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DBPR Adopts the 2009 Food Code

Official Publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association

Andy Reiss 2013 FRLA Chairman and Keystone of Florida Hospitality

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F rom t h e c h a i r m a n ’ s de sk

Boil it Down to

The Basics

W

ell the good news is we don’t have to watch and or listen to any more campaign promises. The commercials have been replaced by Christmas ads and SuperBowl promos. This year I think it’s not a bad substitute. This is the season that I think about faith, hope and love. Usually we hear those three words used together at a wedding, but perhaps we should all think about those three words more often, not just when the minister reads it from scripture during a wedding ceremony. We need to have faith that our maker has a plan for all of us, faith in our country, its democracy, and its leaders regardless of how many Democrats and Republicans there are in the House and Senate, or who is President or who is in the Cabinet. Our system works, although sometimes it seems like it is broken. We have throughout our history, had our ups and downs, kind of like life itself don’t you think? We should have hope for everything. We have to have faith, which is in a sense, trust. Then, of course, there is love; it is written that the greatest of these three words is love. So you may wonder why is the Chairman of the Board of the FRLA talking about these three things. Well, first, remember the season. Second, is that love is an action, not just a feeling. If you love your job, it will show. If you love your employees, it will show. If you love your customers, your partners, your guests, your vendors and everyone else you come in contact with, it will show. Oh, did I mention that besides showing it, that it will pay off? We are all in business to make money, right? Well if we all want to have a good season, a good year forthcoming, great morale in our businesses, better

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Bruce Craul

relationships at work and at home, then I believe that we need to follow an old tried and true recipe; put a whole lot of love into your life! As I look back over this past year as Chairman, and reflect back on my travels throughout the state, I can say that the most successful in our industry are those that love what they do, and share that love with others through how they operate their businesses. How blessed we are to live and work in Florida. You know, one of greatest assets we have our people. Most of them have great attitudes because they love living in Florida. Our guests and visitors that come to see us from other states can only dream about what it’s like to live in Florida. For the past forty years I wake up and say; I live here! How awesome is that! So, remember to give thanks to all of those around you. Tell your employees that you could not do anything without them. Tell your family that you could not do your job without their support. Tell your customers and guests that you know that they had a choice. Tell your vendors thanks for being on time with those deliveries or the services that they provide. Tell your peers and your boss that you appreciate them every day. If you pass by someone in uniform during this season, returning home, or on their way to being deployed, thank them for their service. Our business can be pretty complicated, but it can be pretty simple if we boil it down to the basics.

– Bruce Craul 2012 Chairman of the Board Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association

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F rom t h e c e o

.

Chairman

Bruce Craul

Legendary Inc. & Hospitality Inc., Destin Chairman-Elect

Andrew Reiss

Election Over But a Growing List of Issues Left on the Table

Andrew’s Downtown, Tallahassee Secretary-Treasurer

Jim McManemon, Jr. Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island

Carlos Molinet

Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau

Mitch Doren City Walk/Universal, Orlando

Matt Halme

Outback Steakhouse Inc., Tampa Immediate Past Chair

Dave Reid

Miller’s Ale House, Jupiter President/CEO

Carol B. Dover, fmp EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley email: susie@mckinleyhome.com

M AG A ZINE

Publication Manager

John M. Baker

john@restaurantandlodging.com Advertising

Leslie L. Baker

850-545-5023 • leslie@restaurantandlodging.com Published By

DestinCom 1334 Timberlane Rd., Tallahassee, FL 32312 Phone: 850-545-1362 • Fax: 850-907-8245 Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify, or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members, or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by e-mail. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Publisher’s Address 1334 Timberlane Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32312 850/545-1362 Fax: 850/907-8245

Ad Rates and Submission Guidelines at www.RestaurantAndLodging.com Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 104403640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA Members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Boyd Brothers Printing, Inc., Panama City, FL. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, PO Box 1779, Tallahassee, FL 32302 or via email to susana@frla.org. Subscription address changes (digital or US Mail, can be made at www.RestaurantAndLodging.com, and click the Manage Subscription tab.

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By Carol B. Dover am so proud and excited to welcome our new 2013 FRLA Chairman and newest Hall of Fame inductees! There are so many reasons to celebrate each one of these members. FRLA Chairman and Tallahassee restaurateur Andy Reiss has been essential to the success of FRLA. In the hospitality industry we know that success is largely based on, “location, location, location.” The FRLA now resides steps from the Florida Capitol because of our great “neighbor.” Andy Reiss helped in so many ways to move the FRLA from Hollywood to Tallahassee. For an independent operator to be so involved in an association and contribute as much as Carol B. Dover Andy does, it is truly unparalleled. Our Hall of Famers this year are certainly worthy of the designation. Restaurateur of the Year, Joe’s Stone Crab, is celebrating its 100th anniversary, which is simply incredible. Hotelier of the Year, the Fontainebleau Miami Beach Resort, is one of the most exquisite properties you will ever experience. Lastly, our Supplier of the Year, Al Gardiner of A &L Associates, has played an integral role in the development of this association and our members for decades. We feel fortunate to have all of these inductees as members of the FRLA and are proud of their achievements to the betterment of our industry. Many of us held our breath on November 6th waiting for the outcome of the presidential election. The day was not just about which candidate won, but where that person will take us in the future. With this election in particular, there were many possible outcomes between the two candidates. How will taxes change? What is the future of health care? Mark your calendars! Florida Unemployment? Worker’s benefits? The list was endless and some of those questions remain to be an- Tourism Day will be held March 13, 2013 at FRLA headquarters and at swered. It is imperative now more than ever to stand the Capitol in Tallahassee, Florida. united as an industry and fight for pro-business Meet legislators and let them know initiatives. what’s important to your success. There is one date that is essential for the future of your operation and that is March 13, 2013. Please mark your calendar and plan to join us in Tallahassee for Florida Tourism Day where we will walk the halls of the Florida Capitol together and meet with legislators to let them know what is important to the hospitality industry. There are many pressing issues we will be tackling this year, and it is critical for lawmakers to hear personal stories directly from you. This is a pivotal time for our industry. We are fortunate enough to have a Governor who grasps the magnitude of Florida tourism and its impact on job creation and wants our industry to succeed. Please join us in March as we work together to help shape the future of your business and Florida’s tourism industry. Carol Dover is President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g  

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contents DECEMBER/JANUARY 2013 • WWW.RESTAURANTANDLODGING.COM

18 VIVA 500 Florida Spanish Timeline Part 1 of a Series tracking the progress of Florida’s history over the last 500 years.

22 Andy Reiss: Florida’s Hospitality Keystone Andy Reiss, FRLA’s 2013 Chairman of the Board, has just celebrated 40 years of being in the restaurant business. He has served lunch or dinner to every major politician to work in the Capital City during that time. Andy, and his food, is known and loved by politicians, residents and visitors to Tallahassee.

32 Testa’s: Nearly a Century of Success Located in beautiful Palm Beach on Royal Poinciana Way, Testa’s has been named by Delta Sky Magazine, as part of “A Perfect Day in Palm Beach”. Find out the secret to their 92 years in business.

Departments

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2013

3 5 9 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 19 19 20 21 27 28 30 34 34 35 38

From the Chairman’s Desk Boil It Down to the Basics From the CEO Election Over, Growing List of Issues Left on the Table CEO Forecast Andy Reiss, Owner, Andrew’s Capital Grill, Andrew’s 228 Event Calendar 2013 FRLA Event Calendar Governmental Relations 2013 Legislative Agenda Compliance Why You Need Regulatory Compliance Services Chefs That Sizzle Greg Richie, Emeril’s Tchoup Chop, Royal Pacific Resort FRLA Photo Highlights Tailgating with Emeril A La Carte Mandatory Paid “Sick” Leave Defeated in Miami-Dade County Top Trends for 2013 Technology, How Travelers Use Tech to Plan Travel Movers & Shakers Scalise Named Executive Chef at Seminole Hard Rock Member Benefits David Warriner, Tapper & Co. Properties Safety ADA Pool Lift Requirements: Sink or Swim? Food Safety DBPR Adopts 2009 US FDA Food Code Member Advantage Music Licensing and Your Hospitality Business The Lease Coach How to Negotiate a Lease Renewal Rent Reduction Green Tips Foodservice Operations Save Water, Save Money Membership 2012 Regional Directors Territories ProStart Jobs and ProStart Go Together Social Media Remove the Strings! Build Guest Loyalty with Email SafeStaff Food Manager Training & Texting Schedule

Cover photos Shems Hamilton, Tallahassee, FL

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Introducing

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F L ORIDA RESTAU RANT & L OD GING ASSOCIATION

forecast Andy Reiss Owner, Andrew’s Capital Grill and Bar and Andrew’s 228 FRLA Chairman for 2013

A

ndy Reiss, FRLA’s 2013 Chairman of the Board, has just celebrated 40 years of being in the restaurant business. He has served lunch or dinner to every major politician to work in the Capital City during that time. Andy, and his food, is known and loved by politicians, residents and visitors to Tallahassee. What do you think will be the biggest industry trend in the first half of 2013? I hope that the biggest industry trends will be sustainability in all forms, organic foods and ingredients, a more thoughtful industry towards environmentally-friendly product use, such as biodegradability of paper products, food service and obesity challenges, healthy foods for schools and buying local.

What issue would you most like to see positively addressed by Florida’s Legislature? I would like to see the Florida Legislature pass the preemption bill for mandated paid leave. This is an anti-business issue that could slow Florida’s economic recovery if not corrected during the upcoming Legislative Session. It has been discussed and, thankfully, failed in two counties this year. Another concern with this issue being picked up by the counties is that there could potentially be a different paid leave ordinance for all 67 counties in Florida. In addition, the act of requiring businesses to offer a particular benefit is scary. Where would it end? Mandating a benefit could make hiring new employees more expensive, and potentially, businesses would hire fewer employees. No one wins in that situation.

Andy Reiss

Second, the minimum wage issue is an uphill battle, facing a constitutional amendment, but a concern nonetheless. In order to find good people and keep them, we have to pay them way more than the minimum wage. The tip credit is hurting us. Operators have to pay the servers more and more each year. To run a restaurant it costs much more in Florida due to the tip credit. If I put my Tallahassee “hat” on, I would like to see the “Gift Ban” repealed or modified. This issue is near and dear to my heart, as this initiative has really impacted Tallahassee businesses, and I believe it has negatively impacted the participation of elected and appointed governmental officials with various industries statewide. (continued on page 10)

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Event Calendar 2012-2013

CEO For e c a s t

n FRLA Winter Board Meeting & Installation Gala Wednesday–Friday, January 2-4, 2013 Fontainebleau Resort, Miami, FL

Being an independent owner-operator allows me flexibility and the ability to be at my business every day. I know what is happening. Paying attention and taking care of the details, is what I do. The restaurant business is all about details. Being present every day helps to keeping the management team tight.

For more information: www.frla.org/events

n FRLA Marketing Summit February 5, 2013 – Clearwater, FL n FRLA Legislative Days March 13, 2013 FRLA Headquarters – Tallahassee n FRLA Summer Board Meeting June 10-12, 2013 – Boca Raton Beach Club n FRLA Wild & Crazy Fishing Tournament Summer, 2013 n FRLA Operations Summit July 2013 – Tampa Bay n NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic September 25, 2013 ChampionsGate – Orlando n FRLA Trade Show September 22-24, 2013 Orange County Convention Center – Orlando n FRLA Fall Board Meeting Tentative: September 22-24, 2013 Orange County Convention Center - Orlando n FRLA Big Party September 23, 2013 BB King’s Blues Club – Pointe Orlando

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2013

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your business?

How has participation in FRLA positively affected your business? I don’t pay an alcohol surcharge tax any more thanks to the efforts of FRLA. FRLA, along with a coalition of various industry organizations, has worked to elect business-friendly officials. In addition, the resources FRLA brings to the table with regards to member benefits and merchant services and health insurance rates, among other things, due to FRLA’s purchasing power are highly competitive.

How has your business strategy changed over the last few years? It hasn’t really changed that much in the last

few years even though government has been getting more in the way of business. If you serve delicious food, provide efficient, friendly service, in a clean nice place, people are going to visit your restaurant. This hasn’t changed since my grandfather was in business. Good food, good service, and a nice atmosphere are what you need to be successful in the restaurant business; then your strategy doesn’t need to change.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? Stay involved. If you don’t, government will continue to get into your pocket and your business. As incoming Chairman, I want to be a spokesman for the independent restaurant owner. We are part of the fabric of America. With more than 47,900 restaurants in Florida, independents provide many options to Florida’s visitors and guests. In fact, approximately 71% of Florida’s total food service license population are independent operators.

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G OV ERNMENTA L RE L ATIONS

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association

2013 Legislative Agenda

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n 1946, the Florida Restaurant Association was established to represent the restaurant industry. Since that time, the scope of FRLA’s representation has expanded to include the entire hospitality industry, including lodging establishments, restaurants and thousands of suppliers to the industry. The hospitality industry represents 20% of Florida’s economy. As a 62.4 billion dollar industry, with 3.4 billion dollars collected in sales tax revenue, Florida’s hospitality industry is the largest employer in the state, employing more than 1 million employees. This makes FRLA’s mission: to protect, educate and promote the hospitality industry, not only vital to the industry, but also to critical to the state. With the announcement of the Florida’s new key leadership team, the FRLA has begun work on the 2013 Legislative Agenda. Below is a brief summary of top leadership positions filled by Senate President Don Gaetz and Speaker of the House Will Weatherford followed by FRLA’s top 2013 legislative issues.

of Destination Resort Casinos is certainly not new to the state. Florida voters have rejected the idea of Las Vegas style casinos three times in a 16 year span. Florida is considered one of the most familyfriendly destinations in the world. Florida should not risk decades of hard work in building a wholesome reputation on the dicey proposition of the expansion of gambling. Current thinking is that the legislature will convene a committee to study the issue. FRLA OPPOSES THE EXPANSION OF GAMBLING

IMMIGRATION: Florida Senate

Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto – Majority Leader Sen. Tom Lee – Deputy Majority Leader Sen. Joe Negron – Senate Committee on Appropriations Sen. John Thrasher – Senate Rules Committee Sen. Jack Latvala – Senate Ethics and Elections Committee

Florida House of Representatives:

Rep. Ritch Workman – House Finance and Tax Committee Rep. Jimmy Patronis – House Economic Affairs Committee Rep. Marlene O’Toole – House Education Committee Rep. Richard Corcoran – House Health and Human Services Committee Rep. Dennis Baxley – House Judiciary Committee

MANDATORY PAID “SICK” LEAVE Mandated Paid Leave is a costly new mandate that has been considered by county commissioners of Orange County and Miami-Dade County. Similar measures across the country have mandated that all private sector employers provide to their workers some arbitrary level of paid leave per hours worked. The national groups coordinating this effort have shown disregard for the repercussions, as they push for anti-business mandates that will slow the economic recovery. The issue is not whether paid leave is beneficial or not. There are numerous fringe benefits that are desirable, all of which have costs. The issue is whether businesses should be required to provide a particular benefit. FRLA is concerned mandated paid leave will make hiring workers more w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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expensive and as a result, companies will either hire fewer workers or seek to reduce other costs. FRLA believes issues such as mandated paid leave should not be determined at the county level. With 67 counties in the state of Florida, there could potentially be 67 different paid “sick” leave ordinances for businesses to follow. Many variables come into play that could be extremely burdensome on business. For example, if a business has locations in 30 counties in Florida, they could have 30 different paid leave rules to follow. FRLA OPPOSES MANDATED PAID LEAVE AT THE COUNTY/CITY LEVEL.

DESTINATION RESORT CASINOS “GAMBLING” The issue of Destination Resort Casinos was one of the most lobbied and controversial bills in the 2012 legislative session, which of course, makes it possible for a return in 2013. The issue

With the complete inaction of the federal government, many states are trying to compensate with their own immigration bills. Since 2007, state legislators have considered nearly 7,300 bills and resolutions to reform immigration. Many worry that laws similar to Arizona, Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, South Carolina, and Utah are sending the wrong message. Every state that has passed “immigration reform” has immediately been sued in Federal Court. New state laws passed address nearly every facet of immigration, including how states should handle identification for undocumented immigrants, whether employees should use the federal E-verify system to ensure legal status, and whether schools must verify students’ immigration status. Due to the questionable legal status of most of the immigration bills, FRLA believes that federal lawmakers should address this issue not the states. FRLA BELIEVES THAT WORKING WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT ON A NATIOANAL SOLUTION IS THE BEST WAY TO RESOLVE FLORIDA’S IMMIGRATIN ISSUE.

VISIT FLORIDA FUNDING: Visit Florida is the official tourism marketing corporation for the State of Florida. Visit Florida is not a government agency, but rather a not-for-profit corporation that carries out the work of the Florida Commission on Tourism. Created by the Florida legislature in 1996 as a public/private partnership, Visit Florida receives F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g  

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state funding from a portion of the two-dollarper-day rental surcharge and general revenue. Visit Florida markets to consumers, both in the U.S. and abroad, works with the world’s major travel journalists, represents the state at domestic and international travel trade shows and promotes the state to travel agents, tour operators and consumers all over the world. Visit Florida has numerous programs to help the state’s many tourism businesses and destinations market themselves more effectively and affordably. FRLA SUPPORTS THE FULL FUNDING OF VISIT FLORIDA

HOSPITALITY EDUCATION PROGRAM (HEP) FRLA encourages continued support of funding for the Department of Business and Professional Regulation’s (DBPR) Hospitality Education Program (HEP.) The HEP Program Provides important workforce-related training and transition programs through Florida’s public school system to students interested in pursuing careers in the hospitality industry. The dollars in the Trust Fund are derived from a $10 license surcharge paid exclusively by Florida’s restaurant and lodging establishments for the sole purpose of funding this important program.

Approximately 21,000 students and 200 high schools participate in the HEP Program. This program helps the hospitality industry grow its future workforce by producing a pool of certified and immediately employable workers with the proper skill set to be an asset to the industry. THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING THE HOPSITALITY EDUCATION PROGRAM.

AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES ACT The January 31, 2013 deadline for pool and spa accessibility under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is quickly approaching. In May 2012, the Department of Justice (DOJ) granted a one year extension (to January 31, 2013), and issued two guidance documents related to its interpretation of the requirements for pool and spa accessibility in the 2010 Standard for Accessible Design. According to the current DOJ guidance, by January 31, 2012, all existing pools and spas at lodging facilities must do the following if it is “readily achievable”: • Provide at least one means of entry (pool lift or slopped entry) as long as it is readily achievable; • Pools with 200 linear feet of wall or more must have a pool lift or entry, and one addi-

tional means of entry which can be one of the following: o (1) pool lift; o (2) sloped entry; o (3) transfer system; o (4) transfer wall; or o (5) pool stairs. • Have the pool lift out in position and ready for use all hours the pool is open; • Each body of water (e.g., pools, spas) must have a separate means of entry (except there are special rules for cluster spas). • Pool lifts must be attached to the pool deck or apron in some manner unless it is not readily achievable to affix them;

ONLINE TRAVEL COMPANIES For several years now, competing hospitality interests have been at odds both in Florida and across the country over how taxes should be calculated on hotel rooms obtained over the internet. The dispute revolves around how hotel rooms sold through online travel companies (OTC’s) should be taxed. Internet companies such as Expedia, Travelocity, Priceline, and Orbitz currently pay taxes on only the wholesale rate (what they pay the hotel) rather than on the retail rate (what is charged the customer.) Hotels, who currently pay taxes at the retail rate, argue that online travel companies have an unfair advantage over brick and mortar companies. The Florida Association of Counties estimates that counties are losing $20 million a year in hotel tax revenue due to the discrepancy. FRLA OPPOSES ANY POLICY THAT WOULD PROVIDE ONLINE TRAVEL COMPANIES A SPECIAL TAX ADVANTAGE.

PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT “OBAMA CARE” The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obama Care) was signed into law March 23, 2010, and upheld by a Supreme Court ruling on June 28, 2012. Its stated goal is to reshape America’s health care landscape by expanding health care coverage. For employers, the 2010 health care law mandates some fundamental changes in how their employees obtain health care coverage and is built around dozens of provisions. Some changes are already in place, but the provisions will continue to be enacted over the next several years. Currently, much of the implementation delay is due to lack of federal agencies guidance. 12  D ECEM B ER /JA N UA RY

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COM PL IANCE

Why Do You Need Regulatory Compliance Services? By Eileen Maxham

A

s owners and operators in the hospitality industry, meeting the daily challenges can be tough —employee turnover, menus, food costs, budgets, guest satisfaction, sales growth, expansion, and the list goes on. Of all the challenges, regulatory compliance may be the most confusing and stressful. Regulatory Compliance Services, a division of the FRLA, helps operators stay in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act and maintain employee food handler certification and manager food safety certification. With the former director of Alcoholic Beverages & Tobacco and three former directors of DBPR’s Division of Hotels & Restaurants on staff, RCS proudly boasts that this is our field of expertise. Our goal is to not only keep you informed and compliant, but to save you time and minimize your frustration. The sale of alcoholic beverages is a strictly regulated activity and requires immense due

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diligence on the part of the establishment. RCS Alcohol Compliance Training is the state preferred provider for training under the Florida Responsible Vendor Act (F.S. 561.701-706). Compliance with the act offers substantial benefits including immunity against suspension or revocation of your alcoholic beverage license for certain violations and provides an affirmative defense in the event of a civil lawsuit. RCS training meets the specified requirements including: live tri-annual training meetings, detailed record maintenance, employee background information, establishment employment policy statement and signage. In addition, our professional staff provides consultation and guidance on virtually all legal issues relative to the licensing and sale of alcohol. RCS is the largest and oldest firm of its kind in Florida and has been in the area of risk management for over 25 years. In addition to keeping your establishment in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act, RCS works with owners and managers onsite on a continuous program to certify employees

as food handlers within the state mandated 60 day period. We have experts on staff to answer compliance questions, and we process your documentation with the state on your behalf. Your employee training is consistent, professional and frees the manager from administering the training, which allows him to focus on operations. Another service offered by RCS is the Professional Food Manager Certification with a comprehensive review course and exam, administered in 32 Florida cities. The certification is registered with the National Restaurant Association and qualifies you to operate a food service establishment and to administer employee level training to your staff. The review course and exam is also offered privately for classes of eight or more at your establishment to better accommodate your needs. Don’t allow your alcoholic beverage license to be at risk for suspension or revocation. Contact RCS to discuss how RCS can help you and your business contribute to the overall success of the hospitality industry and the state of Florida. Eileen Maxham is is a Regional Manager for RCS.

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Greg Richie Chef de Cuisine Emeril’s Tchoup Chop Royal Pacific Resort Universal Studios Orlando, Florida

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et in the beautiful Royal Pacific Resort near Universal Studios, Emeril’s Tchoup Chop strives to deliver an exotic Pacific Rim Dining experience that is created with modern and classical cooking techniques. Chef Greg is known for utilizing produce and meats that have been raised with responsibility and care by local farmers whenever possible. Gregory Richie began working in restaurants at age 15 and attended Johnson and Wales University. Chef Greg also worked in operations in the Deep South, training as a butcher, working saute, line cook and saucier. After culinary school, he worked in posts at the front of the house, but returned to the kitchen as sous chef. Chef Greg worked at the Atlanta Athletic Club as Chef de Cuisine, then moved to Hawaii working under Chef Roy Yamaguchi. In July 2000, Chef Greg was among the team that opened Roy’s Restaurant in Orlando, as Executive Chef and Partner. He began to receive accolades for his inspired Hawaiian and Asian fusion cuisine, including “Best New Restaurant in Orlando,” “Best Local Chef,” “Chef of the Year,” and “Best Seafood” restaurant. Drawing upon his experiences in the cultures of Hawaii and the Pacific Islands, and his deep knowledge of modern Asian cooking, Chef Emeril Lagasse enlisted Richie to lead the team at Emeril’s Tchoup Chop in January 2009. As Chef de Cuisine, he shares his exacting skills in the kitchen as both chef and creative leader of Chef Emeril’s Polynesian-Asian restaurant at the Loews Royal Pacific Resort®.

What is the primary inspiration for your menu?

The beauty of our dining room itself is an inspiration to create dishes worthy of it. Of course, nothing can be more inspiring than a farmer bringing something he is truly proud of – Showing off an ultra fresh day boat fish catch, a brilliant crop of little jewel lettuces or some candy sweet heirloom tomatoes!

What are some of your most popular menu items?

Many people love our escargot – Spicy, with notes of lemongrass and Thai basil make it very untraditional and unique. Slow roasted Mongolian Glazed Pork Belly in Chinese Bao with Spicy Kim Chi Slaw is a big hit as well.

What is your “sizzle” – cuisine and food that are your signature or specialties?

I grew up in the South, in Georgia, but also spent time living in Hawaii. All of the diverse peoples that reside in Hawaii make

HotChef? Are You Considered Among 2013 Florida’s Hottest Chefs?

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Chef Greg Richie

for a real melting pot of flavors. Polynesian Influences, Japanese, Korean, Chinese and many more have gone into my palate of flavors to work with. I tie them all together with my knowledge and love of Southern cooking and try to offer something on the menu that will appeal to everybody.

To what do you attribute your success?

Lots of hard work and working for great chefs that took the time to teach me how to do things right. Being fortunate to work with chefs such as Emeril Lagasse that have been there to create opportunities for me to apply myself. And it can’t go without mentioning my hard working staff having great people to work with not only makes this business more pleasurable, it makes it possible.

Your favorite dish?

I go through phases. Right now I am eating a lot of chicken. A few weeks ago I couldn’t get enough pork. But I rarely eat them the same way, even if its on the menu in a way I really love. I think I am often experimenting on myself looking to hit on the next unexpected flavor profile for the next menu change.

Tchoup Chop is such a beautiful restaurant! Please describe the main room if you can for our readers.

When you walk in, your eyes are immediately drawn to the giant waterfall flowing down the rocky wall over the open kitchen. Then you will take in the reflecting pool that runs through the middle of the dining room. The ceiling is very high and there are a number of stunning chandeliers that are made up of hand made glass hibiscus flowers. The bar area is equally lovely as it carries on the theme where the bartenders are crafting the most delicious specialty cocktails..

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to susie@mckinleyhome.com. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. BeF lo sure to include restaurant and contact r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!

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Tailgating with

Emeril

Chef Emeril Lagasse was in Tallahassee for the highly-contested Florida State University vs. University of Florida football game as part of the filming of Emeril’s Florida. Chef Emeril filmed a segment which included a “cookoff” between FSU and UF students, cooking with his son, E.J., and a conversation with Candi Fisher, wife of FSU football coach, Jimbo Fisher, about the Kidz1stFun and Fanconi anemia awareness. After filming, Emeril visited the tailgates of FSU and UF fans. Emeril with Carol and Bruce Craul on the field at Doak Campbell Stadium, with his son (below).

Emeril and Candy Fisher on camera. Emeril with FRLA CEO Carol Dover on the field.

Peter Bos and son, Rick.

Will Seccombe, Visit Florida.

Andy Reiss and Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.

FRLA’s VP of Membership Dan Murphy (right) and friends from IMG. Photos courtesy of Joel Silver Photography and Susie McKinley w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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A L a C a rt e

Mandatory Paid “Sick” Leave Defeated in Miami-Dade County

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uring the third week of November, the first reading of Ordinance 122100 was heard by the Miami-Dade County Commission. This ordinance was introduced by Commissioner Barbara Jordan and would have required mandated paid “sick” leave in Miami-Dade County. The harmful policy was defeated by an 8 to 4 vote. FRLA thanks all members who took the time to educate their local officials of the negative effects such policy has on business. If you have any questions, please contact FRLA headquarters in Tallahassee, Florida, at 888.372.9119 or mgaby@frla.org.

Brock Scholarship Endowment Award Designated to FSU Hospitality Student In memory of its distinguished chairman, FHM Insurance Company partnered with the FRLA Education Foundation in 2008 to establish the James E. Brock scholarship endowment fund. FHM is pleased to announce that Laura Dunham was selected as the 2012 recipient of the $2,500 scholarship. Ms. Dunham is a senior at FSU’s Dedman School of Hospitality Management. She has a 4.0 GPA and currently works at Ted’s Montana Grill. FHM and FRLA congratulate Ms. Dunham for her outstanding achievements which resulted in her scholarship selection.

Top Trends for 2013 The National Restaurant Association’s “What’s Hot in 2013” Each year the NRA conducts a survey of more than 1,800 professional chefs to determine the year’s top menu trends: 1. Locally sourced meats and seafood 2. Locally grown produce 3. Healthful kids’ meals 4. Environmental sustainability as a culinary theme 5. Children’s nutrition as a culinary theme 6. New cuts of meat (e.g. Denver steak, pork flat iron, teres major) 7. Hyper-local sourcing (e.g. restaurant gardens) 8. Gluten-free cuisine 9. Sustainable seafood 10. Whole grain items in kids’ meals 11. Farm/estate branded items 12. Non-wheat noodles/pasta (e.g. quinoa, rice, buckwheat) 13. Non-traditional fish (e.g. branzino, Arctic char, barramundi) 14. Ethnic-inspired breakfast items   (e.g. Chorizo scrambled eggs, coconut milk pancakes) 15. Fruit/vegetable children’s side items 16. Health/nutrition as a culinary theme 17. Half-portions/smaller portions for a smaller price 18. House-made/artisan ice cream 19. Black/forbidden rice 20. Food trucks

Cool Web Pages www.VISITFLORIDA.com If you haven’t seen the VISIT FLORIDA web page lately, take a look! This is a travel planner at your fingertips. With cities, activities, dining, places to stay and features about old and new happenings in and around Florida, this web page is a great marketing tool for your business.

SPANISH FLORIDA TIMELINE

Part 1 of a Series tracking the progress of Florida’s history over the last 500 years. Courtesy of FORUM, the statewide magazine of the Florida Humanities Council, www.FloridaHumanities.org.

1513 Explorer Juan Ponce de León sets foot on land he names La Florida, probably near present-day Melbourne Beach 1521 After serving as governo

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Tr AVEL & TEcHNoLogy Technologies, resources and Services used to Plan Leisure Travel In the past 12 months, which of these have you used to help plan your leisure travel? (Select all that apply) 40

41.3% 41 .0% used user-generated content

24 .6% used social media for travel planning

30

28.4% 23.1%

20

19.1%

16.8%

16.1%

13.4%

13.0%

10

7.8% 0

usergenerated reviews of hotels

usergenerated travel reviews of destinations

usergenerated reviews of restaurants or activities

usergenerated travel itinerary or blog

7.5%

1.3%

3.9%

5.2%

Destination’s liked/Followed Followed Micro- Social photo Social page on destination a city or sharing blogging/ bookFacebook or on Facebook destination Tweeting websites marking other social or other social on Twitter websites media site media site

Source: State of American Traveler, courtesy 40 Miles Media Marketing Destinations, July 2012.

DMO website

TravelMobile phone/PDA related e-mail to access travel info newsletter

Sued for Slip & Fall? 48 .7% used print resources

33.9%

30

Don’t just settle… FIGHT BACK!

28.9% 20

20.8%

13.8%

10

21.9%

21.1%

HIRE THE FLORIDA DEFENDERS TODAY!

18.0% 11.5%

10.6%

13.1%

11.0%

8.0%

9.0%

Travel agent

Travelrelated radio program

4.4%

0

used an group online discount sites mapping site (groupon, specifically to livingSocial, help plan a trip etc .)

Online videos

use a Audio file/ podcasts travel-related app on a mobile device

Opinions Travel-related Travel or Newspaper Commercial DMO of friends, programming lifestyle guidebook print travel colleagues, magazine on TV publication section or relatives

DALE R. HIGHTOWER

Q

When did you use your mobile device for travel information?* TECHNOL OGY (Select all that apply)

DBPR Using iPads for Hotel, Restaurant DUrING a trip(s) Inspections

*Asked only of those using mobile phone/PDA to access travel information

I

78.5%

Q

TERRA D. WILHELM

Direct mail piece

CHRISTOPHER STRATTON

Which of the following did you specifically do using your mobile device?*

Find restaurant information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55.0% Check weather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52.3% look at maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42.9% Find hotel information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41.4% use a gPS-related app for directions . . . . . . . . . . .40.0% Find shopping information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34.9% (Select all that apply) Find sightseeing or attractions information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26.6% * Asked only of those using Check into a flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19.6% mobile phone/PDA to Check into a hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11.4% access travel information get a mobile boarding pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.9% LEE A. KANTOR DANIEL M. NOVIGROD Research public transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10.7% Check out of a hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.0% use a destination-specific app for travel information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2% Buy tickets (to an event, festival, museum, etc .) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.7%

f you see your inspector working with new technology your establishment, don’t be 63.0% BeForein I left home for a trip(s) Defending Florida Hotels & Restaurants Since 1983 surprised. The Department of Business and Miami-Dade Ft. Lauderdale The Keys Palm Beach Martin St. Lucie Professional Regulation’s (DBPR) Division 4770 Biscayne Blvd. Suite 1200 330 Clematis Street Suite 201 of Hotels and Restaurants has begun to utilize Miami, FL 33137 West Palm Beach FL 33401 Fax 305.530.0661 561.833.2022 Fax 561.833.2140 methodology The State of the American Traveler Survey six months by Destination Analysts, Inc, a San Francisco-based tourism industry research company . iPads for restaurant and lodging inspection in is conducted every305.539.0909 The survey is conducted online amongst a nationally representative sample of adultTallahassee Americans . From june 14th through june 21st, 2012, surveys were collected from a group of Orlando Jacksonville November 2012. North Florida was first to use St. Petersburg Tampa Ft. Myers respondents who were then screened by their leisure travel behavior . Only those who had traveled purely leisure or personal 7380 respondents Sand Lake Road Suite 395 at least once in the past 12 months 200for Central Avenue Suite 450 St. thereasons iPad were withinterviewed . Central Florida and South Florida Orlando, FL 32819 This travel must have been of at least 50 miles one-way — the standard distance threshold used in the tourism industry to signify that a “trip” been taken . Petersburg, FL has 33701 Fax 407.352.4201 727.209.1373 Fax 727.209.1383 following. This initiative bethe beneficial tothis sample size, the407.352.4240 In total, 1,000 leisure travelersshould completed survey . With topline data presented here can be considered to have a reliability of +/- 3 .1% . both inspector and licensee. PA g E 4

WWW. HIGHTOWERLAW. NET Destination Analysts, Inc. j u ly 2 0 1 2

as governor of Puerto Rico, Ponce leads a colonizing expedition to the Gulf Coast. wounded by Calusa Indians HE retreats to Havana, where he dies

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GL OB A L MARKETING

Asian-American Guests Welcomed at Seminole Hard Rock With Opening of Asian Gaming Room, Noodle Bar

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n recognition of the growth and importance of their Asian American casino guests, the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tampa is creating its first gaming area and accompanying noodle bar focused specifically on the burgeoning Central Florida Asian market. With the English name “Jubao Palace” and the Chinese name “Ju Bao Ting,” or “gathering hall for treasure,” the new gaming complex will include a mix of 17 tables for games most popular among Asian players: Mini-Baccarat, Pai Gow Poker, Asia Poker and Blackjack. At its entrance, Jubao Palace will also display its Vietnamese name; “Quán Tim Vàng,” which means a “parlor for seeking gold.” It will be open to all casino guests. In addition to its outreach to Chinese American and Vietnamese American casino guests, the Seminole Hard Rock is also reaching out to individuals from many other Asian communities in Florida, including Korean, Japanese, Cambodian, and Filipino gamers. Team members who work in Jubao Palace will be able to converse with customers in each of the major

Asian languages. Seminole Hard Rock created two additional web landing pages for the Chinese and Vietnamese guest who prefers to read in their native languages: http://seminolehardrocktampa. com/chinese or ... /vietnamese. Jubao Palace is slated to open in mid-December as part of a significant upgrade to many parts of the casino, which has grown to become the fourth largest casino in the United States and the sixth largest in the world. Multiple entrances to the 4,000 sq. ft. Asian gaming room are located on one side of the main casino floor, near the original porte cochere entrance to the Seminole Hard Rock. Jubao Palace will also include a 15-seat noodle bar featuring high quality, authentic Asian cuisine and open to both the Asian gaming room and the main casino floor. The noodle bar at Jubao Palace features dishes such as Beef Pho, Roast Duck, Fried Dumplings, XO Seafood Fried Rice, Cahr Siu Pork and Baby Bok Choy. “We are honored to invite our many friends from Florida’s Asian communities to enjoy a gaming and entertainment environment created

Visit Florida ROI Rises in 2012 Each year, VISIT FLORIDA conducts a survey to determine the return on investment from our annual advertising campaign. Results: VISIT FLORIDA’s spring 2012 advertising efforts generated $258 in traveler spending and $15 in new sales tax revenue for every $1 of advertising spent. These figures are up from $177 and $11, respectively, in 2010. The advertising was focused in seven spot markets: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and, new this year, Detroit. VISIT FLORIDA’s strategic selection of these seven key markets resulted in an increase in travel from all the spot markets.

especially for them,” said Anthony Patrone, VP of Marketing & Player Development at Seminole Hard Rock Tampa, one of Seminole Gaming’s seven Florida casinos. “From the selection of games to the interior design and noodle bar menu options, Jubao Palace is designed to make them feel right at home.”

Census Data Supports Asian Market Outreach

Data from the 2010 U.S. Census shows strong growth among Floridians who identify themselves as Asian alone or Asian in combination with another race. According to U.S. Census results, 573,083 Floridians are Asian, up from 333,013 in 2000, an increase of 72.1 percent. The national Asian American population increased 46 percent during the same period, the highest percentage of growth of any U.S. Census classification. Asian Americans now make up three percent of the total Florida population, according to the U.S. Census. “The numbers, alone, show a huge opportunity to build business from Florida’s Asian communities,” said Patrone. “But it’s not just the numbers. Since the Seminole Hard Rocks opened in 2004 and table games like Baccarat were added in 2008, we’ve seen strong response from many Asian American players. Our goal is to continue to build this business.”

Asian-themed Promotions and Special Events

More Asian themed promotions and special events are planned. The Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tampa also plans to develop a marketing program geared to tourists who travel to U.S. gaming destinations from many Asian nations. For decades, Las Vegas has seen a major influx of tourists from China, Japan and elsewhere in Asia. And the Chinese island of Macau, near Hong Kong, is now the world’s leading gaming travel destination. The opening of Jubao Palace in Tampa marks the first entry into the Asian gaming market at any of the seven Florida casinos operated by Seminole Gaming, although the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Hollywood also sees a significant representation of Asian casino guests.

SPANISH FLORIDA TIMELINE

Part 1 of a Series tracking the progress of Florida’s history over the last 500 years. Courtesy of FORUM, the statewide magazine of the Florida Humanities Council, www.FloridaHumanities.org.

1528 The expedition of Pánfilo de Narváez is blown ashore near Tampa Bay. Lost, the group wanders around the Gulf Coast and arrives eight years

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Mov e r s & Sh a k e r s

Scalise Named Executive Chef at Hollywood Florida’s Seminole Hard Rock David Scalise has been named executive chef at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. In his new position, Scalise is responsible for directing culinary operations of the entire resort including Banquets and Catering, Council Oak Steaks & Seafood Restaurant, Blue Plate Restaurant, The Beach Club and the Constant Grind coffee shop at South Florida’s award-winning casino and entertainment destination. Scalise possesses over 24 years of hotel and kitchen management and catering experience from some of the most prestigious resorts across the nation. He joins Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Hollywood from the award-winning Sawgrass Golf Resort & Spa in Ponte Vedra, Florida where he also served as an executive chef directing a culinary team of 60 and overseeing nine restaurants plus a high volume banquet operation. Prior to working with Sawgrass, Scalise was executive chef with the four-diamond Laguna Cliffs Marriott Resort & Spa in Dana Point, California and the Radisson Resort & Spa in Scottsdale, Arizona where he oversaw 12 hotels in a five state region that generated food and beverage revenues in excess of $40 million. He has also worked at the Grand Geneva Resort & Spa in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin and at the Lodge of the Four Seasons Resort & Spa in Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri. He is a member of the Chaine des Rotisseurs, American Culinary Federation and Slow Foods.

Speidel Promoted at Hilton Fort Lauderdale Kevin Speidel, former Managing Director of the Casa Marina and The Reach in Key West, Florida has been promoted Area Managing Director for Hilton Worldwide Hotels & Resorts in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. In this role, Speidel will manage the daily operations of the Hilton Fort Lauderdale and will oversee the five properties in the area: Hilton Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort, GALLERYone, a DoubleTree Suites by Hilton; Bahia Mar Fort Lauderdale Beach, a DoubleTree by Hilton and Embassy Suites Fort Lauderdale. With 25 years in the business, Speidel has held many positions in the hospitality industry: assistant housekeeper, front office director, resident manager and other management positions with Marriott and Interstate Hotels Corporate, as well as, Hilton Brands.

Dine Out for No Kid Hungry Was a Huge Success in 2012! Dine Out for No Kid Hungry, a nationwide Share Our Strength fundraising and hunger awareness event, was held throughout the month of September 2012. This event raised $5.7 million dollars; $700,000 over the goal of $5,000,000.00. Nationally, 8,292 restaurants participated, up from 5,561 participating restaurants in 2011.

MEM BER BENE F ITS

David Warriner

President, Tapper & Co. Properties Port Inn, MainStay Suites by Choice Hotels, The Thirsty Goat Port Saint Joe, Florida

Question: What do you feel are the benefits of being a member of FRLA? Answer: I find the true benefits of membership are the people in the industry from around the State I get to meet and share experiences with. Being in both the hotel and food and beverage business, FRLA provides one stop with such a wealth of knowledge and experience. FRLA offers me that opportunity. Not just experience, but experience on the highest levels. Members of the FRLA are leaders in their respective industries, if not at the present, they often will be! Also, FRLA staff is the most knowledgeable anywhere. I have yet to be faced with an issue, pertinent to industry, that staff has not helped me with a solution. Lastly, we are faced with more challenges today from our government than ever before. The FRLA is the ultimate vehicle to address these attacks, and they do so very well!

ight years later in Mexico City 1539 Hernando de Soto lands near Tampa Bay with nearly 600 men. They trek THRU what is now the southeastern U.S.

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SA F ET Y

ADA Pool Lift Requirements

Sink or Swim? By Mark Bonfanti

W

ith the presidential election in the rearview mirror, businesses throughout Florida can now set their sights on 2013 and the updated regulations under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Although adopted sometime ago, the new regulatory provisions are officially enforced on January 31, 2013. Although there are a variety of provisions applicable to varying types of facilities (hotels/ health clubs/recreation centers/country clubs), FRLA members must pay particular attention to public accessibility requirements for swimming pools, wading pools, and spas. Below is some guidance on how you can prepare your business for the forthcoming regulations and how to properly apply these provisions to existing public facility pools. Employers should utilize the extra time afforded to employers by the Department to understand impacts on individual facilities, and what action plans are necessary for compliance. While the next few months will quickly pass, there is ample flexibility to allow compliance without unnecessary and excessive expenditures.

Readily Achievable Accessibility

Title III of the ADA mandates that newly constructed or renovated (after March 15, 2012) swimming pools, wading pools, and spas must be accessible to disabled individuals. Additionally, any pre-existing facilities must be handicapped accessible and accessibility barriers must also be removed where it is “readily achievable” to do so. The phrase “readily achievable” should, to a certain degree, alleviate our members’ greater concern with respect to existing swimming pools in place prior to the new rule’s effective date. Readily achievable in this case, means that providing access is easily accomplished without much difficulty or expense. As a result, each entity must examine its specific situation, examine economics, safety concerns, construction feasibility, and make a determination as to whether compliance is readily achievable. It is important to note that the existence of a franchisor/franchisee relationship does not require a review of the franchisor’s finances to determine whether modifications are readily achievable. In cases where it is not readily achievable 20  D ECEM B ER /JA N UA RY

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or economically feasible to install pool lifts or remove barriers, then installation of a fixed pool lift is not required, and a non-fixed lift may be an available remedy. Fixed versus non-fixed pool lifts, refers specifically to an entity’s ability to affix the pool lift to the pool deck, therefore a “portable” lift can be modified from non-fixed to fixed when it is readily achievable. Non-fixed lifts purchased prior to the 2012 effective date are still permitted, but lifts purchased after this date must be fixed. However, if access is not readily achievable even via a fixed or non-fixed lift, the employer does not need to make any changes. It is still recommended that facilities explore options in the event that circumstances change and pool lift installation becomes readily achievable.

Available Tax Credits

Many business owners are concerned with the costs associated with pool lift changes and the detrimental business impacts. These concerns

are well placed as modifications to barriers and adding pool lifts are costly investments. Thankfully, there is some tax relief from this governmental mandate. Small businesses with total revenues of $1,000,000 or less in the previous tax year or 30 or fewer full-time employees are eligible for a tax credit that can cover 50% of the eligible access expenditures in a year up to $10,250 (maximum credit of $5000). Tax credits may be utilized for barrier removal and other accessibility improvements. All other businesses may take a deduction of up to $15,000 per year to cover the costs associated with barrier removal or alterations.

Penalties for Noncompliance

The Department favors voluntary compliance with all ADA provisions. However, civil lawsuits and monetary penalties may be enforced if an entity does not adhere to the aforementioned guidelines. Mark Bonfanti is an attorney in Tallahassee, Florida.

DBPR Adopts 2009 US FDA Food Code

E

ffective January 1, 2013, the Division of Hotels and Restaurants, Department of Business and Professional Regulation, will adopt the United States Food and Drug Administration’s 2009 Food Code. Compliance with the new Food Code has been announced with an Industry Advisory issued by the Division, a copy of which is included in this Magazine, and which also can be found on both the FRLA and DBPR web page. Many of the food safety initiatives required by the 2009 Food Code have been slowly incorporated into current standards, so many of the new requirements mandated by this new Food Code have already been put into service by many licensees and members FRLA SafeStaff training materials for both the food protection manager and foodhandler have been revised to incorporate 2009 Food Code requirements, as have ServeSafe materials. Adoption of the 2009 Food Code will in no way invalidate current training or certification issued by FRLA or ServeSafe. Candidates will simply be trained or examined on new requirements when training or certificates are renewed. Highlights of the 2009 US FDA Food Code include: Food safety priorities will be redefined; cut leafy greens will be considered temperature control for safety foods / potentially hazardous foods; food allergen awareness training will be required of all employees; and hamburger must be cooked to correct temperature for items on children’s menus. “Florida continues to lead the nation with its pro-active measures in keeping 19 million residents and 86 million tourists safe through stringent food safety guidelines when dining in Florida’s hotels and restaurants,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. “The adoption of the 2009 Food Code by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation will further improve upon regulatory compliance, and members of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association look forward to implementing these common sense procedures. For more information about additional requirements, please visit www.FRLA.org.

F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

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HONORS

APD Award recipients (above): Ms. Lenne Nicklaus-Ball, Vice President of Sirata Resort; Operational Staffing Senior Representative Sherri Meyer; Senior Manager of Diversity and Inclusion Angela Lagos Universal Orlando Resort; APD Director Barbara Palmer; Joyce Hildreth, Director of Blind Services Aleisa McKinley, Director of Vocational Rehabilitation; Florida Governor Rick Scott.

State Recognizes Disability-Friendly Hospitality Companies The state of Florida recognized several businesses and FRLA members recently, for being exceptional employers of people with disabilities. October is Disability Employment Awareness Month and as part of this celebration, the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, Blind Services, and Vocational Rehabilitation presented the Exceptional Employer Awards to honor businesses for commitment to hiring people with disabilities. Miller’s Ale House (Daytona Beach), Sirata Beach Resort and Conference Center (St. Petersburg) and Universal Orlando Resort (Orlando) were honored by APD. Florida Governor Rick Scott noted, “Employment is one of my top priorities as most people know, and that includes people with disabilities. I am happy to see so many businesses that are inclusive of all individuals in their company’s workforce. There is always an opportunity to be more inclusive. I hope additional companies will follow suit and be open to considering all people who can compete for a position.” APD Director Barbara Palmer said, “I am excited to be able to recognize these Florida companies who give people of all abilities a w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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chance at employment. These business leaders confirm what we have known for years that individuals with disabilities provide a great return on their investment. These employees are dedicated to their employers and wouldn’t dream of missing work because their job means so much to them.” Daytona Beach

Miller’s Ale House

This restaurant has four employees with disabilities of the nearly 50 individuals on its payroll—that is almost 10 percent of employees have disabilities. Most of these people have visual disabilities and work as silverware rollers. This employer has developed job opportunities to capitalize on the employee’s talents, and they have also made accommodations when needed. St. PeteRSBURG

Sirata Beach Resort and Conference Center

Sirata Beach Resort and Conference Center of St. Petersburg currently employs 11 people with disabilities. The hotel partners with

Vincent House which helps individuals with mental health issues enter the workforce. Sirata Beach Resort has employed more than 26 people with disabilities in the past four years. This business has a dedicated commitment to help those with disabilities go to work. Orlando

Universal Orlando Resort

Universal hires many, many people with all types of disabilities in its workforce of 12,000. Universal ensures that proper accommodations are made, including having on staff American Sign Language Interpreters for employees with hearing loss. Universal purchased a video relay interpreting service and placed it at high traffic areas for guests and team members if an ASL interpreter was not immediately available. They have exceeded expectations with assisting people with visual disabilities, with more than a dozen people with vision loss hired in the past five years. To get involved or for more information about the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, visit APDcares.org or call toll-free 1 866 APD CARES (1 866 273 2273). F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g  

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I ncoming F R L A C hairman

Andy Reiss Florida’s Hospitality Keystone By Susie McKinley

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ndrew (Andy) Reiss, FRLA’s 2013 Incoming Chairman of the Board, has been involved in the Florida Restaurant Association (FRA), now the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA), for nearly a lifetime. Andy is the first Chairman of the Board from Tallahassee. Opening a restaurant in the shadow of Florida’s State Capitol as a young man in Tallahassee, Florida, Andy became involved in FRA to better understand the hospitality industry and to have a “voice” in the industry’s direction. He helped to start the Tallahassee FRA chapter almost 40 years ago and served as the

Tallahassee area Chapter President for five years. FRLA’s President and CEO, Carol Dover noted “Andy has been an active member of our association for decades and that is truly remarkable when you look at the duration of involvement of other independent operators. Staying active at the level that Andy has, in a demanding association such as this takes determination, time management, responsibility and a true concern for the direction of Florida’s hospitality industry. Andy has demonstrated all of these qualities during his years of participation in FRLA.” From the “grass roots” level, Andy’s role with the Association grew, and he has sat on the FRA / FRLA Board of Directors and the Executive F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

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There is no question Andy is an industry icon, not only for the exceptional food and service he brings to the table, but also for his community involvement, and association leadership throughout our great state.” — Carol Dover

Committee for many of his years of participation at the state level. In fact, Andy has been on the Board or Executive Committee for every major decision the Association has taken since the early 1990’s: • The move of FRA’s offices from Hollywood, Florida which assisted in placing FRA as one of the primary advocates for business in the state of Florida. • The sale of the Association’s trade show, which was a brilliant move in establishing the stability of the Association. • The incorporation of the Florida Hotel and Motel Association into the Association, creating the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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• The purchase of training partner, Regulatory Compliance Services. Every one of these moves was a “winner”. FRLA President and CEO, Carol Dover, said about the Association’s move to Tallahassee, “In the restaurant industry we say the three major things that matter are: location, location, location. To me, Andy’s vision of bringing the FRLA headquarters to Tallahassee from Hollywood, Florida will be one of his greatest legacies. “FRLA has been able to be a vital part of Tallahassee and make critical improvements to the industry as a whole because we now reside

steps away from the Florida Capitol in the most ideal location!” she said. It is no surprise to anyone that Andy is the Association’s incoming Chairman. It was bound to happen. He is active in so many aspects of the Tallahassee community and the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. Andy notes, “I’m that kind of guy.” As a community advocate having participated in local activities since opening his business in Tallahassee, particularly those reinvigorating the downtown area, Andy, along with other business colleagues, created the successful Tallahassee Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, currently known as Visit Tallahassee. Andy also currently chairs the Downtown F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g  

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The Reiss Family (left to right) Andy, Maxin, Aly, Baby Jonah, Dana and Justin Goodman, Aly’s husband.

Redevelopment Commission and sits on Tallahassee Downtown Improvement Authority. All of these organizations continue to greatly benefit the Tallahassee area. Andy has also been involved in public service on the State level. Appointed by four different governors, he has served on the Florida Hotel and Restaurant Advisory Council (FHRAC) for more than 24 years in various capacities, including Chairman. As a member of FHRAC, Andy was the kind of member that would see issues clearly and provide the very best advice to agency heads and appointed officials. Andy’s value to the FHRAC didn’t stop there, in fact, as a “hands-on” independent owner-operator, Andy’s opinion was critical in providing his unique perspective as a representative for this large group of DBPR’s licensees. Andy’s leadership and input to FHRAC and for many years was looked to as the Council’s historian. Former Director of the Division of Hotels and Restaurants and now FRLA’s Vice President of Education and Training, Geoff Luebkemann, shared, “Andy has always seen the critical importance of engaging the wider world outside his restaurant’s doors. As a regulator, his willing participation in formal and informal industry-regulatory dialog was extremely valuable to me

Andrew’s 228 is a special event and destination restaurant. Residents and visitors to Tallahassee have enjoyed birthdays, engagements and anniversaries and other special nights at 228 since opening in 1998. And, the food is good! Andy’s restaurants have won Florida Trend’s Golden Spoon Award 27 consecutive years - first with Andrew’s 2nd Act and continuing with 228. Dan Murphy, FRLA’s Vice Good food, good service, clean President of Membership said, “Andy place, stay invested and rooted in is the classic restaurant veteran. He, your business. Don’t worry about like a handful of other independent restaurateurs, has somehow navithe competition. Worry about gated through a very tough business what’s on your plate. the last 40 years. He is experienced, — Andy Reiss knowledgeable and successful – but what I admire about Andy is his compassion for people, community in ensuring we understood how our actions and the restaurant industry. He is the perfect would impact business,” he said. FRLA member.” “As a FRLA team member, that same Andy’s old friend, Van Poole, a former state commitment means our industry benefits senator, state agency head and chairman of the from Andy’s invaluable voice and experience RPOF notes, “I have always said he (Andy) was regardless of the issue, even if it means dashthe greatest example of the free enterprise sysing to the Capitol during lunch in an apron,” tem; to start with a tiny little deli on the corner Luebkemann continued. of Adams in the early 1970’s to becoming the Andy Reiss has said it is important to keep very successful business that it is today. Andy up with the times, to stay current, and Andy now has over 40+ years serving Tallahassee has proved that statement to be true with his through hard work, dedication and a successful business. remodel now and then.” Andy was born in China, after his parents’ ver the past 40 years, Andy emigration to that country during World War has operated or continues II. Andy’s father escaped from Vienna, Austria to operate the following and his mother and her family fled Berlin. Tallahassee-based restaurants: The His parents met in Shanghai and fell in love. Deli, the Brass Rail, Andrew’s 2nd Act, After Andy’s birth, the Chinese Communists Maxin’s, Tutto Bene, Epicurean Catering, began to take hold in China, and the family Andrew’s Upstairs, Andrew’s North, Trio, again escaped to the United States. currently Andrew’s Capital Grill and Bar Andy, his brother, Jimmy, and mother and Andrew’s 228. Located on Adams Street, emigrated to the United States, but Andy’s one block from Florida’s Capitol, The Grill father was not given a visa and was unable to is a great place to relax, eat lunch, and enjoy leave Shanghai until the very last ship left the good fast-casual style food. country. The family was finally reunited in Andrew’s Capital Grill and Bar is known Cleveland, Ohio at a relative’s home. state-wide for its sandwiches and salads. Andy Andy’s father, Hans Reiss, was an enterhas named many of his popular menu items tainer and pianist, playing piano in clubs in after politicians and famous faces around Cleveland, Ohio and Miami, Florida. When it Tallahassee. From the “Marco Cubio” Cuban was time for the family to settle down, the famSandwich to the “Dover” California Salad and ily put down permanent roots in Miami where the “Jeb” Burger, Andy has got Florida’s movers Andy and his brother attended school. Andy’s and shakers covered.

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IN THE BEGINNING … there was the Deli.

Which begat The Brass Rail, which begat Andrew’s 2nd Act, which begat Maxin’s, which begat Tutto Bene, which begat Epicurean Catering, which begat Andrew’s Upstairs, which begat Andrew’s North, which begat Trio, which begat Andrew’s Capital Grill & Bar, which –  finally – begat Andrew’s 228. And it was all good. — Tallahassee Magazine, September, October 2012

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afforded him the opportunity father became the maître d’ at the to know all of the members of Carillon Hotel in Miami Beach. the Florida Legislature and other Andy grew up in the hospitality governmental officials because his industry. Working as a young man restaurant is their favorite place to at the Carillon, Andy held many have lunch and dinner. His very jobs gaining valuable experience: successful catering operation has dishwasher, busboy, front-desk clerk, served folks from Tallahassee and cabana boy and valet. beyond. When Andy went to college, he He is close to the politics and started at the University of Florida understands it better than just as an accounting major, but after about anyone else. I love his style a couple of years, he transferred as he sits back and listens, thinks, to Florida State University in and then articulates his thoughts Tallahassee and started in the hotel in a meaningful manner that and restaurant management proeveryone in our business undergram. (Clockwise from top) Fontainebleau Hotel, Al Gardner, A&L Associates, stands. Andy and Maxin Munchick, and JOE’S Stone Crab (South Beach). (Susie McKinley photo). He will be an awesome were dating at the time and after Chairman, and I know that we graduation were married. After their will see a surge of entrepreneurs marriage, Andy and Max spent a from our restaurant side of the year traveling throughout Europe, industry joining our organizaeven working in a Swiss hotel and tion as they witness first-hand his restaurant, Hotel Bellevue in San passion for the business and his Bernardino, to help pay for their Along with the induction of Andrew Reiss as FRLA’s 2013 ability to stress the importance of trip. Chairman of the Board, FRLA has announced the 2013 being part of the FRLA.” Upon their return to the US, honorees for Hotelier of the Year, Restaurateur of the Year Dave Reid, 2011 FRLA Andy and Max first moved to Aspen and Supplier of the Year. The Fontainebleau Hotel in Miami Chairman of the Board, is also where Andy was a cook with the Beach has been named Hotelier of the Year. This legendary looking forward to Andy’s chairWeiner Stube and then to north of property has been open since 1954. Joe’s Stone Crab, celemanship saying, “I would like to San Francisco, Cotati, in Petaluma brating 100 years in 2013, will be honored as the Restaurateur of the Year. Supplier of the Year is A & L Associates, the take this opportunity to congratuCounty, also known as the Russian hospitality management consulting firm known for its “Secret late Andy Reiss as the 2013 FRLA River area, famous today for worldShopper” programs, business plans, market research and hosChairman of the Board. class wineries. pitality management consulting. “I’ve always been impressed Andy and Max enjoyed life until with Andy Reiss’s dedication to Andy was recruited into the restauthe FRLA and to our industry. rant business by Winn Simpson, a Andy offers endless experience, Tallahassee area stockbroker and Watercolor to vacation and are planning to integrity and intellect and is a true businessman who they knew from build a home in Seagrove in the near future. credit to this Association. I am certain that their years in Tallahassee. FRLA members and leadership are excited Andy will prove to be a great Chairman and Mr. Simpson owned the corner where for Andy to become FRLA’s Chairman. CEO a tremendous asset to the FRLA members. Andy’s restaurants still stand and wanted Dover is thrilled for Andy and noted, “I realCongratulations Andy!” Andy to open a restaurant. Andy opened the ly look to him as a mentor and special friend. Dan Enea, President and COO of Deli and was wildly successful bringing true We have shared so many life memories, and I Sunshine Restaurant Partners, said, deli foods to Tallahassee. look forward to making more in the future.” “Congratulations Andy! I am very happy for Andy and Max have two daughters and a Bruce Craul, current FRLA Chairman and you, well deserved. You are a great leader for grandchild. Aly, a doctor with the Centers for soon to be immediate past Chairman said, the FRLA: you represent our industry at the Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, and her “I am really looking forward to Andy’s term highest level. Every restaurant in Florida has husband, Justin have a son, Jonah. Jonah is as chairman. Andy exemplifies the entreprebenefited from your ability to communicate Andrew’s and Maxin’s first grandchild. neurial spirit of our industry and represents our industry concerns to the many legislaTheir other daughter, Dana, also found those in our industry that are hands-on, tors that you regularly communicate with. her way into the hospitality industry, as a National Sales Manager for Gaylord National independent operators that consistently deliv- I appreciate your years of dedication to our er quality food with quality service.” industry,” said Enea. in Washington, DC. The Reiss family enjoys Andy’s location, as most of you know, has going to the northern gulf-coast town of

FRLA Honors 2013 Hotelier, Restaurateur and Supplier of the Year

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F R L A M e m be r A dva n tag e

Music Licensing for Your Hospitality Business

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ost people never give a thought to how songwriters earn a living until they operate a business that plays music in public. Sooner or later, these business owners have to search out facts about copyright law. Representing more than 550,000 songwriters and copyright owners, BMI is the primary source of income for composers who supply half the songs and musical works performed in America. Following are some frequently asked questions regarding copyrighted music: Q: If I bought my CDs in a retail store, can I play them anywhere I want?

A: Buying a CD doesn’t convey the legal right to play it in a business or public place. You must get permission from songwriters or their performing rights organization to play music in a business.

Q: If I have a contract with SiriusXM, do I still need a music license? A: SiriusXM is licensed by BMI. As long as

SiriusXM is used for background music ONLY,

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and your contract with the music provider is a commercial account, then your music use may be covered. A business owner must purchase a BMI license when a satellite radio unit under a consumer account is played in a business. Also, if your establishment charges admission, has dancing, and/or plays additional music such as iPods, CDs, DJs, live music, karaoke, etc, then your establishment must purchase a BMI license. Q: f I play music from a customer’s iPod and/or a MP3 Player in my business, do I need a music license?” A: Music played from iPods and/or MP3

Players is another form of recorded music. The proprietor is responsible for obtaining a BMI license when such recorded music is played by customers or employees. Q: Aren’t songwriters already earning big bucks with concert tours and T-shirt sales? Why do they need my hardearned money? A: Most songwriters are unknown to the

Q&A

public. They don’t tour or sell concessions. The average songwriter doesn’t earn a living wage from songwriting royalties. Many songwriters earn most of their income from the public performance of their music. Q: If I already pay one performing rights organization for the music I use, do I need permission from anybody else? A: Songwriters choose one of three perform-

ing rights organizations to represent them. That organization can license only the music of its affiliated songwriters.

Q: I have heard that the companies that collect for music licensing don’t pay the songwriters, so why should I pay them? A: Founded in 1939, BMI operates as a

non-profit making performing right organization. After deducting administrative fees, BMI pays out more than 85% of revenue collected to affiliated songwriters and copyright owners. More questions? Visit www.bmi.com/ede.

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T h e L e a se C oac h

How to Negotiate a Lease Renewal Rent Reduction for Restaurant Tenants

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By Dale Willerton

relationship with. Obtain the Landlord’s Lease Proposal. I don’t believe in negotiating on the first date. I prefer to discuss the lease renewal with the property manager and invite a proposal. This puts me in a position to counter-offer and negotiate on behalf of the commercial tenant I am working for. Most of the negotiating process will take place verbally – but only after the lease renewal proposal or document has been provided by the landlord. Submit the Counter Offer to Your Landlord. Multiple counGet organized and do your homework. Beginning the lease teroffers from both parties are part of the lease renewal process. If you try renewal process should start 12 months in advance for restaurant tenants to slam-dunk the lease renewal too quickly your attempts for a rent reducleasing commercial space. In most cases, you should not need to exercise tion will probably fail. We recently negotiated a lease renewal for a client your Lease Renewal Option Clause provided there has been a dialogue who was pleasantly surprised how effective this strategy is. We deliberately with your landlord and it has been established that the landlord wants you slowed down the process and renegotiated every single term in the formal to stay for another term. lease agreement that needed to be revisited, not just the rental rate. Talk to Other Tenants in your Building. Valuable information Negotiate, Negotiate, Negotiate. Negotiate to win. Most restaucan be gathered by talking with your neighbouring tenants. I will interrant tenants are not negotiating to win at all … they are negotiating not view tenants to gather information and to determine their future plans. to lose. The landlord and/or the landlord’s representatives are negotiating If other tenants are not planning to renew their lease, thereby creating to win and you must do so as well. The Lease Coach uses various creative more vacant space in the property, you will have more leverage. If another means to make this deal work. Remember, that if you leave, the landlord tenant has renewed his/her lease, the rental rate he/she agreed to pay will gets a vacant space. It is extremely expensive for a landlord to replace an likely factor into the rental rate the landlord expects you to pay. existing tenant. Create Competition for your Tenancy. So many restaurant If the landlord is giving lease inducements (e.g. free rent and/or tenant tenants go straight to their landlord regarding their lease renewal. At The allowances) to attract new tenants moving in, we believe that the landlord Lease Coach, we like to create competition for our tenant clients. Instead should offer those same incentives to you to entice you to stay. You are the of handing over your lease renewal to your landlord on a silver platter, we repeat customer. You have the track record of paying rent. find alternative locations and solicit lease proposals from other landlords Then, we start counter offering. A good boxing match doesn’t go two as a means of making your existing landlord re-earn your tenancy (even if rounds; it goes 12 – 15 rounds. Remember, this is not an event … this is a you don’t want to move). process. Some of the best deals we get for commercial tenants take four to Approach Your Landlord and Your Property Manager. six months. When we counter offer, we will often throw in a few red herConfirm your landlord contact and make sure you are negotiating with rings – things that we don’t really care about and can readily give away as the right person. You may have entered into the lease agreement negotiatpart of the “give and take” proces ing with a commercial real estate agent for the landlord’s in-house repreNegotiate and ask for more than you expect to get. I sentative; however, most lease renewal agreements are negotiated with a remember getting one tenant 12 months of free rent on a five-year lease property manager who you may or may not have a good, bad or otherwise term. When asked how I did this, I explained that I had asked for 18 months free rent. Conclude the lease renewal process by signing the Lease Renewal Document or, if it doesn’t work out, you still have time left to relocate. Ideally, you have done all of this in six months and given yourself a cushion. Often, we negotiate lease renewals for tenants up to 24 months in advance and get rent reductions as well. You don’t have to wait until the end of your lease term and if your landlord is stalling you, this generally means that he’s got a rent increase in mind for your renewal term. Contact FRLA to solve compliance issues at 866-372-7233 or www.SafeStaff.org Dale Willerton is The Lease Coach.

uccessful site selection means more than “location, location, location”! As The Lease Coach, I have coached and consulted to many restaurant tenants and found numerous issues are often overlooked in choosing commercial space to lease:

Out of Compliance?

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GREEN TI PS

Foodservice Operations Save Water, Save Money

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According to the National Restaurant Association, 44% of adults say they are likely to make a restaurant choice based on its green practices. Customers who live an environmentallyfriendly lifestyle will make an effort to support and frequent restaurants that do the same. Plus, many surveys show younger customers—particularly Millenials and Moms—are among the most interested in patronizing businesses with strong records of environmental stewardship. In addition, employees are often the biggest supporters of an employer’s efforts to conserve. Consequently, restaurants at all levels

are embracing environmentally-friendly practices to see more green—both in their bottom line and in their communities. By 2013, more than 70% of the United States will experience some type of local, regional or state-wide water shortage. Improving water efficiency is a much more cost-effective tool to help local markets manage water supply issues than developing new sources. Consumers are aware of the threat to the country’s water supply and are challenging restaurants to take action and be responsible when it comes to water conservation and other sustainable efforts. So what does that mean for foodservice operations? By cutting down on water usage, restaurants are not only demonstrating their commitment to their community’s water resourcSmall Businesses

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es, but are also lowering their water, electric, and water treatment bills. Trend data for the cost of water over the past decade has consistently outpaced the rate of inflation, meaning the cost of water is rising. Implementing sustainable practices may seem daunting, regardless of a restaurant’s size or previous experience with sustainability. Try starting with these three low-cost steps to save water and help lower costs: • Ask your guests if they would like a glass of water. Instead of automatically serving water, only serve water if a guest requests a glass. If one in four guests were to decline a glass of water, the foodservice industry would save more than 25 millions gallons of water annually. This also results in fewer glasses to clean and less ice to make. • Test and repair leaky faucets and toilets. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a leaky faucet that drips at the rate of one drip per second can waste more than 3,100 gallons per year. Check for leaks by placing a small amount of food coloring in the tank. If you see coloring in the toilet bowl within 20–30 minutes, you have a leak. • Cut down on running water. Instead of using running water to thaw frozen food items, thaw them in the refrigerator and melt ice naturally. When you thaw just one product under running water for 45 minutes each day, you can use over 90,000 gallons of water annually in thawing just that one product. You can also cut down on water waste by washing vegetables in a wash basin instead of running water. These water conservation initiatives are part of the more than 90 best practices featured in the National Restaurant Association’s Conserve Sustainability Education ProgramSM. Other best practices focus on topics such as energy efficiency, waste reduction, building and construction and program administration. To find out more about Conserve and how it can benefit your operation, visit conserve. restaurant.org. Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

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THE AmErIcAN TrAVELEr:

RCS

RCS and Miller’s Ale House By PAULA THROOP

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iller’s Ale House is a casual dining, sports restaurant that offers a friendly neighborhood feel serving top-quality food at a great value. Miller’s Ale House was designed by Jack & Claire Miller to attract customers from all walks of life with a menu that focuses on the highest degree of food quality and value. The menu offers succulent steaks, fresh seafood, original pasta dishes, healthy salads, hearty sandwiches, and tasty desserts. All Ale House restaurants contain a full-service bar with an enormous selection of over 75 varieties of beer as well as a large selection of wine and liquor. For many, it has become the ideal place of choice to enjoy a meal with the entire family or relax and socialize with friends while watching your favorite sporting event on one of the largest collections of HD TV’s in town. Many Ale Houses also offer the casual atmosphere of an outdoor patio area with a full service bar to lounge, eat, and watch a game. One of our main priorities at Miller’s Ale House is to create a fun and safe environment for our guests. This is why we have partnered with Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS) to protect and educate our employees. RCS has been an essential resource to keep our restaurants up to date on both food safety and responsible alcohol service compliance. RCS has enriched our in-house training and improved the knowledge of the staff on the laws and regulations that pertain to their jobs and must be followed. It has been extremely beneficial to have RCS as a reference to understanding the laws and statutes. They offer the convenience of online training for our new employees and have flexible scheduling of onsite training meetings to accommodate our restaurants. All of their training materials comply and exceed the requirements with onsite training classes instructed by certified trainers. RCS maintains our training records and has them available anytime at our request. Miller’s Ale House appreciates the expertise of RCS which allows us to focus on creating exciting new menu items and a fun, comfortable atmosphere.

LeisureTravel TravelBasics Basics Leisure

How enjoyed ourselves past year How wewe enjoyed ourselves in in thethe past year 4.6 48% 7.1

Average # of hours spent planning most recent trip of these planning hours were spent online

41%

used a mobile phone to help plan a leisure trip

1/5 $1008

Did not use a computer to plan their most recent trip Average total spending on most recent trip

1/10

Financed a vacation entirely on credit

48%

Spent more money than expected on a leisure trip

1/10

Think they are a “more demanding” traveler than most people

46%

Cut back on travel due to high gas prices

1/5 18%

on the road. industry . Appr primarily by au importance of The remaining by airline, with being relativel common mod of transport .

Traveled outside the united States

Hot Spots. We ask the next year, and t

Took at least one “staycation”

1/3

Visited a casino while traveling

1/4

Visited a National Park

15%

Attended religious services while on vacation

57%

Visited a friend or relative on a leisure trip

1/20

Met a new romantic partner while traveling

12%

Visited a specific destination after getting inspiration to do so on Facebook — Travel data courtesy Miles Media.

j u ly 2 0 1 2

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of these trips were day trips

84%

Paula Throop is Senior Training Manager with Miller’s Ale House.

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Number of leisure trips taken on average

Destination Analysts, Inc. F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g  

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SECRETS OF S UCCESS

Nearly a Century Of Dining Success In Palm Beach

Testa’s By Susie McKinley

Testa’s, located in beautiful Palm Beach on Royal Poinciana Way, is a classic old Florida restaurant serving breakfast, brunch, lunch and dinner. Testa’s has been named by Delta Sky Magazine, as part of “A Perfect Day in Palm Beach”. Susie McKinley, FRLA Magazine Editor, was able to spend a few minutes with the folks from Testa’s in which they revealed their Secrets to Success. Please tell FR&L readers about the history of Testa’s

Testa’s was founded by Michele Testa Sr. in 1921. He opened a 13 seat soda fountain in Palm Beach, operating on a seasonal basis. In 1926 he leased a restaurant space next door and remained in that location until building his own place just down the street in opening there in 1947. Meanwhile, in 1934, Mr. Testa, Sr. decided to open a second location in Bar Harbor, Main to “follow the season” hence: Palms in the Summer, Pines in the Winter. Over the years he continued to expand the menu and his sons Mike Jr and Joe took over the family operation in the 1960’s and continued to expand into the Testa’s of today. In the late 1980’s the business began to be operated by descendants of Joe and Mike Jr., who have carried on their traditions for the past 35 years. Testa’s has been a destination for restaurant-goers for how many years?

We are celebrating our 92nd year. What is Testa’s business philosophy?

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with care for their experience every time they dine with us. Please describe your menu concept.

We offer a wide variety to please as many palates as possible, from breakfast to salads and sandwiches, steaks, local seafood, stone crabs in season and Italian specialties. How do you keep your menu fresh and interesting to returning guests?

With so many longtime customers that return for certain dishes, we carefully test and add, as well as delete items from the menu based on changing tastes. Removing items is a delicate matter, and we always are conscious of our customers who enjoy certain offerings. If we have removed a menu item and a guest requests

it, we will make it for them. What is your most popular dish?

Our Steak-for-Two carved table side, our jumbo lump crab cakes and our lightly crusted veal beurre blanc are all very popular. What is your most popular cocktail?

The cucumber martini is a big hit this year. Have you seen the tastes of your guests change over the years?

Absolutely, more seafood now than ever, steaks still sell well, but always accompanied with a seafood dish at every table. Do you think your web page is beneficial to your business?

It is the first look the world has at who you F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

12/24/12 11:00 AM


are and what you offer; it is essential. Remember the large color ads that people would take out in the yellow pages? It’s that, 1000 times better, and you get to tell your potential customers all about yourself at a fraction of the cost. What drives “traffic” to Testa’s most effectively?

Our consistency and longevity. We have the great grandchildren of our grandfather’s customers dining with us today. Do you host a lot of special events or weddings?

Yes, we do on average about 40-55 weddings and rehearsal dinners each year in our Garden Room as well as other venues within the restaurant. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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What is the most important thing you emphasis to staff about your customers?

They are not just customers, but longtime family friends, who have dined with us for years. They watched our family grow over the years, as we have watched theirs. We get Christmas cards and wedding invitations from our customers just as we do from our own families. What do you think is critical to your employee training?

Consistency. Being in business for many years, people return because of a previous visit. Don’t change the reason they came back. How do you reduce employee turnover?

Treating people with dignity and apprecia-

tion. We always want our employees to feel that we care about them, because we do. No job is too small or insignificant, it all matters, and when they choose Testa’s to be their place of employment we want them to know they have found a home. We have employees that have been with our family for over 30 years, as did the previous generations of the Testa family. Respect for knowledge and the work provided is a key. What is your tip to staying in business for such a long time?

The caring eyes of an owner and longtime dedicated staff can never be overstated. Treating your customers the way you would want to be treated, it is very simple. F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g  

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MEM BERSHI P

F R L A’ s E duc at ion a l fou n dat ion

2012 Regional Directors’ Territories Ray Green

By Abby Gilkey Corkey Bergamo

Jennifer Reed

Dannette Lynch Lynne Hernandez

Northwest Florida - Ray Green

Ray S. Adams Street Green230 Tallahassee, FL 32301

Office 850-224-2250 ext. 230 Cell 850-545-5901 Fax 850-224-1590 rgreen@frla.org

Corkey Bergamo

Northeast Florida - Corkey Bergamo

Jennifer Reed

1190 Gran Crique Ct. S. Jacksonville, FL 32223 Home/Fax 904-880-6964 Cell 904-993-6287 cbergamo@frla.org Central Florida - Jennifer Reed PO Box 915282 Longwood, FL 32791-5282 407-375-6941 JReed@frla.org

Dannette Lynch

Tampa Bay & Southwest Florida Dannette Lynch PO Box 554 Largo, FL 33779 727-642-3404 Fax 727-953-6803 dannette@frla.org South Florida - Lynne Hernandez PO Box 566263 Miami, FL 33256-6263 Office 305-598-FRLA (3752) Cell 305-710-3962 Fax 305-598-3753 lhernandez@frla.org 34  D ECEM B ER /JA N UA RY

FRL_17-06.indd 34

2013

Jobs and ProStart Go Together

Lynne Hernandez

Jobs and ProStart go together, and this combination is one of the things about ProStart that sets the students apart and makes them ready to face the world. Learning the information, being confident in that knowledge, and then going on the interview…. very scary for us all…waiting and waiting to learn if you are acceptable, if they will take a chance on you and finally hearing they want you! As you get older in life and become more mature, it’s recommended that you get a job, thank goodness I had ProStart behind me. I’ve been working part time at restaurants since I was sixteen. Even before that, I volunteered through ProStart for our Coffee Bar at school and worked catering events with not only our ProStart class, but also for local chefs that allowed us to volunteer for large catering events in order to help. The chefs would come to the ProStart class and talk and then offer opportunities to the students. I’ve gained experience at fine dining, as well as fast food locations and currently hold a position at Dominos pizza. I have moved up and up in the job, and feel I am ready for a new challenge. I’m working on applying to other restaurants in my city at the moment. My contact? I met the General Manager of Texas Roadhouse as I was volunteering with ProStart at a BBQ competition. Why? I want the experience to further my knowledge in all aspects of the industry. As a ProStart student, this is important. After hearing so many people talk about the opportunities in this field as they come to our ProStart classroom, it has opened my eyes up to the fact that I love this industry, and know I want to understand this industry by getting first-hand experience. Textbooks can only do so much in teaching. There comes a time when you have to take matters into your own hands! Work experience is important the older you get, not just because you need to show this experience on a resume or college application, but also because you have to make a living after school is completed. I personally think that in addition to this, a job also establishes a high quality work ethic, and gives teenagers a taste of the real world before they’re abandoned in it after high school. This work experience has confirmed my commitment to the culinary and hospitality industry. P.S. As I finished this article and was ready to send it in I heard from Texas Road House, They want me to start next week, I am excited and scared, but know I can do it. Thank you ProStart!

F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

12/24/12 11:01 AM


SOCIA L MEDIA

Remove the Strings!

How to build guest loyalty with email

E

By Joe Gabriel rmail marketing has become a fabric of our industry’s modern marketing strategy. Open an email account, type an offer, add a couple of photos and links, click and send, and voila, new sales. Right? Not so fast. Restaurant operators have been encouraging their guests to “sign up” for their email program for well over a decade now. At Fishbowl, we currently manage a growing list of over 85 million unique email addresses on behalf of our restaurant clients. In fact, the average consumer today belongs to well over a dozen retail & restaurant email marketing clubs. Add the crowded online and social media marketing world to the mix, and it is becoming even more difficult to have your marketing message stand out and drive customer visits. So what can you do to stand out and generate customer visits utilizing your email club? The answer is simple: build loyalty.

Create Loyalty

Email is very permissive. Your guests are “opting in” to be a part of your restaurants community. So make sure you are taking every opportunity possible to thank them for that permission and provide them with a positive return on investment. Email is not as frequent as Facebook and Twitter. Also it is very much a push marketing tactic. So you need to put significant thought into the campaigns you are going to promote via email.

Now get started

When you take the time to thank your guests for being a part of your restaurant, you create loyal customers. The time and expense you put into building that loyalty will be returned to you in many ways. First your guests will respond and redeem your “Thank You” gifts, which will organically bring in more visits and sales for your restaurant. Second your loyal guests will pay closer attention to the rest of your email campaigns throughout the year. And they will bring their friends. In today’s social sharing world, they will want to share those positive engagements they are having with your restaurant. So go out there and take a new look at your email program. Thank your guests and build loyalty. You will stand out above the crowd.

Start with the welcome message.

This may be the most important communication you send to a new email subscriber, as it is the first and only chance you have to reinforce the message you used to get the guest to sign up in the first place. Your welcome message should go out immediately after the guest sign’s up, and have a

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strong value to encourage that guest to return to your restaurant soon. Think free bottle of wine, or free entrée. But remove the strings from the message. Strings you say? What are they?

Strings

Strings are all of the standard restrictions, or “fine print” that operators tend to add to their email message like “receive a free entrée with a purchase of $40 or more,” or BOGO, or “free appetizer with the purchase of two entrees.” What those “Strings” do is turn your loyalty building opportunity into a coupon. You don’t have to give away the house here, but 2 or 3 times a year, use your email program to truly thank those guests who have given you the permission to engage them via email. Think “gift” not “offer.” The results will amaze you.

Examples

Fishbowl works with an operator who has maximized the use of their email program. They have created a buzz around their “Birthday Club” by offering a strong value proposition to their email club. It’s simple really. Sign up for our email club and receive a free dinner on your birthday. No strings attached. Now they know that the majority of their guests are not going to come into their restaurant by themselves on their birthday. So adding the standard BOGO language seemed silly to them. What this operator does do is track email redemption for their birthday club by having a “Free Birthday” button on their point of sale system. Results: over $200K in sales attributed to their birthday emails. Not their entire email club mind you, just the birthday campaign. They have a 40% redemption on this campaign and they have subsequently built an email club of over 13,000 names. Not too shabby. Fishbowl is proud to partner with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association to provide exclusive member pricing, including 10% off of their industry leading local online marketing solutions, including email, social media & reputation management. Fishbowl is the leading provider of online marketing for the restaurant industry, serving over 45,000 restaurant locations. Fishbowl now offers full service social media management-SM3 for restaurants. Sign up today at: www.fishbowl.com/florida Joe Gabriel is the marketing associate for Fishbowl Marketing

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2013

F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

12/24/12 11:01 AM


F R L A’ s E duc at ion a l fou n dat ion

ProStart Students Film PSA with Emeril

Six ProStart students had a unique experience in November 2012. They spent the morning filming a Public Service Announcement (PSA) with Emeril Lagasse. The PSA is designed to encourage tourism to Florida. The students passed the message along that FRLA is supporting ProStart. They also shared that for every 87 visitors to the state, one person gets hired in the hospitality industry.

ProStart students (above, left to right) are: Sean Ahern, Kiyana Reed, Holli Manche, Abby Gilkey, Johnny Zokovitch IV and Jamal Hendricks.

ProStart Regional Workshops

The FRLA Educational Foundation hosted six Regional Workshops during October and November. Regional Workshops are an opportunity for students to learn from postsecondary instructors while enhancing the students’ skill and increases their enthusiasm for the industry. Over 500 students and instructors attended at least one of the six events. Johnson & Wales University hosted students to their North Miami Campus on September 28. Johnson & Wales University staff also traveled to Eastside High in Gainesville and Chamberlain High in Tampa to conduct Regional Workshops there. On November 2nd Regional Workshops were held at Keiser University in Sarasota and the Art Institute of Jacksonville. The final Regional Workshop was held on November 9 at Le Cordon Bleu in Miami.

T h i s e v e n t woul d n o t b e p o s s i bl e w i t hou t t h e s upp o r t o f t h e F R L AE F ’ s pa r t n e r s U NI V ERSA L S P ONSOR

w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

FRL_17-06.indd 37

G L O B A L S P ONSORS

F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g  

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12/24/12 11:01 AM


S a f e s ta ff

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule www.safestaff.org To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. Registration for training begins at 8:00 a.m. and for exam at 12:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Dates subject to change.

City

Jan

Feb

Mar

LOCATION

LOCATION ADDRESS

Altamonte Springs

30

13

20

Springhill Suites

205 W Highway 436

Brandon

30

27

27

Embassy Suites

10220 Plam River Rd Tampa FL 33619

7

4

4

St. Petersburg Marriott Clearwater

12600 Roosevelt Blvd North

Cocoa Beach

17

-

21

Hilton Cocoa Beach Oceanfront

1550 N Atlantic Ave Cocoa Beach FL32931

Daytona Beach

23

6

13

Best Western Plus Intl Speedway Hotel

2620 W Insternational Speedway Hotel Daytona Beach FL 32114

Deerfield

15

19

19

Hilton

100 Fairway Drive

Clearwater

9

6

6

Embassy Suites

1881 SE 17th St Causeway Ft Lauderdale FL 33316

Ft Myers

24

28

28

Hilton Garden inn

16410 Corporate Commerce Way Ft Myers Fl 33913

Ft Pierce

3

7

7

UF Indian River Research

2199 S Rock Rd, OC Minton Hall, Rm 219, Ft Pierce FL 34945

Ft. Walton

8

12

12

Holiday Inn Resort

573 Santa Rosa Blvd Ft Walton Beach FL 32548

Gainesville

8

12

5

Best Western Gateway

4200 NW 97th Blvd Gainesville FL 32606

Islamorada

22

21

18

Islander Resort

82100 Overseas Highway Isalmorada FL 33036

Jacksonville

8

5

5

Four Points by Sheraton

8520 Baymeadows Rd Jacksonville FL 32256

Jacksonville Beach

15

13

13

Quality Suites Oceanfront

11 North 1st Street Jacksonville Beach FL 32250

Key West

17

4

5

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

3990 S Roosevelt Blvd Key West FL 33040

Kissimmee

24

21

21

Seralago Hotel & Suites

5678 West Irlo Bronson Hwy.

Ft Lauderdale

Lakeland

9

5

6

Holiday Inn Express

4500 Lakeland Park Drive

Mandarin

23

20

20

Ramada Inn

3130 Hartley Rd Jacksonville FL 32257

Melbourne

10

21

14

Holiday Inn

8298 N. Wickham Rd.

Miami

24

21

21

TBA

3

7

7

TBA

Naples

3

14

14

Quality Inn & Suites

4100 Golden Gate Pwky Naples FL 34116

Ocala

15

5

12

Homewood Suites

4610 SW 49th Rd Ocala FL 34474

Orlando

17

11

11

Holiday Inn Resort Castle

8629 International Drive Orlando FL 32819

Orlando Spanish

28

25

25

Holiday Inn Resort Castle

8629 International Drive Orlando FL 32819

Panama City

16

6

6

Gulf Coast State College

5230 West US Hwy 98 Panama City FL 32401

Pensacola

22

26

26

Pensacola Bay Center

201 E Gregory Street

Port Richey

16

13

13

Days Inn & Suites

10826 US Highway 19 N Port Richey FL 23668

Sarasota

10

7

7

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

6231 Lake Osprey Dr Sarasota FL 34240

St. Augustine

30

27

27

Holiday Inn Express

2300 State Road 16 St Augustine FL 32084

Tallahassee

31

28

28

Days Inn & Monroe St Conf Cntr

2714 Graves Road Tallahassee FL 32303

Tampa

23

20

20

Clarion Hotel

2701 E Fowler Ave Tampa FL

7

11

11

Clarion Hotel

2701 E Fowler Ave Tampa FL

Venice

14

11

11

Best Western Ambassador Suites

400 Commerical Ct Venice FL 34292

West Palm Beach

28

25

25

Holiday Inn Airport

1301 Belvedere Rd West palm Beach FL 33405

Miami Spanish

Tampa Spanish

38  D ECEM B ER /JA N UA RY

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2013

F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

12/24/12 11:01 AM


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WANT TO LOWER YOUR OPERATING EXPENSES? OUR ENERGY-EFFICIENCY REBATES CAN HELP. Lower your expenses by increasing the energy efficiency of your hotel or restaurant. Progress Energy’s rebates make energy-saving, bill-lowering upgrades easier and more affordable than ever. SAVE ENERGY AND MONEY WITH OUR ENERGY-EFFICIENCY REBATES. UPGRADE

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40  D ECEM B ER /JA N UA RY

2013

F lo r i da R estauran t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n

©2012 Progress Energy Florida, Inc.

©2012 Progress Energy Florida, Inc.

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Florida Restaurant & Lodging  

December 2012/January 2013 Issue of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine.

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