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FLORIDA RESTAURANT & LODGING SHOW SEPT. 22-24

O f f i c i a l P u b l i c at i o n o f t h e F l o r i d a R e s ta u r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s s o c i at i o n

FLORIDA FOOD SAFETY INITIATIVES PAY OFF!

FOODBORNE ILLNESS DROPS SINCE 1997 S e c r e t s o f s u c c e ss

Jim & Milt’s Bar-B-Q September is Food Safety Month Special Insert Inside! Check It Out!

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F rom t h e c h a i r m a n ’ s de sk

Chairman

Bruce Craul

Legendary Inc. & Hospitality Inc., Destin Chairman-Elect

Andrew Reiss

Andrew’s Downtown, Tallahassee Secretary-Treasurer

Jim McManemon, Jr. Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island

Carlos Molinet

Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau

Mitch Doren City Walk/Universal, Orlando

Matt Halme

Outback Steakhouse Inc., Tampa Immediate Past Chair

Dave Reid

Miller’s Ale House, Jupiter President/CEO

Carol B. Dover, fmp EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley email: susie@mckinleyhome.com

M AG A ZINE

Publication Manager

John M. Baker

john@restaurantandlodging.com Advertising

Leslie L. Baker

850-545-5023 • leslie@restaurantandlodging.com Production assistant

Victoria J. Connell

victoria@restaurantandlodging.com Published By

Destination Communications, Inc. 1334 Timberlane Rd., Tallahassee, FL 32312 Phone: 850-545-1362 • Fax: 850-907-8245 Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify, or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members, or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by e-mail. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Publisher’s Address 1334 Timberlane Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32312  850/545-1362 Fax: 850/907-8245

Ad Rates and Submission Guidelines at  www.RestaurantAndLodging.com Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 104403640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA Members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Boyd Brothers Printing, Inc., Panama City, FL.

wchanges w w.Res t au n tto: A nd Lodgi ng.com Address may bera sent FRLA, PO Box 1779, Tallahassee, FL 32302 or via email to susana@frla.org. Subscription address changes (digital or US Mail, can be made at www.RestaurantAndLodging.com, and click the Manage Subscription tab.

Tools for Our Trade

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ot a day goes by that I don’t use some tools that I learned how to use decades ago. One of those tools is called Transactional Analysis. I don’t remember if it was from a three-day seminar, college or perhaps even a one-day class, but whenever I learned it, it stuck. Perhaps, it is because I have been using it over these last two or three decades. For those that need a refresher course, it is about ego states. According to the International Transactional Analysis Association, TA ‘is a theory of personality and a systematic psychotherapy for personal growth and personal change’. Simply put; the people that we come in contact with daily, communicate with you coming from one of three ego states: the parent, the adult or the child. You communicate back to them as the parent, adult or the child. Parent to parent, or parent to child, child to parent, or child to child will be unproductive at best. If you can train yourself to stay in the adult, you will always be bringing the person that you are communicating with back to the adult which will lead toward effective communication. Sounds so simple, but to really get the hang of it and how effective it can be for you in your businesses, you will have to utilize another tool that I use, the four steps of training.

These four steps: explain, demonstrate, try out, correct or even simpler, tell, show, do and review are the basic elements of training that we all must use each day. Leave out one step and you should not expect your employees, group or whoever to “get it.” In any business you have to ask yourself, “are your employees not performing the way you want them to due to deficiency of knowledge or deficiency of execution?” I have learned over the years, that most people want to get everything right, but just have not been shown what right is; thus, if things are not getting done the way they should be done, it is usually because they have not provided them with the knowledge or training.

A third tool that I use and ask others to use is an acronym: “TTTOYF” or train to think on your feet. This tool is a little harder

to explain or articulate. Trying to make it simple though, it is the process by which you ask others to learn on an “as you go” basis, and teach them, through coaching, what are the good decisions that they’ve made, which decisions need improvement, and which ones you would prefer to have a different outcome in the future. Time and experience grows all of us, but we can move the process along with our employees and our peers if we spend a little time each day though discussion of what worked and didn’t work today or yesterday. The final and fourth tool that I am going to talk about is going to come across like an infomercial, but I can assure you that I am not getting now nor have I ever received a referral fee or discount on the services provided by a company called Predictive Index. PI for short, is a process whereby an applicant receives an invitation to go online and complete a word survey that takes only a few minutes. The website returns a summary of the results of the completed survey to the supervisor and then should be shared with the applicant. The results tell the supervisor about the applicant’s personality traits, and then the supervisor can determine if this person’s traits match the position(s) available required traits. I have used this tool since 1978, and I don’t know how anyone in business can manage without utilizing it. For more information about PI, go to: http:// www.piworldwide.com/ I could write chapters about these four tools, but I am saving all of those words for a book some day. I hope that I have at least whet your pallet for pursuing more education on any of the four, since what we all must do each day is sharpen our swords for our daily battles of business.

– Bruce Craul 2012 Chairman of the Board, Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association

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F rom t h e c e o

Exciting Fall Schedule for FRLA

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By Carol B. Dover airnets and aprons are no strangers to the hospitality industry, and now we are asking everyone to wear them once again for a great cause! Join us for one of the most fulfilling events the FRLA has ever participated in, Meals of Hope 2012. We are carrying on the tradition we started last year with a new goal to package more than 100,000 meals for local families. Gather your friends and co-workers: create a team, and find a place in the assembly line as we do our part to end hunger. Not only is this event great for the local community, it is also a lot of fun! There will be prizes for the Best Dressed Team and the

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Most Spirited Team, so let your creativity run wild and we will see you Sunday, September 23rd in Orlando! Did you know that September is National Food Safety Month? You can make sure your staff is well prepared by visiting www.FRLA. org and clicking on the Education and Training link. This will take you directly to our food safety training program. Over the past decade the number of food-borne illnesses in Florida has decreased exponentially and is directly related to food protection manager and food handler education. The FRLA fall schedule is packed full of exciting opportunities and unique events. It all swings into action Friday, September 21 at the Bob Leonard Golf Classic where restaurateurs, hoteliers and

allied partners from across the state see who really is ‘up to par.’ The 2012 Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show will be held Saturday, September 22nd through Monday the 24th, at the Orange County Convention Center. This Carol B. Dover is far more than an ordinary trade show. This event gives you the opportunity to witness the latest industry trends and tools to boost your bottom line. is Election Day. Local, state and No FRLA event would be federal lawmakers are the ones who complete without a big party oversee the regulations that directly and this one really is the BIG impact your business, positively or Party - Southern Style. Meet us at negatively. Learn more about this B.B. King’s Blues Club at Pointe year’s candidates who are supportOrlando on Saturday, September ing the FRLA mission and par22nd to celebrate the hospitality ticipate in the political process by industry with networking and exercising your right to vote! entertainment. Carol Dover is President and There is one last critical date to CEO of the Florida Restaurant remember. Tuesday, November 6, and Lodging Association.

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contents August/September 2012 • WWW.RESTAURANTANDLODGING.COM

29 Food Safety Supplement Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Florida Restaurants Drop 90% Since 1997!

39 2012 Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show Satisfy Your Hunger for More. 44 Secrets of Success: Jim & Milts Bar B-Q Good Food, Good Price, Good People.

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From the Chairman’s Desk Tools for Our Trade From the CEO Exciting Fall Schedule for FRLA CEO Forecast Dan Enea, President & C.O.O., Sunshine Restaurant Partners FRLA Events Wild & Crazy Fishing Tournament FRLA News Hurricane Exercise, Fort Lauderdale VP Carlos M. Molinet Chefs That Sizzle Jeff McInnis, Executive Chef, Yardbird Southern Table & Bar A La Carte Top Food Trends, Cool Apps, You Know You Live in Florida If... Legal Expecting the Unexpected: Protecting Your Business DBPR Secretary Ken Lawson Addresses FRLA Members Social Media Mobile Text Marketing Wine Tips My Napa Experience Unique Amenities For Kids, By Kids Green Tips Recycling Restaurants Demonstrate Commitment to Community Food Safety Fresh Produce Food Safety: 2012 Update Food Safety Laboratory Testing Continues to Confirm Florida Seafood is Safe! Food Safety High Risk Foods: Sprouts, Raw or Rare Protein Foods Food Safety Seafood Misrepresentation, Boil Water Notice Food Safety Active Managerial Control Food Safety Farm to Table Movement Life100 Ways to Stay Motivated Emergency Management Business as Usual (No Matter What) Upgrades $75 Million Expansion at Seminole Hard Rock Tampa ProStart High School Teachers Go Back to School During Summer Vacation In Memory Jim Tillman, Florida House Republican Lead Healthcare How much Coverage Would I Have to Provide for New Employees?

The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine has been awarded a Bronze Charlie Award by the Florida Magazine Association (FMA) during the FMA’s Annual Meeting in August 2012.

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The “Bronze Charlie” was given for General Excellence – Best Special Theme or Show Issue (Association) for its September 2011 Edition featuring Food Safety Month: Food Safety Special. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


“ With Heartland you know.” “Heartland’s endorsement by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and its ability to save us on fees were key to our decision to switch credit card processors seven years ago. Plus, we value Heartland’s timely payment turnaround.” David & Elizabeth Gwynn, Proprietors Cypress Restaurant, Tallahassee

As the fifth largest payments processor in the country, we understand the needs of businesses of all sizes. That’s why we offer custom solutions like card processing, data security, payroll and gift marketing to help your business prosper. Get to know Heartland. Visit us at HeartlandTallahassee.com or call 866.941.1477 w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

“Like” us at www.fb.me/HeartlandHPY

Follow us @HeartlandHPY

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F L ORIDA RESTAU RANT & L OD GING ASSOCIATION

forecast Dan Enea President & C.O.O. Sunshine Restaurant Partners, Operating IHOP Restaurants

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an joined Sunshine Restaurant Partners (formerly FMS Management Systems) in January 1982. During the over 30 years that he has spent with SRP, Dan has worked in virtually every operations position within the Company, from Unit Level Manager, to District Manager, to Vice President of Operations. In 2008, Dan was promoted to President and Chief Operating Officer of SRP. Throughout his tenure with IHOP, Dan has served on many national committees that IHOP is involved with including, for over 10 years, the IHOP National Procurement Committee, in addition to various national menu committees and national operations committees. Dan has been an Executive Committee Member of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association for over seven years and was elected to be their Chairman in 2002. He is currently a member of the FRLA, and continues to serve on various committees. Dan and his wife Mary have two daughters, Trystin who graduated from Florida State University and is now attending graduate school at the University of Miami and Taryn, who recently graduated from the University of Florida. In addition to his duties at SRP, Dan serves as IHOP Brand President for Summit Restaurant Group, overseeing Summit’s IHOP restaurants in Texas, California, Utah, Idaho, Montana, South Dakota, Colorado and Wyoming. Mr. Enea is also serves as a Board Member for Neighborhood Restaurant Partners, Atlanta and Neighborhood Resturant Partners, Florida. Between the two companies they own and operate over 100 Applebee’s Restaurants in Georgia, Texas and Florida.

What do you think will be the biggest industry trend in the second half of 2012?

I think our industry continues to trend toward offering more healthy options for our guests. We know that our guests like to treat themselves to our unique signature items, occasionally indulging their cravings with menu items they cannot make easily at home. However, I believe that

Dan Enea

more of our guests are trending toward being more health conscious when dining out. They would like flavorful healthy options that are reasonably priced. So our industry will be challenged to balance the shift toward offering additional healthy options while still offering the great menu item s we have always been known for, in addition finding ways to make existing menu items healthier without losing flavor.

What issue would you most like to see positively addressed by Florida’s legislature?

Florida has been hit very hard by this economic recession, harder than most states. We have been either number one or number two for three years in a row as the state with the worst foreclosure numbers. Our unemployment has been much higher than the National level for almost four years, currently Florida’s under-employment is above 17%. Almost one in five Florida residents are unemployed or not working as much as they would like to support their family. Florida has lost more construction jobs since the recession than any other state. So from my perspective our legislature understands that job growth is the single most important area of concern. I believe our legislature understands that they need to create job growth to turn our economy around. These jobs can be created by promoting tourism and creating jobs by reducing the cost of doing business in Florida.

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Event Calendar 2012-2013

CEO For e c a s t

For more information: www.frla.org/events

n NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic Friday, September 21, 2012 ChampionsGate, FL For more information, contact Susan Aronson at (850) 224-2250. n Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Saturday-Monday, September 22-24, 2012 Orlando, FL Get Your ServeSafe Certification at the Show Sunday, September 23, 9:00am - 5:00pm Additional fees apply, call 866-372-7233 to register n FRLA Big Party Saturday, September 22, 2012 BB King’s, Orlando, FL n FRLA Fall Board Meetings Saturday-Monday, September 22-24, 2012 Orange County Convention Center, Orlando, FL n Meals of Hope Sunday, September 23, 2012 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show For more information, contact Susan Aronson at (850) 224-2250. n Panama City Beach Seafood & Music Festival: Unwined 2012 Wednesday-Sunday, October 24-28, 2012 Panama City Beach, FL n FRLA Winter Board Meeting & Installation Gala Wednesday-Friday, January 2-4, 2013 Fontainebleau Resort, Miami, FL

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What is the single greatest factor in the success of your business?

Customer service, we call it “Passionate Hospitality.” Most of us understand that our team members are the most important tool in the success of our business. Most restaurants have great menu choices and nice looking buildings, but the level of service will truly determine our success.

How has participation in FRLA positively affected your business?

Being involved in the FRLA keeps you current on the issues that affect our industry. We have access to the people who represent our industry. Carol and Richard and their entire team are always willing to listen to your concern, understand your perspective, and represent us to the best of their ability. Look at unemployment insurance as an example, I believe the FRLA has done a great job of softening the burden of the unexpected crisis in unemployment insurance in this state. They worked with our legislature to figure out

solutions, both short term and long term, to mitigate some of the increases in unemployment insurance, thereby saving this industry millions of dollars. I think being a member of the FRLA is a good business decision for our business.

How has your business strategy changed over the last few years?

We have made adjustments to our business strategy to accommodate each new government program that raises the cost of doing business. If you simply look at our business today vs. three years ago the cost of doing business has increased dramatically. Unemployment insurance has more than doubled, minimum wage has increased by almost $1/hour, and property insurance continues to increase each year. With the potential implementation of the Health Care Reform Act we will need to make additional strategy changes. In our industry you learn to make the necessary adjustments to your strategy, you must evolve as a business. It can be difficult at times, but great companies find solutions!

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Wild & Crazy Fishing Tournament

FRLA Central Florida Chapter: Al Gardner, A&L Associates Nick Olivieri, FMI Jen Osgood, ProvInsure Eddie Nickel, FMI, Dave Hadleman, Hooters of America.

Chef Brendan Mica from Hot Tin Roof won the most outstanding catch award (39.22 lb Wahoo) for the AFM team on the Wild Bill boat.

The winners of the Most Outstanding Catch: Chef Brendan Mica, (39.22 lb Wahoo) AFM and Wild Bill boat; Ron Warfield, (72 inch Sailfish) Bonefield and Fishcheck. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Ron Warfield catching a 72” sailfish. Michael Murphy, son of Dan Murphy, winning the Tournament with the largest dolphin – 36.28 lbs. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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FR L A News

Preparedness When and If Needed

FRLA Staff Participate in Statewide Hurricane Exercise

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Secretary Lawson and Bryan Koon (EOC Director) getting food from the Red Cross Disaster Recovery Mobile unit.

RLA participates in an organization called ESF 18, Emergency Support Function 18 of the State Emergency Operations Center, which works towards incorporating the private sector into disaster recovery – when and if needed. In this role FRLA staff were prepared to participate in a statewide activation of ESF 18 in the wake of Tropical Storms Dennis and Isaac if necessary. During a training session before hurricane season began, leaders from across the state met at the State Emergency Operations Center in Tallahassee to exercise various functions of the State’s capability to respond in a disaster.

Carlos M. Molinet

Appointed Senior Vice President by Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau

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ong serving member of FRLA, Carlos M. Molinet has been named Senior Vice President of the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau. In his new position, Molinet will report directly to Nicki E. Grossman, president of the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau, and have oversight responsibilities for CVB operations, sales and marketing. “Carlos M. Molinet, CHA, brings 25 years’ experience in hospitality, business and motivational management and leadership to the Convention & Visitors Bureau, including senior level positions with some of the country’s leading lodging brands including Starwood, Wyndham, Hyatt and Hilton hotels,” said Nicki E. Grossman. Molinet recently was General Manager of the Hilton Fort Lauderdale Marina; Director of Operations for LXR Resorts and Hotels Fort Lauderdale; and the General Manager of the Fort Lauderdale Grande. Previously, he was the Area General Manager for the Hyatt Regency Pier Sixty-Six and Bahia Mar Beach Resort. Molinet has held leadership roles with FRLA as both a Past President of the FRLA Broward Chapter, and member of the FRLA Executive Committee. Among his many industry awards and designations include Certified Hotel Administrator from the American Hotel & Lodging Association, HSMAI’s General Manager of the Year award in 2009 and the State Leadership Award from the AH & LA in recognition of his work with the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. 12  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

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FRLA Board of Directors Meeting in Key West

Enjoying the Cocktail Party: Tom Hayes – AmeriGas; Juan Morales – Monroe County Sheriff Department; Luke Lewis – AmeriGas; Del Teigs – Omega; Shawn Penny – Nationwide Ins; Lt John Crane – Monroe County Sheriff Dept

Michelle Wilson and Andy Reiss

FRLA Board of Directors in Key West for the FRLA Summer Board of Directors Meeting w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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jeff mcinnis

Executive chef & Partner Yardbird Southern Table & Bar

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eff McInnis was born to do two things: fish and cook. And, in the best situations, he’s doing both. He grew up in the Florida panhandle in a place called Niceville (true story) where waterfront property was not yet reserved for the elite. With the ocean as his ‘playground’, you could almost always find him on a fishing boat reeling, peeling, cleaning and cutting Redfish, Cobia, shrimp and whatever else was caught that day. So, it was no surprise that at 16 he was already cooking on the line at The Marina Cafe. In the summer, he would head inland to join his grandparents in Alabama on their working farm. They raised chickens, hogs and horses, grew their own vegetables, churned their own butter and made their own blackberry jelly preserves from fresh picks of the day. They got up early. They went to bed late. They ate what they raised. To others it’s the definition of the “farm-to-table” concept that’s become the new restaurant buzzword. To Jeff it was just the way things were, a way of life. When he was 18, Jeff left Florida to go cook in Charleston, SC, where he dove even deeper into low country cuisine; “I found it very hard to leave this Southern Belle and spent siz years cooking, fishing, and livin’ in Charleston,” says McInnis. Jeff sought to broaden his palette and began a series of culinary adventures; First as Sous Chef at Asolare, a Caribbean-Asian restaurant in St. John, Virgin Islands. Next, in San Francisco, at fine dining Asian-French restaurant Azie, where he learned Japanese cuisine from renowned sushi chefs while at the same time polishing his French techniques. And then to rural Virginia, where he worked at Keswick Hall, an exclusive 5-star hotel built on Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello Estate and owned by the Orient Express. Named Fossett’s in honor of Jefferson’s chief cook at Monticello, Edith Fossett, the restaurant served up Southern/French cuisine in a fine dining atmosphere. It was here that Jeff was able to begin mixing his passion and talent for fine Southern cooking.

Chef Jeff McInnis

Please describe your restaurant concept. What about the restaurant inspires you?

We are a southern table restaurant that features fresh Florida ingredients in addition to ingredients from neighboring states: Alabama, Georgia and Louisiana. The traditional dishes are inspired by my personal upbringing in the South, but I also draw inspiration from my years of work in the kitchen with other types of global cuisines. We’re all about paying respect to the Southern classics like fried chicken, biscuits, grits, etc.

Which region would you consider to be most influential in your cooking?

Soul food, Cajun, Lowcountry, Gulla and Southern cuisine. I’ve dabbled in other cuisines and I’ve been lucky enough to travel around the world through my work as a chef – the South is where my heart belongs though.

Please describe some of your most popular menu items.

Everyone loves the fried chicken! It’s crispy, juicy, just the right amount of spicy, tender and irresistible! No one leaves the restaurant without a smile after a plate of our signature Llwellyn’s Fine Fried Chicken. It takes a full 27 hours to prepare and is served with spicy Tabasco honey.

What is your “sizzle” – cuisines and foods that are your signature or “specialties,” unique food presentations or any new ideas you are using? I grew up in the Florida panhandle in a small fishing village called Niceville. There weren’t a lot of fancy restaurants in town, especially then. We mostly fished and ate the great, fresh seafood that we caught. My grandparents lived a hundred miles north of us in

HotChef? Are You Considered Among 2012 Florida’s Hottest Chefs?

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Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to susie@mckinleyhome.com. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. BeF lo sure to include restaurant and contact r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!


Alabama, and my Grandma Bryce ran a yardbird farm full of chickens, roosters and geese. Every summer, my brother and I would go up to Alabama to work on the farm and cook with Grandma. They didn’t take many trips to the grocery store. They ate what they produced. It was real farm to table cooking and this experience inspired me from an early age. Growing up on the Gulf Coast, I’d often take trips to New Orleans – this city is never a dull moment! I’ve always been influenced by the Cajun and Creole cuisine in the Big Easy. I still visit the city several times a year and respect the chefs there who are making serious waves in today’s southern food movement. As a young adult, I moved to Charleston, South Carolina. That’s where I learned about Lowcountry cooking. The flavors are similar to what I grew up knowing, but in Charleston I was surrounded by the unique, high-end southern restaurants and chefs who really knew that type of food and culture. Basically I’ve always been very immersed in soul food, Cajun, Lowcountry, Gulla and southern cuisine – this is what I love and where I look for inspiration.

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Which of your dishes are your favorite?

I don’t think any chefs enjoy repetition, and I’m always looking forward to my next creation – and that’s my favorite thing to eat. There’s nothing more exciting for a chef than being introduced to a new ingredient. Recently, one of my buddies brought in ten pounds of duck tongues. We braised ‘em, fried ‘em and pickled ‘em. That’s what’s fun!

Can you tell readers about the James Beard Award Nominations you received this year?

Yardbird was a semi-finalist for Best New Restaurant in the South and I was also recognized as semi-finalist for Best Chef in the South. It was an honor and a very exciting time.

Would you explain to readers about Yardbird’s relationship with the farmers that provide fresh ingredients to the restaurant?

The relationship is simple: we buy as much local fresh ingredients as possible from Florida

farmers. I’ve been privileged to work with a forager named Juan Rochix, who travels the state visiting different farms and bringing us only the best, freshest products. Everything from rabbits to tropical fruits and alligator to emu eggs – all this in addition to staples like tomatoes, greens, poultry, collards, corn, okra and other Florida jewels.

Your “House Cocktails” are so unique. Can you explain the process you used to develop them?

Essentially, we drive the bar like we drive the kitchen: unique ingredients while still playing homage to the classics. We have the best and biggest bourbon selection in South Florida (all of our signature cocktails are bourbon based).

To what do you attribute your success in the restaurant business?

My dad taught me at a young age there’s no substitute for hard work and dedication. I’ve worked 70+ hour weeks since I was 18 years old. I got my start in the business when I was 14 – I’ve been focused on my career in the culinary world ever since.

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Cool Web Pages Visiting www.runchickenrun.com is as much fun as you can have looking at restaurant web pages on the Internet. runchickenrun.com is the home page for Yardbird Southern Table & bar and on it you will find the menus for food and drink, the story behind the restaurant, the farmers that supply the restaurant, photos and more. Visitors to the web page can make a reservation and review the restaurants press coverage as well. Check it out!

A L a C a rt e

Top Food Trends Main Dishes / Center of the Plate*

1. Locally sourced meats and seafood 2. Sustainable seafood 3. Newly fabricated cuts of meat (e.g., Denver steak, pork flat iron, Petite Tender) 4. Non-traditional fish (e.g., branzino, Arctic char, barramundi) 5. Half-portions / smaller portion sizes

Produce

1. Locally grown produce 2. Organic produce 3. Superfruits (e.g., acai, goji berry, mangosteen) 4. Exotic fruits (e.g., rambutan, dragon fruit, paw paw, guava) 5. Heirloom apples

Sides/Starches

1. Non-wheat noodles/pasta (e.g., quinoa, rice, buckwheat) 2. Black / forbidden rice 3. Quinoa 4. Red rice 5. Vegetable pickles

*Source: National Restaurant Association, “What’s Hot in 2012” Chef Survey, 2011

www.loewshotels.com/MiamiBeach-Hotel is a beautiful and very useful web page for folks who are interested in that South Beach hotel. The photographs are fantastic and encourage visitors to the site to visit Miami and the Loews Hotel. The City Experience describes all that Miami and Miami Beach have to offer to guests from major attractions and culture to nightlife and sports teams. Loews programs are clearly described as are all of the offerings at the pool and the beach. If you need to know the current weather in Miami Beach, you can find it on this web page as well.

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Prepare Your Family and Your Business for a Hurricane or other Natural Disaster Hurricane season is in full swing and we have seen the negative effects of severe weather. If you have not already done so, it is imperative that you create a plan for your family and your business for emergency situations. Check out Floridadisaster.org for a complete step-by-step guide for creating a plan.

Seagar’s Prime Steaks & Seafood Honored with ‘Certificate of Excellence’

Seagar’s Prime Steaks & Seafood, the only AAA Four-Diamond restaurant in Destin, FL, is the proud recipient of the 2012 ‘Certificate of Excellence’ from TripAdvisor. The accolade, which honors hospitality excellence, is given only to establishments that consistently achieve outstanding traveler reviews on TripAdvisor worldwide. Approximately ten percent of listings on TripAdvisor receive this prestigious award. To qualify for the ‘Certificate of Excellence,’ businesses must maintain an overall rating of four or higher, out of a possible five, as reviewed by travelers on TripAdvisor. Additional criteria include the volume of reviews received within the last 12 months. Seagar’s has also been recognized by Wine Spectator magazine with the ‘Best of Award of Excellence’ and by Distinguished Restaurants of North America (DiRoNA) with the ‘Award of Excellence,’ among many others.

Six Month Free Trial for FRLA Members Staymonkey.com is a new web page that will assist lodging establishments in marketing properties. It aspires to “educate and advocate” consumers about lodging operations. Staymonkey.com conveys information to consumers about properties, not just pricing. From property maintenance and security to quality of housekeeping, staymonkey.com can assist operators in property promotion. Staymonkey.com is generously inviting FRLA lodging members to take advantage of a free six-month trial listing. Go to staymonkey.com to complete the application and note in the application that your property is a FRLA member.

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


FRLA Summer Board Meeting Host Kevin Spiedel Donates to FRLA PAC Fund! Kevin Spiedel, the GM of the Casa Marina has decided to donate 5% of the total revenues from the FRLA Summer Board Meeting to the FRLA PAC Fund. Thank you very much for your donation and inspiration! We would also like to thank the other chapters and members who made individual contributions to the FRLA PAC.

Ritz-Carlton Naples Wins T&L SMITTY The Ritz-Carlton Naples was recently awarded a SMITTY (Social Media in Travel and Tourism) Award by Travel + Leisure. The SMITTY was for the Best Use of a Social Media Platform. T + L notes that the hotel’s Facebook page, “…asked questions on Facebook such as “How do you like your coffee?” For any respondents who booked a stay, staffers were able to surprise the guests with a detailed knowledge of their preferences.” Congratulations!

VIVA FLORIDA 500

Where and when did the US begin? Ask most Americans, and they will likely respond that it was, well … in 1607 with the British settlement of Jamestown, or when the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock in 1620, or maybe the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776. A more informed answer is that “La Florida” began half-a-millennium-ago in Florida! Way back in 1513, Spanish explorer Ponce de León landed on the Atlantic coast, proclaimed it “La Florida,” and forever changed this continent, and the world. Next year - 2013 marks the 500th anniversary of this momentous event, and the year-long, statewide commemoration is being called “Viva Florida 500.” For the nonprofit Florida Humanities Council, “Viva Florida 500” is an unprecedented “teachable moment,” a time for Floridians and Americans alike to explore and appreciate our state’s rich history and culture. FRLA, Visit Florida, and the Florida Department of State additionally view 2013 as a unique time to promote Florida, tout our fascinating history and landscape, and draw visitors to our state. Over the next year, there will be “Viva Florida 500” commemorations of every kind in virtually every corner of Florida. They will include history fairs, re-enactments, conferences, exhibits, festivals, and seminars. Learn about all of it, and get your business or group involved, by accessing these web sites: www.flhum.org and www.fla500.com

You know you live in Florida if.... Socks are only for bowling. You never use an umbrella because you know the rain will be over in five minutes. A good parking place has nothing to do with distance from the store, but everything to do with shade. Your winter coat is made of denim. You can tell the difference between fire ant bites and mosquito bites. You’re younger than thirty but some of your friends are over 65. Anything under 70 degrees is chilly. You’ve driven through Yeehaw Junction. You know that no other grocery store can compare to Publix. Every other house in your neighborhood had blue roofs in 2004-2005. You know that anything under a Category 3 just isn’t worth waking up for. You dread love bug season. You are on a first name basis with the Hurricane list. They aren’t Hurricane Charley or Hurricane Frances. You know them as Andrew, Charley, Frances , Ivan, Jeanne & Wilma... Irene... Cheryl... Rita... Mary... Alison... You know what a snowbird is and when they’ll leave. You think a six-foot alligator is actually pretty average, and you know what it tastes like – chicken. ‘Down South’ means Key West

Mark your calendars! The FRLA Winter Board Meeting and Installation Gala will be held January 2-4, 2013 at the Fontainebleau Resort in Miami, Florida.

Menulus is about to ship!

Menulus Composer, a web-based mobile application, allows food service operations to index and structure menu content in a way that is search and mobile friendly. In other words, food service operations can take a regular menu, break apart the individual food items and list them on the web so that search engines will find them. This is a significant improvement over the current option of simply digitizing a menu as a single unit. To prepare for Menulus, post and tag photos of your food items. Menulus Composer will provide the user-friendly online tools to make uploading photos and descriptions a piece of cake (or pie), so the best thing to do now is start taking photos. Food service operators, be sure to go to www.menulus.com to pre-register. Menulus is completely FREE and provides a completely mobile website, increased SEO, Facebook and website embedding and enhanced local search.

w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Flip-flops are everyday wear. Shoes are for business meetings and church, but you HAVE worn flip flops to church before. You have a drawer full of bathing suits, and one sweatshirt. You get annoyed at the tourists who feed seagulls. A mountain is any hill 100 feet above sea level. You know the four seasons really are: hurricane season, love bug season, tourist season and summer. You’ve hosted a hurricane party. You can pronounce Okeechobee, Kissimmee, Withlacoochee , Thonotosassa and Micanopy. You understand why it’s better to have a friend with a boat, than have a boat yourself. You were 25 when you first met someone who couldn’t swim. You’ve worn shorts and used the A/C on Christmas and New Years. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

17


L e g a l SIDE

Expecting the Unexpected

Protecting Your Business

A

By: Stephen K. Talpins and Jacey Kaps Miami attorney is proving once again that people can and will sue for almost anything. Mark S. Gold visited the Gold Rush strip club in Miami on November 27, 2010 and spent almost $19,000. When he sobered up, he demanded that the club return his money. Not surprisingly, the club refused. Gold then sued the club, seeking a full refund, attorneys’ fees, costs and punitive damages. Gold alleges that Gold Rush engaged in unfair, deceptive and “unconscionable” trade practices by intentionally “causing” his intoxication to “charge his credit card excessive amounts of money.” Gold argues that he is entitled to a refund because he was so drunk that he “had a complete loss of judgment, rational thought or the ability to enter into lawful contracts or agreements.” While this case sounds frivolous and is a

comedian’s dream come true, it is no laughing matter to the establishment that now must spend money defending itself. Thus, it begs the question: how can establishments protect themselves? Every licensee that serves alcohol should obtain appropriate insurance. General liability policies typically exclude coverage for negligent service and, in any event, only provide coverage for harms occurring on-premises. Licensees should consider protecting themselves with liquor liability policies that cover them and their employees for: • Assaults and batteries occurring on premises; • Suits brought by third parties who are injured off premises by a patron served at the establishment; • All available types of damages (ie. bodily injury, mental, etc.); • Employee drinking (some insurance companies will exclude them); and • Defense costs. Small Businesses

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18  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

In addition, licensees should investigate insurance that provides discounts for a positive track record and participation in service and safety training. Establishments that permit others to host events on their premises, such as hotels or motels, should consider requiring hosts who plan to serve or permit alcohol to obtain and provide proof of insurance, preferably naming the facility as an additional insured. In addition, they should make use of agreements requiring hosts to indemnify them. Licensees want to be responsible vendors. In addition to following all state laws and regulations, they should consider: • Obtaining state certification as a responsible vendor; • Partnering with well-known and independent outside providers like Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS), a subsidiary of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA), to train management and staff on responsible service; • Drafting written alcohol service policy and monitoring staff compliance; • Prohibiting employees from drinking alcoholic beverages while working and from arriving for work under the influence of alcohol; • Requiring that anyone who appears to be under the age of 30 produce proper proof of age; • Refusing service to all visibly intoxicated patrons (not just known habitual addicts); • Removing customers who become belligerent or drunk; • Encouraging designated drivers and promote safe transportation alternatives for customers who should not drive; and • Documenting and tracking all incidents. Following these suggestions is good for business and for the community. It reduces risk, promotes customer/guest and public safety, and facilitates the defense if someone is harmed. Stephen K. Talpins and Jacey Kaps and attorneys with Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


De pa rt m e n t of BUSINESS & Prof e s sion a l R e gul at ion

DBPR Secretary

Ken Lawson Addresses FRLA Members

F

lorida Restaurant & Lodging Association members and partners were recently treated to an exceptional opportunity to hear directly from Department of Business & Professional Regulation Secretary Ken Lawson, who shared his perspective on the regulator-industry relationship. Secretary Lawson spoke to the Broward Chapter on May 8th and the Miami-Dade Chapter Executive Committee on May 9th. Additionally, the May 9th event included Secretary Lawson providing keynote remarks to several hundred industry members attending the Sysco South Florida Food Show at the Miami Beach Convention Center. During his talk, titled “We Are In This Together,” Secretary Lawson spoke on “smart de-regulation, strong but fair enforcement, and maintaining effective, open lines of communication” with the Department’s customers. Highlights of his remarks included news that: • All DBPR license renewals and most initial applications are now available online, reducing time to process applications • The average time for a DBPR Division of Hotels & Restaurants plan review has dropped from more than 17 days to eight days over the past two years • Plan Review email help is now available to customers at dhr.planreview@dbpr. state.fl.us • Many DBPR services are now available on their website, www.myfloridalicense.com • Licensees can even follow DBPR on

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Facebook and Twitter, accessible from myfloridalicense.com/dbpr Additionally, Secretary Lawson mentioned that DBPR’s “strong but fair enforcement” stance has yielded: • Continued downward trend in reported Florida restaurant food borne illness – an 87% decrease* since 1997, according to the Florida Department of Health • 25% drop in emergency food service closures over the past two years • 21% reduction in administrative enforcement cases with an associated 57% decline in total fines assessed The Sysco keynote presentation was very well received, followed by excellent participation from attendees during an extended “question and answer” period with Secretary Lawson. Julie Bracken, Vice President Customer Resources for Sysco South Florida, and organizer of the Food Show, said “our customers loved the topic and we were very pleased with the turnout. What Secretary Lawson presented is so important. We certainly hope to work together again!” Appointed by Gov. Rick Scott, Secretary Lawson recently celebrated his first anniversary at the helm of Department of Business & Professional Regulation, where he emphasizes a culture of quality service and responsiveness to the myriad regulated industries under DBPR’s purview. A former United States Attorney and member of the U.S. Marines Judge Advocate General’s Corps, Secretary Lawson has extensive leadership and legal experience. *Updated preliminary data indicates a 90% decrease at this time.

FR L A news

Christy Crump has been hired as Director of Operations for RCS, Inc. Christy began in July and will be housed in FRLA headquarters as RCS operations transition to Tallahassee and more closely align the E&T and RCS teams. Christy brings an excellent mix of experience that will immediately benefit RCS and FRLA. Since 2008 she has owned and operated a training company she founded and recently sold, where she personally managed all facets of a regional, client-centered training business. She acquired new business, served and retained clients, and developed and taught various business curricula. Some of the workshops Christy developed and delivered to clients include Communications Skills, Personal Effectiveness, Goal Setting, Team Building, Problem Solving, and Customer Service. Christy’s background also includes high level administrative posts with the City of Tallahassee and the Florida State University College of Law, and she holds a Bachelor’s degree from FSU.

Please welcome Maggie Gaby back to GR in FRLA’s Tallahassee office. She will be working closely with Richard Turner and Jason Reynolds on all things “Governmental.”

Congratulations! FRLA’s Former Chairman of the Board and Immediate Past Chairman, Dave Reid, and Camron Becker of Miles Media were married in Tallahassee, Florida on Saturday, July 14, 2012.

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

19


S o c i a l m e di a

Mobile Text Marketing Untapped Potential for Restaurants to Connect with Customers “It’s clear that businesses who don’t embrace Mobile phone technology in the coming year will be left behind. Much as those businesses who sat on the sidelines during the early days of digital or social media are now playing catchup.” – AdvertisingAge

E

By Conrad R. Carney, II

veryone with a cell phone carries it wherever they go. Customers are already texting inside your restaurant – so why not take advantage of that... It’s simple... People don’t redeem paper coupons like they used to. It’s a hassle to print them, cut them out, and remember to keep them in their pockets. But people have their phones with them at all times and so the redemption rates for mobile coupons and offers are much higher when compared to paper coupons that must be printed out from a computer. Reaching consumers on their mobile phones presents fresh marketing opportunities for restaurateurs by enabling them to push readily adopted and measurable offers right to the palm of their customers’ hand. The competition for consumers’ dollars remains fierce according to the Restaurant Association’s Trends Survey. It stated that 7 out of 10 full-service operators agreed that their customers’ loyalty is more difficult to maintain than it was two years ago, making repeat customers even more important to the bottom line. It is imperative that restaurant operators appeal to frequent diners’ expectations for value, because of how important repeat customers are to their success. One way to satisfy customers’ growing appetite for value while encouraging loyalty is through frequentdiner programs. According to the Association’s Trends Survey, 57 percent of adults said they would be more likely to patronize an establishment that offers a customer loyalty and reward program, such as a Mobile Loyalty Club. Starting your own Mobile VIP Club gives you an easy way to access your customers and generate a very high rate of response, which means more people spending money at your restaurant. Mobile Text marketing works because you are reaching people who want you to send them promotions about your restaurant. They read your advertising the instant you send it to their mobile phone. Since they already know you and like you, they are much more likely to take advantage of your offer. 20  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

A recent case study involving a casual dining restaurant chain with over 125 locations demonstrated the power of Mobile Text marketing. The case study compared the effectiveness of email, social media (such as Facebook and Twitter), and SMS Text Message marketing in generating new and unique members for their Loyalty Club. Over a five year period, the chain was able to collect 120,733 unique customers for their email club. Over a three year period, they attracted 44,462 people to become “fans” on their Facebook page. In the 18 months since they first launched their Twitter account, they have acquired 1,849 people as “followers” of their restaurant. These numbers were drawn from data comprised by all locations in the United States. Four months after the launch of their SMS Text Message marketing campaign, the chain was able to collect 60,709 unique members for their Mobile VIP Club. This represents over one-half of the members that joined their email club and 16,247 more than the number of Facebook Fans, all in just the first four months. The study further explored the redemption rate of the SMS campaigns, for which 10 stores were selected for the test group. These 10 locations had 6,186 people Opt-in to their Mobile VIP Club, an average of 648 per location in the first 5 weeks. The casual dining chain saw 1,633 participants redeem the initial one week offer, or an average of 163 redemptions per store. The 1,633 redemptions generated a total of $41,283 (average check $25.28) in additional revenue, or an average of $4,128 per store. The average expense per location was $38.90 for the SMS campaign. The conclusion of the study showed that restaurant customers who participated were more likely to join a Mobile VIP Club than become an email member or Facebook Fan. While all Participants surveyed stated they liked receiving special offers from their favorite restaurants, they said it was easier to sign up for the Mobile VIP Club via their cell phone, and that is why they joined. Mobile text marketing provides restaurants an inexpensive way to engage and reward their customers which increases the frequency of visits, thus increasing the financial bottom line. Conrad R Carney, II is the Chief Executive Officer of CMSText. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


® 2012 SafeStaff® Order Form 2012 2012 SafeStaff® SafeStaff® Order Order Form Form 2012 SafeStaff Order FormForm 2012 2012 SafeStaff® SafeStaff® Order Order Form Form 2012 SafeStaff® Order Form 2012 SafeStaff® Order

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Product DescriptionSafeStaff® Employee Foodhandler Training Guide

SPAN

CHIN Quantity CREO TOTAL

Price Member $8.00 Non Member $8.00

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Total

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$17.00

61-100

$25.00

SafeStaff® Employee Foodhandler Training Guide SafeStaff® SafeStaff® Manager Manager Review Review Guide Guide SafeStaff® Manager SafeStaff® Review Manager Guide Review Guide

$8.00 $8.00 $55.00 $35.00 N/A N/A N/A $55.00 $55.00 $55.00 $35.00 $ N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A$35.00 $35.00 $55.00 $35.00 $ N/A N/A

SafeStaff® Manager Review Guide

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$18.95 $ $ $ $ SafeStaff® Manager Flash Cards (Billingual) $12.95 N/AN/A N/A $18.95 SafeStaff® Manager Flash Cards (Billingual) $12.95 $ $18.95 N/AN/A N/AN/A SafeStaff® Manager Review Guide N/A N/A $35.00 $55.00 $12.95 SafeStaff® SafeStaff® Manager Manager Flash Flash Cards Cards (Billingual) (Billingual) N/A N/A N/A 31-60 $23.00 $18.95 $18.95 $18.95 SafeStaff® Manager SafeStaff® Flash Manager Cards (Billingual) Flash Cards (Billingual) $12.95 $ $ N/A N/A$12.95 $12.95 Business Street Address: ________________________________ Ste: ________ Fax: ______________________________ Cell: ______________ $18.95 SafeStaff® Manager Flash Cards (Billingual) $12.95 $ N/A N/A SafeStaff® DHCOP - (AOP) Glove Alterna‹ve (AOP) SafeStaff® DHCOP - Glove Alterna‹ve SafeStaff® Manager Flash Cards (Billingual) SafeStaff® SafeStaff® DHCOP DHCOP - Glove - -Glove Alterna‹ve Alterna‹ve (AOP) (AOP) SafeStaff® DHCOP SafeStaff® - Glove DHCOP Alterna‹ve Glove (AOP) Alterna‹ve (AOP)

N/A N/A N/A $20.00 N/AN/A N/AN/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A$20.00

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101+ 4% of Order SafeStaff® DHCOP - Glove Alterna‹ve (AOP)Poster $40.00 $ N/A N/AN/A N/A SafeStaff® Allergen Awareness $18.00 $24.00 N/A $20.00 $18.00 City: _________________________________________State: ________ Zip: _____________ ___________________________________ SafeStaff® DHCOP Glove Alternative (AOP) N/A N/A $20.00 $40.00 SafeStaff® Allergen Awareness Poster $18.00 $24.00 $ $24.00 N/AN/A N/A N/A SafeStaff® SafeStaff® Allergen Allergen Awareness Awareness Poster Poster $18.00 $24.00 $ $$$ $ N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A SafeStaff® Allergen SafeStaff® Awareness Allergen Poster Awareness Poster $18.00 $24.00 $24.00 $ N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A$18.00Email:

SafeStaff® Allergen Awareness Poster SHIPPING & HANDLING SafeStaff® Choking / Heimlich Maneuver Poster Are you an FRLA Member? □YES □NO contact meManeuver about membership SafeStaff® Allergen Awareness Poster SafeStaff® Choking / □Please Heimlich Maneuver Poster SafeStaff® SafeStaff® Choking /Maneuver Heimlich / /Heimlich Maneuver Poster Poster SafeStaff® Choking SafeStaff® / Choking Heimlich Choking Heimlich Poster Maneuver Poster Posters® Qty Cost SafeStaff® Choking / Heimlich Maneuver Poster 1-4 $17.00 SafeStaff® Choking / Heimlich Maneuver Poster

$24.00 $ N/A N/A N/A N/A $15.00 $22.00 N/A $18.00 N/A N/A N/A $18.00 $24.00 $15.00 $ $22.00 $22.00 N/A $15.00 $15.00 $22.00 you an RCS Responsible Vendor Client? N/A N/A N/A $15.00 $15.00 $ $22.00 $22.00 N/A N/AAre N/A N/A N/A N/A $15.00 $ N/A N/A If$22.00 Tax If Tax

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Product Descripon

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Member Non Member $8.00 $8.00 SafeStaff® Employee Foodhandler Training Guide $55.00 SafeStaff® Manager ReviewCVC: Guide $35.00 N/A Name as it Appears Card: _______________________________ _______________________________ Name Name ason as itasAppears it Appears onon Card: _______________________________ _______________________________ CVC: CVC: _______________________________ _______________________________ Name Name on iton Appears Card: onCard: Card: _______________________________ CVC: CVC: _______________________________ N/A Total $ _____________________ Nameas asit itAppears Appears Card:_______________________________ _______________________________ CVC:________________________________ _______________________________ Signature: ___________________________________ Solicited by FRLA/RCS Staff: ___________ Date:_ _______________________ $18.95 SafeStaff® Manager Flash Cards (Billingual) $12.95 N/A N/A Signature: ______________________________________________ Solicited by FRLA/RCS Staff: _____________ Date: ___________________________________ Signature: ______________________________________________ Solicited by FRLA/RCS Staff: _____________ Date: ___________________________________ Signature: Signature: ______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Solicited Solicited by by FRLA/RCS FRLA/RCS Staff: Staff: _____________ _____________ Date: Date: ___________________________________ ___________________________________ Signature: Signature: ______________________________________________ Solicited Solicited FRLA/RCS byStaff: FRLA/RCS Staff: _____________ Date: Date: ___________________________________ Signature:______________________________________________ ______________________________________________ Solicitedbyby FRLA/RCS Staff:_____________ _____________ Date:___________________________________ ___________________________________ SafeStaff® DHCOP - Glove Alterna‹ve (AOP) $20.00 $40.00 N/A N/A SafeStaff® Allergen Awareness Poster

N/A

SafeStaff® Choking / Heimlich Maneuver Poster

Payment: □Visa

□MC

□AMEX

□DISC

□MO

N/A N/A

N/A N/A

□Company Check # ___________

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$18.00 $15.00 If Tax Exempt, please provide copy of cer ficate with order.

$24.00 $22.00

Subtotal $____ Tax $____ $ S&H $____

Total $____

Signature: ______________________________________________ Solicited by FRLA/RCS Staff: _____________ Date: _____________________

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w i n e t i ps

My Napa Experience

B

eing a seasoned hospitality veteran and sommelier, I was embarrassed to say I had never been to Napa Valley! You can imagine my joy when Christian Dammert, the Corporate Beverage Director of Shula’s, called and invited me to join him and three other Head Coaches for a trip to Napa Valley. Of course, I had always heard about others going during the fall for crush when the grapes are being harvested and all of the activity during that time, so I was a little disappointed that we were going in the spring (May to be exact). Boy I could never have been more wrong! Yes, there are grapes on the vine in the fall, but the wine makers are busy doing what they do for a living, so getting to spend time with them is almost impossible, I am told. I would definitely recommend going in the spring, and the following recap will explain why. After making our journey to San Fransisco, we made the scenic ride up to Napa Valley. Our accommodations really set the tone for our trip as we stayed at the beautiful Stag’s Leap Winery, which is located up a picturesque, winding drive off of the Silverado Trail nestled away from the crowds. 22  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

The grounds are absolutely beautiful as well as the Manor House, where tastings are enjoyed. There are two guest cottages, and a three bedroom guest house on the grounds that overlook 240 acres of some of the prettiest vineyards in Napa Valley. We were all pretty hardcore wine lovers, so our action-filled itinerary worked just great for us...

two wine tasting / tours in the morning, lunch, two more wine tasting/tours in the afternoon followed by dinner. Here is a sampling of our journeys. After checking into Stag’s Leap and tasting some of their wines, we were off to our next stop, Domaine Chandon. We were met by Tom Tiburzi, the sparkling winemaker, and given a tour of the

grounds and the beautiful winery. The winemaking facility was huge…I have never seen so many large, stainless vats in my life. They truly marry the best of French tradition with new world innovations to deliver the highest quality in the bottle. After touring the property, we were treated to a beautiful table out on the terrace where we tasted and

discussed all of Domaine Chandon’s offerings with the winemaker. What a way to start our journey! I am not a huge fan of Rosé; but their Pinot Noir Rosé was excellent, though it was hard to not enjoy all of them sitting in such a beautiful setting with the winemaker. After a long afternoon of tasting, we were ready for dinner and we really

Caymus 2009 Belle Glos, Clark & Telephone Pinot Noir “Deep scarlet color, aromas of cinnamon, cranberry and a hint of ginger... sweet baking spices, and tart berries, even a hint of roasted meat.” –Joseph J. Wagner, Winemaker.

Amuse Bouche Winery 2008 Amuse Bouche Napa Valley Merlot 95 Points; “One sip is all it takes to understand that this is a vital, impressive and profound wine. A blend of 96% merlot and 4% cabernet franc, it displays the voluptuous richness of a Heidi Barrett wine, but also shows a firmness of character and structural dryness that elevates it. Exceptionally flavorful in blackberries and cherries, it has tantalizing hints of herbs, olive tapenade and intensely fine oak. Drink now – 2016.” – Wine Enthusiast, March 2011

Recommendations

Domaine Chandon 2008 Reserve Pinot Noir Rosé 92 Points Wine Spectator, Dec. 15, 2008 “Offers lively raspberry and graham cracker aromas, with crisp, festive strawberry, Gala apple and spice flavors that rally toward a zesty finish.”

Caymus 2009 Special Selection Cabernet Sauvignon “Dark scarlet color, purple edges. Subtle juicy character with an intense presence, bitter chocolate, charred peppered meat, raw dry aged beef, brown spice, vanilla yogurt, sarsaparilla, cream soda with judicious grip and texture.” – Chuck Wagner, winemaker

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


by Steve Adams

were in store for a treat. We had dinner reservations at ētoile Restaurant at Domaine Chandon and I have to stay, it was one of the most amazing meals I have ever had in my life. Chef Perry Hoffman’s tasty menu, paired with Domaine Chandon’s wines were spectacular, and the service was outstanding from start to finish. Needless to say, we slept

very well that night. Having been a huge fan of Caymus wine all of my life, the next morning was truly one of the highlights of my trip. After a quick stop at the Napa Valley farmers market for breakfast, we made our first stop of the day at Caymus Vineyards. As we were approaching the door we were greeted by none other than Chuck Wagner, the

winemaker. It was kind of crazy to walk up and get greeted by “Hi, I’m Chuck.” After brief introductions, we walked out into the vines and talked grapes and winemaking. We then proceeded to the winery for a tour where we were joined by his son Joey, who makes the very popular Belle Glos Pinot Noir, as well as the Meiomi Pinot Noir. We tasted and

discussed the entire line of Wagner Family wines, which include Mer Soleil, Conundrum, Bell Glos, and of course, Caymus. I would have to say that tasting the Caymus and Bell Glos were the highlights, since we had both of the winemakers right there tasting with us. We were excited when Chuck asked if we would like to taste some Caymus Special Select out of the

barrel, to which we all answered “of course!” We finished the day grabbing some souvenirs that Chuck would not allow us to pay for. As we were leaving, we received one last kind token of appreciation. Chuck had gone back to the cellar and brought out a magnum of 2002 Caymus Special Select that he and Joe signed and gave it to us to enjoy. I was thinking, “This is

Au Sommet 2009 Au Sommet Atlas Peak Cabernet Sauvignon “This blend is 98% cabernet sauvignon and 2% petit verdot. Dark, rich, concentrated flavors. Bold purity of fruit in the nose, very soft and silky palate structure. This wine will ship in the fall of 2012.”

St. Clement 2007 St. Clement Oroppas Napa Valley “The 2007 Oroppas (92% cabernet sauvignon, 6% merlot, and the rest petit verdot and cabernet franc) exhibits a more tannic structure as well as notes of cedarwood, roasted herbs, bay leaf, red and black currants, licorice and toasty oak. It requires 2-3 years of bottle age, and should drink well over the following 20 years.” –90+ Points, Wine Advocate

Markham Vineyards 2010 Cellar 1879 Blend “Sleek and supple, offering appealing aromas of red currant and toasty vanilla, with layered flavors of black cherry, espresso and spice that lead to ripe, supple tannins, merlot, cabernet sauvignon, petit verdot and petit sirah. Drink now through 2017.” – 91 Points, Wine Spectator

Newton 2008 The Puzzle “This Cabernet Sauvignon-based Bordeaux blend is very rich and elaborate, a major league hitter for its spectacular fruit and tannins. The flavors are deep and concentrated, suggesting perfectly ripened blackberries, cassis, and milk chocolate, with a minerality that must come from the soil. It’s also very soft, in the modern style.” – 91 Points, Wine Enthusiast

Raymond 2008 Generations Cabernet Sauvignon “So rich and ripe in fruit, you almost don’t notice that it’s also a complicated and layered wine in structure. Blackberry marmalade, cassis, and cocoa flavors are balanced... An extraordinarily delicious wine.” – 94 Points, Wine Enthusiast

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w i n e t i ps

crazy!” That bottle was enjoyed a few days later at Morimoto’s in downtown Napa. Our second stop of the day was at Conn Creek which turned out to be very interesting indeed. We were met in the unique tasting room by the Director of Hospitality, Paul Asikainen. The AVA (American Viticultural Area) tasting room was truly unique because it included a barrel of Cabernet Sauvignon from each of the Napa AVA’s as well as a picture, description, and soil sample. After tasting each of the barrel samples and taking notes, we were able to blend our own wine to bottle and take home with us. In addition to the Cabs, there were also barrels of Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec, and Petit Verdot to finish off the blend. Just for the record my blend was 20% each from Calistoga, Diamond Mountain, Howell Mountain, St. Helena, rounded off with 15% Merlot and 5% Cabernet Franc. I aptly named it “Coach’s Special Select.” After a morning of tasting, we were off to Rutherford Hill, where we were treated to a lovely picnic lunch under the trees viewing a beautiful valley. Our lunch and wine pairings were hosted by Kay Malaske of Terlato Wine Group. After lunch, we were treated to a tour of their extensive cave system where 8,000 French and American Oak barrels age wine in an ideal, consistent storage environment of 59°F and up to 90% humidity. After visiting Rutherford Hill, our next tasting was truly unique. After the long and winding ride to the top of Atlas Mountain, we were met by John Swartz, who is the General Manager/Partner at Amuse Bouche Winery. We were treated to some wonderful food the chef had prepared on the huge outdoor piazza, right next to the pool, along with some great wines, such as Amuse Bouche Merlot and Au Sommet, to name a few. Of course, being a huge art fan, I was amazed at the numerous Blue Dogs, as well as, a rare Pink Dog by George Rodrigue. Many of the pieces of art displayed were used to create some of the labels for their wines. Almost everything we ate was from the garden at the vineyard as well as some awesome lamb appetizers. As a wonderful parting gift, the chef gave us a bottle of his signature BBQ sauce. For dinner that night, we met up with our 24  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

friend Paul Asikainen of Conn Creek and ate at his recommendation: the Goose & Gander in St. Helena. It is a beautiful little spot where the locals and winemakers hang out. We had “G & Gs” version of a Wedge, which was topped with pork belly and micro greens as well as roasted bone marrow. Both were to die for and needless to say, they have a stellar wine list. Did I mention I probably put on five pounds on this trip? The next morning started with a stop at Dean & Deluca, where we had some beautiful smoked salmon, duck liver pâté, and baguette for breakfast. After that, we were ready for our first stop of the day, the venerable Beringer Estate. This was quite simply the most beautiful historic property I think I have ever seen. The Rhine House, which was completed in 1884, was a classic example of Victorian architecture. The Hudson House, though smaller, was equally impressive, especially given the fact it was built around 1850. After touring the property and caves with Phillipe Thibault from Château St. Jean, we were treated to one of the most educational wine and food pairings I have ever had. In our tasting room, upstairs in the Rhine House, we were confronted with a plate that included steak, white fish, peppered cheese, lemon, apple, salt and water. We systematically tasted White Zinfandel, Chardonnay, Cabernet and Pinot Noir with all of these foods, exploring the differences each flavor had with each wine. It was a really neat exercise that truly articulated the play between food and certain types of wine. We ate lunch on the terrace under the beautiful California sun before heading off to our next stop, St Clement where we tasted some great reds including their 2007 Oroppas. Since we were in the neighborhood, we could not resist stopping in on our friends at Markham. We were in luck because Bryan Bondio, president, and Kimberlee Nicholls, winemaker, were both on property and took time out of their busy day to taste wines and talk winemaking with us. We tasted too many wines to list, but the Cellar 1879 Blend was one of my favorites. Our next to last stop would be to head up to the top of Spring Mountain to tour the winery and grounds of Newton Vineyards which was by far one of the most colorful and beautiful wineries we saw. The gardens are absolutely beautiful. We tasted many of their excellent

wines and my favorites were the Puzzle and the unfiltered Chardonnay. These vineyards are literally terraced on the side of the mountain and look almost impossible to work. Our trip was winding down and after two and a half days of incredible experiences I thought, before we made our last stop, there would be no way to top what we had experienced…was I ever wrong. Enter Raymond Vineyards. We were met at the front door by Mark Drake, the National Sales and Marketing Director for Boisset Family Estates, which owns Raymond Vineyards. We started our tour with examples of their commitment to organic and biodynamic farming. The winery also has an area called Frenchies Winery that is dedicated to those with dogs. The pets are treated to nice beds made of old wine barrels while the adults enjoy the winery. After touring outside we entered the winery and that is where everything changed dramatically! It was as if someone dropped a South Beach nightclub into the middle of a winery. In the Crystal Cellar, I saw more Baccarat Crystal than I have ever seen in one place…incredible chandeliers and mannequins hanging from the ceilings. From there we made our way to The Red Room which is open to members only. Next, we toured the Barrel Room, as well as the Blending Room, before making our way to the Rutherford Room, where we tasted some outstanding wines from the Generations Collection, as well as the R. Collection and Sommelier Selection. Whatever you do, don’t miss their Corridor of Senses, where you can experience the color, smell, and texture of wine. After a long day of tasting, we were led out of the winery to a beautiful courtyard by the pool and into a pool house that looked like something out of Goldfinger…it was just amazing! We were treated to a dinner prepared by Chef Michele Cornu that was out of this world, and it was of course paired with plenty of outstanding wine. It was a fitting end to an extraordinary three days of sampling some of the best Napa has to offer. Would I like to see Napa in the fall? I think so, but I would not trade that for being able to spend the one-on-one time we did with some exceptional wine makers. Steve Adams is Food and Beverage Director for the Hotel Duval in Tallahassee, Florida. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


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Economic and Property Damages Settlement Class

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by Amanda S. Barr he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association retained the law firms of Levin, Papantonio, Thomas, Mitchell, Rafferty and Proctor, P.A., Cooney and Conway and Weitz and Luxenberg, P.C. to represent it with regard to losses sustained as a result of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. There have been some notable developments in the BP oil spill litigation that may impact the rights of certain FRLA members. A class settlement has been reached between the Plaintiffs’ Steering Committee and BP for certain individuals and businesses impacted by BP’s 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The settlement will compensate hundreds of thousands of individuals and businesses who suffered an economic loss as a result of the BP oil spill. The settlement class includes individuals and businesses located within the “Gulf Coast Area” between April 20, 2010 and April 16, 2012. The “Gulf Coast Area,” as defined by the settlement, includes the State of Louisiana, the State of Mississippi, the State of Alabama and certain counties located in the States of Texas and Florida. The Florida counties included in this class settlement are: Bay, Calhoun, Charlotte, Citrus, Collier, Dixie, Escambia, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hernando, Hillsborough, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Lee, Leon, Levy, Liberty, Manatee, Monroe, Okaloosa, Pasco, Pinellas, Santa Rose, Sarasota, Taylor, Wakulla, Walton and Washington. Individuals and businesses located in counties other than those enumerated above are excluded from this settlement. The “Gulf Coast Area” is further broken down by geographical zones A through w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

D. Zone A represents the areas closest to the Gulf of Mexico and moving inland through Zones B, C and D. A business’ zone classification is based upon the physical location of the business in 2010. For those individuals and businesses located within the “Gulf Coast Area,” eligibility also depends on whether the business or individual meets one of the causation requirements. The causation requirements vary depending upon the zone and business type applicable to a specific claim. The settlement is designed to determine eligibility for compensation upon basic financial tests. If your total revenues were down in any month between MayDecember of 2010, you may qualify for compensation. By meeting the basic financial test, you are not required to do anything else to show that your loss was caused by the spill. In other words, regardless of your actual facts and circumstances you are eligible for compensation for all of your losses if you meet the test. While the majority of claims will receive full compensation under the settlement, some claimants may elect to “opt-out” and pursue individual litigation. Claimants electing to opt-out of the settlement must send written notice to the Deepwater Horizon Court-Supervised Settlement Program no later than October 1, 2012. Failure to opt-out on or before October 1, 2012 will result in the Class Member being bound by the terms of the settlement, even though that may result in non-payment of benefits. For more information about the settlement, visit www.deepwaterhorizonsettlements.com. Amanda S. Barr is an attorney with Levin, Papantonio, Thomas, Mitchell, Rafferty & Proctor, P.A.

Administrative Rule Affecting Restaurants and Method of Calculation for the Required 51% Food Service Remains Unchanged by RICHARD TURNER

A

rules workshop was held July 11, at the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Alcoholic Beverages, regarding “Special Restaurant Licenses” (SRX). The purpose of the workshop was to consider administrative changes to Rule 61A3.0141, Florida Administrative Code. At the conclusion of the rules workshop, it was a consensus of the participants that NO CHANGES to the current administrative rule was required at this time. FRLA is extremely pleased with this result. This is a good time to remind all “SRX” holders they should ensure their business operations are sufficient to meet the requirements of their “Special Restaurant License.” Finally, any vendor who serves alcoholic beverages should train their staff and conduct their operations in a manner to meet the requirements of the “Responsible Vendor Act,” Sections 561.701-706, Florida Statutes. To avail oneself of the benefits under the” Responsible Vendor Act” very specific requirements must be met. FRLA, through its training company, Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS), provides this service at reasonable rates. If you have any questions about this or alcoholic beverage training services available through the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, or its affiliates, please contact: Richard Turner at: Rturner@frla.org; (850)224.2250 ext. 248 Geoff Luebkemann at: Gluebkemann@frla. org; (850)224.2250 ext. 249 F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

25


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2012

Columbia GM Guito Honored On 50th Anniversary with Florida’s Oldest Restaurant

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ay back in 1962, John F. Kennedy was President, Johnny Carson took over hosting duties of The Tonight Show, and a young boy named George Guito came to work at the Columbia Restaurant. Fifty years later, George is still working at The Columbia Restaurant, he has never worked anywhere else. Florida’s Oldest Restaurant, the iconic 107-year-old Columbia Restaurant in Ybor City, honored General Manager George Guito for his 50th Anniversary with the fourth and fifth generation family-owned business at their Employee Appreciation Dinner this summer with a video that paid tribute to his amazing career. (Search YouTube. com for “George Guito.” The music accompanying the video is “The Yellow Rose of Texas,” performed by Cesar Gonzmart.) It all started when third generation family member Cesar Gonzmart (current fourth generation coowners Richard and Casey Gonzmart’s father) took a chance on the then 15-yearold George by letting him clean the restaurant. At first Cesar thought George was too young to work, but George begged him to give him a chance. He was paid $35 as a “porter” to mop floors and clean bathrooms six days a week. George became a busboy before long and worked odd jobs at the restaurant. Cesar returned his loyalty and found a way to reward George and the restaurant. He sent George to butcher school and paid the bills. George became a certified butcher, and began cutting all the meat for the kitchen. While working in the kitchen, he learned how to buy produce and supplies, and to cook. When the chef retired, he temporarily took on the cooking. Over the years, he has installed dishwashers, wired the computers, fixed the fountain when it flooded and hung the chandelier. He has worked every job in the restaurant except tending bar and performing in the Flamenco dance shows. Today George knows how to cook everything on the award-winning restaurant’s menu. At his home in West Tampa, paella is his signature dish. In 1992, as Cesar Gonzmart was dying of pancreatic cancer, he insisted that George, who he had practically raised as his own son, become general manager of The Columbia of Ybor City. And that’s where you can find George today. His nickname is “The Mayor of Ybor City.” The original Columbia Restaurant was founded in Tampa’s Historic Ybor City in 1905 by Cuban immigrant Casimiro Hernandez, Sr. All Columbia locations are owned and operated by 4th and 5th generation members of the founding family; except for Columbia Restaurant Cafe at Tampa International Airport which is operated in partnership with HMSHost. Please see www.columbiarestaurant.com for more information. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


u n iqu e a m e n i t i e s

For Kids, By Kids Hyatt Regency Clearwater Beach Resort and Spa launches a new, healthier children’s menu offering fun, fresh and flavorful items including three-course organic menu developed by Alice Waters.

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yatt Regency Clearwater Beach Resort and Spa announced in July the launch of a new, innovative menu, “For Kids By Kids,” which provides more nutritious, fresh and interactive offerings for children. The menu is grounded in Hyatt’s industry-leading philosophy Food. Thoughtfully Sourced. Carefully Served. – promoting healthy people, a healthy planet and healthy communities – and has been developed in association with the Partnership for a Healthier America (PHA). As part of the roll out, separate from the PHA commitment, Hyatt Regency Clearwater Beach will also offer a three- course organic menu for children developed exclusively by renowned food pioneer and chef, Alice Waters. The “For Kids By Kids” menu was tasted, tested and approved by kids, including 11-yearold cooking enthusiast Haile Thomas, who is spearheading a campaign for healthy eating through her online cooking show, Kids Can Cook. Hyatt’s food and beverage team worked with Haile and her peers to ensure offerings on the menu not only meet the brand’s standards for nutrition and quality, but are also fun. Through their research, Hyatt learned that kids today have a greater level of sophistication in their taste preferences, but also enjoy items with which they can interact. To that end, new menu offerings will present a creative way for kids to engage with their food, such as customizing their own pasta dish and “shaking” their own salad. With their new “For Kids By Kids” menu, Hyatt is making children’s health a priority and strives to make the healthy choice, the easy choice for guests. Sample items from the new Hyatt Regency Clearwater Beach Resort and Spa “For Kids By Kids,” menu include: • Breakfast: Top Your Own Taco, a whole wheat tortilla filled with scrambled eggs, cheese and fun toppings; Waffle Dipping Sticks with peanut butter, maple syrup and fruit sauces. • Lunch: Shaken Chopped Salad with roasted chicken, vegetables, brown rice and yogurt basil dressing; Build Your Own Whole Wheat Sub Sandwich with turkey, lettuce, tomato, cheese on a whole wheat mini-sub. (These offerings are w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Cinnamon Pancakes

Sustainable Fish

Create Your Own Pasta

also available during dinner hours). • Dinner: Natural Beef grilled and served with potatoes, roasted vegetables and garden salad; Vegetable and Sesame Rice Noodles with marinated tofu, corn, green beans, basil and cherry tomatoes. Additionally, the menu developed by Alice Waters features a full organic meal offering including a salad, chicken entrée and a dessert. Another unique feature is that for children who prefer to choose the same meal as their parents, they have the option of ordering a half portion off the regular menu at half the price. “We have made an industry-leading commitment to serving food and beverages that are good for our people, our planet and our communities. That is why we have transformed our children’s menu and looked to experts such

as Alice Waters, to help guide our offerings,” said Brian Kramer, General Manager of Hyatt Regency Clearwater Beach Resort and Spa. “We look forward to welcoming our youngest guests to try our new “For Kids By Kids” menu.” “For Kids By Kids” further illustrates Hyatt’s commitment to Partnership for a Healthier America, which will hold Hyatt accountable for continuously improving the nutritional profile of food menus at full-service managed Hyatt properties across the U.S. over the next ten years. Through this commitment, Hyatt’s “For Kids By Kids” will offer fruits and vegetables as the default side item, make low-fat milk available with free refills, meet the most recent U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, My Plate and PHA’s standards and ensure food illustrations depict healthier options. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

27


gr e e n t i ps

Recycling Restaurants Demonstrate Commitment to Community

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ecycling has quickly become an essential part of waste management in homes nationwide, so it’s no surprise that consumers are beginning to expect their restaurants to demonstrate the same environmentally-friendly efforts. One in four foodservice operators say that their guests inquire about their recycling efforts. Numerous foodservice establishments have already taken

28  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

notice and started to re-evaluate the way they handle waste management throughout their establishment. Recycling transforms waste into valuable resources, while saving energy and even generating additional revenue. Outside of saving money, recycling initiatives offer easy publicity, especially when restaurants involve the customers by inviting them to participate in their recycling program or actively promote worthy causes. For example, more than 49 million Americans risk going hungry on a daily basis and yet, more than 100 billion pounds of uneaten, prepared foods end up in landfills every year. Restaurants can significantly cut down on this waste and demonstrate their commitment to the community and the planet by first, simply reducing, reusing and recycling, and second, donating any excess food to a food bank. Check out how you can get your customers involved and other specific ways your establishment can start to reduce, reuse and recycle: • Set up recycling bins or containers. Colorcode your containers and make sure they are clearly identified by posting signs and concise directions. Cut holes in the container lids and use clear, biodegradable plastic bags, so that you can see the recyclables. • Audit your daily waste. Review what your restaurant throws away on a daily basis and identify what you can and cannot recycle. Use this to develop a waste management plan. • Create a recycling environment. Train employees about the importance of recycling and involve customers in your restaurant’s recycling efforts by offering recycling canisters in the front-of-house. Advertise your efforts with signs and tabletop displays. These waste reduction initiatives are part of the more than 90 best practices featured in the National Restaurant Association’s Conserve Sustainability Education Program.SM Other best practices focus on topics such as energy efficiency, water conservation, and building and construction. Visit conserve.restaurant.org to find out more about Conserve and how it can benefit your operation. Sources: National Restaurant Association / Georgia-Pacific Recycling Research 2011; U.S. Department of Agriculture; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


S

U

P

P

LE

M

E

N

T

September is Food Safety Month

By Steve Hoffmann, DBPR

Foodborne Illness Outbreaks in Florida Restaurants Drop 90% Since 1997!

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n August 1995, a major salmonella outbreak occurred at a restaurant in West Palm Beach, Florida. Over the course of a weekend, more than 300 people became ill. This one event proved to be both the final chapter for the restaurant and a major wake up call for food safety in Florida. In the aftermath of this outbreak, the Department of Business and Professional Regulation’s Division of Hotels and Restaurants began to re-evaluate what it was doing and how it was being done. After looking at its mission and checking its focus, the Division decided change was needed. As a result of systematic improvements by the Division and restaurants statewide, the number of reported foodborne illness outbreaks in Florida’s restaurants has decreased by 90 percent since 1997. This is a phenomenal number when you consider that there are currently more than 47,000 public food service establishments in Florida, running the gamut from hot dog vendors to high-end restaurants and all points in between. These restaurants feed not only the year-round residents but also the 80 million plus tourists who visit Florida each year. So, what are the reasons for this remarkable reduction in foodborne outbreaks? Starting in 1997, Florida mandated Food Service Employee Training. This was not job-specific training, but rather a requirement that all employees who handle food receive training in good personal hygiene and foodborne disease prevention. In addition to the employee training, the 1997 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Food Code was adopted in mid 1998. With this version of the Food Code, emphasis began on the need to eliminate bare-hand contact with ready-to-eat food as much as possible and to install extra precautions when it did occur. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

In 2000, the Division adopted the 1999 Food Code and followed that with the adoption of the 2001 Food Code in 2005. This year, the 2009 Food Code will become the new standard for the Division. Each subsequent Food Code has added important new science-based safeguards and expanded the duties and responsibilities of management – all improvements that help control the incidence of foodborne illness. In 2001, the Division of Hotels & Restaurants enrolled in the FDA National Retail Food Regulatory Program Standards. This is a set of national standards designed as a goal to measure the quality of regulatory agencies. Since that initial enrollment, the Division has met five of the nine standards, an accomplishment that is unparalleled by any other restaurant inspection program of the Division’s size. 350 323

90 %

300 250 200 150 100

244

243 226

210

Also in 2001, the Division incorporated Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) Principles into the inspection process. This approach showed the importance of laying a solid foundation of good retail practices upon which to build and allowed the inspectors to get a better overall view and understanding of all the processes involved in the restaurant operation. It also gave a synopsis of how each process interacted with the next. The HACCP approach focused on where things could go wrong in the process and stressed that monitoring and corrective actions should be applied to these critical control points. In 2006, the Division re-emphasized the standardization of all inspectors conducting food service inspections. While this process was not new, the added emphasis helped raise aware-

De cre a se

193 143

sin ce 199 7

134 107

114 86 67

50

44

*Preliminary Data 6/5/2012

41

32

0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 *2011 F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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Food Safety ness of food safety processes, not only with the inspection staff, but throughout the regulated establishments. In 2007, the Division implemented risk-based inspections, an approach that focuses on risk factors - the leading causes of foodborne illnesses. Food source, time/temperature controls, employee health, good hygienic practices and active managerial control became the primary focus in the inspection process. The training of inspectors also became more focused and job specific. The Division teamed up with the FDA for specialized training needs and began using the FDA’s online Office of Regulatory Affairs’ University (ORAU) training programs. On an annual basis, the Division routinely provides more training hours than are mandated.

In 2009, the Division partnered with the FDA on a hand-washing campaign entitled “20 Seconds to Success!” The purpose of this campaign was to educate operators about proper hand-washing, since estimates indicate that proper hand-washing could eliminate nearly half of all cases of foodborne illness. The Division has also been very proactive in developing ways to improve relations with the industry it regulates. The objective was to change the old traditional adversarial roles that often existed and instead develop a relationship based on understanding that both parties ultimately have the same goals. This spirit of working together via cooperation, discussion and mutual respect has been a major factor in reducing the number of foodborne illnesses in

the state. The Division’s mission statement has evolved and changed through the years, but “working with industry” has always been a common theme. Looking back, the Department and the Division have come a long way since August 1995. Better tools, better training, and a clear purpose and focus have helped us on this journey. A 90 percent reduction of foodborne illness cases in 15 years is a remarkable feat. We can continue to improve, and we look forward to working with the industry to do just that. Steve Hoffmann is a FDA Standardized Training Officer with the Florida Division of Hotels and Restaurants, Department of Business and Professional Regulation.

Fresh Produce Food Safety: 2012 Update

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By Susie McKinley

n almost every food service establishment across the state of Florida, fresh produce is a cornerstone of the menu. These delicious and nutritious additions appear in everything from salads, to condiments, drink garnishes, and even entrees. Florida’s agricultural bounty is virtually limitless. In fact, some of our customers eat nothing but vegetables and produce. What could be more healthful than generous servings of fresh Florida produce? Floridians eat fresh produce every day both at home and when dining out of the home and have grown to expect high-quality and safe-toeat fresh produce from Florida’s food service establishments. Along with this healthful trend, though, comes some additional responsibility for food safety. In years past, foodborne illness was primarily associated with protein foods and a few exceptions. Slowly, beans, garlic in oil, sprouts and sautéed onions were added to the list of potentially hazardous foods / temperature control for safety foods. Later, cantaloupe, raspberries, mamey and green onions were culprits in foodborne illness outbreaks as well. Now, leafy

greens, tomatoes, cut melon, basil and watercress have joined the list of foods requiring temperature control for safety. What is behind this expanding need for caution? Three primary reasons have emerged: 1) to deliver year-round fresh produce and in many cases, out-of-season varieties; a global marketplace and supply chain now prevails. More fresh fruits and vegetables are being imported from around the world, frequently from areas with food safety standards substantially weaker than those in the US. 2) Additionally, according to a recent LA Times article, consumer demand for fresh produce has dramatically increased, with produce featured at more meals and in greater quantities than ever before. “The industry’s very success could be one of the reasons behind recent outbreaks. People are eating more fresh produce, including the bagged variety, than ever before.” 3) Lastly, centralized processing of fresh and freshcut produce may be another important reason behind widespread foodborne illness outbreaks – when something goes wrong at a high volume processor, it can affect exponentially more people than ever before. Recently, the American fresh produce industry has experienced widely publicized foodborne illness outbreaks associated with American-grown produce. During the early fall in 2011, 146 people were sickened and 30 deaths were Contact FRLA to solve compliance issues attributed to a Listeria at 866-372-7233 or www.SafeStaff.org monocytogenes

Out of Compliance?

30  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

outbreak that was associated with cantaloupe grown in Colorado. In September 2006, 3 people died (and other deaths are being investigated) and hundreds were sickened from E. coli 0157:H7 tainted spinach traced to a California grower. Late in 2006, another E coli outbreak occurred, sickening 71 customers and temporarily closing 90 restaurants. Lettuce grown in California was implicated in this outbreak; the contamination occurring most likely during the growing process. The Florida Department of Health, charged with providing epidemiology investigations for all foodborne illness outbreaks that occur in the State, in the last 15 years Florida has seen trouble from Salmonella in fresh-squeezed orange juice, Cyclospora in mesclun lettuce, fresh basil and raspberries, Norwalk in green salad and fruit salad, Salmonella in Roma tomatoes and Salmonella typhi (typhoid fever) in mamey. The Department reports that fresh produce can be contaminated with microbial pathogens during the growing process, the production process, and the food handling/preparation process. To mitigate risk and protect patrons, it is important to use a number of precautions when handling fresh produce and fresh-cut produce. While contamination that occurs in the growth and production process is, in most cases not within a food service establishment’s control, restaurateurs can reduce risk by purchasing produce only from approved sources, and checking to be sure deliveries are in good condition, in clean trucks, and in packaging free from dirt, stains and insect contamination, upon receipt and before acceptance of a delivery, visually inspecting the product, the delivery vehicle, F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


Laboratory Testing Continues To Confirm Florida Seafood Is Safe!

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by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services he Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (DACS) is responsible for testing seafood harvested from the Gulf of Mexico to ensure it is safe to eat. Laboratory testing shows that Florida seafood products are plentiful, safe and have not been affected by the oil spill. Between August 2010 and June 18, 2012, the Department’s Division of Food Safety has screened 1854 seafood samples, including 1010 finfish, 171 shrimp, 312 oysters, 164 crabs, 167 clams and 30 lobsters for possible oil contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Except for finfish (at least 1.0 lb fillet), samples represent a composite of multiple organisms (10 crabs, 15 oysters, 0.5 lbs shrimp). All findings are well below the FDA’s levels of concern. See Table 1. With $10 million in additional funding, the DACS Division of Food Safety has enhanced its laboratory capabilities to conduct seafood inspections in an effort to further restore public confidence in the safety of Gulf of Mexico seafood. In addition to PAH analyses, samples have been screened for the dispersant dioctylsulfosuc-

cinate (DOSS) since March, 2011. All findings for dispersant are also well below the FDA’s levels of concern. Current analyses include PAH analyses using the liquid chromatography fluorescence screening or gas chromatography mass spectroscopy and analysis of the dispersant, dioctylsulfosuccinate (DOSS) by liquid chromatography mass

spectroscopy. Continued testing will assure the safety of Florida’s seafood for several years to come. As additional analyses are completed, detailed summaries will be posted.

and its packaging to verify good condition. Additionally, you may want to require that your produce distributor provide guidelines to you that they will use when it appears as though one of the products that they’ve sold may be contaminated. Many growers in the produce industry have or are in the process of developing their own best management practices (BMPs) or good agricultural practices (GAPs) to provide every possible opportunity to insure that their products are not contaminated during the growth or processing phase. Many trade groups, including tomato growers, leafy green growers, and the citrus industry, have stepped up quickly to work on and finalize industry best practices. With nearly 46,500 food service establishments licensed by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation serving more than 18,800,000 residents and more than 86 million visitors per year, Florida’s food service establishments are very busy preparing and serving food.

The most critical control point for fresh and fresh-cut produce safety is during the preparation process. It is imperative that produce, particularly fresh-cut, ready-to-eat produce is handled with food safety in mind. Proper personal hygiene, especially careful and correct hand-washing is essential, when handling fresh produce and fresh-cut produce. Prior to preparation, all fresh produce should be washed, rinsed and dried. Fresh produce should not be cut with a dirty knife due to potential cross-contamination concerns. Cutting boards should be clean, sanitized and in good condition. All food contact surfaces in contact with fresh produce and fresh-cut produce must be clean and sanitized. After preparation, it should be covered and stored in a cooler. Fresh-cut, ready-to-eat produce is a temperature control for safety (TCS) food, and thus must be stored it at 41F or below. Limit the time these food items spend in the temperature danger zone, so to minimize

the growth of microbial pathogens. Closely managing these precautions will help operators capitalize on public demand for healthy, locally sourced produce while maintaining high food safety standards. Serving more than 10,000 members across Florida, FRLA is committed to safe-guarding the needs of the hospitality industry and improving the business climate. Led by CEO, Carol Dover and an active Board of Directors, FLRA has influenced legislation that has saved the industry $1.2 billion in taxes and fees over the past decade. Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association is also part of a strategic alliance with VISIT FLORIDA., the state’s marketing arm. To learn more, visit www.frla.org or call 888372-9119 to find out how you can get involved.

w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Table 1: Summary of DACS Seafood PAH and DOSS Analyses Completion Dates: 8/1/2010 – 6/18/2012

Number of Samples

Range of Findings (mg/kg)

Total

Number without Detections

Number with Detections

Number exceeding LOC*

Finfish

1010

957

53

0

ND – 0.072

Shrimp

171

165

6

0

ND – 0.030

Oysters

312

298

14

0

ND – 0.0052

Crabs

164

163

1

0

ND - 0.005

Clams

167

153

14

0

ND - 0.023

Lobster

30

29

1

0

ND - 0.0099

*LOC = FDA’s Levels of Concern

For more information about testing by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services visit www.freshfromflorida.com.

Susie McKinley is the Editor of FR&L Magazine and is a former Director of the Florida Division of Hotels & Restaurants. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

31


Food Safety h igh-r i sk fo ods

(Part II of a Series)

High-Risk Foods Sprouts, Raw or Rare Protein Foods, Reduced-Oxygen Packaging and Active Managerial Control By Susie McKinley

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s a restaurant owner, manager or person-in-charge, it is an obligation of business to serve safe food to customers. Awareness of and adherence to food safety requirements is the responsibility of all food service management and employees. Why then offer foods that have a long-time association with foodborne illness? Many foods provide an excellent environment for the growth or transmission of foodborne illness. Most of these foods, with correct time and temperature control, correct handling, cooking, cooling and reheating methods, can be safely served to patrons. Still, there are those foods that don’t stand up to food safety even after correct handling, cooking and service. These are high-risk foods. In an earlier edition of Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine, you read about raw milk and raw milk products as a high-risk food. This article will focus on other high-risk foods: sprouts, raw protein, ie: sushi, steak tartare, raw eggs and foods in reduced-oxygen packaging. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) notes Five Risk Factors to Food: 1. Food from unsafe sources 2. Inadequate cooking 3. Improper holding temperatures 4. Contaminated equipment 5. Poor personal hygiene Managers that want to reduce the risk posed to customers are certain to make every effort to steer clear of these risk factors and comply with recommendations to eliminate unsafe risk factors. Unfortunately, in many cases, high-risk foods are of their nature from unsafe sources and serving high-risk foods exposes your operation to one of the risk factors scientifically identified by the FDA. Over the last several years, raw sprouts have been associated with foodborne illness outbreaks of several of the major pathogens: Salmonella, E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes. Europe’s massive outbreak in 2011 was due to contamination from within Egyptian fenugreek seeds and sprouts from those seeds. There were at least 4075 outbreak related 32  Au g ust/ S ept em b er

2012

cases and 50 deaths.* (*Source: http://outbreakdatabase. com/details/international-outbreak-fenugreek-sprouts2011/?vehicle=sprouts) In the United States, foodborne illness due to consumption of sprouts has sickened approximately 2,273 individuals since 1990 according to Drew Falkenstein of MarlerClark. Yet operations continue to use them. Sprouts are typically eaten raw or with light cooking, but with no cook-step. Sprouts are grown in a warm and moist environment, ideal for both the growth of sprouts and foodborne pathogens, and served ready-to-eat, usually as a garnish to salads and /or sandwiches. The FDA recommends to consumers, “…when eating out, ask that raw sprouts not be added to your food. If you buy a ready-made sandwich, salad, or Asian food, check to make sure raw sprouts have not been added….” If your establishment is determined to serve sprouts to customers, be certain that upon receipt and until service maintain sprouts at 41F or below and purchase from an approved source. The second FDA risk factor noted above is inadequate cooking of food. Raw protein foods are appealing to many customers. Sushi is the top choice for many, while others enjoy steak tartare, rare steaks, hamburger or prime rib and or other undercooked meat. Guests may complain when a caesar salad doesn’t contain raw egg because “it’s not a real caesar salad” without the raw egg. Every day restaurateurs are faced with serving raw or undercooked protein products in order to please customers. This dilemma poses a business and food safety risk. Ultimately, the establishment must decide if fulfilling guests’ requests is worth the risk. A well-trained staff, under meticulous active managerial control and using food safety best practices every shift, every day can take some of the risk out of this equation. Raw and undercooked foods have been specifically identified in what regulators term the Consumer Advisory. In Florida, the Consumer Advisory states: “Consuming raw or undercooked meat, eggs, poultry or seafood increases your risk of contracting a foodborne illness – especially if you have certain medical conditions.” In one form or another, the Consumer Advisory F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


language is recommended in the US FDA Model Food Code. The Food Code, developed in conjunction with regulators and industry, provides strong guidance to establishments that may consider serving raw or undercooked protein foods. The Food Code requires the Consumer Advisory in any establishment serving protein foods, and is commonly seen on menus or placards posted near the guest entry point. Food Code developers and food safety regulators require this to help guests understand important risk factors associated with raw or undercooked foods. The choice to not serve raw or undercooked protein foods can dramatically reduce foodborne illness risk in your establishment. If these foods are offered, however, then careful operational controls must be employed. Rigorous attention to cold holding temperatures from receipt to service, using cold ingredients for recipe preparations whenever possible, and rapidly heating foods to correct temperatures, and cor-

rectly posting the Consumer Advisory will all contribute to a safer experience for your guests and protection for your business. Reduced Oxygen Packaging, or ROP, is the process of preparing and packaging food to remove oxygen. This is another risk area that requires careful controls. Removing oxygen from food packaging can lead to the growth and development of pathogens that thrive in anaerobic environments, such as the potentially deadly Clostridium botulinum. ROP can be used to reduce food prep time during busy service periods. Food is prepared, partially cooked, and then packaged in a reduced-oxygen environment. Because this prep method requires great care, skill, and attention to food safety detail, the choice to use this method must be carefully considered and staff using the method highly-trained to reduce risk. ROP foods obtained from commercial approved sources pose less risk than ROP foods prepared and preserved on premises. Carefully weigh the benefits before using

ROP methods in your business. High-risk foods, while trendy and popular, can pose a serious threat to your establishment. If the choice is made to offer these, then careful planning and risk mitigation is required. Using the information included here, and consulting your food distributor and regulatory inspector can yield a system that controls risk, protects your guests, and protects your business. Serving more than 10,000 members across Florida, FRLA is committed to safe-guarding the needs of the hospitality industry and improving the business climate. Led by Carol Dover, President/CEO, and an active Board of Directors, FRLA has influenced legislation resulting in over $1.2 billion in tax and fee savings over the past decade. To learn more about the FRLA, visit www.frla.org or call 888-3729119 to find out how you can get involved. Susan McKinley is the Editor of FR&L Magazine and is a former Director of the Florida Division of Hotels & Restaurants.

Lionfish – Toxic?

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By Susie McKinley

n recent years, the beautiful lionfish, native to the Indian and Pacific Oceans, has been identified as an invasive species in and around Florida’s coastal waterways, the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Originally brought to the United States as an aquarium species, lionfish were likely released into the wild and are now populating waters surrounding Florida at an alarming rate because the fish has no known predators in the region. Lionfish are poisonous to both fish and man. In an effort to reduce the lionfish’s impact on the environment, several activities have been encouraged and / or undertaken to assist in reducing the population -- one of which is to eat the invasive species. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has even developed an eat lionfish campaign “If we can’t beat them, let’s eat them!” However, lionfish have recently been associated with Ciguatera, a seafood toxin that has dramatic symptoms for humans who’ve consumed fish contaminated with the toxin, including a reversal of hot and cold sensations. Early symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, etc. and other symptoms can include tingling of the extremities and mouth. Ciguatera is typically associated with grouper, snapper and other large reef fish. NOAA is now recommending to lionfish harvesters to avoid eating lionfish found in waters associated with Ciguatera fish poisoning. According to the World Health Organization (WHO),”Outbreaks of ciguatera are limited in distribution and time and are usually localized.” If your establishment chooses to serve lionfish, be certain that it was not harvested from waters associated with Ciguatera. Local fishermen may be the best source to determine waters that are free from the toxin. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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Food Safety

Seafood Misrepresentation by Susie McKinley

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perators should be aware that serving any misrepresented, mislabeled or misbranded food is illegal. Since 2006, there have been 1,435 cases of food misrepresentation in restaurants prosecuted by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Hotels and Restaurants. The majority of these cases relate to seafood fraud. Operators knowingly serving misrepresented food can be found guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor. Fines may also be charged and restaurant licenses can be suspended or revoked. Unfortunately, seafood “fraud” is an ongoing problem for seafood lovers. A recent study conducted by Oceana, an international ocean conservation group, found that “…31% of seafood tested in South Florida is mislabeled.” The study also notes that seafood fraud in South Florida is lower than many other U.S. locations. According to Oceana, “…but just because the numbers are lower in South Florida doesn’t mean that seafood fraud is any more acceptable. Some of the fish being served under a different name pose risks to health and sustainability. The study found that king mackerel, a high mercury fish with a health warning for sensitive groups, was being marketed as ‘grouper.’ The large amount of seafood coming into the U.S. market can make it difficult to trace each item to its source.” As an answer to seafood misbranding the group is asking the federal government implement a “traceability system” to assist U.S. consumers in knowing what they are eating. Seafood fraud is essentially serving one type of seafood and declaring on the menu or the daily specials board that it is another type of seafood. There are many scenarios in which this violation plays out: imitation crab is served and is declared as real crab, one type of fish is served and another is declared on the menu, and the like. In many cases, the misrepresented fish is a species of lesser value that is imported from another country that may or may not have food safety standards equal to those of the United States. When purchasing seafood for your operation, be certain that your supplier is a licensed seafood dealer. If the price for the seafood seems to be less expensive than usual, the seafood may be misbranded or misrepresented. Be familiar with the color and texture of the popular seafood that you serve. If you receive seafood that doesn’t appear to be “legit,” don’t accept it, and return it to the vendor. By following these recommendations, you can help prevent seafood fraud in your operation. Susie McKinley is the Editor of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine. 34  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

Boil Water Notice

These procedures must be observed while a “Boil Water Notice” is in effect: Tap Water • Do not serve water from faucets until local health authorities advise the water is safe for consumption. Use only bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled tap water. Boil water at a rolling boil for one minute to kill infectious organisms. • An alternative method for areas without power is to mix 8 drops (1/8 teaspoon) of unscented household bleach per gallon of water and allow to stand for 30 minutes. If the water is cloudy in appearance, add 16 drops (1/4 teaspoon) and let stand for 30 minutes. (Water will not be toxic, but may have a chlorine odor and taste.) Note: Using bleach will not kill parasites that may be present, however boiling will kill parasites.

Ice, Ice-Making, Beverage & Water Vending • Ice bagged or made prior to the issuance of the boil water notice may be used. • Ice produced in ice machines after the issuance of a boil water notice must be discarded and machines not restarted until the water supply is deemed safe. Sanitize the interior of the ice machine, ice trays and built-in ice-makers with two teaspoons (100+ ppm) of household bleach in one gallon of water prior to restarting the ice machine or ice-maker. • Disconnect or turn off water vending machines, drinking fountains, misters, ice-making units and soda machines to prevent their use. • Filters in water lines should be replaced if the water supplier detected bacteria in the water samples or if debris accumulation is observed in the filter(s). Information regarding the presence of bacteria will be provided by your water supplier or the news media. Handwashing • Do not use tap water for handwashing. Use only bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled (and safely cooled) tap water. After proper handwashing, use a sanitizing solution on the hands. This may be accomplished by using a commercial hand sanitizing lotion that requires no rinse or a chlorine bleach solution

of two teaspoons of household bleach in one gallon of water. Single-use gloves may be used to provide additional protection after proper handwashing. • No bare hand contact with ready-toeat food is allowed while boil water notice is in effect. Cooking & Cleaning • Food equipment, utensils and foodcontact surfaces that must be cleaned in place (does not fit into a threecompartment sink), may be cleaned with steam with no additives, a sanitizing mix of bottled or boiled water and bleach (50-100 ppm) or other approved sanitizing solution. • Do not use tap water for food processing or food preparation until the “BOIL WATER NOTICE” is lifted. Use only bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled tap water. Dishwashing/Warewashing • Manually wash, rinse and sanitize dishes, food equipment and utensils with bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled tap water utilizing a three-compartment sink in the approved manner. • Mechanical dishwashers may be used only to remove food residue and debris, if followed by a manual wash, rinse and sanitization as described above. Rescinding the Boil Water Notice • You will be advised by the local Health Department directly or through the news media when a “BOIL WATER NOTICE” has been rescinded (lifted). AFTER the “BOIL WATER NOTICE” is lifted, allow water to run for five minutes at each tap to flush the lines with safe water. Remember to include misters, drinking fountains, ice makers (discard the first binful), soda machines, etc., when flushing the lines.

If you require further information, contact your local water supplier. If you have questions about the BOIL WATER NOTICE, please contact your licensing agency and visit www. MyFloridaLicense.com/dbpr/hr/.

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Active Managerial Control

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By Steve Hoffmann, DBPR ave you ever just sat down and read the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Food Code for fun? OK….maybe you were busy doing other things, like running a business. If that business happens to be a restaurant in Florida, you may want to make reading the FDA Food Code part of your summer reading. Like most books, the Food Code is divided into chapters. The first chapter is made up of definitions so you can understand all the terms used throughout the code. Chapter 2 jumps right into “Management and Personnel.” Long before any minimum requirements about foods, sources, temperatures, parts per million (ppm), inches off the floor, vermin control, chemicals, plumbing or sanitizing are explained, the Food Code talks about the responsibilities of management – the person in charge, the boss, the “buck stops here” person. The reason for this is simple – the management and employees are the first line of defense against factors that could ultimately cause a foodborne illness outbreak. In the 1993 FDA Food Code, the chapter for management was 14 pages long. In the 2009 Food Code, this same chapter has expanded to 23 pages. You can expect the 2013 Food Code to place even more emphasis on management and personnel knowledge and practices. Clearly the responsibility and importance of management is growing. You might ask why this is happening. While a restaurant may be open more than 3,000 hours a year, regulatory inspectors usually only “see” what goes on in the establishment three to four hours per year. The other 2,996 hours are management’s responsibility. Keeping all the food safety issues under control, providing guidance to employees and monitoring risk factors all contribute to the concept of what is collectively referred to as “active managerial control.” The increasing cost of traditional regulatory activity combined with the public’s desire to minimize government growth challenges regulatory agencies to maximize the effectiveness of existing staff and resources. Through a series of innovative quality initiatives and risk-based inspections, a program can concentrate its efforts on protecting the public by eliminating sources of foodborne illness. This approach is creative, cost effective and empowering because it allows inspectors to involve restaurant operators in protecting the food supply. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Florida Food Managers get your mandated ServSafe® certification at the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show September 23, 2012.

While Food Manager Certification and mandated employee training are key comFood managers in Florida must receive this certification. ponents in preventing foodborne Register for your exam www.safestaff.org illness, simply passing a test and getting a card is not sufficient proof that what was learned has been put into or foodborne illness – is not an option. practice. Active managerial control is using that Focusing an inspection on the risk facacquired knowledge and applying it in the daytors and how they are controlled is the best to-day operation of the establishment. This is use of the inspector’s and the operator’s time, why inspectors ask so many questions during an energy and resources. When Management inspection about employee health policies, food develops,implements, and enforces a food safety sources, hand washing, good personal hygiene, system to address foodborne illness risk factors, temperature control and cross contamination. “Active Managerial Control” is in effect. The These items represent the risk factors that most presence of a tube of chlorine test strips on top commonly cause foodborne illness. It is much of the dish-machine may meet the requirement more effective to have a preventive food safety of the food code, but actually using them a few program than a reactive policy that only kicks in times a day to verify that proper sanitization is after control in the establishment has been lost. occurring is Active Managerial Control. Every process from receiving and cold holdActive Managerial Control may require some ing to cooking, cooling, re-heating and hot additional work in the beginning, but knowing holding have certain associated risk factors, your restaurant provides safe food, is clean, and some of which may be unique to that specific makes a profit, along with no surprise violations process (e.g., approved source and receiving). during your inspection can feel like a dream. It’s However, some risk factors like time/temperaall about being proactive, not reactive, to factors ture control and cross contamination apply to that influence your operation. After all, it IS all processes. your business. How management controls the risks associSteve Hoffmann is a FDA Standardized ated with each process and the corrective actions Training Officer with the Florida Division of it takes when a problem arises will define the Active Managerial Control in that establishment. Hotels and Restaurants, Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Management must be proactive since “failure” –

The Mother of Farm-to-Table

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lice Waters and Chez Panisse by Thomas McNamee is an interesting book about the “mother” of farm-to-table and market cooking. Decades ago, Alice Waters single-handedly brought this style of cooking, shopping and living to American society and shared it with guests at her now famous restaurant, Chez Panisse. Alice Waters has been credited with being the founder of “California” cuisine. This is a great read for anyone interested in the farm-to-table movement.

Poisoned

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f you want to read a “riveting” description of the foodborne illness outbreak that changed America’s approach to food safety forever, Poisoned, by accomplished author, Jeff Benedict, is a book that you won’t want to miss. Published in 2011, the book provides a current look into foodborne illness and its aftermath.

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Food Safety

Farm to Table Movement

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By Commissioner Adam H. Putnam hough a national market of food production and distribution is critical to meeting the needs of the American population, the “farm to table” movement yields great benefits for both consumers and producers. “Farm to table” is a growing trend that refers to the consumption of locally-grown food or food that travels the shortest distance from the farm to the table. For consumers, locally-grown fruits and vegetables are fresher, last longer and offer the highest nutrient density. Purchasing locally-grown fresh produce is an opportunity for community residents to interact with their local farmers and support their local economy. Though the “farm to table” movement minimizes processing and transportation of agricultural products, consumers can be confident that the safety and quality standards for these products remain high. Many Florida growers participate in Good Agricultural Practices and Good Handling Practices programs, which promote best practices to verify that fruits and vegetables are produced, packed, handled and stored in the safest manner possible to minimize risks of microbial food safety hazards. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Audits of produce suppliers throughout the production and supply chain verify these industryrecognized practices are upheld. For producers, serving their fresh products to their neighbors yields great benefits as well. The local market provides another potential avenue for distribution of their products. By eliminating packaging and transportation expenses, producers are able to charge less for their products and reap more profit. Furthermore, the exchange is an opportunity to educate consumers about where their food comes from and grow appreciation for the importance of agriculture. Here in Florida, it’s easy to support the “farm to table” movement. The state’s yearround growing season yields fresh options every month. With nearly 300 commodities produced in Florida, our growers offer a wide variety of ingredients to choose Farm to Table Movement. What’s more, Fresh From Florida products have a strong reputation for being the freshest and highest quality products in the world. Visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com to learn more about Fresh From Florida products. Adam H. Putnam is Florida’s Commissioner of Agriculture and Consumer Services. 36  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

Florida Crops Seasonal Availability JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

Avocado Bell Pepper Blueberry Broccoli Cabbage Cantaloupe Carambola Carrot Cauliflower Celery Cucumber Eggplant Grapefruit Grape Guava Lettuce Lime Longan Lychee Mango Mushroom Onion Orange Papaya Passion Fruit Peanut Potato Radish Snap Bean Spinach Squash Strawberry Sweet Corn Tangerine Tomato Watermleon JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

*Orange shows available months.

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w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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38  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

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Se p t 2 2 –24 , 2 012 • Or a ng e C ou n t y C on v e n t ion C e n t e r • Or l a n d o

The Southeast Foodservice Industry Prepares for

The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show

Pizza Team Trials Just Part of the Fun PMQ Pizza Magazine will host the 6th Annual U.S. Pizza Team Trials and the American Pizza Championship in Orlando September 23-24, 2012. This competition will bring pizzaiolos from around the country to the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show and Pizza Pavilion to compete for spots on the U.S. Pizza Team and a chance to accompany the team to the World Pizza Championships in Italy in the Spring of 2013. AMERICAN PIZZA CHAMPIONSHIP (September 23, 2012) The American Pizza Championship pits some of the country’s top pizza chefs against each other for the title of Best Pizza in the U.S. Pizzas are judged by a panel of industry professionals (and the occasional celebrity) on appearance, commercial viability and most importantly…taste! A previous competition was judged by several cast members of HBO’s “The Sopranos”. This year’s competition will be held at NYPD Pizzeria’s Metro West location, which has warmly welcomed the U.S. Pizza Team, allowing them to compete during operational hours.

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Se p t 2 2 –24 , 2 012 • Or a ng e C ou n t y C on v e n t ion C e n t e r • Or l a n d o

U.S. PIZZA TEAM TRIALS (September 24, 2012) By far the most visually stimulating segment of the competition, the U.S. Pizza Team Trials feature an array of events testing the speed, agility and acrobatic skills of the competitors. FASTEST PIE: Competitor’s speed is put on display in the Fastest Dough Making competition. Designed to see who can slap out five dough balls in the fastest time, the flour flies off the table as competitors beat, pound and stretch dough balls at breakneck speeds. LARGEST DOUGH STRETCH: The name says it all. This competition gives competitors five minutes to stretch a regulation size dough ball to its utmost breaking point. The dough becomes almost transparent as competitors use many different techniques to stretch it, including spinning, stretching with their elbows and even placing the dough on their heads and jumping, allowing the dough’s own weight to stretch itself, often large enough for a grown man to hide behind.

ACROBATICS: By far the crowd favorite and crowning moment of the competition, dough flies high and the air is filled with a cloud of flour as the competitors perform a three-minute acrobatic freestyle routine. Often dramatic and always exciting, the routines catch the eye as dough spinners toss dough through their legs, over their shoulders and lying on their backs while juggling two to three pizza doughs at a time, all set to fast paced and foot stomping music. The occasional dough has also been lit on fire…while the competitor is blind folded! The first place winner of the culinary and acrobatic competitions will earns a coveted spot on the US Pizza Team, and the grand prize of an all expense paid trip to Italy in April of 2013 to represent the United States in the World Pizza Championships. (worldpizzachampionship.com) These competitions were made possible with the help of U.S. Pizza Team sponsors: Pizzaware, Gordon Food Service, California Milk Advisory Board, Paradise Tomato Kitchens, Pizza.com, La Nova, Pizza Packet, Cheney Brothers, Liguria, Fontanini Italian Meats and Sausages, Univex, Bag Solutions, Marsal & Sons, DeIorio’s and Ruxter.

Special Event Line-Up The 2012 Ferdinand Metz Foodservice Forum offers over 40 sessions tailored to the needs of food service operators. Thousands of industry leaders will gather at these sessions, offered at no charge, to profit from real applicable business lessons, the latest information on trends and best practices in the market. This year’s emphasis on trends will include sessions on social media, catering, healthy/green, beverages, legal, top business management, networking, staffing and hospitality. ALL NEW Food Trends Experience is a tasting adventure providing direct access to products, flavors and ingredients driving the most recent trends in the market – healthy, organic, sustainable, ethnic, artisanal, and more. Presented within the Show, the Food Trends Experience is the foodservice professionals’ fastest and most convenient way to see, taste, discover and learn about the new culinary innovations that will inspire creative and fresh menu ideas, delight customers and drive profits. Meals of Hope: FRLA and the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show is joining forces with Meals of Hope to build 100,000 meals for local families in need. This new charity team challenge will gather teams of 8-10 people for a race against the clock to build as many meals as possible. There will be prizes for the best team spirit and most meals created. World Class Culinary Competitions managed and organized by the American Culinary Federation (ACF)/Central Florida Chapter (CFC). Chefs will compete in the Student Florida State Champion Team Skills Competition, Taste of Elegance Pork Signature Recipe Competition, the USA Culinary Cup Team Competition, and the Pastry Challenge. Many of the award winning meals will be served during the Chef’s Table Luncheons, a four-course surprise lunch prepared by the participating chefs. The 2nd Annual Foodservice Council for Women and Networking Event provides a community for women to develop and advance their business knowledge, contacts & careers and to connect, exchange, and discuss relevant topics in foodservice. Presented by Kathleen Wood of Kathleen Wood Partners, Ferdinand Metz, and Reed Exhibitions.

Sonya Moore, Illustrator; Nation’s Restaurant News. 40  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

The FRLA Big Party - Southern Style: The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association will host the Show’s hottest party taking place on Saturday, September 22 from 6:30 – 9:00 pm at BB Kings - Pointe Orlando. Guests will enjoy the rocking music at BB Kings while doing business in the one of the best venues in town. Tickets are $50/person in advance and include open bar and appetizers. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


Se p t 2 2 –24 , 2 012 • Or a ng e C ou n t y C on v e n t ion C e n t e r • Or l a n d o

Food Trends Experience Featured at the Show Over 8,000 restaurant and foodservice buying professionals plan to attend the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show with one thing on their agenda - FOOD. This year, show producer Reed Exhibitions will debut the Food Trends Experience, a new opportunity for food companies to gain exposure by introducing their products to food buyers who are searching for the hottest trends. The Food Trends Experience will consist of a 25,000 square foot diamond shaped area reserved for food products aligned with current food trends - from healthy, ethnic, fusion, hot flavors and more. This new forum takes food purveyors outside the traditional trade-show booth for a new cost-effective, high-impact professional environment. This area will include a Culinary Demonstration Theater, where restaurant and foodservice industry trends can be highlighted in an educational, interactive and entertaining way. “We are listening to our attendees who visit the Show to source the latest food products and we are excited to offer this new feature for restaurant owners, chefs and foodservice operators to find unique, new and interesting food and

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beverage items,” said Ron Mathews, Industry Vice President for Reed Exhibitions’ Foodservice Events. “An independent jury will review all submissions for the Food Trends Experience to ensure that only the newest specialty food and beverage products are featured. This new feature area is a terrific value for smaller businesses that have great products and want the opportunity to network and gain exposure.” A sampling of companies already approved

include: Raw Foods, Processors Co-Op, Amoy North America, HomeFreeTreats, Ducktrap River, Domino, Greek Island Spice, Captain Foods and Westminster Bakers... with more being added every day! Product lines include juices, seafood, ethnic products, gluten free, healthy and more. For details, visit the event website at www.flrestaurantandlodgingshow. com.

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42  Au g ust/ S ept em b er

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EZ Wings...............................................................2144 Filter Pure Systems Inc........................................1226 Finn Marketing Group Inc.....................................1401 Fishbowl Inc..........................................................1549 FLHIP......................................................................1750 Florida Agents........................................................TBA Florida Dept of Business & Professional   Regulation........................................................ 1053 Florida International University...........................1252 Florida Natural Gas Association (GetGasFlorida.com).........................................1743 Florida Power & Light...........................................1909 Florida Propane Gas Safety, Education & Research Council.......................................... 1036 Florida Reps...........................................................1631 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Assn.....................1701 Focus POS Systems Inc.......................................1625 Fontanini Italian Meats.........................................1455 Food Equipment Representatives........................1630 Fresh Brew Innovations.......................................1132 Fresh Cup Magazine.............................................1041 Front of The House................................................1413

Floorplan

THEATER 1

THEATER 2

1082a

1283a

DEMO THEATER

FTE1070

FTE1270

FTE1370

CULINARY COMPETITION AND CHEF’S TABLE LUNCHEONS

FTE1170

FTE1160

FTE1060

FTE1360

FTE1260

1560 1056 1054

1055 1154

1155 1254

1354

1052

1053 1152

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1050

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1048

1049 1148

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1245

1345

1043 1142

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1243 1342

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1040

1455 1554

1341 1438

1041 1140 1039 1138

1036

1037 1136

1137

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1339 1436

1133

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1333

1131 1230

1231 1330

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1129 1228

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1555 1654 1553 1652

1353 1452

1251

1451 1550

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1449 1548

1549 1648

THEATER 3 NEW PRODUCTS GALLERY

PHOTO BOOTH

1437

1034

Fruit Fly BarPro.....................................................1025 Fuel 21st................................................................1049 G.S. Gelato & Desserts Inc...................................1136 Garden Protein International................................1551 Gasket Guy of Orlando..........................................1341 Gaskets Rock.........................................................1429 geoMOFO...............................................................1010 Gift Assistants USA............................................. 2026 Glacial Energy...................................................... 1343 Gold Medal Products........................................... 1348 Gordon Food Service, Florida Division................1310 Gourmet Foods International...............................1813 Greek Island Spice Inc...........................................TBA Greenpacks USA...................................................1345 Grosfillex Inc.........................................................1631 Guittard Chocolate Company...............................1850 Halperns Purveyors of Steak & Seafood.............1519 Hammerstahl Cutlery...........................................2019 Happy Feet Inc......................................................2136 Harbortouch..........................................................2114 Heartland Payment Systems...............................1701 HK France..............................................................1424 Homefree LLC.........................................................TBA Honey Smoked Fish Company.............................1133 Hoshizaki America................................................1739 Hot Action Sportswear.........................................1342 i.Business Magazine Kiosk.................................. 1005 I.C.E. Infinite Creative Enterprises.......................2135 i.Menu Magazine...................................................TBA Ice Cream 36 Supplies............................................... 1118

1032

1033 1132

1030

1031 1130

1028

1029 1027 1126 1025 1124 1023

1122

1020

1021

1018

1019 1118

Gourmet Food Pavilion

3M Foodservice Division..................................... 2027 A to Z Printing + Graphics...................................2147 A-1 HR....................................................................1055 Abacus Business Solutions..................................1219 ABC Research Corp..............................................1926 Absolute Source...................................................1947 AcclaimPOS Solutions Inc.................................. 1005 Aldelo, LP...............................................................1637 Alegacy Foodservice Products Group Inc..........1229 Aloha POS..............................................................1219 Alsco Inc................................................................2112 Altamar Foods Corp............................................. 1940 Amana ACP...........................................................1325 American Beverage Marketers-Finest Call........ 1045 American Culinary Federation,   Central Florida Chapter.....................................TBA American Express-Open......................................1927 American Trading Company.................................1001 Americas Cuisine..................................................2105 Americo Inc........................................................... 1114 AmeriGas Propane................................................1231 Amoy North America.............................................TBA Amy’s Kitchen........................................................TBA Anchor Food Brokers............................................1555 A-NIKS Outdoor Comfort Solutions.....................2129 Applied Media Technologies Corp...................... 1643 Artuso Pastry Foods Corp.....................................TBA ASI/Restaurant Manager/Write On Handheld....1207 Atlantic Aqua Farms Inc........................................TBA Avery Dennison.....................................................1641 Award Excellence.................................................1014 Bar Solutions.........................................................1731 Bevinco of Florida.................................................1548 Bindi Dessert Service Inc.....................................1130 Bizerba Inc, USA.................................................. 1648 Black Rock Grill Limited....................................... 1033 Blackstone.............................................................2106 Blue Bell Creameries............................................1138 BPI Certified Tender dba Two Rivers Certified Tender.............................1919 Broaster Pressure Fryer.......................................1222 Brooklyn Knish......................................................1554 Bugambilia International Inc................................1905 Burrows Paper Corporation.................................1152 Cabot Creamery Cooperative...............................1242 California Olive Ranch............................................TBA Cambro Mfg Co.....................................................1301 Capital For Merchants LLC...................................1652 Captain Foods........................................................TBA Carmi Flavor & Fragrance Co Inc..........................TBA Cendyn.................................................................. 1005 Chef Rubber...........................................................1853 Cheftec/Culinary Software Services................. 2040 Chernoff Sales Inc..................................................TBA Chetu Inc............................................................... 1005 Citrus America, Inc................................................TBA Click Clack US LLC................................................1833 Clipper Mill............................................................1015 CloudClean.............................................................1248 CMSText................................................................1901 Concord Foods Inc................................................1428 controlPLAY Inc................................................... 1943 Conway Imports Co., Inc.....................................1937 Cookshack Inc.......................................................1845 Cooper Tea Company........................................... 1843 Craftis Corporation...............................................2123 Creative Water Concepts, Inc..............................2104 Cusanos Italian Bakery.........................................2012 Custom Sales & Service.......................................1533 Daiya Foods Inc......................................................TBA David’s Cookies.....................................................1449 Debit Technologies Inc........................................ 1840 Delifrance..............................................................1700 Delivery Concepts East........................................2155 Design Furnishings Inc.........................................1748 Digital Dining.........................................................1011 Dinerware By Pinnacle Hospitality Systems......1225 DirectTV.................................................................1228 Domino Foods Inc..................................................TBA Donper America....................................................1513 Double D” Knitting and Glove Inc”.......................2119 Dr Pepper Snapple Group.....................................1930 Drum Rock Specialty........................................... 2054 Ducktrap of Maine.................................................TBA Dwellfire/Chilldisc.................................................1837 Dynamic USA........................................................1749 E. Sam Jones Distributor, Inc............................. 2023 Easy Foods Inc..................................................... 2005 Eaton Marketing & Associates.............................TBA ECOFUEL Worldwide Inc......................................1028 Ecolab Inc..............................................................1913 EDDM Experts / SonicPrint.com......................... 2045 Electro Freeze........................................................1842 Empire Equipment Company................................1201 Enomatic Wine Serving Systems........................1653 Envirotub.............................................................. 1006 Exact Payroll Inc...................................................1233

1127 1226 1125

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1225 1324

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1016 1014

1015 1114

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1005 1104

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1001 1100

1101

1207

1006 1004 1000

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Ice Design Center, division of Baker Distributing aka Manitowic ICE........................1109 Ice-O-Matic...........................................................1331 Ifranchise Group Inc............................................ 2044 Imperial Range......................................................1324 Infinite Energy.......................................................1230 Ink Trax Inc............................................................2113 Inventure Foods, Inc.............................................1553 Island Oasis...........................................................2118 JCR Systems.........................................................1219 Jester Beverages..................................................1838 JLA Equipment Distributors.................................1529 John E. Koerner & Co, Inc....................................1753 Johnson & Wales University...............................2109 Jones Dairy Farm..................................................1131 Joseph’s Gourmet Pasta & Sauce Co.................1142 Keiser University Center for Culinary Arts..........1654 Kellogg Company..................................................1127 KinniKinnick Foods Inc...........................................TBA Kitchens with Confidence................................... 2042 Kontos Foods Mediterranean................................TBA Koppert Cress, USA..............................................1936 Le Cordon Bleu......................................................1354 Liberty Bell Steak Company................................ 2009 LoLo........................................................................1333 Long Range Systems LLC.....................................1736 M & M Asphalt......................................................1155 Magefesa, USA......................................................TBA Makelide Wood Products Co.Ltd.........................1442 Marathon Engineering Corp.................................1031 Marinel Inc..............................................................TBA Marsal & Son..............................................1330, 1332

Floorplan

FLOOR PLAN

1572

Pizza

1655

1954

1955 2054 1953 2052

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1853 1952

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1949

DEMO STAGE

2155 2153 2151 2149

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1843 1942

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2043 2142

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Pizza Pavilion

1643 1742

2147

1743 1842

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1833 1932

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2133

1831 1930

1931

2031 2130

2131

2029 2128

2129

1939

2041

2140 2138

2141

Matt & Steve’s Beverage Co................................1140 Matt Aloia Foods LLC...........................................2126 McCall Service Inc................................................1016 Mercer Cutlery......................................................1928 Mercury................................................................. 2111 Meridian Star Merchant Services.......................1245 Miami Trailer.........................................................2013 MIC Food................................................................TBA Michigan State University...................................1051 Micros Systems Inc..............................................2117 Milano Food USA..................................................1018 Mobile POS, Inc.................................................... 1005 Modern Business Associates Inc........................ 1112 Modern Line Furniture..........................................1407 Moffat Turbofan................................................... 2033 Molto Gourmet Foods/ Gelato & Ice Cream....... 1448 Mr. Oil Saver......................................................... 1043 Multigrains Bakeries Inc......................................1724

2139 2137

1731

1928 1827 1926

2028

1927 2026

1625 1724

2027 2126 2025 2124 2023 2122 2021 2120

1719

1619

1819

2019 2118

1919

New Exhibitor Pavilion

2135

1631

2123 2121 2119 2117

1713

1613

1813

2114

2115

1913 2012

2013 2112

2113

1909

2009

2109

2111

1706

1601 1700

1701

2006

2007 2106

2107

1905 2004

2005 2104

2105

1901

2001

2101

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Placon....................................................................1154 PMQ - Pizza Magazine..........................................2149 POSabilities Hospitality Group.............................1219 Pregel America Inc...............................................1121 Premium Blend-Santos Sangria.......................... 1020 Prime Line Distributors Inc...................................1149 Pristine Bio Diesel................................................ 1848 Pro Energy.............................................................2107 Processors Co-op Inc, Frozen Food Company.....TBA Progressive Specialty Glass Co...........................1931 Quickcue, LLC....................................................... 1005 Randolph Packing.................................................1145 Rao’s Specialty Foods Inc.................................... 1119 Raw Foods International, LLC...............................TBA RCC Associates....................................................1336 RDS of Florida........................................................1237 Regal Springs Tilapia........................................... 1000 Repeat Rewards....................................................2120 Res-Tek Inc............................................................1349 Return On Ingredients®.......................................1751 Review Monitoring Services................................1945 RL Schreiber Inc....................................................1126 Roman Packaging.................................................1254 Rosen College of Hospitality Mgmt.....................1153 Rowland Coffee Roasters Inc............................. 2036 San Bernadino Ice Cream.....................................1831 SAS Shoemakers..................................................1836 Schwan’s Food Company.....................................1019 Shangri La Tea Company......................................1427 Silikal America..................................................... 2037 SmokinTex, LLC.................................................... 1034 Solaira-Inforesight Consumer Products............. 2006 Somerset Industries Inc.......................................1938 Source Contract Furniture....................................1319 Spaceman International USA, Inc...................... 2025 Standard Coffee Service Company.....................1524 Star Micronics Inc............................................... 1005 Stefano’s Gelato.....................................................TBA Steve’s Frozen Chillers.........................................1101 Storetech Inc.........................................................1249 Sugart Group Ltd, USA.........................................1742 Sun Telecom International Inc............................ 1944 Sunglow Industries Inc.........................................1737 Sweet Mesquite Bakery Inc.................................1932 Swisher Hygiene.................................................. 2028 Systemfiltration Inc..............................................1037 Tallowmasters LLC...............................................2121 Taylor Freezer Sales Company.............................1218 Taylor US...............................................................1218 TBS Beverage.......................................................1222 TeamSable POS.................................................... 2007 Terminix International...........................................1204 TG Lee Dairy......................................................... 2004 Thats Different ...Chocolates................................TBA The Bruss Company..............................................1706 The Culinary Institute of America........................1655 The Ice Cream Club Inc.........................................1744 The Mancini Packing Co.......................................2145 The Neil Jones Food Companies.........................1125 TheRestaurantExpert.com...................................1352 Thunderbird Food Machinery...............................1105 TMI Trading Corp..................................................1123 Today’s Restaurant News................................... 1040 Torani.....................................................................1243 Toufayan Bakery of Florida..................................1129 TPI Corporation.....................................................1436 TransAct Technologies.........................................1250 Tristan International..............................................1841 Tropical Enterprises LTD.......................................1849 True Food Service Equipment Co..........................TBA Tundra Restaurant Supplies.................................1941 Ultra Green Inc..................................................... 1148 Ultra Thin Pizza Shells..........................................1124 Uniform Sales Inc................................................. 1054 United States Postal Service.............................. 2049 UnitedHealthcare..................................................1701 University of South Florida at   Sarasota-Manatee........................................... 1039 Univex Corp...........................................................1056 Unox Inc.................................................................1619 US Foodservice.....................................................1719 Valley Proteins Inc................................................2133 Veterans Salute......................................................TBA Vinyl Repair Master............................................. 2021 Vitrifrigo.................................................................1939 Vollrath Company, L.L.C., The..............................1713 Walco Stainless....................................................1339 Walking Tree Farms...............................................TBA Westminster Bakers..............................................TBA Whaley Foodservice Repairs...............................1933 Wikki Stix Company.............................................1426 Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board........................1613 Your Green 2 Go....................................................1013 Zonal USA..............................................................1104 Zumex of America Inc......................................... 2046

Must Have Menus................................................ 1005 MustHaveMenus................................................. 1005 Nardi / S.I.T. Inc.....................................................1100 Natalie’s Orchid Island Juice Company............. 1645 NCR Corporation...................................................1219 Nespresso Business Solutions............................1649 New York International Bread Company.............1143 Nueske’s Applewood Smoked Meats.................1530 Oasis Outsourcing.................................................1650 One Fat Frog..........................................................1528 OpenTable Inc....................................................... 1438 OrderCounter.Com................................................ 1110 Ordyx.................................................................... 2032 Oreck Commercial Sales......................................2108 Orkin Commercial Services..................................1425 Oscoda Plastics Inc..............................................1942 Oser Communications Group...............................1351 P & H Company Inc...............................................2132 Palate-Fitness.......................................................1021 Pansaver, M&Q Plastics Products.......................1827 Paragon Water Systems Inc................................1740 Partech Inc............................................................1419 PC Music...............................................................1244 Piantedosi Baking / EZ Wings..............................2144 Pinnacle Hospitality Systems..............................1819

37 F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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se c r e t s of s uc c e s s

good food good price good people FRLA member since 1984, Mike Flury, owner of Jim & Milt’s in Tallahassee, FL, sat down with FR&L Editor Susie McKinley earlier this summer to share his “Secrets to Success.”

The history of Jim and Milt’s

Opened in 1968 by Jim Burgess and Milt Johnson, Jim and Milt’s has been a place you don’t want to miss when visiting the home of the Florida State Seminoles for 44 years. In 1979, the restaurant was bought by Mike Flury. He and his wife, Debbie, and sons Jim, Ryan and David have owned and managed the operation since that time. Jim and Milt’s logo is a hobo graphic that depicts the establishment’s famous “Hobo Special” – a beef and pork sandwich, Brunswick stew and fried corn – much like a meal that a “hobo” could prepare.

Describe your menu concept.

Jim and Milt’s is a Southern Barbeque restaurant serving smoked chicken, beef and pork. The country breakfast is a mainstay of the restaurant, and we also serve burgers, wings and salads. We are mindful that we are located close to Florida State and try to offer specials that will appeal to the students as well. Our

49-cent wings, $2.99 pitchers of beer and “All You Can Eat” specials have fed students throughout their college experience.

How do you keep your menu fresh and interesting to returning guests?

We’ve added new menu offerings through the years to keep the menu fresh and current: wings, specials such as countryfried steak and mashed potatoes and sides have expanded from just two offerings to almost anything a customer would want.

What is your most popular dish?

The Yankee is our most popular menu item. It is chopped pork and beef, mixed with Jim and Milt’s secret barbeque sauce.

Have you seen the tastes of your guests change over the years?

Guests’ tastes haven’t changed too much over the years. In fact, many folks comment that the Jim and Milt’s they order today tastes just like it did when they attended FSU – however many years ago. That’s what customers want: Jim and Milt’s to taste just like it always has.

Mike Flury, Sons & Family Back Row: Christy Nicols Flury, Ryan Flury, Jim Flury, David Flury, Sarah Gist Flury. Front Row: Ben Flury, Connor Flury, Owner Mike Flury, Debbie Flury, Carson Flury. 44  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

45


se c r e t s of s uc c e s s

Looking over www.JimandMilts.com, I see you’ve got a mobile website option in addition to a typical desktop site. Do customers utilize the mobile option? Jim and Milt’s customers definitely use the mobile website option.

What is the most important thing you emphasize with staff about your customers?

The most important person(s) in the building is the customer. We really try to make our guests feel at home, and some of our regular customers take that to heart!

Your mobile site provides easy-to-use directions from What do you think is critical to your any location to Jim and Milt’s. That is awesome. Do you employee training? think this is helpful for potential guests? Our best waitress spends a lot of time with new employees. Extended It is sometimes difficult for customers to get to Jim and Milt’s, particularly if visiting Tallahassee. The area has grown and changed so much over the years. It really doesn’t look the same as it did in this area. The mobile site’s directions are very useful.

on-the-job training with the best really helps to develop great customer service. We conduct training for our employees and test them afterwards to be certain that employees have not missed a thing.

Is catering a big part of your business? How do you let customers know Jim and Milt’s is available to cater functions?

How do you eliminate/reduce employee turnover?

Catering is a big part of Jim and Milt’s business. We push the catering program in all forms of marketing: print advertising, websites and to-go menus. Jim and Milt’s has a fantastic reputation for catering. Word-ofmouth is a big driver of traffic for our catering program as well.

How do you drive “traffic” to your restaurant?

In terms of marketing, we post and distribute flyers; we advertise in local papers. We also buy some radio time. We have a website as noted earlier. We’ve traditionally been involved in our community which also assists in driving traffic. In addition to marketing, our specials of the day, 49-cent wings and $2.99 pitchers bring in the business too.

Have you found social media to be a helpful tool in marketing Jim and Milt’s? Yes, we have. You can find us on Facebook and Twitter.

46  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

We consider our employee–employer relationship as a “two-way street.” We care for and respect our employees. They care for and respect management. We are loyal to them; they are loyal to us. Being a college town, we get some turnover from our students every three or four years, but once they work for Jim and Milt’s, they don’t usually leave until it is time for graduation. Our long-term employees are just that -- long term. We just had a 34-year employee retire recently. We’ve got folks on staff currently that have been with us for 17 years, 20 plus years, 7 years, and the list can go on and on. I tell my wait staff, “…if you can make it waiting tables at Jim and Milt’s for a year, you are equipped to do just about anything….” Jim and Milt’s alumni have gone on to be lawyers, doctors and scientists. We have so many success stories. Jim and Milt’s is a training ground for life.

What is your tip to staying in business for such a long time?

I like to come to work every day. This is where my I spend time with my customers, friends and employees. We have a good relationship with our vendors, and I enjoy seeing them too. We have good food, for a good price served by good people. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


SPOT L IGHT ON

AmeriGas Propane

Lance Franscell

S

even years ago, one of the first official duties for Lance Franscell as an Area Sales Manager was to prepare for a large customer golf event at ChampionsGate near Orlando with an organization called the FRA. “I had no idea that this event would have the amount of VIP’s from the restaurant industry as it did. I was cooking hot dogs and greeting golfers, and it seemed like every foursome that came to our hole had somebody that our company had an interest in selling to.” Since that first experience with the “then” FRA, Lance has been found each year on the eighth tee at ChampionsGate serving hot dogs and greeting fellow members as they prepare for the Longest Drive contest. “It’s a great networking opportunity to spend four or five hours playing golf with a customer, but even better to get a chance to shake the hand of nearly 300 golfers that come by the AmeriGas hole each year and spend a couple of minutes learning more about how AmeriGas may be able to help their business.” AmeriGas is the country’s largest propane supplier and offers full sales/service throughout the state of Florida. Whether you have a location in the Keys or the panhandle, AmeriGas can offer the same program and same exceptional service throughout the entire state. “Our commitment to the FRLA has always been to “Improve the Customer Experience” when working with FRLA members. We offer discounted pricing, free service hours, priority service during the storm season, 24/7 emergency delivery/service, the very best cylinder exchange program for patio heaters around, and an exceptional referral program to all FRLA members. But we are most proud of our unwavering commitment to providing world class safety.” AmeriGas was chosen as the FRLA’s 2007 “Supplier of the Year.” Dan Murphy, FRLA’s VP for Membership explained that this award was given to AmeriGas for “…their consistent support at w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

2012 Regional Directors Territories

the State and local chapter levels year after year. They are just one of Ray Green those partner/members that you can always count on.” Corkey Bergamo Lance served as the Chairman of the Allied Members Council in 2011 and also served as the Vice Chairman Jennifer for two years prior to that. Dan Reed Murphy notes that “Lance has been one those solid members that makes the Council work. Every association has to have someone like Lance.” Dannette The AmeriGas relationship Lynch encouraged by Lance has certainly been a special one for all of the Lynne Hernandez AmeriGas employees that contribute throughout the state. AmeriGas has been very active within many of the local FRLA chapters and has had multiple local account managNorthwest Florida - Ray Green ers hold chapter board positions Ray Green 230 S. Adams Street throughout the state. “Our success has come from the efforts made Tallahassee, FL 32301 within the local chapters and the Office 850-224-2250 ext. 230 Corkey Bergamo relationships we have built. We have Cell 850-545-5901 found that if we live up to our ‘ICE’ Fax 850-224-1590 concept then we will continue to rgreen@frla.org grow through our reputation and referrals.” AmeriGas has seen treNortheast Florida - Corkey Bergamo mendous growth in the restaurant Jennifer 1190 Gran Crique Ct. S. and lodging sector in the 10+ years Reed Jacksonville, FL 32223 as an FRLA member. AmeriGas Home/Fax 904-880-6964 now services well over 120 FRLA Cell 904-993-6287 restaurateurs and hotelier memcbergamo@frla.org bers and this number is growing every year. Lance notes, “We are Central Florida - Jennifer Reed especially proud of the relationDannette ships we have with the Regional 230 South Adams Street Lynch Directors. Their support and efforts Tallahassee, FL 32301 in working with our local Account Phone 888-372-9119 x226 Managers has introduced us to new Fax 850-224-1590 Lynne customers and opportunities and JReed@frla.org Hernandez we value the relationships we have developed with the entire FRLA Tampa Bay & Southwest Florida - Dannette Lynch management team.” PO Box 554 Spearheaded by Lance, AmeriGas Largo, FL 33779 representation can be found at 727-642-3404 most FRLA functions: from the Fax 727-953-6803 Winter Installation Banquet, dannette@frla.org Summer Board Meeting/Fishing Tournament, NRA/FRLA Celebrity South Florida - Lynne Hernandez Golf Tournament, FRLA Show Gala and local chapter events. Stop PO Box 566263 by a future event and say hello to Miami, FL 33256-6263 Lance and the AmeriGas team. Office 305-598-FRLA (3752) They aren’t hard to find as they are Cell 305-710-3962 usually the ones having the most fun Fax 305-598-3753 at our functions. lhernandez@frla.org For more visit www.amerigas.com F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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a l a c a rt e

NRA Visits Tallahassee

In June, Rob Gifford, David Gilbert, Paul Hineman, and Sherman Brown from the National Restaurant Association visited Tallahassee to discuss future endeavors with the FRLA/NRA partnership. They are pictured here at the home of Carol Dover with FRLA’s Senior Staff and Executive Chef John Minas from the Governor’s Mansion.

WaterColor Inn & Resort Awarded Certificate of Excellence

Sarasota Chapter, $1,000 from the Hillsborough Chapter and $2,000 from the Forgotten Coast Chapter. The Central Florida Chapter provided the FRLAEF with a $8,000 check from the proceeds made from their Food & Wine Festival!

WaterColor Inn & Resort was recently named as a prestigious 2012 Certificate of Excellence award winner from TripAdvisor, the world’s largest travel site. TripAdvisor boasts more than 60 million reviews and opinions monthly by real travelers. TripAdvisor asks writers to rate properties in several categories including location, service, rooms, cleanliness, spa, sleep quality and more.

FRLA Bay Chapter Raises $4,000 for FRLAEF

The FRLA Bay Chapter’s “Sip & Savor” fund raiser held last month at Boatyard Restaurant in Panama City Beach netted $4,000. The entire $4,000 will be donated to the FRLA Educational Foundation and specifically earmarked to support ProStart programs at Bay, Mosley, Rutherford and Arnold High Schools in Bay County.

Introducing

SafeStaff® Online Foodhandler The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association

The SafeStaff® program is convenient, affordable

online food safety training to the hospitality

by Florida law.

is proud to announce that it is now offering industry. As the Department of Business and Professional Regulation contracted provider, FRLA

has

developed

the

SafeStaff®

Foodhandler Online Training Program.

and meets all of the requirements mandated

For more information, visit www.SafeStaff.org or contact our Education and Training Department at (850)224-2250 or (866)372-7233.

www.SafeStaff.org

1-866-372-SAFE Official State-cOntracted fOOd Safety PrOvider – dBPr# 1752486 FRLA-Ad.indd 1

48  Au g ust/ S ept em b er

7/29/11 5:00:54 PM

2012

Sirata Beach Resort Welcomes Military Members

FRLA Members Raise Thousands for the FRLA Educational Foundation

The FRLA Educational Foundation would like to thank several FRLA Chapters for their generous support awarded to the FRLA Educational Foundation during the summer board meeting in Key West. The FRLAEF received $500 from the Space Coast Chapter, $500 from the Manatee Chapter, $1,000 from the Pinellas Chapter, $1,000 from the

Memorial Day weekend, Sirata Beach Resort of St. Petersburg Beach welcomed active military members by offering 100 free rooms per night in honor of Memorial Day. Many active military members came to just relax and enjoy themselves, and some spent time with family. Some members were returning to the Sirata, having taken advantage of the offer before, and others were new to the resort. Niklas Hill has been a member of the Coast Guard for nearly twelve years. He wrote to the Sirata about some of the adversities he and his family have encountered as a military family. “When a company like the Sirata Beach Resort opens their doors to military members and their families it makes the load just a bit more bearable,” wrote Hill. Sirata Beach Resort was able to run this offer for the fourth year in a row. Thanks to the Coast Brothers and the Marietta Company for partnering with Sirata and providing complimentary amenities for our military guests during their stay.

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


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F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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life

New York Times Bestselling author and business expert Grant Cardone has developed a list of 100 Ways to Stay Motivated. Food for thought!

Motivated 1. Go to Bed Early 2. Get up Early 3. Stay Busy 4. Stay Scared 5. Do it Anyway 6. Eat Healthy 7. Avoid Sugars 8. Avoid Energy Drinks 9. Be Responsible for Your Energy 10. Over Commit 11. Always Say Yes 12. Put in More than Everyone Else 13. Show up Before Everyone else 14. Make a List of Contacts That Would Change Your Life.

15. Work to Your Potential Not Your Quota 16. Get in Mastermind Group 17. Read a Book a Week 18. Control Time 19. Create 15-minute Blocks 20. Get the Right Partners 21. Cut Out Negative People 22. Be Deaf When Someone Says You Can’t 23. Be Honest With Everyone 50  Au g ust/ S ept em b er

2012

24. Exercise Daily 25. Make Time for Family Everyday 26. Have a Higher Purpose Than Money 27. Go for Extraordinary 28. Avoid Perfection 29. Keep Statistics 30. Seek to Dominate Not Compete 31. Stay in the Spotlight 32. Make the News Don’t Watch the News 33. Become a Celebrity in Your Space 34. Keep Full Calendar 35. Never Settle 36. Do a Little More Each Day 37. Be a Maniac 38. Do So Much You are Criticized 39. Be a Fanatic 40. Take it to Another Level 41. Write your Goals Down Everyday 42. Write your Goals Down Before You Go to Sleep

43. Have Finance Meeting With Your

Spouse on Sundays 44. Once a Month Have Goals Meeting with the Family

45. Reach Up for New Friends 46. Ask For Help From People Above Your Stature

47. Stay Involved With Community 48. Be Social 49. Stay Uncomfortable 50. Look For New and Bigger Problems 51. Be the Most Positive Person You Know 52. Surround Yourself with Positive Sayings 53. Go the Extra Mile 54. Be So Big in Your Space That People Start to Hate You

55. Do What Others Refuse to Do 56. Stay Away From TV 57. Be Willing to Fail 58. Write a Daily Plan of the Actions You Can Take

59. Stay Focused on the Daily Target 60. Do the Most Difficult Things First 61. When You Take Time Off Take Enough to Satisfy You

62. Go to Workshops 63. Get Out of the House and Do New Things

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


64. Avoid Ads That Promote Depression as

a Disease 65. Avoid Drama TV and Radio 66. Have Rewards For Big Accomplishments 67. Have a Never Lower Your Target Mentality 68. Schedule Short Breaks 69. Take Power Naps If They Help You 70. Picture What You Want at the End of the Deal 71. Keep Images of What it is Your Want in Your Environment 72. Stay Around Hitters Avoid Those That Don’t 73. Assume Responsibility for Every Outcome in Your Life 74. Move with Speed and Urgency. 75. Stay Hungry 76. Never Allow Yourself to be Satisfied 77. Go Look at What is Possible via What Others Have Accomplished 78. Look at Those Things That Are Still Out of Reach But Accomplished by Others 79. Find Music That Gets You Pumped 80. Make a List of Those Things That Negatively Make You Feel Poorly About Yourself 81. Create Daily Rituals 82. Push Yourself to Do More Than You Think is Possible 83. Identify What You are Passionate About 84. Talk to Your Customers 85. Write Down the Successes You Are Having 86. Call Every Problem Customer Personally 87. Hit Deadlines 88. Bring More to Events Than You Could Ever Need 89. Always Show Up Early For Meetings 90. Be the Most Dependable Person You Know 91. Let People Know You Are Hungry by Your Actions 92. Complete Every Task Once Started 93. Respond to Every Email 94. Respond to All Social Media Responses 95. Get on TV 96. Get on Radio 97. Become a Celebrity in Your Field 98. Seek to Be Exceptional in Every Area of Your Life 99. Give Each Area Attention Everyday 100.  Look For Every Opportunity to Help Others w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

How to Respond to Negative Social Media Reviews

Help By Casey Pritchard

T

from

Yelp!

hese days everyone talks about engaging customers through social media. Whether you prefer Facebook, Twitter, Google+, or Foursquare, this article will help you better manage your online reputation and boost your online credibility. While having a strong social media presence could be extremely beneficial for your business, it could also potentially cause harm if customers, or competitors, post about their “so-called” bad experiences and you either a) do nothing or b) respond negatively. So that leaves us with the million dollar question: “How on earth should I respond to online complaints?” Thankfully there are experts out there willing to help. Darnell Holloway from Yelp suggests following this framework when managing your online reputation:

1

Start With Great Customer Service As a business owner, you want to ensure that your customers are happy. Happy customers translate to better business and lead to success. It is important to maintain a high level of customer service to minimize the chances of a customer having a bad experience. Many consumers actively engage in social media and it’s important to expect that they will post about their experiences via those mediums. Businesses should prepare for this by providing a great experience for customers.

2

Stay Cool Don’t let your emotions get the best of you when responding to negative reviews. This is a poor reflection on your company and could cause even more harm. If you have to, give yourself some time to cool down before addressing the review. If you still find yourself getting upset, don’t hesitate to delegate managing your business’ reviews to another employee that can remain level-headed. Remember, responding negatively could turn into a PR disaster and you could lose credibility.

3

Respond Diplomatically With that being said, sometimes you just have to bite the bullet and be the bigger person. Whatever you do, don’t argue with the customer! Thank them (by name if possible) for their feedback, apologize and address the problem, state what you are doing to correct the problem, and invite them to come back to see how your business has improved.

4

Implement Feedback While it isn’t fun to receive a negative review, take advantage of this opportunity to make improvements! Use these reviews to measure your performance and see where changes can be made to better your business. Address some of the reviews in staff meetings to get your entire staff on board with correcting these issues. Negative reviews aren’t a death sentence and can actually help improve your business!

5

See Step Number One Let’s face it, when customers visit a business they want to be treated well and have a great experience! Differentiate yourself from the rest by constantly providing wonderful customer service. Customers will notice and will frequent your business! Yelp.com is an online tool people can use to find the best restaurants, hotels, shops, businesses, and attractions in a given area. Community members can review their favorite (or not so favorite) places and can use Yelp to discover a town’s hidden treasures! Be sure to check out Yelp’s website (www.yelp.com) and blog (www. officialblog.yelp.com). Casey Pritchard is a Marketing Assistant with FRLA.

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e m e rg e nc y m a n ag e m e n t

Ten Steps Every Business Should Take To Prepare For A Business Interruption

Business as Usual (No Matter What)

W By Agility Recovery

hen people think of disasters, they generally envision hurricanes, tornados or floods catastrophic events that devastate communities. But for a business, a disaster can be something as small as a failed server or power outage. These seemingly minor events can have a shocking impact on a business, often bringing operations to a standstill. “The impacts of an interruption can be stunning,” says Bob Boyd, President and CEO of Agility Recovery, an industry leader in business continuity and disaster recovery solutions for small to midsized businesses. “Statistics indicate that about 40 percent of small businesses do not reopen following a major disaster because they do not have a recovery plan in place.” Agility Recovery ensures continuity of operations in the event of a disaster by providing businesses in need with any or all of the four key elements of disaster recovery: 1. Office Space complete with desks and chairs 2. Power for your office (generators) 3. Communication: telephone and internet access 4. Computer systems: computers, servers, printers, fax. Creating a basic, executable business continuity plan is one of the most important steps you can take to protect your organization and assure business as usual – no matter what the scenario. Below are ten key steps to help you get started.

1

Assess your risk – both internally and externally. Which disasters will most likely impact your business? Though major disasters dominate the headlines, most business interruptions are caused by every day events, such as power outages, human error and technology failure. It is important to assess your risk for catastrophic weather occurrences, but equally if not more important to assess exposure to more commonplace risks. 52  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

2

Assess your critical business functions. Evaluate and document how your company functions and determine which processes, employees, equipment and materials are critical for your daily operations. Critical business functions include such things as billing, payroll and service fulfillment. List these functions and determine a process for restoring them in the event of an interruption.

3

Plan for an alternate location. What would you do if your building were inaccessible tomorrow? Where would you go to continue basic business operations? Review your site requirements and determine a plan for recovery. Alternate site options include your home, a branch or second location, the site of a similar business, or a vendor that provides mobile recovery.

4

Consider supply chain preparedness. According to recent surveys, less than half of American businesses have disaster recovery or business continuity plans in place to maintain supply chain logistics in the event of a disaster. Talk to your key vendors and suppliers about their recovery plans. Develop relationships with alternate vendors in case your primary vendors experience an interruption.

5

Appoint a crisis manager and develop an emergency management plan. Planning what to do after a disaster is just as important as what to do beforehand. A crisis manager and sound emergency management plan helps facilitate a smooth transition between normal business operations and catastrophe response.

6

Back up your data and plan to restore your technology. In today’s highly technical economy, information is more valuable than ever. Having an automated, daily back-up system for important data is crucial. Make sure to store your data

in an offsite, safe and secure location, preferably 50 miles or more from your site. Regularly verify that you are able to retrieve your data. Outline a plan to replace PCs, software, servers, printers and fax machines should your office be destroyed.

7

Create an employee, vendor and key client communication plan. Create a 24-hour phone tree for all employees and their spouses or closest relatives. Make sure your employees know ahead of time how to exchange or obtain information should standard lines of communication fail. Also, compile a list of your critical clients and vendors and store it in an offsite location. Determine a process for contacting them should your systems go down.

8

Assemble an emergency kit. An emergency or disaster recovery kit should contain items such as fresh water, nonperishable food, flashlights, extra batteries, battery-powered AM/FM radio, first aid kit and copies of important documents and records. For a complete list of recommended items, visit www.Ready.gov, an emergency preparedness site from the Department of Homeland Security.

9

Take a look at your insurance coverage. Is your insurance coverage adequate? Sit down with your agent to assure that you are insured for potential risks. Consider business interruption insurance, which may compensate you for lost income should you experience a disaster. Make sure you keep photos of your building, equipment lists and policy information stored in a safe and secure offsite location.

10

Test your plan. Make sure your plan is workable – test yearly and update the plan as necessary. Make sure to re-educate employees when any changes to the plan are made. About Agility Recovery: Agility Recovery, a former division of GE, is North America’s premier provider of business continuity and disaster recovery solutions to small and midsized businesses. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


u p gr a de s Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Tampa recently completed a $75 million expansion, making it the world’s sixthlargest casino, based on gaming positions or number of seats at a table or slot. It is also larger than any casino in Las Vegas. The casino floor is now larger than five football fields combined and features more than 5,000 slot machines, 110 table games and 50 poker tables. An enclosed smoke-free slot room with 70 machines is located next to Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino’s newest restaurant, Rise Kitchen & Bakery™.

Larger Than Any in Las Vegas

$75 Million Expansion Makes Seminole Hard Rock Tampa World’s Sixth-Largest Casino

w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Players will enjoy unmatched views of the pool area and tropical landscaping from within the casino. While some casinos have hinted at providing natural light in limited areas, Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Tampa has embraced the ability to feature it along with the pool. Players can take in Florida’s summer sun and beauty while they play at Florida’s ultimate entertainment destination. The Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino is one of the largest employers in Tampa Bay and pays more than $74 million annually in salaries and wages to local team members. The property currently employs over 3,300 people.

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F R L A’ s E duc at ion a l fou n dat ion

FRLA Educational Foundation Hosts 16th Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute at Johnson & Wales University

High School Teachers Go Back to School During Summer Vacation

D

uring the Summer of 2012, 121 Florida high school food instructors were students again for one week during their summer vacation. The teachers participated in the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Educational Foundation’s (FRLAEF) Sixteenth Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute June 24-28, 2012. For the fifteenth year, this event was held at Johnson & Wales University’s (JWU) North Miami Campus. Participating instructors taught FRLAEF’s two-year ProStart School-to-Career curriculum. The instructors returned to school to “fine-tune” their culinary skills and foodservice knowledge during this weeklong event. While the teachers were able to have a little fun, there was no skipping class! They spent countless hours hitting the books and studying hard. The teachers were divided into four groups based on past attendance at the event. First year attendees learned the basics of kitchen essentials, knife skills, dining room service, kitchen safety and sanitation and stocks. Second year ProStart instructors covered topics such as nutrition, storeroom operations, desserts and baked goods and salads and garnishing. There was no slacking off as third year participants learned to identify and cut meats, decorate cakes, learn about advanced kitchen design and special event planning.

The fourth year attendees finished off their experience with business accounting, strategic marketing, French pastries, candies and cookies. All participants will take the information learned during the weeklong training back to the classroom and share it with students.

Wanda Carrington, from West Broward High, filleting fish.

Daniel Leavy from Forest Hill High.

T h i s e v e n t woul d no t be p o s si bl e w i t hou t t h e s u pp ort of t h e F R L AE F ’ s pa rt n e r s U NIVERSA L SPONSOR

GL OB A L SPONSORS

Michael Pryor from Lake Weir High demonstrating his knife skills. 54  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

2012

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


ST U DENT BL O G

ProStart

A ProStart Student’s Perspective on the School Year By Abby Gilkey

I

t’s getting to be that time again - school starting. Only this time, things have shifted and are different now. I’m a senior! As a senior and a member of ProStart, I know that my year is going to be busy, but I can’t wait for new opportunities to participate in the program. As this is my last year in ProStart, I’m anticipating learning new things and competing again in the annual Hospitality and Culinary competitions. In addition to this, I’ve started thinking about college and exactly how that whole chapter of my life is going to turn out. I researched culinary universities that appeal to me - schools I learned about through my years of being a ProStart student. I convinced my manager to let me take two weeks off of work from my part-time job at a fast-food restaurant so I could take a road trip with my mom and sister to tour different colleges. There’s nothing better than a first-hand look of the potential college of your future, right? In doing this, you gain a lot of valuable insight towards which college is “the right fit for you.” Of course, curriculum is important and should be reviewed. However, going to see the college and getting a feel for the atmosphere is essential. You might think the education is excellent, but what if the dorms aren’t safe? What if you hate cities and the college of your dreams sits smack in the center of one? On my trip I got to see three potential culinary schools that appeal to me: The Culinary Institute of America, Johnson and Wales, and New England Culinary Institute. All offer a great education, but some I liked better than others. In particular, the CIA caught my eye because of the pure beauty of the school. Going to see the schools in person really changed my opinion; each has its own atmosphere. There are other ways to prepare for college, but touring your college before you go is definitely something that should be done. It can be life changing. Abby Gilkey is a ProStart student in Florida. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

2007 Supplier of the Year ATTENTION

ProPane Users!

Excuse me… www.amerigas.com

Do We Know Each Other? FRLA Members Lets Get Acquainted with this

NEW CUSTOMER SPECIAL! We’ll BEAT our Competitor’s Propane Price up to 5%! PLUS New Customers Receive 4 Hours of FREE Labor on a Scheduled Service Appointment • Hassle Free Patio Heater Programs • Special Tankless Water Heater Rebates • $150 New Customer Referral Awards COMPLETE STATEWIDE COVERAGE Lance Franscell • (813) 210-4763 lance.franscell@amerigas.com Automatic Delivery • 24/7 Live Customer Care Find us on Facebook & Twitter www.amerigas.com/blog New FRLA member customers only. Written invoice verification required for up to five percent competitor discount. Certain restrictions may apply. F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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fr l a ev ents

Operators’ Summit Was Another FRLA Success!

O

n July 19, 2012, more than 150 FRLA members met in Tampa, Florida to attend FRLA’s 2012 Operators’ Summit. This interactive meeting was held for members to get a glimpse into the business of highly successful operations, understand more clearly the efforts needed to expand an operation into several stores, and learn about effective marketing techniques and motivational management for employees. Did you know that 54% of the restaurant industry is fastcasual? That is what we learned from Firehouse Subs CEO Don Fox. He spoke to attendees about “Building a Culture of Optimism” and advised franchisees that the key to success starts with your people and culture.

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Monte Ammons with Epicenter Marketing Systems, talked to the group about “The Last Mile: Secrets to Winning in OutletLevel Marketing.” Ammons said implementation and execution are the most critical components of marketing success. He also advised guests to not take on more than three marketing initiatives at a time to ensure effective results. “It’s going to be difficult, if it was easy, anyone could do it,” those are the famous words of Dr. Joe West of Brooklyn Water bagels. West strongly encourages systems for success. Start with a clearly defined goal, keep it simple and clear so your entire team understands your vision. Do your employees know what differentiates you from your competition? Make sure your entire team is working as one unified front and keep it consistent. That was part of his messaging for his presentation on “One Store... to Multiple Stores.”

Operators Summit speakers included: Don Fox, Firehouse Subs; Bob Basham, Founder, Outback Steakhouse; MaryAnn Ferenc, Mise En Place, Inc; Mike Lester, Melting Pot; and Joe West, Brooklyn Water Bagels and some of the Coca-Cola team.

Any restaurant patron can tell you that employee behavior is viewed from the customer’s perspective. Doug Press, of the Incentive Group spoke on “Elevating Crew Performance” and told guests that the customer’s perspective has a direct correlation to the amount of money spent. A Lunch panel, which was highlighted in the Tampa Bay Times

included speakers Bob Basham of Bloomin’ Brands Inc. (formerly OSI Restaurant Partners, LLC), Maryann Ferenc of Mise en Place Inc., a popular Tampa restaurant and Mike Lester, President of Melting Pot Restaurants Inc. This panel gave participants the opportunity to ask critical questions, and seek advice from some of the industry’s most influential leaders.

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


i n m e mory

Jim Tillman Florida House Republican Leader

J

im Tillman, 77, long-time lobbyist and past Florida House Republican Leader, passed away July 4, 2012 in Tallahassee, Florida after a long illness. Mr. Tillman was an advocate for the hospitality industry for many years, primarily working for the Florida Hotel and Motel Association. Jim was born in Adel, Georgia and moved to Florida as a youngster. He graduated from high school in Ocala, Florida where he played football, and upon graduation, Jim enlisted in the U.S. Air Force serving from 1953 to 1957. After his service in the Air Force, Jim attended Florida State University. While at FSU, Mr. Tillman was employed as a Deputy Sherriff Photo courtesy of Florida Photogrqaphic Collection for Leon County. He graduated from FSU in 1961 with a Criminal Justice degree. After graduation Jim moved to Southwest Florida and ness industry. Jim helped to pioneer many proworked as a counselor for the Juvenile Court business issues that we still enjoy today. He will of Sarasota County. He purchased a ranch in be missed.” the area and raised horses and cattle. Jim was Tommy Waits former CEO for Florida’s state involved in various community activities and lodging association worked closely with Jim ran as a State Representative from the area in Tillman and said: “For almost three decades I 1967 and won. Jim was re-elected three times had the pleasure of working with Jim Tillman. and held leadership positions while serving in As CEO for the state lodging association I the House as Minority Whip and Minority relied on Jim to be the eyes, ears and primary (Republican) Leader. advocate in the state legislative arena for all matJim and his family moved to Tallahassee ters affecting public lodging, which is a major in 1975 and Jim became a principal in a lobcomponent of Florida tourism and the state’s bying firm. He managed the Rodeway Inn business community. He brought to our indusin Tallahassee at the same time. Jim’s clients try the highest level of honesty, integrity and varied from the Florida Hotel and Motel advocacy leadership in all his Association and the dealings (on our behalf) with Florida Veterinary elected officials, governmental “Jim was not only a Medical Association, and industry regulators. to the Florida Public great friend and mentor, staff, His past experience as an Defenders Association he was truly a wonderful elected state legislator providand World Jai Alai ambassador for Florida’s ed Jim with a unique ability among others. to more clearly appreciate the hospitality industry.” In 1996, Jim was variety of issues and concerns invited to speak at a legislator faces, which greatHarvard University’s ly enhanced Jim’s ability to successfully lobby John F. Kennedy School of Government about even sometimes under difficult and challenging the “Rise of the Republican Party in Florida circumstances. Jim’s presence at our statewide Politics.” In 2005, he was named “Lobbyist lodging events provided him the unique opporof the Year” by the Florida Association of tunity to learn and know firsthand the constituProfessional Lobbyists. ency we served and its needs to better serve the Carol Dover, FRLA’s CEO noted: “Jim was Florida tourism industry. Jim was a straightnot only a great friend and mentor, he was truly forward guy, a respected friend, a hard-working a wonderful ambassador for Florida’s hospitalassociate, and a man of true dedication to all his ity industry. As Minority Leader in the Florida endeavors. We all shall miss him greatly!” legislature he was always a steward for the busiw w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Primo Gusto® High-Gluten Flour is proud to be the official flour of the United States Pizza Team. Stop by Gordon Food Service® booth #1314 for more information.

Distributed exclusively by Gordon Food Service 2850 NW 120th Terrace • Miami, FL 33167 • (800) 968-6474 ©2011 Gordon Food Service® • www.gfs.com/florida F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


fu n dr a i si ng

Join with the Industry and Help End

Childhood Hunger in America

S

hare Our Strength’s Dine Out For No Kid Hungry™ is a national fundraising event, sponsored by the National Restaurant Association, that brings together thousands of restaurants and millions of consumers to help make sure no child in America grows up hungry. One in five children do not know when their next meal will come. You can join the restaurant industry September 16-22, 2012 in this united effort to put an end to this staggering statistic and help end childhood hunger in America. To participate, follow these five easy steps: 1. Register on line: www. DineOutForNoKidHungry.org. 2. Go to the participant resource center and download the media kit, employee training guide, video’s and more at: http://join.strength.org/site/ PageServer?pagename=GADO_participant_resources 3. Determine promotion and dates. Restaurants are welcome to extend

their promotion beyond the week of September 16-22. 4. Promote to the local community, communicate with loyal guests, and display point of purchase materials. 5. Educate employees on the issue of childhood hunger and on your promotion. In 2011, the No Kid Hungry campaign invested funds in strategic private-public state and city partnerships, and in community organizations in all 50 states to help surround at-risk kids with healthy food where they live, learn and play, through programs including school breakfast and summer meals. Visit www.DineOutForNoKidHungry.org or contact Molly Burke at 202-478-6538 to find out how you can participate.

You’re in the business of making customers happy. So are we. When it comes to energy and equipment needs, your complete satisfaction is our success. Equipment consultation and sales Incremental billing solutions • Energy cost forecasting, budgeting and management • Appliance services • Natural gas services • •

At TECO Partners, we focus on providing solutions that work for your business – helping to make your customers happy, too. Call to connect with your dedicated account manager today.

Primo Gusto® High-Gluten Flour is proud to be the official flour of the United States Pizza Team. Stop by Gordon Food Service® booth #1314 for more information.

1-800-235-4427 tecopartners.com

w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Distributed exclusively by Gordon Food Service 2850 NW 120th Terrace • Miami, FL 33167 • (800) 968-6474 ©2011 Gordon Food Service® • www.gfs.com/florida F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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THE FLORIDA RESTAURANT AND LODGING ASSOCIATION AND UNITEDHEALTHCARE HAVE TEAMED UP TO HELP YOUR BUSINESS

GROW HEALTHY.

Help an employee get healthier for $5 a month. Group medical plans for 1-855-652-5918 your employees uhctogether.com/FRLA Health plans for individuals and their families Solutions that work with your budget

The UnitedHealth Allies discount plan is administered by HealthAllies,® Inc., a discount medical plan organization. The discount plan is not insurance. The discount plan provides discounts at certain health care providers for medical services. The discount plan does not make payments directly to the providers of medical services. The member is obligated to pay for all health care services but will receive a discount from those health care providers who have contracted with the discount plan organization. HealthAllies, Inc. is located at P.O. Box 10340, Glendale, CA 91209, 888-809-6539. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through a UnitedHealthcare company. ©2012F loUnited HealthCare r i da R estau r a n t & Services, Lo d g i n g A sInc. so ci at i o n 60  Au g ust/ Sept em b er 2012 UHCFL540173-001


H e a lt hc a r e

Burning Health Care Reform Questions

“How Much Coverage Would I Have to Provide & Must I Do This Immediately for New Employees?”

A

s you weigh the options of your restaurant’s offering health care insurance to employees, here are two important questions to consider.

How Much Health Insurance Do I Have to Offer if I Choose to Do This? You already know this is a choice: if you have fewer than 50 full-time equivalent (FTE) employees, the health care reform act doesn’t require you to offer insurance to them. If you decide to do this — or have 50 or more FTEs — then you must offer “minimum essential coverage.” The rub is that this has yet to be defined, beyond the idea that it offers “required essential health benefits.” There ultimately may be multiple definitions for this term — one from the federal government and a different one from the state where you operate. However this eventually turns out, there are two requirements of you as an employer. • First, you must cover at least 60 percent of the actuarial value of coverage. • Second, the total cost to your employees can’t be more than 9.5 percent of their household income. This point poses a difficulty. There is no way for you to know what your employees’ household income is, or how many people there are in the household. Ultimately, each state exchange and the IRS are supposed to determine this — although it’s uncertain how that information will be conveyed to you. Realistically, that means all you can do for now is to meet the first requirement. Do I Have to Provide Coverage to Full-time Employees from Day One? The simple answer is “no.” When the reform act becomes law on January 1, 2014, you will have up to 90 days after a person is hired to provide insurance coverage to him or her. What

w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com m Articlew#4: Reform Article #4:

happens on that 91st day depends upon the size of your company. If you have fewer than 50 FTE employees, there are no consequences for not insuring your new hire. That person will have to get the coverage from another source, which could include a government program (such as Medicare), buying insurance through a state exchange, or purchasing it from an insurer in the individual market. If you have 50 or more FTEs, you’ll either need to offer the new hire your minimum essential coverage by day 91 or pay a penalty. This could be up to $2,000 a year per FTE. If you happen to have 200 or more FTEs, then you will be required to auto-enroll your new full-time employee in your health plan. Health Care Education Resources for Restaurants The National Restaurant Association is committed to helping you get the facts about health reform as new rules are defined and implemented. Please visit the NRA Health Care Knowledge Center at www.restaurant.org/ healthcare to stay informed on other changes as they occur. In addition, UnitedHealthcare and the National Restaurant Association have created the Health Insurance Options Center. If you would like individualized assistance with evaluating your options for health insurance, speak to our dedicated restaurant team at 800-293-0105 or visit www.restauranthealthcare.org. UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company or its affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc., or their affiliates. The content provided is for informational purposes only. This communication is not intended, nor should it be construed, as legal or tax advice. Please contact a competent legal or tax professional for legal advice, tax treatment and restrictions. Federal and state laws and regulations are subject to change.

ing Health Burning Care Health ReformCare Questions: Reform Questions:

Primo Gusto® High-Gluten Flour is proud to be the official flour of the United States Pizza Team. Stop by Gordon Food Service® booth #1314 for more information.

Distributed exclusively by Gordon Food Service 2850 NW 120th Terrace • Miami, FL 33167 • (800) 968-6474 ©2011 Gordon Food Service® • www.gfs.com/florida F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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S a f e s ta ff

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. Registration for training begins at 8:00 a.m. and for exam at 12:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Dates subject to change. Altamonte Springs Sep 19, Oct 17 Springhill Suites 205 W Highway 436

Clearwater Sep 10, Oct 1 St. Pete Marriott CLWR 12600 Roosevelt Blvd N

Bradenton Sep 17, Oct 24 Courtyard Marriott 100 Riverfront Drive

Cocoa Beach Sep 20 Hilton Cocoa Beach Oceanfront 1550 North Atlantic Ave

Daytona Beach Sep 12, Oct 10 Holiday Inn 2620 International Speedway Blvd

Ft. Lauderdale Sep 5, Oct 3 Embassy Suites 1100 SE 17th St Causeway

Deerfield Beach Sep 20, Oct 18 Hilton 100 Fairway Drive

Ft. Myers Sep 13, Oct 11 Holiday Inn Downtown 2431 Cleveland Ave.

www.safestaff.org Ft. Pierce Sep 6, Oct 4 UF Indian River Research 2199 South Rock Rd.

Naples Sep 27, Oct 25 Quality Inn and Suites 4100 Golden Gate Pkwy

Ft Walton Sep 11, Oct 9 Holiday Inn Resort 573 Sana Rosa Blvd

Ocala Sep 18, Oct 16 Homewood Suites 4610 SW 49th Rd

Gainesville Sep 11, Oct 9 Best Western Gateway Grand 4200 NW 97th Blvd.

Orlando (Spanish Dates*) Sep 10, Oct 8 Sep 18, Oct 16 Holiday Inn Resort Castle 8629 International Drive

Islamorada Sep 25, Oct 25 The Islander Resort MM 82.1, US Hwy 1

Panama City Sep 12, Oct 10 Gulf Coast State College Gibson Lecture Hall 5230 W. Hwy. 98

Jacksonville Sep 6, Oct 2 Four Points by Sheraton 8520 Baymeadows Rd Jacksonville Beach Sep 12, Oct 10 Quality Inn Oceanfront 11 North 1st Street Key West Sep 10, Oct 9 Doubletree Grand Key Resort 3990 S. Roosevelt Blvd Kissimmee Sep 20, Oct 18 Seralago Hotel and Suites 5678 Irlo Bronson Mem. Hwy Lakeland Sep 5, Oct 10 Country Inn & Suites 4500 Lakeland Park Dr Mandarin Sep 19, Oct 17 Ramada Inn Mandarin 3130 Hartley Road Melbourne Sep 13, Oct 11 Holiday Inn 8298 N Wickham Rd Miami (Spanish Dates*) Sep 11, Oct 16 Sep 6, Oct 4 Hilton Miami Airport & Towers 5101 Blue Lagoon Drive

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2012

Pensacola Sep 18, Oct 23 Pensacola Civic Center 201 E. Gregory St Port Richey Sep 19, Oct 24 Days Inn & Suites 10826 US 19 North Port Charlotte Sep 10, Oct 8 Days Inn & Suites 10826 US 19 North Sarasota Sep 13, Oct 4 Hampton Inn 5995 Cattleridge Road St. Augustine Sep 25, Oct 24 Holiday Inn Express & Suites 2300 State Road 16 Tallahassee Sep 25, Oct 25 Day’s Inn Monroe Street Conf Cntr 2714 Graves Road Tampa (Spanish Dates*) Sep 27, Oct 25 14, Sep 11, Oct 9 Clarion Hotel 2701 E Fowler Ave West Palm Beach Sep 18, Oct 22 Holiday Inn Airport 1301 Belvedere Rd

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n


BOOTH #1104

Hospitalit y Systems Inc.

FLORIDA RESTAURANT SHOW SPECIAL! INTRODUCING: Zonal as a Service! Financially better than a lease.

COmpleTe pOS SySTemS 2 terminal systems from $225/month 3 terminal systems from $285/month 4 terminal systems from $394/month Pricing includes installation, upgrades, training, and ongoing support. One-time $1,800 implementation fee required.

Stop by our booth #1104 or contact us to find out how Zonal can work in your business.

w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

888-376-3767 | info@zonalusa.com | zonalusa.com 206 West Sybelia Avenue | maitland, Florida | 32751

F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g  

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Customers are at the

center of everything we do. Proud to serve you in Florida.

“Customer is king” has been our philosophy for over 110 years. As the largest family-owned broadline foodservice distributor, we are committed to providing the products, solutions, and reliable service our customers need to be successful in the everchanging foodservice industry. We distribute to foodservice operators from Northern Michigan to Key West, Florida, and coast to coast in Canada. We also operate over 140 GFS Marketplace® retail stores, which are open to the public and provide the benefits of restaurant-quality products.

www.facebook.com/gordonfoodservice 64  Au g ust/ Sept em b er

To learn more call (800) 968-6515 or visit www.gfs.com/florida.

2850 NW 120th Terrace • Miami, FL 33167 F lo r i da R estau r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s so ci at i o n 1410 Gordon Food Service Dr. • Plant City, FL 33563

2012

Florida Restaurant & Lodging August/September 2012  

August/September 2012 Issue of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine.

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