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ISSN 1614-4600 · MAY · JUNE £13 · US$  24.50 · €18.90

English Edition

Housing for Seniors · Review of Architecture and Construction Details · Vol. 2017 · 3

Concept


∂ Review of Architecture Vol. 3, 2017 • Housing for Seniors Editorial office: E-mail: redaktion@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89 38 16 20-57 Dr. Sandra Hofmeister (editor-in-chief, V. i. S. d. P.), Sabine Drey, Andreas Gabriel, Frank ­Kaltenbach, Julia Liese, Michaela Linder, Peter Popp, Maria Remter, Jakob Schoof, Edith Walter, Heide Wessely Christa Schicker (freelance a ­ ssistants) Dejanira Ornelas Bitterer, Marion Griese, Emese M. Köszegi, Simon Kramer ­(drawings) Editorial team DETAIL product ­information: Thomas Jakob, Jenny Clay Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-0 Giovanna Dunmall (66 –70) Peter Green (pp. 1 – 5, 10 – 64) Alisa Kotmair (pp. 6 – 8) Marc Selway (pp. 72–94) (English translations) Advertising: E-mail: anzeigen@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-48 Advertisement Sales Representative Cézanne Sales Services Denise Cézanne-Güttich Rotdornstr. 2 41352 Korschenbroich, Germany T: +49 (0)2182 578 39 73 F: +49 (0)2182 578 39 75 M: +49 (0)172 821 0095 E: dcg_detail@cezannesales.com Distribution and marketing: E-mail: mail@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Subscription contact and customer service: Vertriebsunion Meynen Grosse Hub 10 65344 Eltville, Germany E-mail: detailabo@vertriebsunion.de Tel.: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-211 Fax: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-212 Publisher and editorial office: Institut für internationale ArchitekturDokumentation GmbH & Co. KG Hackerbrücke 6 80335 Munich Germany Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Fax: +49 (0) 89-39 86 70 www.detail.de/english


Bungalow with open plan: in the London Borough of Greenwich, gaps in the urban fabric have been closed with subsidized housing for senior citizens. Read moreabout this project by Bell Phillips Architects on pp. 18f.

Editorial

Visitor Centres A serious consideration of housing forms for the elderly is long overdue. What concepts comply with the needs and wishes of the older generation? In the current issue of Detail, we present various housing developments for senior citizens. The cultural background ranges from Japan to Switzerland, from Paris to Frankfurt and London, and a question is addressed that arises in all industrial nations. Typologies of homes for seniors are documented here that offer various levels of care in forms that range from dwelling clusters to solitary buildings integrated in the urban landscape. Health centres that provide special medical support and that contain communal zones are discussed as well as subsidized housing that offers old people – whether in wheelchairs or not – scope to find happiness within their own four walls. Our editorial team has taken a closer look at the Erika Horn care home in Graz, for example, as well as the Padre Rubinos social centre in Corunna. The views of residents there reveal how successful housing concepts can have a direct impact on the lives of people in advanced years. We hope these themes may be of inspiration to you in this field.  Sandra Hofmeister


Reports  1 Editorial Sandra Hofmeister   4

Studio Mumbai: MPavilion in Melbourne Christian Schittich

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The New Design Museum in London Heide Wessely

Discussion   10 Growing Old in One’s Own Neighbourhood – New Housing Forms for Old Age Roland Pawlitschko

Typology   18 Terraced Housing for Senior Citizens in London Bell Phillips Architects, London   22 Retirement Home in Frankfurt am Main Waechter + Waechter Architekten, Darmstadt   26 Home for Senior Citizens near H ­ iroshima CAn, Susumo Uno, Nagoya; Met Architects, Katsumasa Hirano, Gifu   28 Retirement Home in Küsnacht Bob Gysin + Partner BGP Architekten, Zurich   31 Retirement Home in Paris Atelier du Pont Architectes, Paris   34 Residential Care Facility in Vienna Delugan Meissl Associated Architects, Vienna; Vasko + Partner Ingenieure, Vienna

Process   38 Erika Horn Residential Care Home in Graz Dietger Wissounig Architekten, Graz   52 Padre Rubinos Social Centre in Corunna Elsa Urquijo Architects, Corunna

Special Inside   66 Jewellery Boutique in Beijing Ippolito Fleitz Group Identity Architects, Stuttgart

Products   72   76   82   90   95

Lights and Lighting Bathrooms and Universal Design Landscaping and Outdoor Living Interior Walls, Ceilings and Acoustics On the Spot

 98 Service 102 Persons and organizations involved in the planning • Contractors and suppliers 104 Programme • Photo credits • Editorial and publishing data


Typology


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Terraced Housing for Senior Citizens in London Architects: Bell Phillips Architects, London Team: John Lineen Structural engineers: Richard Jackson, Colchester Others involved in the project: see page 102

In former times, the Royal Navy had its base in the Royal Borough of Greenwich, and the impressive buildings still standing there are a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Also of significance is the Royal Observatory by the architect Sir Christopher Wren. But there are poorer, neglected areas in the bo­rough as well, with a lot of public housing dating from the post-war years. In part, these dwellings had their own garages – often disused and in a run-down state – which were scattered about the district on small plots of land. The borough council therefore decided to use these areas to develop small, single-storey houses for senior citizens, with the further aim of freeing larger housing for families. Six plots

of various sizes were available, on which a single house type was to be erected in an additive, terraced form. In all, 22 dwellings were created on this basis. The largest development comprises six dwellings set next to each other. By using a timber load-bearing structure with a high degree of prefabrication it was possible to reduce the construction period and the costs, allowing more to be invested in the brick facades. Depending on the location, these are either in mottled red or paler ochre tones. The large lantern lights in the galvanized steel roofs lend these small bungalows a bolder presence in the surroundings. They also allow daylight to enter without permitting views into the houses. Re-

cessed entrance zones afford immediate, barrier-free access to the living area, comprising a dining corner, kitchen strip and living room. The open layout allows greater latitude in the way residents use their dwellings. An impressive feature is the spatial effect created by the roof, with surfaces of different pitch that slope down in opposite directions to the middle. The bedroom is oriented to a small garden, and a further external space adjoining the road can serve various uses. Thanks to wider doors and passageways and a large bathroom, there is no hindrance to wheelchair users. The dimensions actually exceed the requirements of the local authority for barrier-free construction. A central goal


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was to invest in high-quality architecture that is so attractive that elderly people would willingly leave their large dwellings and move in here. That also explains the generous area of 84 m² per unit, which is generally occupied by only one to two persons. Photovoltaic panels were installed on the roofs, and the window frames are of wood. The concept seeks to allow residents to look after themselves for as long as possible. An emergency call button can be pressed should they need help. If long-term aid becomes ne­ cessary, one can apply to the local authority for a care person. Even 24-hour aid is possible: an additional room for flexible use provides adequate space.

Typology

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Terraced Housing for Senior Citizens in London

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Little more than a year ago, Ms Koria from India moved into Colomb Street, Greenwich, a development comprising four houses. Her grandson translated her interview with Detail. Detail: How were you able to get this house? Ms Koria: The public housing block in Greenwich in which I lived previously for 25 years was to be demolished. The ground floor dwelling I had there was larger than this one. Then the council offered me the present house, and I moved into it. Was it hard for you to move? The old dwelling was linked with many memories, of course. The family had lived there. But when my husband died, it was better for me to attempt a new beginning, and the move here was a good step. How are things for you here? The neighbours are very nice, and I can get everywhere easily. The house is light and airy. I like the high ceilings in the living room, and the large bathroom is really luxurious. The fact that you can move from one room to the next in a circle. pleases me, too. There’s no wind lobby, so it can be a bit draughty in winter, but that’s only for a few days a year. Otherwise everything’s fine here. There’s a pub opposite, which is sometimes a bit loud, but I can send guests there when things get too much for me; and if I have to shop for larger things, someone from the family helps me. Looking after the garden is a bit hard, but my grandson can help me with that, too. It’s OK.

22 terraced houses on 6 different sites for 1– 4 residents each Size of dwellings: 84 m² Client: Royal Borough of Greenwich Effective floor area: 78,5 m2 Gross construction costs: € 2,640/m² Completion date: 9/2015

Typology

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Special • Inside


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The “mix & match“-concept of combining individual elements from the Dada jewellery collection is orchestrated with great visual exuberance. Dada Jewellery, Beijing 2014, Design: Ippolito Fleitz Group, Stuttgart

Jewellery Boutique in Beijing Architects/Interior design: Ippolito Fleitz Group Identity Architects, Stuttgart Interior fit-out: Huachuang

Since early 2015, the international edition of DETAIL has been supplemented by two special issues of DETAIL inside. DETAIL inside presents contemporary interior design and construction in combination with professional information relevant to architects and interior designers. Particular attention is dedicated to the significance and characteristics of the materials used. Our aim is to provide readers with insight on trends as well as inspiration through the projects we present. The jewelery boutique in Beijing was first featured in the 02/2016 issue of DETAIL inside.

The exploding retail sector in China leads to a booming interest in a successful retail design. The most important retail marketplace of the future has come into being at lightning speed. In order to meet customers’ expectations, designers have to respect the local culture while presenting their own approach with confidence. European engagement in countries like China takes place in the tension areas ­between two major and significant cultural groups. A precondition for the encounter is a cosmopolitan attitude but also the willingness to try new things and discard old habits. After all, anyone who has been active abroad knows that copying Western processes and ways of thinking is not enough, and above all, it’s no guarantee of success. The global trend to emotionalise selling points in product presentation and embed them in a world of experience also, and especially, applies to China. Design no longer has just the task to inspire and increase value, but it rather needs to create adventures. After the fall of communism the retail sectors have been influenced not only by the upper classes but also by a huge middle class. A generational change among consumers has occurred. For the first generation it was predominantly about luxury and the display of wealth. The second generation, on the other hand, is familiar with the symbols of prosperity and has a more subtle approach to luxury. Young Chinese women in their 20s are affected by the country’s former one-child policy and seeking ways to relax and reward themselves for the private and professional pressures they must endure. Their parents have given up a great deal in order to give them a better future. However their lives usually take place in hectic, over-crowded and polluted metropolises and their workloads are enormous. The desire to treat themselves and give themselves rewards is growing. This observation was central to the work for jewellery brand Dada. The Western lifestyle opens up dream worlds to prospective customers that transform shopping into something unforgettable. The aim was to strengthen their awareness of their own

identity and what made them unique. The design specifically ­focused on the romantic ideals of young Chinese women. Whether it’s the iconographic image of the Eiffel Tower or French actress ­Sophie Marceau, both stand for Paris, the ­ultimate fashion emblem. In the case of both brands they played with elegance and fashion consciousness and created connotations of longing, sexiness and self-confidence – all ­attributes greatly in demand by modern, well-paid Chinese women. The atmosphere is ­emphasised by cool lighting that satisfies the Chinese beauty ideal of pale, delicate, even skin. The store was very well received and capture the Chinese zeitgeist. The design of the jewellery brand Dada transforms the “mix & match“ principle – by which elements of the collection can be combined as required – into a setting of highly adaptable types of furniture. As ­customers journey around the monochrome room they should feel as if they have entered an “enchanted forest“. Graphic facet patterns, backlit silhouettes and over-sized beauty posters serve as visual leitmotifs. The solid white lacquered furniture provides a formal bridge into the fairytale landscape and evokes associations to graceful mythical creatures. Despite a shared material palette and design language all the “family members“ have their own personality: the elongated counters rest on slender, conical legs; a dressing table, the so-called DIY table, gleams with a pivoting, backlit mirror attachment. Free-standing and enigmatic product display cases play with ­motifs that oscillate between exclusivity and desire; they show collective “places of longing“ in semi-open capsules, sculptures that bring to mind the complex ­mythology of Indian deities or allegedly unattainable displays in wide mesh cages. A back wall of mirrored glass amplifies the promise of happiness. Light displays mounted directly on the glass are combined with an irregular pattern of vertical decorative strips to create a shimmering background that visually dissolves all spatial boundaries.


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Special

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DIY table Mirror wall Counter Display case (type 1) Display case (type 3) New product counter Storefront display

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Jewellery Boutique in Beijing

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Section product display case scale  1:5  1 c  abinet: 20 mm MDF, milled, RAL 9016 white semi-matt finish  2 milled conduit for fibre optic cable  3 LED strip light   4 neodymium magnet  5 top plate, detachable, magnetically fastened: 2 mm sheet steel, RAL 9016 white powder-coated 30 mm rigid foam board, slotted 5≈ 0.5 mm  6 LED downlight  7 circular magnetic strip   8 silhouette motif: 2 mm sheet steel, laser cut, RAL 9016 white powder-coated   9 bottom plate with vent slot, detachable, hook-and-loop fastening: for structure see (5) 10 lighting technology 11 pillar, RAL 9016 white powder-coated: 2 mm sheet steel, curved Ø 50 mm steel CHS Ø 460 mm metal foot 12 Ø 2 mm knotted nylon thread 13 fi 12/20 mm clamping profile, stainless steel, high-gloss polished

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 0 mm MDF 2 20 mm MDF, white leather upholstered, removable 2 mm chrome-plating, magnetic pivoting mirror frame in metal-sleeved ball joint connection: 12 mm MDF, RAL 9016 white semi-matt finish 4 mm float glass with high light transmission LED light strips, circular table leg with Ø 6 mm steel rod reinforcement: Ø 25 – 94 mm milled MDF, RAL 9016 white semi-matt finish Ø 20 mm metal foot, black finish cable routing: Ø 60 mm wooden balls, white finish


Products


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Lights and Lighting

Contemporary fittings chosen to complement their historic surroundings Lighting by Catellani & Smith has been selected to play a significant role in the interior design of two business premises in France within recently renovated historic buildings, as well as a new restaurant set in panoramic surroundings in Italy. Above, the Fil de Fer, made of aluminium wire that is sculpted, ­intertwined by hand and lit by small LED light sources, has been developed as a full range of customisable lights available in several shapes and sizes for both indoor and outdoor spaces. Here it has been used to light the new headquarters of a security company in Marseilles located in a restored 19th century building. The interior is richly decorated with stucco and elegant details, complemented with stylish furnishings in neutral colours, which show the light fittings to advantage.

Aix en Provence that is home to the branch office of banking group BNP Paribas. The lights provide a colourful detail in the building, where white prevails. Macchina della Luce in gold finish, with Sorry Giotto copper suspensions hand-painted in blue-universe (just seen in the background) are harmoniously integrated into the rooms. The latter are additionally available as both floor and table lamps. The Macchina della Luce pendant is composed of diffuser discs lined with gold-coloured leaf with brass rods; it also comes in copper-coloured leaf with brass rods, or ­silver-coloured leaf with nickel rods, on a nickel base, which are all dimmable, or on a matt grey base (not dimmable). The light source is halogen or low-voltage LED.

The bespoke fittings appear to float like clouds in mid-air in the halls and along the main staircase. Standard sizes of these LED and halogen light sources are available as pendant, floor, wall and table lamps, most of them dimmable, and they can be anodised in gold colour on request.

Finally, the company’s lighting has been used to effect in the Michelin-starred chef Enrico Bartolini’s Casual Ristorante, in the Bergamo Alta area of Italy. Surrounded by 16th century fortifications, the building has wide windows along one wall offering a view of the funicular railway, which takes visitors to the highest part of the city.

Below, Catellani & Smith lighting makes its presence felt in the 18th century building in

The restaurant has two large rooms and a smaller room that offers more privacy, com-

plemented by a roof garden for use in good weather. The lighting design has been developed to create a balance between light and shadow, and this interplay between different visual elements serves to create a welcoming atmosphere that contributes to the overall ambience. Amongst the products chosen to illuminate the restaurant are the gold and white lamps from the Lederam collection shown below, right. Essentially the lamp consists of an LED module concealed by a shaped disc that embraces and reflects the light, and can be connected directly to the mains voltage without requiring a driver. Created for the company in 2014 by Enzo Catellani, Lederam has recently been enlarged with new models and offers a versatile product family. Other finishes available are silver, copper and neutral tones of white, black and chrome, and the collection comprises floor, table, wall and ceiling models. The lights are dimmable and eco-friendly, offering low consumption. ¥ Catellani & Smith srl Italy � +39 (0)35 656 088 www.catellanismith.com


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Lights and Lighting

Floral decoration

Thermoformed material gives flexibility in design

Linea Light Group says that its Moonflower design offers a new way of decorating with light, thanks to the modularity which offers the ideal solution for a variety of settings and room sizes. Each modular tile conceals a compact ‘heart’: an optical unit enclosing the RGB LEDs integrated into a circuit which gives up to 21 pre-set programmes providing both static and dynamic colour effects. The lighting can be customised through the DMX protocol on request.

Created to offer a warm and intimate atmosphere through gentle, indirect lighting, this tulip-shaped lamp, top, is by designer Pierre Cabrera. Searching for harmony between material and light, he found that Hi-Macs® from LG Hausys delivered the desired aesthetic appearance and offered a sensitive and soft diffusion of light. Once the original prototype had been completed to find the right balance of curves for the lamp, he then designed a special tool so that the ellipsoidal thermoformed ribbon could intertwine to produce smooth, flowing shapes.

The wall light is described as sturdy, practical and reliable, its self-supporting structure achieved by integrating the many modules that are connected to each other through side brackets. This means a large structure can be simply assembled using just a few screws. The product recently gained international recognition by winning the Codega prize in the LED solutions category, chosen for its ability to create fascinating colour effects in numerous combinations. The judges considered it to be ‘a very innovative solution with an appealing design, thanks to the use of RGB LEDs’. ¥ Linea Light srl Italy � +39 (0)423 78 68 www.linealight.com

These lamps come in different sizes for use in large spaces and also as wall lamps. The latest generation of Beneito & Faure LEDs are used with Tulip20, Tulip30 and Tulip40 models, whilst the larger Tulip50 and Tulip60 also feature a connected high-tech lighting system and a Bluetooth gesturecontrolled switch/dimmer, which can be operated by either a smartphone or a tablet to create mood lighting. The Filter collection of lamps by Sabine Marcelis came about through an invitation from Baars & Bloemhoff, distributor of HiMacs in the Netherlands, to six respected designers to create products using various sheet materials from its library. Marcelis

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works with a strong focus on materials in the field of product design, installations and spatial design, and chose Hi-Macs for her project: “This natural acrylic stone comprises a huge diversity of decors and colour collections that vary in visual density, composition and layering. In my work I often experiment with the manipulation of a light source, and I continued this key theme for Filter. I started by playing with the material, varying it in thickness and texture, for instance, and then illuminating it.” Colours used are Star Queen, Opal, Gemini and Arctic Granite, and she combined these with moulded resin in various colours. Unseen when the light source is off, the colours and patterns come alive when the light is switched on, as seen above, right. Below is a rather bigger lighting project featuring the material, at Osram’s headquarters in Munich, Germany. Translucent Opal was used for the reception counter, which is 11 m long and has the lighting manufacturer’s LED lamps built into it. ¥ LG Hausys United Kingdom � +44 (0)1892 704074 www.himacs.eu


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Landscaping and Outdoor Living

Lightweight and strong

Flexible installation for external tiled floors

Sen-su Lounge is part of the Sen-su and Sen-to contemporary chair and armchair collection by Bartoli Design for Italian manufacturer Daa. “The system was developed in a continuous exchange between design and engineering by several prototypes to translate the lightness of the sensu traditional Japanese fan with the rules dictated by the steel-wire manufacturing technology,” explained Bartoli.

OUT2.0 from Ceramiche Refin are 20 mmthick porcelain stoneware tiles suitable for external floors using traditional or raised installation methods. The thicker tiles are designed to guarantee a high resistance to loads and stresses and are suitable for both residential and commercial outdoor flooring, being frost- and fire-resistant, as well as resistant to the attack of chemicals and adverse weather conditions.

“The result is a chair whose technical and aesthetic focus is the ‘spine’ where several V rods alternate and are reflected, creating a distinguishing pattern, extremely light yet sturdy.” The seats are available with a textured or satin lacquer in various colours.

The tiles can be dry-installed directly on to the footing, gravel or grass or can be laid as a raised floor by means of polypropylene supports of variable heights. Fixed supports represent the quickest, most economical ­solution and allow for a raise of 15 mm, whereas the self-levelling supports can be adjusted in height from 50 to 75 mm; these are equipped with a self-levelling head that reduces uneven surfaces and means the system can compensate for an incline of up

¥ Bartoli Design Italy � +39 (0)39 387225 www.bartolidesign.it

to 5 %. Quick and easy to install, the floor can be walked on straight away. As the dry-installation method does not require the use of adhesives and grouts, the porcelain stoneware slabs can be easily removed and reused if desired. As well as helping to reduce unevenness of the surface, the raised flooring system is said to increase thermal insulation, whilst the gap created between the floor and the substrate allows for the housing of cabling and pipes and ease of inspection. OUT2.0 tiles are available in a selection of finishes including Artwork (above, left), Bluetech (top and below, left) and Wood2 (bottom), as well as Graniti, Pangea and Pietre di Borgogna. ¥ Ceramiche Refin Italy � +39 (0)522 990499 www.refin.it


Design + Performance™ and Legendary Performance Fabrics™ are trademarks and Sunbrella® is a registered trademark of Glen Raven, Inc.

L E G E N DA R Y P E R F O R M A N C E FA B R I C S

S U N B R E L L A .C O M


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Cover 3_2017: Home for Senior Citizens near Hiroshima: Architects: CAn, Susumo Uno, Nagoya Met Architects, Katsumasa Hirano, Gifu Black-and-white photos introducing main sections: page 3: The New Design Museum in London Architect: John Pawson, London page 9: Erika Horn Residential Care Home in Graz Architects: Dietger Wissounig Architekten, Graz page 17: Terraced Housing for Senior Citizens in London Architects: Bell Phillips, London page 37, 71: Padre Rubinos Social Centre in Corunna Architects: Elsa Urquijo Architects, Corunna page 65: Jewellery Boutique in Beijing Architects/Interior Design: Ippolito Fleitz Group Identity Architects, Stuttgart Photo credits: Photos for which no credit is given were either provided by the respective architects or they are product photos from the DETAIL archives. pp. 1, 17 – 20, 21 bottom: Edmund Sumner pp. 3, 6 bottom, 7: Hélène Binet pp. 6 top, 8 top right: Luke Hayes pp. 8 top left, 21 top, 62, 64 top: Heide Wessely p. 8 bottom: Gareth Garner pp. 4, 5: John Gollings p. 9: Christian Theny p. 10 top: Erich Malter p. 10 bottom, 11 bottom: Sebastian Schels p. 11 top: Freilichtmuseum Finsterau und Massing p. 12: Julia Knop p. 13 top: Michael Nagy p. 13 bottom: Julia Liese, Munich p. 14: Ricardo Oliveira Alves pp. 15, 16 top: Thomas Madlener p. 16 bottom, middle: Andrea Helbling/Arazebra pp. 22 – 25: Thomas Ott pp. 26, 27: Hiroshi Ueda

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pp. 28 – 30: Dominique Marc Wehrli pp. 31 – 33: Takuji Shimmura pp. 34 – 36: Hertha Hurnaus pp. 37, 53, 54, 55 – 60, 63, 64 bottom, 71: Elsa Urquijo Arquitects pp. 39 – 48, 49 bottom, 50 top right, ­bottom, 51 top: Paul Ott p. 49 top: LUPI SPUMA Fine Photography p. 51 bottom: Albrecht Imanuel Schnabel p. 50 top left: Dietger Wissounig Architekten pp. 65, 66 – 70: Shuhe Architectural Photography, Beijing p. 72 bottom left Nava-Rapacchietta p. 73 top centre Franck Foucha – Xavier Muyard p. 73 top right Ronald Smits p. 73 bottom right Daniela Hommel p. 78 top left and centre Darren Chung p. 78 bottom left Riccardo Bianchi for DuPont™ Corian® p. 80 top left David Frutos p. 80 bottom left Claudio Bader p. 96 top right Phil Boorman

∂ Review of Architecture + Construction Detail

DETAIL English appears in 2017 on 13 January, 1 March, 2 May, 3 July, 1 September, 2 November.

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DETAIL English 3/2017 - Concept: Housing for Seniors  

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DETAIL English 3/2017 - Concept: Housing for Seniors  

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