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SWEETART When SweetArt opened, there were only four employees, including owners Reine and Cbabi Bayoc.

“I want to make sure I’m honoring myself and being authentic to myself first and hopefully that resonates with other people.” Reine Bayoc

Reine spent several years of her career in what she called “the please-everyone stage.” She admitted it took a couple of years to get out of, but now she is at a stage where she bakes what she knows is good. “I want to make sure I’m honoring myself and being authentic to myself first and hopefully that resonates with other people,” Reine says. “I’m at a space where I’m really clear about what I want to produce. I’m really clear about what I’m passionate about. It took six years, but finally I’m there.” Six years later and Reine is living her dream. More than anything, she wants others to do the same because opening a bakeshop started as a small, far-flung idea. “Everyone has one of those ideas, those thoughts of, ‘One day I’m gonna try x, y and z,’” Reine says. “For me, that’s really what this was. For me, it was, ‘One day I wish I could have a bakery.’ It just started from that far little dream. So if you can just keep propelling yourself and have faith, all things are possible.”

Sharing the Dream

Reine’s passion has certainly rubbed off on others. Tamar Eiford has been a baker at SweetArt for three-and-a-half years. When Tamar started, she had never frosted a cake

in her life. She had never even made a tray of brownies from scratch. “My first cupcake I frosted was horrendous. It was absolutely terrible,” Tamar says. “And now I can frost a whole tray of cupcakes in 90 seconds. I’ve learned a lot, and Reine is a fantastic teacher. She’s very nurturing.” Reine makes work fun, too. Tamar says she and Reine have impromptu dance parties in the kitchen just to shake off the stress of the day. Working side-by-side with Reine in the kitchen, Tamar has developed a lot of passion for SweetArt. “It’s rubbed off for sure. I care about this shop,” Tamar says. “Not just about the baking aspect of the shop, but I am very invested in the shop as a whole and where they’re going.” SweetArt’s customers care about the shop as well. Katie Shields has been going to SweetArt for four years. “It really is incredible. I’ve never had a bad meal and I’ve never not felt happier after going there,” Katie says. “I try to be a SweetArt evangelist. I just talk about it all the time. If people want to get lunch with me, I’m cool with that, but I prefer it to be at SweetArt.” Cbabi talks about expanding the business, hosting more events and even

selling baked goods online. He wants SweetArt to be a household name. “We’d love to be a destination spot when people come to St. Louis,” Cbabi says. “We’d like to become one of those places you have to visit before you leave. That’s our grand vision for ourselves.” Tamar shares that vision for SweetArt’s future, and she says SweetArt deserves some long-overdue attention. “SweetArt is very much underrated,” Tamar says. “I want the word to get out because it’s such a fantastic place to work, and we’re proud of everything that comes out of here. It’s an exceptional place. It really is. It can’t be a hidden secret for that long.”

>>web exclusive Read more about Cbabi’s passion for art on our website, detoursmagazine.com.

winter 2014

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Detours Winter 2014 Issue  

Detours Magazine Winter 2014 Issue — Read stories about the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre (pg. 26) and see the beauty of Missouri’s murals (pg....

Detours Winter 2014 Issue  

Detours Magazine Winter 2014 Issue — Read stories about the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre (pg. 26) and see the beauty of Missouri’s murals (pg....

Profile for detours