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Campus extension in Madrid

A large complex complements the private Francisco de Vitoria university founded in the 1990s in Pozuelo de Alarcón on the western outskirts of Madrid. The pure, gleaming white building, designed by the architect Alberto Campo Baeza from Madrid, is divided into two parts that are clearly differentiated both in terms of their size as well as the facade design. While the sports hall is a brightly lit volume with extensive glazing that opens up towards the outside, the flanking two-storey wing, with its seminar rooms and offices, is a more introverted cube with a perforated facade. Both structures are connected by a single-storey central section, which accommodates entrances, a foyer and a café; its flat roof acts as a terrace, which is accessible via the seminar rooms and the stand. Not visible from the outside, the basement houses multipurpose rooms, a gym, changing rooms and two swimming pools. The facades of the 50 m long, 38 m wide and 12 m high sports hall are designed to optimally supply daylight to the interior, while simultaneously responding to the climatic conditions of central Spain. Hence, the northern and eastern sides chiefly consist of translucent insulating glazing, which admits glare-free, scattered light into the hall. The southern facade, by contrast, is completely clad in white, only 10 mm thick glass-fibre-reinforced concrete panels. The western side, ori94

Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza

ented towards the afternoon sun, is also largely closed. Here, however, the lower area, with its continuous glazing extending across the building corners, provides direct visual contact between the inside and the outside, between the activities in the hall and on the central square of the campus; three large entrance doors are also integrated into the glazed ribbon and oriented directly towards the square. This corresponds with glazing that extends across the entire length of the building on the opposite facade towards the roof terrace, permitting visual contact towards both sides. The sports hall has a steel structure whose 3.10 m high steel trussed girders span the hall width of 37.80 m. The loadbearing structure and all surfaces in the interior are designed in white—both the acoustic panels on the walls and the ceiling, as well as the ceramic surface of the stand. On the one hand, the monochrome and bright surfaces scatter the incoming light, while on the other, they lend the space surprising lightness. Restriction to only a few selected materials and the chromatically homogeneous design underline its almost abstract impact. In the evening, the pavilion-like structure gleams from the inside like a luminary, further emphasising the immaterial, floating impression. Apart from its use as a sports hall, it also offers an attractive setting for conferences and universitybased events. LIGHT

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Sports Facilities  

Leisure and Movement in Urban Space. More information: https://bit.ly/2JwWQSB

Sports Facilities  

Leisure and Movement in Urban Space. More information: https://bit.ly/2JwWQSB