&#x2021;%ORRPILHOG+LOOVÂ&#x2021;'HDUERUQÂ&#x2021;'HWURLWÂ&#x2021;/LYRQLDÂ&#x2021;3RLQWH3OD]DÂ&#x2021;5R\DO2DNÂ&#x2021;6KHOE\7ZSÂ&#x2021;1RYLÂ&#x2021;Warren

Exquisite Helpers | Adult Day Program â&#x20AC;&#x153;Providing Compassionate Care in a Social Environmentâ&#x20AC;? Offering Nutritional Meals, Kosher Foods and Other Dietary Restrictions Individual and Group Clinical Therapy Services Transportation Can Be Provided Private Duty Care Home Visitations CNAs, Registered Nurses and CPR CertiďŹ ed on Staff Licensed and Insured

Monday-Friday 7:30am-6:30pm

Call 586-267-0303 for inquiries and rates

44

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

jn

FACEBOOK

JAY BERNSTEIN PUBLIC RELATIONS

uptownshangri-la.com

FACEBOOK

WIKIMEDIA/GAGE SKIDMORE

EAT HERE

celebrity jews


on the go people | places | events

THURSDAY, FEB. 14

FEB. 14 - MARCH 10

LEARN WITH A RABBI 7 pm, Feb. 14. At Temple Emanu-El, 14450 W. 10 Mile Road, Oak Park. Four-session opportunity to learn with the rabbi. Through Feb. 28, Rabbi Matt Zerwekh will lead Pirkei Avot classes. RSVP to TempleFamily@emanuel-mich. org.

FRIDAY, FEB. 15 KIDZONE VACATION 9 am-4 pm, Feb. 15, Feb. 18 and Feb. 19. At the Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor. Fun and adventure for children in K-5 when Ann Arbor Public Schools and Hebrew Day School have scheduled closures. Children enjoy computer time, games, reading, arts and crafts, sports and a kid-friendly movie. Pre- and post-care available. Visit jccannarbor.org for information (including pricing) or to register. Info: Nicole at nicolefeinberg@ jccannarbor.org or 734-971-0990.  TOT SHABBAT 5:45 pm, Feb. 15. At Temple Emanu-El. Infant through second-grade children. Followed by a complimentary meal. A child-friendly Shabbat experience with Rabbi Matt Zerwekh, guests and PJ Library. 14450 W. 10 Mile Road, Oak Park. RSVP to TempleFamily@ emanuel-mich.org. continued on page 46

THE SPITFIRE GRILL The Spitfire Grill with music and book by James Valcq and lyrics and book by Fred Alley, based on the film by Lee David Zlotoff, creator of the TV series McGyver, runs through March 10 at Meadow Brook Theatre on the campus of Oakland University in Rochester. A newcomer has arrived in quiet Gilead. She raises her new neighbors’ suspicions, as strangers in small towns do, but Percy is a breath of fresh air in the small Wisconsin town. The musical The Spitfire Grill tells Percy’s story as well the Spitfire Grill’s. The owner wants to sell, but there are no takers. “That’s when Percy suggests to Hannah — the owner of the grill — that she raffle the grill off,” explains MBT director Travis Walter. “People are asked to write an essay on why they want the grill. The best essay will win. As word spreads, the mail starts pouring in.” Tickets range from $30 to $45 and are available at (248) 377-3300 or ticketmaster.com.

Feb. 18 JOSHUA DAVIS AT THE ARK Joshua Davis, former finalist on The Voice, is back at the Ark, 316 S. Main St, Ann Arbor, to celebrate the release of a brand-new album. His first-ever live solo album was recorded over two nights at Lansing’s Robin Theatre and captures his songs distilled into spare but powerful arrangements. “I’ve wanted to make this album for years,” says Davis, “and I’m so excited to share it. I love playing solo shows. It allows me the freedom to dig deep into my songs and really be in the moment with an audience.” Michigan to New Orleans transplant Luke Winslow King opens. Info at theark.org.

Feb. 18 MOTOR CITY MUSIC TALK Mark Slobin, native Detroiter and author of Motor City Music, A Detroiter Looks Back, will be at Wayne State University’s Old Main, Room 1343, beginning at 11:30 a.m. Feb. 18 to talk about his new book, a sweeping study of Detroit’s music in the 1940s-60s, from jazz to classical to ethnic that features plenty from Detroit’s Jewish community during that era. Information: music.wayne.edu.

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

45


on the go SHABBAT APPELLA 6 pm, Feb. 15. At Adat Shalom. The beautiful melodies of Kabbalat Shabbat are presented in intricate a cappella harmony, allowing you to participate in the spirituality of this special service to welcome Shabbat. The service is open to the community. Info: 248-851-100.

FEB. 17 SOUTHFIELD WINTER FEST 2-4:30 pm, Feb. 17. The Southfield Parks & Recreation Department will host Winter Fest in the Southfield Pavilion, 26000 Evergreen Road. Guests will enjoy inflatables, a DJ, African folktales told by storyteller Mary Grant and games inside the Southfield Pavilion. Participants can also roast marshmallows or take a horse-drawn carriage ride to the Southfield Sports Arena for free ice skating. New this year, guests can enjoy snow tubing outside the Southfield Sports Arena. Admission and parking are free. Information: 248-796-4620.

BRIGHTER DAYS 1-2:30 pm, Feb. 17. At Jewish Family Service, volunteers will spend time with isolated older adults and create Brighten-Their-Days Bundles. Info: Erin Thackray, 248-880-3787 or elederman@jfsdetroit.org.

FACEBOOK

MEDITATION & MINDFULNESS 9:30 am, Feb. 17. Adults of all ages are invited to join Rabbi Aaron Bergman at Adat Shalom. The class is designed to help individuals find internal spirituality and realize that Judaism can make them happier. The community is welcome. There is no charge. Info: call 248-851-5100.

Howard Hertz by Wendy Hertz

Elliot Zimet

FEB. 17

FEB. 19

MAGIC REIGNS

MOTOR CITY MUSIC

TO THE STARS 1:30-2:30, Feb. 17. The Beth Shalom program team will host an afternoon at Vollbrecht Planetarium at Adler Elementary School, 19100 Filmore, Southfield. Event is for whole family. Cost: $5 per person. RSVP: 248-5477070.

4-7 pm, Feb. 17. At the Berman Center for the Performing Arts. Master Illusionist Elliot Zimet’s fresh approach to his material is incomparable magic, featuring heart-pumping illusions, exotic birds, mentalism and humor. Contact the Berman Box Office, at 248-661-1900, or theberman@jccdet.org for ticket information.

7 pm, Feb. 19. At Otus Supply in Ferndale. Jewish Historical Society will offer music, food, cash bar and conversation. Howard Hertz and Gary Graff will discuss Jewish music makers’ influences on music in the D. Cost: JHSN members $36; non-members $50: info@ michjewishhistory.org.

QUILT EXHIBIT & RECEPTION 3-5 pm, Feb. 17. In Ann Arbor. Amster Gallery reception for quilter Julia Eisendrath’s exhibit. For more information, contact Karen at 734971-0990 or karenfreedland@ jccannarbor.org.

MONDAY, FEB. 18

CAREGIVER SUPPORT 5:30-7 pm, Feb. 18. The Dorothy & Peter Brown Adult Day Program holds free monthly family caregiver support group meetings. At JVS, 29699 Southfield Road, Southfield. For information or to RSVP, contact Dorothy Moon, 248-233-4392, dmoon@jvsdet.org.

JEWISH DENOMINATIONS 1-2:30 pm, Feb. 18. At Max M. Fisher Federation Bldg., 6735 Telegraph, Bloomfield Hills. FedEd will present Rabbi Mitch Parker on “Jewish Denominations — Challenges of Modernity.” Tuition: $225, includes FedEd Student reader.

TUESDAY, FEB. 19 SIMPLY DANCE 11 am, Feb. 19. At JCC, 6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield. Led by Christine Stewart; no partner necessary. Cost: $7. Info: 248-4325467. HISTORICAL DETROIT 1:30 pm, Feb. 19. “The Development of Northwest Detroit” will be discussed in a presentation by Jewish Historical Society of Michigan docents Judie Blumeno and Ruthe Goldstein. Hosted by Shaarey Zedek Seniors at the synagogue in Southfield. Light refreshments served.

FACEBOOK

SUNDAY, FEB. 17

BEGINNERS MAH JONGG 10 am-noon, Feb. 17. Sisterhood of B’nai Moshe invites you to learn to play mah jongg. All lessons will take place in Bodzin Hall at the synagogue, 6800 Drake Road, West Bloomfield. Lessons will continue on Sunday, March 10, 10 am-noon.

GETTY IMAGES

continued from page 45

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 20 FILM SCREENING 12:30-2 pm, Feb. 20. At the Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann Arbor. A screening of the 2006 film Failure to Launch! This event is part of the J’s Lunch Cafe. An optional lunch will be available at noon for purchase. Call 734-971-0990 at least one day prior to reserve lunch. For information about this event, contact Rachael at (734) 9710990 or rachaelhoffenblum@ jccannarbor.org. MOVIE MATINEE 1 pm, Feb. 20. At JCC, 6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield. Jewish Americans, Part 3 (110 min.) Info: 248-432-5467. BRAIN HEALTH WORKSHOP 1-2:30 pm, Feb. 20. At JVS, 29699 Southfield Road, Southfield. Ellen Yashinsky Chute will discuss ways to navigate all types of family dynamics to minimize impact of this type of stress on brain chemistry and brain health. To enroll, contact Mary Martella, mmartella@jfsdetroit.org or 248592-2671. No charge.

continued on page 48

46

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn


Things you use every day. Created for a new way of living.

NX1 Toilet

TOTOUSA.COM | 800-350-TOTO

www.advanceplumbing.com

99 YEARS 1920 - 2019

NEW SHOWROOM

DETROIT 150 Parsons Street Detroit, MI 48201 313-831-7770

WALLED LAKE 1977 E. West Maple Rd. Walled Lake, MI 48390 248.669.7474

Like dinosaurs love escaping from theme parks. We love to help. How can we help you? Woodward north of 14 Mile 248.723.7200 boaa.com Member FDIC

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;¢ 2019

47


on the go continued from page 46

DROP IN & LEARN 1 pm, Feb. 20. Lectures on DVD at Beth Ahm in West Bloomfield. Free and open to the community; no reservations needed. Now through March 6: “My Jewish Mt. Rushmore: Four Figures Who Changed the Course of Jewish History,” featuring Prof. Howard N. Lupovitch (DVDs of lecture series originally presented in July 2018). Feb. 20: “Part 2: Nachmanides and the Importance of Compromise.” 5075 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield. For info, contact Nancy Kaplan, 248-737-1931 or email nancyellen879@att.net.

Medieval Seville.” The talk will examine Jewish life in the kingdom of Castile just before the tragic events of 1391 changed it forever. Info: judaicstudies@ umich.edu or 734-763-9047. JEWISH MYSTICISM 7 pm, Feb. 20. Join Rabbi Brent Gutmann at Kol Ami in West Bloomfield for a 4-session adult education series on Jewish Mysticism (2/20, 2/27, 3/6 & 3/13). Temple Kol Ami & B’nai Israel members are free; non-members $18 for the series or $5 per session.

THURSDAY, FEB. 21 BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT 1:30-3 pm, Feb. 20. At Shaarey Zedek, 27375 Bell Road, Southfield. For individuals who have experienced the death of a spouse or partner. Sponsored by National Council of Jewish Women. No charge; donations appreciated. RSVP: mail@ncjwmi.org or 248-3553300. MUSHROOM WORKSHOP 6-8 pm, Feb. 20. Join Yad Ezra and special guest Tess Burzynski of FungiFreights and learn how to grow your own mushrooms and make oyster mushroom buckets that will be raffled off to attendees. Cost, $5-$10. 2850 W. 11 Mile, Berkley. RVSP to RSVP to Stathis@yadezra.org. LECTURE SERIES 7-8:30 pm, Feb. 20. University of Michigan Frankel Center for Judaic Studies will sponsor Maya Soifer Irish of Rice University at the West Bloomfield JCC, 6600 W. Maple in West Bloomfield. Topic: “The Vanished Synagogues of

POTTERY CLASS 11 am-1 pm, Feb. 21. At JCC, 6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield. This class for adults is taught by Allison Berlin. Cost $15. Info: 248-432-5467. SPEAKERS AT THE ‘J’ 12-1 pm. Feb. 21. At the Jewish Community Center in Ann Arbor. The Third Thursday series. Check the J’s website (jccannarbor.org) for information about upcoming speakers. Optional lunch available at noon. Lunches must be reserved at least one day in advance. BERMAN NIGHT OF LEARNING 7 pm, Feb. 21. “How Innovative Can Orthodox Judaism Be?” with Rabbi Asher Lopatin. At Shaarey Zedek in Southfield. Info: 248-354-5477.

Mead Tasting at B’nai Moshe The Men’s Club of Congregation B’nai Moshe in West Bloomfield, is hosting a mead tasting event open to the community at 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at the synagogue. The event is for those age 21 and older. Cost is $30 per person for a flight of five or six different meads and then a full serving of your choice — plus appetizers, coffee and desserts. Mead, which will be supplied by Schramm’s Meads in Ferndale, is a delicious alcoholic dessert wine made from honey and spices. In one rating of meads, including others from Michigan, across the U.S., and Europe (Link), two varieties of Schramm’s Meads took first and sec-

ond place, and in total 10 out of the top 25 world-wide. As these meads do not contain any grape product, they do not fall under wine designations and do not need a heksher. In addition, Rabbi Shalom Kantor has inspected the production facilities and confirmed that all ingredients, honey, wine, fruits, spices, yeast, settling agents, bottling supplies, are all inherently kosher or have a kosher certificate on them. RSVPs are due by Feb. 18 to the synagogue office at (248-788-0600). Checks should be made payable to the B’nai Moshe Men’s Club, 6800 Drake Road, West Bloomfield 48322.

Facebook Group for Jewish Grandparents Have you seen the new grandparent Facebook group called Jewish Grandparents by JFamily Detroit? This group will be the hub of Jewish grandparenting in Metro Detroit. JFamily Detroit will curate and share resources for Jewish grandparents, including local programming from community organizations, information to aid in raising Jewish grandchildren, and goodies to enjoy at Bubbe/Zayde/ Grandma/Grandpa/Nana/Papa/Savta/Sabha’s house for years to come. This group will act as one resource for finding all the JFamily programming that you already know and love, including Bubbies, Zaydes and Babies, PJ Library Story Times, jbabydetroit! programs, Matzah Factory and more. Look for it at facebook.com/groups/JFamDetGrandparents.

Sy Manello/Editorial Assistant Send items at least 14 days in advance to calendar@thejewishnews.com.

The Well Announces Summer Camp for Young Adults The Well is taking young adults to summer camp for a very special Shabbat, Aug. 16-17. Whether you’re a veteran camper or a first timer, a Tamarack, Tamakwa, Walden, George, Willoway or any other kind of kid, come relive your glory days (or create some new ones!) out in nature at Tamarack’s Camp Maas. The subsidized cost for the program is $100 and includes overnight stay in bunks, three meals, high ropes, pioneer skills, waterfront access with canoeing, kayaking and paddleboarding, song-session bonfire with s’mores and a number of additional surprises. The weekend is for 20-and 30-somethings only. Space is limited. To register, go to https://bit.ly/2DwUMH0. No one will be turned away due to inability to pay.

48

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

UMatter Event In March The teen leaders of UMatter are proud to present their community event, “One Thing I Wish You Knew,” which will focus on members of their community and how their attempts to overcome challenges have often felt isolating and alienating. “One Thing I Wish You Knew” will highlight the vulnerability and honesty of telling the people in their lives what they wish they knew about their journeys. The event will highlight multiple relationships that teens in the community have, including parent-child, sibling-sibling and friend-friend, and the difficulty of sharing what occurs beneath the surface. The event takes place from 6:30-9 p.m., Thursday, March 14, at Friendship Circle, 6892 W. Maple Road in West Bloomfield.


the exchange community bulletin board | professional services

For information regarding advertising please call 248-351-5116 Deadline for ad insertion is noon on Friday prior to publication.

Custom Closets,Inc. WHERE PROFESSIONAL SERVICE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

Caren Bass 248.855.8747

as featured on

HGTV

Leading the industry with over 30 years experience in the Metro Detroit Area. Now also organizing the Metro Denver Area with our 2nd location Custom Closets, West, Inc.

MAX THE HANDYMAN You Name It – I’ll Do It! 5PJMFUTt%JTQPTBMTt&MFDUSJDBM %PPS-PDL3FQBJS 4IPXFS(SBC#BSTt&5$

248-356-0114

Call today for your free in-home consultation

BOOKS

Bought & Sold

1 Call Computer Solutions st

On-Site Repairs

LIBRARY BOOKSTORE Open 7 Days M. Sempliner

248.545.4300 Books Bought In Your Home

t

Upgrades

t

Training

248-515-5702 t$FSUJGJFE3FGFSFODFT

A E C

REMODELING t Kitchen t Bath t Basement

248-425-9565

HANDYMAN SERVICE t Carpentry t Plumbing t Electrical

ONSTRUCTION

Serving the Jewish Community for Over 25 Years

t)PVTF$BMMT t0GGJDF$BMMT

t/FUXPSLJOH

'3&&&45*."5&4t-*$&/4&%*/463&%

ROBERT SMITH Handyman revingrob@comcast.net

CHANGING HANDS ESTATE SALES

PHONE: 248 787 6786 Fax: 248 681 0157 Repairs, Home Improvement Electrical, Plumbing, Carpentry etc.

Let our experienced team handle all of your estate needs:

ǵLjǵHands free-hassle free estate sales

LET BOB DO IT

Visit our Leshoppe showroom in Keego Harbor Call Leslie Weisberg today for a free consultation

248-709-9648

HOUSEWORK GOT YOU DOWN? We specialize in

quality serv

ice B R O O M H IL D A’S

฀ ฀ ฀

Est. 1986

Call for a free estimate 248-547-4525 BHILDACLEANING@GMAIL.COM

Email: jrcmycomputerguy@gmail.com

ELECTRONICS UNLIMITED

Sales

s

Ser vice

Audio s Video s Telephones Paging s Intercom s Computers Signal Systems & more Warren Mendelsohn 248-470-7715

letbobdoit.com

Junk-B-Gone We Haul It All! Still the Lowest Prices in Town! SAME DAY SERVICE! Proudly Serving the Jewish Community for over 20 Years Owner Present on EVERY job! SENIOR AND MILITARY DISCOUNTS Mention the Jewish News and get 10% Discount

FREE 248-760-4450 ESTIMATE

February 14 • 2019

49


AND

CLEAN UP

HAUL AWAY

Removal of ALL unwanted items from garages, attics, basements, offices, warehouses, etc.

AN TOUCH L RO P E L E UPainting Interior & Exterior C

Free Estimates

WINTER RATES

Serving Wayne and Oakland Counties.

248-521-8818

t*OUFSJPS&YUFSJPS 8PPE(SBJOJOH t8BMMQBQFS

20% OFF Insured

248-489-5955

586-850-6661

BOB MENDELSON & SON

Pet resort s Daycare s Training Grooming s Web Cameras

Heating t Air Conditioning t Installation and Repair

248-230-PAWS (7297) 2244 Franklin Road Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302 www.4pawscc.com

$65

Service Call Nothing per hour, plus parts. Serving the metropolitan area for over 40 years! STATE LICENSED #3984

248-855-0437

“Let us love your pet while you are away”

KETUBAHS and Other Wedding Stuff

SNOWPLOWING AND SALTING Seasonal Rates Licensed and Insured Emergency Services Commercial Free Estimates Residential

Heating, Air Conditioning Service and New Installations 24 Hour Emergency Service RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Serving the Community for Over 55 Years WHATEVER IT TAKES:

25

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Clubside at Boca West CC - 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, grndflr condo w/garage. Approx. 2,500 sq ft. Next to CC. Ina 201-280-9730 / Judy 561-483-2176 Lang Realty

80

TRANSPORTATION

1 AAA BEST DRIVER ReasonableRates/Airport $50 Harold 248-496-1302 Mastercard, Visa, AMEX

50

1A1 DRIVER for Dr’s appts, shopping, airports and more. Renee (248)991-4944

$50 Airport & Appts. Ontime at a reasonable price Howard. 248-345-8709

SERVICES

A MOVING truck to Florida and returning Bud 239-273-3565

95

TRANSPORTATION

February 14 • 2019

Driver to airport & more. Great rates & reliable. Call David 248-690-6090

Friendly Transportation Dr’s, Airports, Shopping, Etc. Call Denise 248-890-9908 or 248-991-0108. NORMAN. Airport or other transportation. Reliable.248737-8847, 248-408-7660.

Tradition! Tradition! (248) 557- 0109 www.traditiontradition.com

53"%*5 53"%*5

LACOURE’S LANDSCAPING 248-521-8818 248-489-5955

248-352-4656

95

Alicia R. Nelson

160 MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

180 SITUATIONS WANTED

180 SITUATIONS WANTED

190 HEALTHCARE

Make fun money! Sell your high end clothing & furs. 248-549-7000

Are you looking for a reliable, compassionate caregiver? Ours was amazing while caring for our dad. Denise and her daughter, Ashley will work together or seperately. Call 313-384-1742

Jewish woman availible for companionship, caregiving and driving. Call Lorraine 248-891-8174

Always Show’ guarantee. Experienced, mature and caring individual available for hourly or live-in position. Contact Amy 248-444-3353.

165 AUTOS DOMESTIC/IMPORTS

CASH FOR YOUR VEHICLE any make or model Barry 248-865-2886

At Your Service LLC. Nurses and Caregivers avail. 24/7. 19yrs experience. Call Divine 248.778.7232

180 SITUATIONS WANTED 10+ yrs experience. Diabetes & dimentia care.B.A in social work. call Cynthia 248.896.4372

Caregiver, mature, 15+ yrs exp. Compassionate, dependable, loving care. 248-307-6062

Angie Loving Care LLC Caregivers w/12+yrs experience.Errands, house work, bathing,feeding& med reminders. 313.729.0160

Experienced Caregiver and driver. Light house keeping. call Care by Grace Inc. 734-365-2450

190 HEALTHCARE Caregiver. 15 yrs. exp. Seeking live-in position. Call Melinda 248-550-5637 1A1 CAREGIVER/ COMPANION. Part/Full Time or 24 Hr Care Exc. Refs 248-991-4944

A1 Caregiver over 20 yrs. exp. rendering quality service. I specialize in 24 hrs, hospice, dementia, travel assistance, long and short term care. Trusted care you can depend on. 248-212-6173

CAREGIVERpart/full-time 24hrs of loving care Exc ref. 248-890-9908 or 2/259-5888

Help Hand Caregivers. 12 yrs. exp. Exc. references. Call 734-644-1335 Home caregiver. Reliable, affordable, refs.Formerly run by Stephanie. Call Donna 586-977-5775


soul of blessed memory

MARGARET BERLIN, 72, of Farmington Hills, died Feb. 6, 2019. She is survived by her brothers, Arthur (Linda) Berlin and Gerald (Marie) Berlin; nephews and nieces, Jeffrey and Allison Berlin, Jon and Leslie Berlin, Jimmy and Amy Berlin, Rachel and Rich Handloff, Deborah and Justin Kramer, Naomi and Michael Hoffman; great-nieces and great-nephews, Ari and Olivia Berlin, Annabel and Miles Berlin, Sam and Eddie Berlin, Hannah and Sophie Handloff, Lucy and Etta Kramer, Mollie and Jonah Hoffman; her wonderful caregivers at JARC. Mrs. Berlin was the cherished daughter of the late Harry and the late Sara Berlin.  Interment was at Adat Shalom Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to JARC, 30301 Northwestern Hwy., Suite 100, Farmington Hills, MI 48334, www.jarc.org; or Jewish Hospice & Chaplaincy Network, 6555 W. Maple, West Bloomfield, MI 48322, www. jewishhospice.org. Arrangements by Ira Kaufman Chapel. SANDRA “SANDY” MARJORIE GERSH, a resident of Las Vegas, Nev., passed away peacefully on Feb. 2, 2019. She was born on March 9, 1941. Sandy, who worked for the city of Detroit, the Oak Park Michigan School District and Sanyo Fisher Corporation, loved mahjongg, seashells, cruises, coupons, movies and her family. She wasn’t, however, fond of earthquakes, wildfires or anyone else driving. A legion of friends, loved ones and acquaintances describe Sandy as wonderful, sweet, funny, beautiful, just so special. Many stated, “I loved her.” She’d ask anyone wearing Detroit sporting apparel, “Are you from Michigan?” She made incredible salmon patties and could carry on four conversations simultaneously. Quick to smile, Sandy could light up a room. She leaves innumerable warm memories for generations to remember. Mrs. Gersh is survived by two sons and daughters-in-law, Howard and Julie, and Andy and Sharyn; grandchildren, Noah, Zac and Evan, Owen and Leo; two siblings, Saul Lenhoff and Joyce Torby. She was preceded in death by her parents, Alice and Aaron Lenhoff; her sister,

Elaine Goldstein; and devoted husband of 48 years, Allen Gersh. The funeral was at Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery, 1900 Buchanan Blvd., in Boulder City, Nev. Contributions to a charity of one’s choice would be greatly appreciated. Arrangements by Kraft-Sussman Funeral Services in Las Vegas. ROSALIE GREENBERG, 92, passed away peacefully on Feb. 4, 2019, at Tidewell Hospice in Sarasota, Fla. She was born July 11, 1926, in Memphis, Tenn. She married Joseph Greenberg of Detroit on Oct. 6, 1946. In 2010, Rosalie and Joe moved from Michigan to Sarasota. Rosalie touched the lives of all who knew her and will be deeply missed. She will be remembered for her keen sense of humor, her style and creativity, and her warm and loving heart. Mrs. Greenberg is survived by Joe, her loving husband of 72 wonderful years; her sons, Cary and his partner, Joanne, Mitchell and his wife, Cindy; granddaughters of the beloved “Mimi,” Staci Davis Broadwell and her husband, Christian, Lissa McGirt and her husband, Chris, Ellery Berinstein and her husband, Jeffrey, and Gillian Greenberg; great-grandsons, Dylan, Brady, Rylan and Mavryk. Contributions may be made to the Sarasota Hospice House, checks payable to Tidewell Hospice, 5955 Rand Blvd., Sarasota, FL 34238. DOROTHY KAHN, 100, of Farmington Hills, died Feb. 6, 2019. She is survived by her son, Bruce (Judy Dalsey) Kahn; daughter, Karen Kahn; grandson, James Kahn; brother, Marshall (Bonnie) Fry; nephews and nieces, Ron Fry, Madeline Fry, Matthew Fry, Steven (Fran) Cole; great-nephew, Eric Fry.  Mrs. Kahn was the beloved wife of the late Robert J. Kahn; the loving sister of the late Harold Fry; the dear sister-in-law of the late Adele Fry.  Interment was at Clover Hill Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Hebrew Free Loan, 6735 Telegraph Road, Suite 300, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48301, hfldetroit.org; Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit, 6735 Telegraph Road, Suite 260, P.O.

Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein

Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, Interfaith Activist Dies at 67 CNAAN LIPHSHIZ JTA.ORG

T

PHOTOS COURTESY IFCJ

o the many employees and partners of Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, who died Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019, at the age of 67, he was a man of vision whose enormous drive to succeed both facilitated and complicated his relentless efforts on behalf of the Jewish people. As head of the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews, or IFCJ, the New York-born rabbi raised more than $360 million in donations — mostly from Christians — for projects benefiting needy Jews and Arabs in Israel and beyond, To many thousands of ordinary Jews and Christians whose lives he touched without ever meeting them, Eckstein was something of a guardian angel, heading a powerful machine that offered everyday assistance and was able to intervene quickly in emergencies, in creative ways cutting through the red tape characteristic of some other Jewish aid groups. The impact left by Eckstein, who died of cardiac arrest at his home in Jerusalem, was reflected in the glowing eulogies that mainstream Jewish groups offered within hours of his death. “He was a tireless worker for the Jewish people and for Israel, and he made significant contributions by fostering evangelical support for Israel,” wrote Jonathan Greenblatt, national director of the ADL. Eckstein, who grew up in Canada and moved to Israel in 1999, began his involvement in interfaith dialogue with the ADL in 1974 and started the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews in 1983. Using TV adver-

tising, his tremendous charisma and tireless outreach legwork in the United States, he made unprecedented headway in raising funds for Israel and Jews in crisis situations among evangelicals. Eckstein served as a member of the board and executive committee of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee and, in 2014, together with IFCJ, received its highest honor, the Raoul Wallenberg Award. He also pushed back against Jewish leaders who distrusted evangelical support of Israel. “[T]he majority of evangelicals are passionately pro-Israel because it is part of their theology to love and support the Jewish people,” Eckstein wrote in 2002. “I could not accept the conditional love of those who expect a payback on behalf of my people. I could not embark on a relationship that would compromise my personal integrity and ideals or that of the Jewish community I represent. But having been the first — and most often the only — Jew to build bridges with the right-wing Christian community, I have a view and understanding of their pro-Israel fervor that most people ‘on the outside’ lack.” Isaac Herzog, chairman of the Jewish Agency for Israel, wrote on Twitter that the Jewish people have lost “a leader who worked tirelessly on their behalf.” Eckstein was ordained at Yeshiva University in New York and held master’s degrees from Yeshiva University and Columbia University, where he also completed studies for his doctorate. One of his three daughters, continued on page 53

continued on page 55

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

51


soul of blessed memory

‘Humility Empowered Him to Never Stop Learning from Others’ ESTHER ALLWEISS INGBER CONTRIBUTING WRITER

M

any knew and respected Marvin Berman during his long, successful association with Farmer Jack supermarkets. He was always “Mr. Berman” at work, but at home with family — his No. 1 role — he adored being Marilou’s husband, “Dad” to their four children and “Papa Marv” to the eventual 10 grandchildren. Marvin Berman, 86, of West Bloomfield, died Feb. 3, 2019, following a brief illness. His funeral service took place in the Davidson-Hermelin Chapel at Clover Hill Park Cemetery in Birmingham. Officiants were Temple Israel Rabbi Jennifer Kaluzny and Assistant Cantor Leonard Gutman of Congregation Shaarey Zedek. The son of Russian immigrant parents, Marvin Berman was born in Detroit to Anna and Ralph Berman on June 30, 1932. He and his twin brother, Sherwin, were the youngest of five children. After graduating from Central High School, Marvin earned a bachelor’s degree at today’s Michigan State University and a master’s in business education at Wayne State

University. As cousin Gilbert Borman tells it, the Berman family was always in the food business. Peretz and Iteh Berman came to America with children Tom, Al, Ralph, Harry and Goldie. “Two brothers changed their names to Borman, but [whether] Berman or Borman, the family all worked together and all their children also worked in the business,” Gilbert said. The brothers operated stores through the Great Depression and World War II, eventually merging them into Borman Foods. As a young teenager, Marvin learned the grocery trade from his father, the head produce buyer. Marvin worked his way up to head of store operations. At its height, the Bormans’ Farmer Jack supermarket chain included more than 80 stores. Marvin, the company’s executive vice president, was valued as a “forward-thinking leader who knew how to manage people, stores and systems,” Borman said. Marvin worked more than 80 hours a week and was Farmer Jack’s longest-tenured employee. He stayed on to share his knowledge after the chain was sold.

“He was detailed-oriented, disciplined and prepared,” Rabbi Kaluzny said in her eulogy. “He required excellence from himself, and he expected it of you as well.” Marvin took his role of father and husband as seriously as his role at Farmer Jack. Judaism was very important to him. Because he worked in retail, he made Sunday the family’s Shabbat, a day of rest for everyone to be at home together. Marilou (Feldstein) Berman was the matriarch. Marvin met her on a blind date at Sandy Beach in Waterford after his military service in Nance, France, during the Korean War. They married in March 1956 at CSZ. Although Marilou passed away 23 years ago, Marvin kept her memory alive for the family through stories and pictures. “Marilou was his everything,” Kaluzny said. “He would choke up saying her name.” Shaarey Zedek honored Marvin with an aliyah on the yahrzeits of Marilou and his parents. “We would put tefillin on together,” said Rabbi Tzvi Schechtman of West Bloomfield-based Friendship Circle. Marvin immediately signed up for FC’s Family Mission to Israel in 2015. “To be able to see Israel through the eyes of his granddaughter Carlie (Suris), who has cerebral palsy, was one of his significant life experiences,” said Marvin’s brother, David Berman. Ryan Sakwa eulogized “Papa Marv” as “the world’s greatest grandfather.” “To his 10 grandchildren — he was our leader, our hero. We were his sidekicks,” Sakwa said. Among his attributes, Papa Marv

was known for telling corny jokes, radiating a natural warmth and kindness, being curious about science, politics, business and human nature, and possessing a “humility that empowered him to never stop learning from others.” Marvin’s home was his castle and his much-admired backyard was an oasis. “He insisted on building and fixing things himself,” Sakwa said. “But the most important thing Papa Marv built, his most beautiful project, was his family.” He is survived by his children, Randi (Berman) and Stuart Sakwa, Deborah (Berman) and Eric Suris, Steven and Kimberly (Morgan) Berman, and Michael and Michelle (Fenberg) Berman; grandchildren, Ryan Sakwa (fiancee, Brooke Schulman), Hayley Sakwa, Ashley Sakwa, Eli Suris, Ari Suris, Carlie Suris, Benjamin and MarliAnna, Jesse and Dylan Berman; brother, David (Diana) Berman.  Mr. Berman was the beloved husband of the late Marilou Berman; the loving brother of his twin, the late Sherwin Berman, the late Peryle Moss and the late Lucille Rossen Steinberg; devoted son of the late Ralph and the late Anna Berman. Interment was at Clover Hill Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Friendship Circle, 6892 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield, MI 48322; Bear Hug Foundation, 139 W. Maple, Suite F, Birmingham, MI 48009, thebearhugfoundation.org; or to a charity of one’s choice. Arrangements by Ira Kaufman Chapel. ■

HELP IS ON THE WAY Please see our menu at

32906 Middlebelt Rd (at 14 Mile)

(248) 855- 0007 www.johnnypomodoros.com Johnny Pomodoro’s is your ONE STOP SHOP for all of your needs! Shiva Trays, Deli Nosh Dairy and Deli Trays, Marty’s Cookie Trays, Johnny’s Signature Fruit & Veggie Trays Delivery Available

CALL JOHNNY’S FOR TRADITIONAL AND NON-TRADITIONAL SHIVA TRAYS.

If you have one or more of the following symptoms: Dizziness U Headaches U Neck Aches U Drifting While Walking Reading Difficulties U Light Sensitivity U Anxiety…

Then you may have a condition called vertical heterophoria (slightly misaligned eyes). To find out if this could be your problem, fill out a questionnaire at: www.isitmyeyes.com Or call us at 248-258-9000 for a questionnaire to be sent to you.

DAIRY TRAY

52

MEAT TRAY

Febraury 14 • 2019

FRUIT TRAY

jn

CANDY & NUT TRAY

MARTY'S COOKIES

Vision Specialists of Michigan

248-258-9000

2550 S. Telegraph Rd., Bloomfield, MI

vision-specialists.com


soul of blessed memory continued from page 51

Yael, works at the ICFJ as global executive vice president. Despite the posthumous embrace, Eckstein had a thorny relationship with the Jewish establishment most everywhere he went. Critics considered him a tacky manipulator of public opinion with a mercurial temper and an overgrown ego. Most recently, he clashed publicly with the Jewish Agency, to which his group had donated many millions of dollars over the years. The funding stopped in 2014 amid a fight over recognition for the ICFJ by the agency and Eckstein’s long-held reservations about the agency’s efficiency in fulfilling its main task: facilitating immigration of Jews to Israel, or aliyah. That year, Eckstein had the ICFJ start its own aliyah operation. He offered every new immigrant a $1,000 grant on top of benefits offered by the Jewish Agency. And he helped bring thousands of immigrants from Ukraine during its conflict with Russia, France, Venezuela, Yemen and other trouble spots for Jews. But Eckstein’s outreach to Christians made him a pariah for many years of Israel’s chief rabbinate. In 2001, Israel’s then chief Ashkenazi rabbi, Avraham Shapira, published a letter condemning Eckstein’s use of Christian money to “expand Christian missionary propaganda.” Rabbi Yosef Shalom Elyashiv, an influential haredi Orthodox Talmud scholar, signed a letter forbidding cooperation with Eckstein, calling it “close to idolatry.” Eckstein, who dismissed the chief rabbinate’s attacks as not worthy of a response, angered some of his nationalist critics with his group’s support to the tune of millions of dollars for Israeli Arabs, Christians and Muslims. Despite repeated conflicts over the years with establishment figures and bodies, the scale of Eckstein’s work made his organization too big to ignore or sideline, forcing even his most outspoken critics to work with him or get out of his way. Thanks to Eckstein, “today so many Christians from around the world stand in fellowship with Israel,” Rabbi Tuly Weisz, an author and publisher of the Israel National News website, wrote in an obituary. “We, Jews and Christians together, mourn the tragic loss of a true bridge builder.” ■

‘‘They were wonderful.’’ We hear kind words consistently.We’re proud that people feel comfortable enough with us to openly tell us how much they appreciate what we did for them. In fact, it’s this appreciation that drives us to offer the very best in comfort, compassion and service.

www.thedorfmanchapel.com 30440 Twelve Mile Road Farmington Hills • MI 48334 248.406.6000 TOLL FREE 1-866-406-6003 Licensed Funeral Directors: Alan Dorfman, Jonathan Dorfman ©Adfinity

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

53


Nibbles

We use the FRESHEST Kosher Bakery, Nuts, Chocolate & Fruits

Nuts

Same Day Local Delivery Nation Wide Delivery

soul of blessed memory

An Unrelenting Spirit SPECIAL

Come Visit Our Store at 32550 Northwestern Hwy. Farmington Hills

$10

* OFF CUSTOM SHIVA TRAYS %BJSZt%FMJt$BOEZ/VUt1BTUSZ *With Purchase of Any Tray over $50

248.737.8088

NIBBLESandNUTS.com

Monument Center Inc. “Same Location Over 80 Years” Monuments and Markers Bronze Markers Memorial Duplicating Cemetery Lettering & Cleaning

www.MonumentCenterMichigan.com

Some days seem to last forever… We’re offering one that actually will. You can honor the memory of a loved one in a most meaningful way by sponsoring a day of Torah learning at Yeshiva Beth Yehudah.

During g the coming g week,, Kaddish will be said ffor these departed p souls during g the daily y minyan y at Yeshiva Beth Yehudah. Your support of the Torah learning of our children and our Kollel’s Torah Scholars brings immeasurable heavenly merit. Please call us at 248-557-6750 for more information.

12 Adar I

February 17, 2019

Morris Karbal Louis Kukes Meyer Ephraim Revzin

Louis Daniels Clara Eisenberg Henry Grossman Louis Moss 13 Adar I

16 Adar I

February 18, 2019

Benjamin Bruseloff Kalman Solomon Florence Simcha Kleinemus Esther Nusbaum 14 Adar I

17 Adar I

February 19, 2019

February 20, 2019 18 Adar I

Bertha Feldman Morris J. Hart Sarah Horowitz

PARNES HAYOM PROGRAM

54

February 22, 2019

Rebecca Bresler Jennie Butensky Morris Fine Vojtech Haber Nathan Krentzin Elkan Levine Shabse Yosef Lipschutz Martin Schoen Samuel Silver Charles Solomon

Myron J Armon Tillie Cohen Celia King Ellis Markofsky Isaac Mickelson Sarah Seppen 15 Adar I

February 21, 2019

Harry B. Park Jack Pollock Malka Yassky

February 23, 2019

Seymour D Brodsky Sarah Lyons

School for Boys v Beth Jacob School for Girls v Early Childhood Development Center Weiss Family Partners Detroit v Kollel Bais Yehudah v Bnos Bais Yehudah—Maalot Detroit P.O. Box 2044 v Southoeld, MI 48037v 248-557-6750 v www.YBY.org

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

A

ndrew Martin, 93, died Feb. 2, 2019. From humble beginnings, Andy left his home to learn a trade at the tender age of 16 as there were no schools and no future prospects in his hometown of Pavlovo, Czechoslovakia. By the time he was 18 and living in Budapest, Hungary, the Nazis had a hard grip on Europe. Andy went on to endure unimaginable hardships and horrors. As a Holocaust survivor, c.1977 he lost his home and community. He lost his parents. Of nine siblings in his family, only four survived the war. In his characteristic manner, Andy persevered. After coming to America in 1951, he learned English as his eighth language. He arrived with his wife, Margaret (Muncie Klein), started a family, began his new trade in plumbing, and built a new beautiful life in Oak Park and later in Southfield. Andy was one of the founding members of the Shaarit HaPlaytah, the organization for Holocaust survivors, established to further their values, preserve history and inspire future generations. His lifelong devotion in synagogue brought him comfort and fulfillment. He was active in the Plumbers Union and was known for his integrity, reliability and solid work. He was close with surviving friends and family and had a rich and active social life. Andy and Margaret raised three children: Judi, James and Peggi. After Margaret died, Andy went on to marry his second wife, Judy (Bell) Robins, in 1977. In their expanded family together, he embraced Judy’s children:

Beth, Mitchell and Howard. Andy and Judy shared many years in a robust and energetic lifestyle. They spent great quality time enjoying family, travel and many wonderful friendships. Andy Martin lived life with full vigor. Whatever he did, he approached with a singular focus and unrelenting energy. Andy was a powerful force, whether he was helping family, working, engaging in religious devotion, overcoming challenges, supporting Israel or tending his garden. He was a role model who touched many lives. Andy is the last of his generation in the Mermelstein (Martin) and Klein families. Still, he leaves a legacy of children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and close friends inspired by his strength, loyalty, dedication, generosity and caring. He will be deeply missed. Andy said, “Every person makes a difference in this world.” He certainly did. Andy’s life story, told in his own words, is available in his book, Determined to Survive, From My Village to America, by Andrew Martin (available on Amazon). Andy is featured in the “Portraits of Honor” exhibit at the Holocaust Memorial Center in Farmington Hills. He has been laid to rest at Hebrew Memorial Park in Clinton Township. Contributions in honor of Andrew Martin may be made to the Holocaust Memorial Center in Farmington Hills, holocaustcenter.org; or to the Seany Foundation, theseanyfoundation.org.


soul of blessed memory continued from page 51

Box 2030, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48303, jewishdetroit.org; or to other charities. Arrangements by Ira Kaufman Chapel. KENNETH KATZ, 84, of Novi, died Feb. 4, 2019. He is survived by his beloved wife, Phyllis Katz; daughter, Lori Tuchklaper; son and daughter-in-law, Steven and Jackie Katz; grandchildren, Allie (Joe) Asmann, Zachary Tuchklaper, Rachel, Dani, Kevin and Garrett Katz; great-grandchildren, Liana and Logan Asmann; many other, loving family members and friends.  Mr. Katz was the brother of the late Donald Katz.  Interment was held at Adat Shalom Memorial Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Jewish Family Service or a charity of one’s choice. Arrangements by Dorfman Chapel. JEANNIE M. KRON, 90, of Livonia, died Feb. 2, 2019.  She is survived by her sons, Kenneth

(Wendy) Kron, Kevin (Lisa) Kron and Kurtis (Stacy) Kron; daughter, Jacqueline (Randy) Weddle; son-in-law, John Kerr; grandchildren, Renee, Nathan, Amber, Davin, Justin, Colin, Ryan, Bobby, Anthony, Jessica, Katie, Serena and Mallory; great-grandchildren, Olivia, Schafer, Riley, Junko-Makiah, Kaiden, Cameron, Rylen and Alana; great-greatgrandson, Ezra. Mrs. Kron was the beloved wife of the late Robert Kron; the loving mother of the late Pamela Kerr.  Interment was at Oakview Cemetery. Contributions may be made to a charity of one’s choice. Arrangements by Ira Kaufman Chapel.  DR. RUBEN KURNETZ, 94, of Birmingham, died Feb. 6, 2019, just shy of his 95th birthday.  Dr. Kurnetz was raised in Detroit with his sister Blanche by their parents, Dora and Sam Kurnetz, who immigrated to Detroit from Russia He was a Navy medical officer in

both the Korean War and WW II. Dr. Kurnetz graduated from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1948 and was a beloved pediatrician for almost half a century. He was the chief of pediatrics at Beaumont Hospital from 1979-1986, and director of the Pediatric Residency Program. He was also a clinical professor of pediatrics at Wayne State University Medical School. Even after retirement, he was still very passionate about medicine, and multiple doctors asked for his advice. Dr. Kurnetz was a hero to many doctors, his patients, numerous friends, but most of all to his three children, their spouses and granddaughters. He cared deeply about their well-being and happiness and was always there for them.  He had incredible values and lived his values fully. Dr. Kurnetz was a true liberal and an early advocate of health care for all Americans. He was passionate about racial injustice and fought against anti-Semitism. He was an honorable man and a true mentsh. He will be greatly missed.  Dr. Kurnetz is survived by his daugh-

ters and sons-in-law, Sheila and Marty Tatz, Elizabeth and Jim Stahl; son, Sid, who was also his best friend; granddaughters, Zoe and Sasha Stahl; sister, Blanche (the late Philip) Needle; niece, Jan (Michael) Lachman; their children and grandchildren; niece, Sandy (the late Ernest) Needle; great-nieces and great-nephews, Dori (Anders) Borgquist, Daniel Needle, Audra (Brian) Glauser and Scott (Stephanie) Lachman. He is also survived by his long-term, loving companion, Margot Abramson. Interment was at Clover Hill Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Children’s Hospital of Michigan Foundation, 3011 W. Grand Blvd., Suite 218, Detroit, MI 48202, childrenshosp italofmichiganfoundation. org; American Civil Liberties Union, 2966 Woodward Ave., Detroit, MI 48201; or to Yiddish Book Center, 1021 West St., Amherst, MA 01002, yiddishbookcenter.org. Arrangements by Ira Kaufman Chapel.

continued on page 56

WE ARE THE COMMUNITY FUNERAL HOME Death is not a business – It is a time for understanding your needs

ENTERING OUR SECOND CENTURY OF CARING AND RESPECTFUL SERVICE HebrewMemorial.org | 248.543.1622 | 800.736.5033 | 26640 Greenfield Rd, Oak Park, MI 48237

jn

Febraury 14 • 2019

55


soul of blessed memory continued from page 55

DOROTHY KLAUSNER, 76, of Southfield, died Feb. 5, 2019. She was active with Hadassah, ORT and AMIT. Mrs. Klausner is survived by her sons and daughters-in-law, Dr. Howard and Margery Klausner of Southfield, Dr. Mitchell and Rebecca Klausner, also of Southfield; brother and sister-in-law, Dr. Michael and Kathleen Sandler of West Bloomfield; grandchildren, Nathan, Eli, Daniel, Alter, Raffi, Ezra, Yaffa, Zev; loving companion, Dr. Warren Tessler, and his family. She was the beloved wife of the late Stephen Klausner; loving daughter of the late Jean and the late Dr. Nathaniel Sandler. Contributions may be made to Farber Hebrew Day School, 21100 W. 12 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48076; or Young Israel of Oak Park, 15140 W. 10 Mile Road, Oak Park, MI 48237. Interment was held at Machpelah Cemetery in Ferndale. Arrangements by Hebrew Memorial Chapel.

56

Febraury 14 • 2019

jn

LOUISE LAZARUS, 90, of West Bloomfield, died Feb. 7, 2019, after a long illness. She is survived by her beloved husband, David Lazarus; cousins, Dorothy (the late Byron) Gerson; and her children, Ralph (Erica) Gerson and Matthew (Marysia) Gerson, Karen (the late William) Davidson; and her children, Ethan (Gretchen) Davidson and Marla (Cyrus) Karimipour; Kim (Steven) Davidson Friedman, Kayli Davidson, Scott (Melissa) Davidson and Jon (Ellyn) Davidson. Interment was held at Clover Hill Park Cemetery in Birmingham. Contributions may be made to Jewish Senior Life or to a charity of one’s choice. Arrangements by Dorfman Chapel. MICHAEL “MITCH” NEWMAN, 96, of Farmington Hills, died Feb. 5, 2019.  He is survived by his wife, Jean Becker Newman; son, Harry (Audrey) Newman; daughter, Brenda Newman; Jean’s children, Marci (Stuart) Feldman, Steve (Barbara) Becker; grandchildren, Courtney (Brendan) Koerner,

Kelli (Yudi) Rosenzweig, Eric (Diana) Feldman, Ryan Becker and Julie Becker; great-grandchildren, Maceo Koerner, Ciel Koerner, Jackson Rosenzweig and Eli Rosenzweig; longtime friend, Marty Bacow. Mr. Newman was predeceased by Louise Kolko. He was the beloved grandfather of the late Michelle Newman; the loving brother of the late Art Newman, the late Harry Newman, the late Carl Newman, the late Max Newman and the late Lou Newman. Interment was at Clover Hill Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Friendship Circle, 6892 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield, MI 48322, friendshipcircle.org; or to a charity of one’s choice. Arrangements by Ira Kaufman Chapel. DR. LOWELL RESSLER, 90, of West Bloomfield, died Feb. 7, 2019. He is survived by his daughter, Judy (Sheldon) Pearlman; sons, Jeffrey Ressler, Robert Ressler

and Ron Ressler; grandchildren, Erin (Dustin) Weiner, Lisa (Patrick) North and Jody Ressler; great-grandchildren, Adin and Talia Weiner, Audrey, Lucy and Hannah North; nieces, nephews, cousins, family and friends. Dr. Ressler was the beloved husband of the late June Ressler; the devoted son of the late Jacob and the late Lena Ressler; the loving brother of the late Harold and the late Pearl Ressler, the late Milton “Peppy” Ressler and the late Esther Ressler. Interment was at Clover Hill Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Hospice of Michigan, 43097 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302, hom.org; or Jewish Senior Life of Metropolitan Detroit, 6710 W. Maple Road, West Bloomfield, MI 48322, jslmi.org. Arrangements by Ira Kaufman Chapel.


raskin the best of everything

Decade of Dining Delight

A Danny Raskin Senior Columnist

Grand Tavern celebrates 10th anniversary.

s the site of a former Chiliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant, many reasons may crop up as to why it lasted less than a year at the location â&#x20AC;Ś But the present tenant, Grand Tavern, is among the winning eateries that many customers are keeping to themselves â&#x20AC;Ś Located at M-59 and Adams, MarketPlace Circle, Rochester Hills, it is among a fine small chain of choice dining spots in Rochester Hills and local areasâ&#x20AC;Ś After adding still another 80 seats with its new enclosed patio, along with the 350 seating and 20 bar stools, on this, its 10th birthday at the elegant locale, Grand Tavern is furthering its many efforts in gaining continued and more prominence. Other renovations like new walls, etc., have again vaulted the location into an even more striking dining spot to go with its varied attention-getting choice of dining selections â&#x20AC;Ś Like being one of a very few restaurants that have two Happy Hours â&#x20AC;Ś Tuesday through Friday, 3-6 p.m., and Tuesday through Saturday 9 p.m. until closing with all the goodies that these popular times usually bring â&#x20AC;Ślike appetizers galore, 10 burger styles, including one you build yourself, homemade soups, steaks, scallops, shrimp, etc. â&#x20AC;Ś including the popular stone cooking rave with diners preparing their own steaks, seafood, etc., on heated stones at their own tables. Favorite-selling dishes like cedar plank or bruschetta salmon or chicken bruschetta, tuna tacos, bar-b-q platter and others â&#x20AC;Ś and daily specials available all seven days are included in the bevy of selections.

IMMIGRATION LAW FIRM ANTONE, CASAGRANDE & ADWERS, P.C. Representation in all areas of family and business immigration law. N. PETER ANTONE

TIP TO SERVERS Dept. â&#x20AC;Ś When serving steak, suggest that customers cut into it while you are there to make certain it is cooked to their liking â&#x20AC;Ś It is amazing how many fail to do this, resulting in the steaks being returned â&#x20AC;Ś Restaurateurs and managers should insist upon this. NO, YOU ARENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T seeing double â&#x20AC;Ś And they are not even related to each other â&#x20AC;Ś but could almost look like sisters â&#x20AC;Ś Chris Feasel, fine general manager at Stage Deli, and Courtney Hill, excellent server at Pickles & Rye Deli â&#x20AC;Ś Steve Goldberg, owner of Stage Deli, and Rick Therrien, owner of Pickles & Rye Deli, and their customers enjoy the presence of each at their West Bloomfield delis. LOOKS LIKE George and Crissy Kutlenios, owners of the Holly Hotel in Holly, Mich., must like fires â&#x20AC;Ś For 41 years they have been celebrating the big blaze that almost destroyed the hotel 105 years ago â&#x20AC;Ś George and Crissy recently gave 41 percent off dinner purchases in memory of the blaze. OLDIE BUT GOODIE Dept. â&#x20AC;Ś Attorney says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, doctor, isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it true that when a person dies in his sleep, he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about it until the next morning?â&#x20AC;? Witness says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Did you actually pass the bar exam?â&#x20AC;? CONGRATS â&#x20AC;Ś To Jim Hiller on his birthday â&#x20AC;Ś To Peter Ginopolis on his birthday â&#x20AC;Ś To Clara Musgraff on her birthday. â&#x2013; Dannyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s email address is dannyraskin2132@gmail.com.

@]pflXi\efkn\Xi`e^`kÂżj\cc`k%%% fi9FIIFNfe`k Pfl canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enjoy jewelry if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sitting in your safe deposit box. Sell or borrow on it for immediate cash. We deal in jewelry, watches, diamonds and coins.

JUSTIN D. CASAGRANDE

www.antone.com or email at law@antone.com 8.JMF3E 4UFt'BSNJOHUPO)JMMT .*

Ph: 248-406-4100

Grand Tavernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house-made carrot cake is one of a slew of choice delights that are made on the premises â&#x20AC;Ś The menu features many popular dishes that may be obtained at popular prices to go with the huge look of cleanliness. Seven-day hours are Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m.-midnight, Saturday, 10 a.m.-midnight, Sunday, 10 a.m.10 p.m. Little wonder that Grand Tavern has become a large favorite as it celebrates its 10th anniversary. ANOTHER MAJOR COUP by the Michigan Jewish Sports Hall of Fame â&#x20AC;Ś as former Detroit Tiger Major League Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Jack Morris receives the 2019 Hank Greenberg Lifetime Achievement Award, Monday, June 3, at the Franklin Hills Country Club â&#x20AC;Ś George Blaha, longtime Detroit Piston announcer, will be given the Excellence in Media Award, and Danialle Karmanos the Bremen Award â&#x20AC;Ś Morris, now a Detroit Tiger broadcaster, entered the 2018 Major League Hall of Fame with former Tiger shortstop Alan Trammell â&#x20AC;Ś The 29th Annual Hank Greenberg Memorial Golf and Tennis Invitational will be a sellout for the inductions and sports panel biggie alone â&#x20AC;Ś plus the frivolity, cocktails and dining. REARVIEW MIRROR â&#x20AC;Ś When little Brian Gussin, son of Norman and Diane Gussin, attended his first Passover seder at Minnie Raskinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home and was told not to wipe his hands on his shirt, obeyed and wiped them on his pants.

Fax: 248-406-4101

A Service to Private Owners, Banks & Estates

Coins & Jewelry Contact Larry Allan

**.''Nff[nXi[8m\%Â&#x203A;9\kn\\e(+D`c\8[XdjÂ&#x203A;9`id`e^_Xd#D@

248-644-8565

jn

Febraury 14 â&#x20AC;˘ 2019

57


m —

m

g n and ch s an on ondemned ugh ccoug ughou and h ou nd nves ga on s u gedd nd y p o esso s c e gymen abor eade s by b

a

m

e reng ngtthe on we ssttre io ttio d id

el g we ng in da w isi da ssin

of of

of of

a had iz err ha e eiz ei ptte apt hap ha ch mw aim ai ha ent i e id rs ych esid es rre r mrs all na arr pr a ona on ra orra no on o nattio rna fe fe ern er wiife nte in ew

h niza the n th en on o io me ld ld zattio za rld rl

of of

off

n o or ani gan ga orrg o he w he th nt a a n at en de ion io sid si attio essid iza prre niz ni alllll ba ba gan rga orrg to hoy acc ho he he la lac lllla n tth ay a adilla da d cca -ca on iin k-c eo und un oksu ook oo bo he b he e th he h p m ns or th or f fo s 5 n 15 1 by by ::15 va o on 2:1 2: 2 12 attiio rva ade n serrv mad e y on 8 rreeesse be b so ay a 28 2 dsso d id m

vvi avvid a ph da lph allp rra

mb

at on feder fe eade c mm

m

d nd o

a

m

rs 2211 g mrs ng n 0 602 6 60 all a nd 6nd e en erra ne ne nssse n d en e wn nd an itttyy an w cciity all ge jje a ew e ua u nu n nn n ea lea ty le ity ity h an ccii u it nth nt e mun ncil unc un ven evve e ou ffarre co icc ellfa e ec ivvic he h he se he th th civ ayy ta da da y nt ci nt nd wsaat b urd ur and tan mbl atu ity f em n an se ons on unit tiio is is at a his hi h mun th ra er e r re de d er e n ed ppeen he ed in ed ing h ing ne h fe nin oiin o err jo ve o enin g ove ov eg e lleg le ele dss op de d 7 nd nd n 2 27 n un u a an e on th he co th he ecco e the th h htt ja re gh g iig t es eccts e tties fec fe iiti it ffe fff eff ivvit ivi e accttiv g he ef the th ng n gee nin uge ds rreeffu ds fug eni en ed pe p ee e op ne d a n nd n eas ea he the th se an nn an ma i na tiio izzm ed e eizm ei be r ccttio ru riib we w ncyy nc crib cr sttru sc s en e m es ge g i im de d ag ai a h wis ha h ch be y dr c issh ettttt e ke k ewish wiililll be jje b iccck piiick p n by on o io the nc th ssio essi ses se eri nt ce e a en nce mer ren side arre a essid llar h am he tth pre pr ne ccla ttiin ettin le ittee ale pal mmit om o n co or pa ffo eiin i ive tiv ttiiv nssstte of of

off

b tzk zkr eg g bro by y brrro b ok oken ken ke en e nb

at at

off o

off o

off o

r

p —pa nss— ns on atio rat era der de

ee e itttte mit

e ed e ffe ee se se

p

m

mm —

po ay

g

e a n

m

m

m

o i tto al troit nnial en e detr a bie nal

o

ms

m

n have

m

u

m

w m

m

i.c 19 e u.eae.ttiiiiin ing her a

m

m

ew ws n eu op ope o pe pe me mes es essag sssag ages ag es om e he r m

xm xme xm me e ca aw awa wa w a s

m

m

—p pa e pa ne new n ew e w o —pa

m

t

41

m

a ta ta e of of o d

sh h ggen ge en e ne a sov sso ov ov e ew s

wo

o h

on n en en

p

m

ann o dm dpregak an s

an rib ti e n da res uttio an a ma pre pr bu irrrm rib ri aiirm tri ha sttr ch icce ice e ch nt diist int iice ic oiin o vvic vi ve vic ive ive tiv h jjo ssh utiv iish cut eccu e xe x ewis ew jje ex de nd n ge 122 ge an a

m

p

ew sh h cca ope op ope pen n ng go a e cam am ampa pa g gn n w wom wo omen s you h ed d ew me mee e ee e ng d v s o ons on n open sh he e a ded d a ed ede erra era r a on m p 2 ca ccam am amp pa ag gn nd drr ve

ovv go or go yo ayo may d ad a ea he he

u ut en ic eccu we xe x n ex ow dss nd nd i an ica n lo en e on eric frie mo mer n fri om o an a ollo cca mi so he am he om o of th of n co on o s si d io

m

articles on on jewish issue as an nti-semitic1414

m

roni cle

m

day evening p po ost st pm c pm co ond ndemns emns em ns the saturd

s h epo s a ew s

of of

n zman ay eiizzm y s wei unda su ah ah eon ssa heo dasss da

n on eo heo he ch

m

m

by

r

m

p

m

ui b gu ay be may e gu he h e je as th m as he the th hiiim h h rtth iirt bir bi eb e re ed he h ayy tth ma th ith it w n dre err te ate at owne row ea e crro gr g p op lo ello e ve no on io attio orra o sto esst e re

ais y ai d ra un iity nd n niit un u ffu arr a mmu g y ea e om o ing ye d co cco nd min om o he th

m

w —

and he eg a

w

n

di p and an sta he uttsst u th ou ann d nd n zmes zm ne an weiipa l ssttiine alle a orr fo fo

atte a ga eg e le leg ele ell e de nss w n i n tio atio at erra e u un de d ou o ed ttyy co ity niit un d ed e tte mmun nite ni he un he err de n th id ssiide s in nsid ns on l i co ilill

w

T

he term Ho ocaust was not used as a h stor ca concept ch o nce unt a ter Wor d War II when a h ed ew sh c the wor d na y understood that the a mpa r gn g nece s wee e Naz party and ts co aborators had k s s s 55 ay w quo dr ve arg 0 000 system ca y and bruta y attempted e a gvn w m w g subann to sc b h ate the Jews o Europe e Un ked Amer cas ma nstream med a the Jew sh News and ts e ug ee predecessor the Detro t Jew sh Chron c e cont nua y pub shed reports about Naz atroc t es dur ng Wor d War II An exh b t assemb ed by Detro t Jew sh News Foundat on Arch v st a M ke Sm th was shown at the Ho ocaust Memor a Center ate ast year On th s “Look ng Back” page we w o er se ected exh b t pane s amu e ae h m ev show ng the h story o what we now n be me h on e o h u na d dge aa ca the Ho ocaust as t un o ded n o co an n m an s ch on c d the pages o these pub cat ons e on

n

department of justice commences war on pro-nazi and anti-semitic elements

w

m

ew h ew

m

o be

m

of of

oiit o tr tro he deeetth tth a e he errra de de o th ed ng tto off ffe min ish com co ncciil o nc ewis ew un ou co e jje he h th he c the of th of ns u du errss de ade ad ed ea e le errre e he he h ng he th ning ni en e orrryy s nve nv sstto on is i co hi s es e ur ur e re of ou he h day h th alllll of itth em urd in a in he th d wiith ed e of th accce ef of liiie ellie arre ffa a e re ee he orr re k fo e he s fo he h e ks pea sumn su es der tth de ie nd ittie iti liit g un un n sp ng billit ibi riin errin e ffe ossssiib os n ett e o n po sse i io -s o s si io e et tio e re r ss at a ne n es e ra r i in s se gr g essstt e alle pa pa ly b y iiss orr o ffo mbl mbly em se p de ep e is aasssin ad ade ea his tth ng le n es re es

w

we ee ek ek y e a wee ev v ew ew

m —

s

on ede a meewffe ish we co jeew

nw

o ans ch s es naz o op c ra pub

n an a

oiitt o ettrro det de

m

tthe he jewish n news ews

nttss nts nt an a 10 cca 10

a

ro

co h by n

n

hr h c s i w it je

mm

w

Looking Back | e l c i on b

j

it ewis Nov. 11, 1938 hc h

m

m

detr o

h m

end m een o on ew w s

m

h

m

m

ane bo n en a h m d d an an e gy n h c u ougougho o h poe y

d

m

m

f

m

m

w

m

ned em ged onds u s ona on eade g

na

on

m

mm

no

e he na

n he e e ng ee e mee m me na

m

m

m

m

am

There were so many broken w ndows n ew n 28 n a ch s nves Jew sh bus nesses, ade h n aund and gyme ss le er cougu ho e g n o o sc h s s e din by p o it synagogues and homes d u d tro that the r ot ng on Nov. ace en pe ou enn a a d n d e 9 and 10, 1939, n ry on ew un ss jew m w a e h n g a p ew d m Germany, Austr a and pp odom y d wa e d n ua a ky m ed lips h cn Czechos ovak a became p on m nde urg s o s d p u c d u r ew s t e ll d Kr sta nacht, i m p n pu e e m u b known as h o rognat on r eadp o ng un f nd wo w ud en m m n m on t —p c wo ty om end yen bo ge ex mit st a est tee ad oo or Crysta N ght. Naz hr nvmen a on hcaass dy s c m e e e en m civ e d nd gy ed a il w n a c w n p d a e f o s o o o e ju o n ve a en la r d of on d o nauthor oun ewor t es stood by thr ugh ex ghlghout rs c e de h 1n7men coeds ng u o e s e n o o o e e e m m d c rou ess byw ugh an be gov oy pe x em de new a ey e n pr m and d watched as r ot ng o th prof kes anwd u o des o ofe ut chr deu opad c — y e a e h o ed o s he l p s a co b s n v p ors nd t an o e oo io m w c t zens damaged or a c e nve fro rad o o kes m pe d r v n and e s g p e t a t ym ga co d ho e cn ge an est mated d d destroyed w ube d ge e en t on nde e h m ouen g m e l o 1 ad d o ve 7 a d abo is u ne n u nm e de d 278 synagogues and rge d d n ted ed r oy en cin o s e d n h s e a e v a co e der an mr ds a cas ge 7,000 Jew sh-owned un s sd d p y po e ng w bus nesses. More than on e a m ll 30,000 Jew sh men mr troit e d were arrested and sent el to concentrat on camps. The Jew sh Chron c e had an extens ve report on th s “New Wave of Ant -Sem t sm.”

ann

l ouncci cco

m

m

of of

w

m

m

du

m

w

m om

w

o

of

s

pag w e3

y1 0

0b g manne

a e a open d ca 6 ng d

spea ke

o

m

us

10

h ca n g

on

s n g b seeks a an by d

s

nm

w

w

ma vuta nn lc a n e

m

at n jje ewthe is i h

to th

ds e ean and je

w

rep w ose

w

fr m

w h

pag e

nizritis atio

ish news

p

u

soc n p oa us ce e

n e on ear uro m w r a as a n w m he ted st m y rri mawas m m du nn w ra c jewtive m m m is mm ric ice h m

w

m

w

tha t

mm

aw

1

new ed o o r ve s a 30 000 d h e a he k o rst wepeage home 0 ra sed n 0 00

l

mann

e n hou e a ed ne u pa e

m

m

m t

p

b

w

m

190 6

jew the jews by nazis 60,000 d e m

mu de

d ca e oca ch

he w h mpoage o e

ma s enewge man

m

pag

h

an jew om

new make e magne w hsa dah s a ab e asp a on dr u o a p opo ma s e max oppo o

2

mm

m

ele cte d

m

m

cr massa

m

e agen

e2 n o r r a kers st ed d art vm r ve

mm

m

ona

n s den es em sm

m

m w

mm

dr we

es a

m

m

am

m

m

ch n aun wome po

m mm

w

m

ood a wedgw

p

m

m w

m

mm

n new o ds o

k sm h age b ac

m

usa

gera he e d m

u

m

oc a new v

f sta or e r v atio so c u n tat o n eer w o

w

w

m

m

p on

350 0 vo

w

m

w

ounc

s n e

w

eb

ad

w

m

m

h d n

n pa e

w

naz w n o e

new s

m

w

jn

w

w

m

c n day ommu g ue ew h mee n qua e

w h e en

w

n ommu

m

d

r o wa c ed kahn

e e w

m

m w

d w

h

a week

w

w

February 14 • 2019

m

m

w

m

w

m

m

m

w

—p wh n ou

w

n

w

d

om m

w

nazi in lws slaugh t

n

m

m

h

m

w

m

w

m

the je wish

un

m

m

m m

m

of

w

w

pub mw

w

m m

ssue n hs

58

mm

m

m

m

w

m

w

w

m w

m

m

m

died ow rep er 13 0 ort 00 jew in ra br us sh ab d 1 50 ce or e s om o ew s as 0m k fu s o

w t aleted to unioations lec f thengreg e and l w w d ele o u a o o ers ew c nagog annuve a n f ebr sy the cutiv

m

m

m

w

m

he

w

w

a weaa ed ew p s

m

w

m

m m mm m w m

m

m

w

w

dn mn

ou se he co c ew om m a mmon m a lare jo w d dt eta by m p ry ou w co r co m of nflic th s we f a ed ranyd m r cotha un t

w

m

m

n

w

pag e1 4

m

w

m w

m

w

h

w

m

m

m

w

w

m

w m wm

m

of

m

m

w

m m

m mmmw

m

h m

w

w

m

w

m

m

p

m

w

w m

m

n

w

m

n d

m

m

pm ram d n rogio on a am elig rogr ent p d onpresid r n th all foups iin s c o nt us gr oblem d e o r io p g ect d -elle rld wo er raegers ndman of ard er of and he bo of t n x

h t of at exe n en sio on io n ld in n niot held xte the uju s or an g u llllo n i t e nse the m th u me o s c i g wn a 5-36un isin rtis o 193 co d e n v k ad r is is ok for in de ted d co aiiggn f xan irec tate ancamp s the d a er g s n w i t hohiga rtissin e s h cen i icc dve a t taxewish d as e d e n j v e r u an e nq f the d se le x liin e t a o an der tion nt e ciareside th memb i on it p i d wunio e t a a

m

w

m

w

w

w

w

m

m

m

m

are eet

g

w

n

b m

0 2,0

m

m

m

r

m w

n

u

m

m

m f 41 ent o

m

mm m m

s

of of

n

m

m

m

h und

m

m

d

m

w

m w

m

m

m

e

h e

s

of of of of

w

s

m arrrm n nt en ce ecce e re n ha in

c issooooosse i elltt rreeel gi gio igio elilig eve sev ann e cro io ion io attio at wo erra n wo on io tiio dm tiv utio ut iv h ooptthpe ollu e so he h gol isstraw n m rd off m on o i is lto lt ado oar bo b e iss miilto tototoon in je in m m eccctt le d ..ld ellec ele ld n th r ooimittililtlto e--e ass re a wa errs o e ge •o w ag ag e ii•o ana an wo ed iin e brre br eb n he onf ooffmmerriica ican iv nt o ment tm rtm arrt a arr k to c on the aaam pa p ep ns de d e en xtttens ex e e e he h th ing et ttiin in eettin ttiin we eaderswill bsess mee etin ee me d r rd ar a l le oa b na tti ati at na n nn inn he o bo cin ti rtti rti ing t erati l s aann adddvveer i urin d i il d rec re diiire d it il of fe nd w the ich an sstt oit iga ig hiiga h hig m ch y a errrtt ve dve lqaduuedv ilininlllnq uncfundns ged bress ail ntt t en e nqu th off th err o re arra cong de d na ti t tio a at ia r sh en m l ccia ide id es esid a prre new i r n it it e io ish aatteteeddawwiun je statlt natio u l e el el inen jew t o h rom ican t to n e n r s p o e loui pres atiio amin g v by he lu di l be ser e ncl t wil er re madkow e a n n ideis dinmay bspev divis th ich than 40 6-6ec whrs na m the ress tein s t f s ga ocong feld pter rt cha lbe oit and s alb r it 559 na deterry 6 00 ch

o

m

8

arr p yea -yye -ye n 1100- ttoo r on o niio un u io niio n ed y th un ase as ea e he u nccrrre in rac the ittth ocra moc ony wiith on em de

he he tthe

n

po e

m m

m

o g tto ng n iin

h

p n

m

u

off o

8

uah

po

n

on o niio ni un he u the gat ga ve th eg avve grre g ha o ha ong on co i iss tto oit wc ro ciili m ew e etttro e brre uncccil un de d ou o hebr nh an al cco a i a ic nia to a e ica nni nn en ing to mer ie am a biie rdiin ord cor co nal b na th on io tio att th attio a ay a a 1 acccc da na 41 nd nd 94 94 un u 19 1 su s o 4 tto e h dg o he h a he reac nn ciinn n re i off tth cin ttiin nccin ion ion sio si eettin ee n n in on o co rd in arrd a al m e b a oa o ua u 00 nu n 300 ive bo ov err 30 e tiv utiv ove cut ecu ec p xe up ex the n ut th eu out de h ho ad g gh k u ug mad s o ou i is n kn hrrro h th on o nio uni n ns err e on io b be ttio the un th ib i lib d da d dy ad ennt a od o h na tth bo b an ca arent ri ar pa p a c i ica ic r ric e or o e er h tth m siitto 9 ssit am viisi na nd v 19 an sm iin sm ism es a e1 he h attte ga ga leg n th elle e o end te de elo attte vel evve o at de t d tto ctte eccte e pe p

of

o ttiio

w

m

mu

m

h


Great changes are happening at With renovations complete and new management guided by Northstar Senior Living, we’re just getting started. We are committed to creating a lifestyle where you can be confident, comfortable and maintain your independence knowing a helping hand is always close by. A style of living that gives you more to smile about.

It’s a new day for Assisted Living in West Bloomfield, WITH EVEN MORE GREAT CHANGES COMING SOON!

Discover the great changes taking place and receive

2 MONTHS FREE* You’re going to love what’s next!

* Available for a limited time. Restrictions apply.

Visit or call us today at (248) 683-1010 to find out more. 4460 Orchard Lake Road . West Bloomfield, MI 48323


Profile for The Detroit Jewish News

DJN Feb. 14, 2019  

DJN Feb. 14, 2019