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FLORIDA THE “STATE” OF FOOD SAFETY INSIDE

O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E F LO R I DA R E S TA U R A N T & LO D G I N G A S S O C I AT I O N

September: Food Safety Month Special Insert • FSMA: How Does This Impact You? • Dr. Otwell: What’s Happening with Gulf Seafood? • Active Managerial Control – Another Perspective


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250+ State Associations

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F rom t h e c h A I r m A n ’ s de sk

Show Time Is Perfect Time To Get Involved in FRLA

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eptember means it is time for the annual Florida restaurant & lodging Show. Held at the orange County Convention Center September 22–24, this is your chance to get involved with yoUr association. along with the Show, there are several additional opportunities to be a part of all that Frla has to offer during your time in orlando. Providing a comprehensive display of hospitality products and innovations and drawing industry leaders, the Show and related events will give you countless opportunities to network and exchange ideas, find new products, and gain insight to help improve your business.  educational opportunities are available, with daily seminars offering strategies to help grow your business.  Andy Reiss With multiple options, the Show offers: • The Solutions Center featuring the latest trends in education, food and operations. • Culinary competitions. • New product demonstrations. • a chance to meet Frla’s ProStart students, providing a glimpse at the rising culinary talent in Florida.  • The Big Party is a great networking venue; it will be at BB King’s Blues Club on Monday evening. • The Nra / Frla Bob leonard Golf Classic will be at the award-winning ChampionsGate on September 25, 2013. Most importantly, if you are not already an Frla member, stop by Frla’s booth on the Trade Show floor and find out more about the savings, networking, events and advocacy that Frla membership delivers. I encourage you to get involved today and start benefiting from all that Frla membership has to offer.  Make plans today to attend the Show if you haven’t already, and if you are attending, enjoy yourself and take full advantage of this special event.

– aNDy reISS 2013 Chairman of the Board Florida restaurant and lodging association w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd lodgi ng.com

Urban Expositions Acquires Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show FRLA Maintains Sponsorship of Trade Show

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he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA) announced it will partner with Urban Expositions, the new owner of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show. Urban Expositions has acquired the trade show from Reed Exhibitions. As part of the acquisition, the company also purchased the Western Foodservice & Hospitality Expo, Expo Comida Latina and the International Restaurant & Foodservice Show. Urban Expositions will assume ownership immediately, although Reed Exhibitions is managing the 2013 Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show at the Orange County Convention Center. “We are thrilled to partner with Urban Expositions and build on the success of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of FRLA. “We will work closely, as we did with Reed Exhibitions, to strengthen professional growth opportunities and enrich the trade show experience for exhibitors and attendees.” Doug Miller, President of Urban Exhibitions, said, “We look forward to building upon the tradition of success the FRLA and Reed Exhibitions have firmly established for the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show.” In addition, Miller noted, “To that point, we will be working closely with the Association’s executive leadership, veteran show team members, and actively seeking feedback from exhibitors and attendees alike, as we move forward in our efforts to continue strengthening the show’s business and professional growth potential for all participants.” The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show is the only comprehensive industry event devoted to the Southeast U.S. restaurant, foodservice and hospitality market. The Show provides exhibitors a strategic forum to demonstrate food products, technology and equipment, as well as discuss service solutions with current customers and new prospects. Urban Expositions is the largest gift, airport and souvenir trade show organizer in the U.S., hosting a total of 28 shows each year. In January of 1996, Urban Expositions launched the semi-annual Philadelphia Gift Show, which has become one of the largest and most successful regional gift events in the Nation. Since then, the company has continued to grow through acquisitions and new show development. Based in Kennesaw, GA, Urban Expositions offers a complete roster of trade show management services, including exhibit sales and marketing, operations, exhibitor/ attendee promotions and services, media relations, seminar and event coordination, database development and management. For more information please visit www.urban-expo.com. F lo R i dA R ESTAU R A n T & lo d G i n G  

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contents august/september 2013 • WWW.RESTAURANTANDLODGING.COM

3 Urban Expositions Acquires Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Urban Expositions is new owner of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show, recently acquired from Reed Exhibitions. Urban Expositions assumes ownership immediately, although Reed will manage the 2013 Show at the Orange County Convention Center. FRLA maintains sponsorship of the Annual Trade Show.

25 Annual Food Safety Supplement September is Food Safety Month and this issue’s special supplement offers updates on food safety defenses and best practices as well as articles on: FSMA: How Does This Impact You?; Dr. Steve Otwell on What’s Happening with Gulf Seafood?; and Active Managerial Control – Another Perspective.

42 Secrets of Success: The Angus When The Angus Restaurant opened in Pensacola 45 years ago it offered filet mignon for $1.49! Years and hundreds of memorable events later, the restaurant – now at 10,000 square feet – is a Pensacola landmark. New Chef, George Makris, has revamped entrees and added some new menu items as well.

Departments

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From the Chairman’s Desk Show Time is Perfect Time to Get Involved From the CEO Use Trade Show to Boost Your Bottom Line CEO Profile Darryll Adams, Hotel Manager, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island Event Calendar 2013-2014 FRLA Event Calendar Chefs That Sizzle Chefs Giuseppe Galazzi, Gregory Pugin, The Biltmore Hotel Health Care Compliance Portal Notification Rule Goes into Effect Oct. 1 A La Carte VISIT FLORIDA Partners with Google Maps to Showcase Beaches Cool Apps/Top Trends ThermoWorks, Kanvess • Preparation Methods Movers & Shakers/Cool Web Page Joe Dantoni, Pier House •FoodSafety.gov Unique Amenities Hawks Cay, Florida Keys Operations FRLA’s Marketing/Operations Summit Highlights Employee Relations NLRB Keeping an Eye on Social Media Member Benefits Impact Banners and Signs Endless Summer Music Series Blue Skies & Silver Spurs ProStart Florida’s LMP Program • Lissette Albelo Social Media Search Engine Optimization and Social Media Optimization ProStart High School Teachers Go Back to School During Summer Vacation Membership 2013 Regional Directors’ Territories; New Regional Managers SafeStaff Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


F rom t h e c e o Chairman

Andrew Reiss

Andrew’s Downtown, Tallahassee Chairman-Elect

Jim McManemon, Jr. The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island Secretary-Treasurer

Matt Halme

Outback Steakhouse Inc., Tampa

Dave Hadelman Twin Peaks, Orlando

Greg Nicklaus Sirata Beach Resort, St. Petersburg

Kevin Speidel

Hilton, Fort Lauderdale Immediate Past Chair

Bruce Craul

Legendary Inc. & Hospitality Inc., Destin President/CEO

Carol B. Dover, fmp EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley email: susie@mckinleyhome.com

M AG A ZINE

Publication Manager

John M. Baker

john@restaurantandlodging.com Advertising

Leslie L. Baker

850-545-5023 • leslie@restaurantandlodging.com Published By

DestinCom 1334 Timberlane Rd., Tallahassee, FL 32312 Phone: 850-545-1362 • Fax: 850-907-8245 Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify, or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members, or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by e-mail. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Publisher’s Address 1334 Timberlane Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32312 850/545-1362 Fax: 850/907-8245

Ad Rates and Submission Guidelines at www.RestaurantAndLodging.com Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 104403640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA Members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Boyd Brothers Printing, Inc., Panama City, FL. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, PO Box 1779, Tallahassee, FL 32302 or via email to susana@frla.org. Subscription address changes (digiw Mail, w w.Res ra at n twww.RestaurantAndLodging.com, A nd Lodgi ng.com tal or US can bet au made and click the Manage Subscription tab.

Use Trade Show as “Jumping Off Point” To Boost Your Bottom Line

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By Carol B. Dover e hope you enjoy reading FRLA’s Annual Food Safety Special and Trade Show Edition of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine. The Magazine just won two bronze Charlie Awards for excellence in Magazine publishing, and we are proud to provide our readers with an award-winning publication! September is National Food Safety Month, and it is a great time to double your efforts in being certain all of your employees are compliant with Florida’s food safety training and certification laws. Visit www.FRLA.org and click on the Education and Training link to access Carol B. Dover FRLA’s educational and training tools; this will take you directly to our food safety training program. Over the past decade, the number of food-borne illnesses in Florida has decreased exponentially and is directly related to food protection, manager certification and food handler education. Be certain to talk with FRLA representatives in our Trade Show Booth if you have any questions about food safety and how FRLA can help you meet Florida’s requirements. It is also important to note that the Department “We are thrilled of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) is in the process of incorporating risk-based inspections into to announce our their standard operating procedure. We’d like to thank new trade show them for working with industry to identify common partnership with sense regulation that will effectively protect the public and does not overly burden business. Stay tuned on Urban Expositions this issue. FRLA will be your source for interpretation and look forward of these new requirements. The 2013 Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show to a beneficial kicks off several events in September, including the relationship with massive Trade Show held at the Orange County this group.” Convention Center, the NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic held at ChampionsGate Golf Course in Orlando and the Big Party at B.B. King’s Blues Club in Pointe Orlando. These are unique opportunities to network with peers, see the latest culinary and lodging trends and products, meet FRLA’s up-and-coming ProStart and LMP students, and have some fun as well! We are thrilled to announce our new trade show partnership with Urban Expositions and look forward to a beneficial relationship with this group. Take advantage of all that FRLA has to offer. Play a role in our Governmental Affairs efforts. Ensure that your employees have received the necessary training to comply with Florida law. Protect your license with our responsible vendor program. Use the Trade Show and related events as a “jumping off point” to boost your bottom line. Cheers! Carol Dover is President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g  

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F L or I dA r e s tAU r A n t & L od GI nG A s so c I At Ion

FR&L Magazine’s CEO Profile highlights CEOs of both our hotel and restaurant members. The CEO Profile will offer insight into the hospitality industry, as well as how to get started in the business. As Hotel Manager, Darryll Adams is responsible for all day-to-day operations of The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island. He reports directly to General Manager and 2014 Incoming FRLA Chairman of the Board, James E. McManemon.

Darryll Adams Hotel Manager The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island How did you get started in the hospitality industry? When I was attending college, I remember standing in a hotel lobby and seeing two security guards escorting a celebrity, and remarking to my friend, “that would be cool job.” I enlisted in the air Force and worked in the Military Police. after the service, I pursued a career in law enforcement and while I was waiting to be called, I took a security position at the Marriott Hotel in Tysons Corner, va. and have been working in hospitality ever since.

Early in your career what was the most valuable lesson you learned? When I was in the military, I always looked serious. Work was work, and fun came later. My first Marriott mentor, Blanco Drummond, told me to lighten up, that fun and work can go together. It was a moment of enlightenment for me, and from that day forward, I changed my body language around people. I

Darryl Adams

was much more approachable, and my true personality was revealed. From then on, when I reached out to other people and engaged them, good things happened. I became the person that people sought out when they were working on a problem. once you have that trust, then people will move mountains for you.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? And, if so, please share any thoughts you have about your mentor that might be of interest to FR&L readers? I’ve been blessed to have many mentors. I already mentioned Blanco my first manager. another important mentor is ed Starvos who I worked for nine years at The ritz-Carlton, Naples. ed is one

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of the founders The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company. Imagine learning and growing under the man who pioneered the guest experience at The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company. Ed leads by example, and his leadership style reminds me of what it takes to “Ritz-Carlton.” He’s a gifted leader and served as a caring mentor who helped me tremendously with my career path.

Do you have any careerrelated advice that you would like to pass on to Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine’s readers? My advice is to always position yourself as someone who wants to learn. Live a professional life of continuously learning. When I first started at Marriott, a colleague and I were encouraged to take a test that would lead to one of us getting a promotion. Well, we both studied together, asked each other questions for a week and finally my colleague said, “You can have the job its only 25 cents more per hour.” Well, I kept going and did get the position. It wasn’t about the quarter; it was about achieving the first stepping stone in a career path.

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? People. I love working with our “Ladies” and “Gentlemen,” and I believe one of my biggest contributions is to inspire them so they can see what they can achieve in life.

How has participation in Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association positively affected your business? Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association helps us in many ways. For example, we have been introduced to vendors with better products and service. Then there are the networking opportunities. When you’re with fellow members, it’s about assisting and sharing insights. It’s important to have that kind of forum. Plus, the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association’s Government Relations arm helps all of us accomplish more together than what we would be able to do on our own. 8  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

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Hotel Manager Darryll Adams works with team member of the Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? Florida is a hospitality state and each of us has a responsibility to give guests the kind of experience that makes them want to return to Florida. We are all Ambassadors for the state and when we do that well, there are rewards for all.

Event Calendar 2013

For more information: www.frla.org/events

n FRLA Trade Show September 22-24, 2013 Orange County Convention Center – Orlando n FRLA Big Party September 23, 2013 BB King’s Blues Club – Pointe Orlando n NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic September 25, 2013 ChampionsGate – Orlando n FRLA Winter Board Meeting January 6 - 8, 2014 Ritz-Carlton Amelia Island n FRLA Tourism Day March 12, 2014 FRLA Headquarters, Tallahassee

F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


ACA Employer Penalty Delayed until 2015

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n July 2, 2013, the US Department of the Treasury announced that it will postpone the implementation of the Affordable Care Act Employer Mandate until 2015. Carol Dover, FRLA’s President and CEO, said “We are thankful the Administration delayed the ACA employer mandate deadline, giving businesses across Florida the chance to properly implement the new regulations. The hospitality industry is Florida’s largest employer, and there are still concerns about how to effectively fulfill the requirements without negatively impacting our economy. We are hopeful this delay will give us the chance to provide insight, gain knowledge, and encourage the positive growth of our industry.” In addition to delaying the mandate, this move will also delay penalties against employers until 2015.

The Gaming Impact Study and its Lack of Attention to the Casino Cannibalization Issue

Recently, FRLA President and CEO Carol Dover released the following statement regarding Part 1 of the Gaming Impact Study and its lack of attention to the casino cannibalization issue. “We commend the Florida Legislature’s comprehensive approach to assessing the current lay of the land and future alternatives with regard to gambling in Florida. We are also glad that the House and Senate select committees on this subject are undertaking a thorough analysis of what we have today and various policy alternatives. “We have read with interest the first report issued by Spectrum Gaming. While this report has a lot of good information, we would like for it to have gone farther in its analysis of the cannibalization effect of gambling – particularly as it relates to restaurants and lodging establishments. Just eight of the 320 pages in the report were devoted to the subject of cannibalization, and much of that analysis was related to how casinos might harm existing gambling operations. “While Atlantic City was mentioned, the staggering Atlantic City statistics were not. Policymakers and the public should know that 40% of restaurants and a third of w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

retail establishments going out of business in the wake of casinos opening there. They should know that crime skyrocketed and the population actually shrank. “We take exception to the report’s characterization of cannibalization, or the “substitution effect” as “…essentially synonymous with market competition.” The practice of providing free or heavily subsidized room nights and meals – a standard practice in the casino industry – is not competition. It is a predatory business practice that would hurt Florida businesses – particularly those that are a part of our hospitality industry. “We strongly urge that the issue of casino cannibalization along with the dismal economic numbers associated with Atlantic City be legitimately and factually addressed in Part 2 of the Gaming Impact Study due in October 2013. “We appreciate the ongoing work of the legislature on this issue, particularly legislative leaders and those who chair and serve on the House and Senate Gaming Committees.”

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(left to right) Chef Giuseppe Galazzi and Chef Gregory Pugin.

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n this edition of FR&L Magazine, we are featuring two chefs from the same property – the Biltmore Hotel. The Biltmore has recently welcomed two new chefs for their signature restaurants and both sizzle! The hotel’s famous Palme d’or, now claims Chef Gregory Pugin as its Chef de Cuisine and Fontana, an Italian restaurant surrounding the Biltmore fountain has recently brought on well-known Chef Giuseppe Galazzi, “Chef Beppe.”

Chef Giuseppe Galazzi “Chef Beppe” is the creative talent behind the Biltmore Hotel’s Fontana dining experience. He is known for his regional and modern Italian cooking, but also excels at South american and asian cooking styles. With an education earned in Italy, the Netherlands and venezuela, Chef Beppe brings that and more than 17 years of experience to Fontana. Beppe has been Chef or consulted for many places in the Miami area over the years: locanda Sibilla, Segafredo Group, Sardinia, via Quadronno and Caffe Milano to name a few. In addition to employment in the US, Beppe has worked in Italy, Sal Island of the Cape verde Islands, Finland, Sydney, austrailia and Cyprus. Chef Beppe is fluent in Italian, Spanish and english.

Chef Gregory Pugin CHEF DE CUISINE, PALME D’OR Born and raised in Tarbes in the Southwest region of France, Gregory Pugin began perfecting his culinary art from a very young

HotChef? Are You Considered Among 2013 Florida’s Hottest Chefs?

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age. His father, a chef, ignited in Gregory a passion and love for cooking as a child, and they often cooked together for the family. at the early age of 15, he began a 2-year course that incorporated both classes and hands-on culinary experience simultaneously. Gregory started his career at the illustrious Hôtel du Palais in Biarritz, France, and was quickly handpicked to work alongside meticulous master chef Joël robuchon in his Paris laboratory. Under robuchon’s instruction, Pugin not only expanded his culinary horizons to include opening restaurants and working on a television show, but he also learned the importance of precision and consistency in creating a perfect dish. Pugin then joined robuchon at atelier Joel robuchon at the Four Seasons, New york. after many years working and learning with robuchon, Pugin was hired as the executive Chef for veritas, where he received a Michelin Star and was nominated for a coveted James Beard award for “rising Star Chef of the year.” Pugin then moved to las vegas, where he took on the role of executive Chef at le Cirque in the Bellagio. There, his specialty, oxtail Bucatini Timbale, was awarded the “Most Savory Dish of the year” for 2011.

CHEF BEPPE

Please describe your restaurant concept. Fontana offers a distinct european charm and delivers authentic regional Italian cuisine, using local and seasonal products. Some of the ingredients, such as sea-urchin, rabbit, tripe and guinea fowl, may not be as well-known and therefore offer a truly unique experience for our diners.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to susie@mckinleyhome.com. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. BeF lo sure to include restaurant and contact R i dA R ESTAU R A n T & lo d G i n G A S So ci AT i o n information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!


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Who do you consider to be your most influential culinary What is your “sizzle” – your signature or “specialties” – mentor / teacher? unique food presentations or ideas you are using? I have had two major influences in my life. The first was my grandfather, “Nonno ernestino,” who introduced me to the world of cooking and helped me understand the difference between cooking with pots and with pans. The second was Marco Jannotta, my teacher at the Culinary Institute in Ferrara, Italy. He helped to transform my curiosity about food into the passion I now have by showing me the importance of travelling and absorbing the influence of different cultures.

I like to offer what people cannot often find in restaurants, and that they won’t cook at home. Some examples are Tripe, Wild Boar, rabbit, Guinea Fowl, Mantis Shrimp, Sea Urchin, Sea asparagus, etc. I like to offer these unique items as special dishes, and populate our menu with some of the more wellknown Italian dishes.

What influences your cooking style?

How long have you been in the restaurant business? Since the age of 16.

every chance I get, I like to go back to Italy, travelling through different regions, in an effort to find old or traditional recipes that may have been forgotten. I can then bring them back and offer them here, using local ingredients.

Please describe some of your most popular menu items:

CHEF GREGORY PUGIN

Where are you from? Tarbes, in Southwest France.

Are you married / do you have any children? Married, no children.

Where did you first learn to cook? I started cooking at home as a young child because I loved being in the kitchen, eating well, and making people happy with my food. I went on to study for my CaP and BeP Hôtellerie et restauration (French National vocational Qualifications Diplomas for Hospitality and restauration), and afterwards was taken on as an apprentice at the Hôtel du Palais in Biarritz, France.

“Chef Beppe”

Insalata di ventresca di tonno, fave e cipolla: ventresca (a preserved part of the Tuna stomach) tossed with Fresh Fava Beans and sweet red onion Polipo del mediterraneo: We use a very tender octopus from Spain that has been roasted in a wood oven and served with local organic salad Costine di agnello alla brace: Tender rack of lamb seasoned with rosemary and garlic and grilled to perfection Taglionini al nero con vongole e bottarga: This is a black squid ink tagliolini with garlic, parsley, clams and Bottarga from the island of Sardinia. all of our pasta is made fresh in-house.

What are some of your favorite/signature dishes? What makes them special? My favorites vary, as I change my menu to reflect the change in seasons. Presently, I have two favorites: Bellota Ham, because it brings together products from my region, with all the flavors that I remember from my childhood, but in a very refined fashion. lemon Marinated langoustine: Because it showcases luxury products from the sea and a touch of exotic flavor that reminds me of Panama, with the vodka gelée as the perfect liaison between the sweet, delicate flesh of the langoustine and the fatty richness of the caviar.

What do you like most about your job? Seeing people leave the table with a smile upon their lips.

What is the hardest part of your job? always reassessing what I do to be as close as possible to perfection.

What is your sizzle?

Balsamic Caprese

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I like to stick to classic recipes and techniques, but finish with a twist, creating presentations that burst to life. The langoustine au Caviar, for instance—langoustines marinated a citrus vinaigrette alongside passion-fruit tapioca and finished with an apple-vodka gelée. “I’m always thinking about the experience, and I want every meal to be the best meal anyone has ever had. F lo R i dA R ESTAU R A n T & lo d G i n G A S So ci AT i o n


GET READY: Employee-Notification Rule Goes into Effect Oct. 1

NRA tool can help employers comply U

nder the 2010 health care law, all employers covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act will be required to provide written notice to their employees by Oct. 1 about employees’ coverage options through new health insurance marketplaces, or exchanges. The Department of Labor released temporary guidance on the mandate May 8, including providing model notices and templates employers can use to provide notice to employees. Visit HealthCareAdvice.com for tools from the National Restaurant Association to help employers comply.

Q & A – EMPLOYEE-NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENT Q: Who is covered by the notice requirement? A: All employers covered by the FLSA must provide the notice to every employee, whether full-time, part-time, seasonal or temporary. Q: What is the deadline for providing the notice? A: Employers must provide notice to existing employees by Oct. 1, 2013, and at the time of hiring for all employees hired on or after that date. Starting in 2014, the notice must be provided within 14 days of the employee’s start date. Q: What must employers include in the notice? A: The health care law requires employers to provide the following information to their employees: • Information regarding the existence of the exchange in their state as well as contact information and description of the services provided by an exchange. • Information regarding an employee’s potential eligibility for a premium tax credit if the employee purchases a qualified health plan through the exchange. • Information regarding how if an employee purchases a qualified health plan through the exchange, the employee may lose the employer contribution (if any) to any health benefits plan offered by the employer and that all or a portion of such contribution to employer coverage may be excludable from income for federal income tax purposes. This means plans bought on the exchange will not have the same tax benefits as employer-sponsored coverage. Q: Are employers required to use DOL’s model notices to meet the requirement? A: No. However, if employers use their own form of notice, they must provide the same information the law requires. Q: What information is contained in DOL’s model notices? A: The DOL offers two model notices — one for employers who provide health benefits, one for employers who do not. Part A of the DOL’s model notices include general information: • Basic information about exchanges, including how employees can contact the exchange in their state. • Notice that employees may be eligible for federal subsidies to help buy coverage on an exchange if their employer does not offer coverage, or if w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

the coverage their employer offers is not affordable or does not provide “minimum value.” • A reminder that employees are not eligible for federal subsidies to buy a private plan on an exchange if their employer offers coverage that meets the law’s affordability and minimum-value standards, and that employees who opt for exchange coverage rather than the employer’s plan in these cases may lose their employer’s contribution (if any) to employer-offered coverage. Part B of DOL’s model notices include additional information employees can use to apply for health care coverage (and subsidies, if applicable) on the exchange: • For employers who do not offer health coverage: The DOL template asks for the employer’s name, address, phone number, an employer contact (name, phone, email), and an Employer Identification Number. • For employers who offer health coverage: In addition to the above information, the template asks for the following information about the employer’s plan: • Whether the plan is offered to some or all employees, and the definition of eligible employees. • Whether the plan is offered to dependents, and the definition of eligible dependents. • Whether the coverage satisfies the minimum-value standard and whether the coverage is intended to be affordable. Employers have the option of providing further details, including whether the employee is currently eligible for coverage, or will be in the next three months; what the employee’s share of the premium is; and any changes the employer plans for the new plan year. Q: How does information need to be provided? A: Employers must provide the FLSA notice in writing, “in a manner calculated to be understood by the average employee.” The notice may be provided by first-class mail. It could also be provided electronically, if the electronic notice meets certain DOL standards. Q: Where can I get the sample DOL notices, model language and more details? A: Search for DOL Technical Release 2013-02 or visit HealthCareAdvice.com for a link. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g  

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HEALTH CARE COMPLIANCE PORTAL

The National Restaurant Association has developed an online solution to help restaurateurs comply with the new FLSA notification requirement and keep track of the employees whom they’ve notified. While the law doesn’t require employers to track notifications, this tool gives employers an easy way to prove they’ve kept up with the law’s requirements — similar to the way many employers track the notices they give to employees and others about COBRA continuing health care coverage.

What’s the National Restaurant Association’s solution?

The benefits for your restaurant: simplified reporting and recordkeeping

Website portal provides employees with the required FLSA notice.

Provide the required written notice to your employees.

Your portal can be branded with your logo.

Access the Department of Labor’s notice templates.

Simple process for employees to learn about the exchange notice. Tools to help employees make health insurance decisions. Provides general information about the law for employees.

Track and report which employees received the notice. Create records to verify which employees received the notice, if proof is needed.

LEARN MORE TODAY: Employers can register for the National Restaurant Association’s online solution and learn more about how to meet the Oct. 1, 2013, deadline for employee notification at HealthCareAdvice.com. © 2013 National Restaurant Association. All rights reserved. The National Restaurant Association logo is a trademark of the National Restaurant Association.

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Emeril’s Florida, Year 2!

Red Lobster Celebrates 43 Years in Tallahassee!

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ed Lobster (Tallahassee) celebrated its recent remodel and 43-year anniversary in the community with a ribbon cutting and menu tasting. Dave Pickens, President of Red Lobster; Chip Wade, Executive Vice President of Operations at Red Lobster; Josh Andrews, General Manager of Red Lobster; and Commissioner Andrew Gillum addressed the audience made up of long-time employees and customers, community partners and elected officials. The restaurant’s flag was raised by the local Marine Corps League – Arthur R. Meyer Jr. Detachment and a check was presented to America’s Second Harvest of the Big Bend. Red Lobster Tallahassee is the longest continuous operating Red Lobster operation in the country.

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meril’s Florida is filming its second season! The inaugural season of Emeril’s Florida has been a popular addition to the Cooking Channel’s lineup. Covering Emeril “on location” in Florida, viewers have visited food hotspots, fantastic events, beautiful resorts, activities, and, of course, some of Emeril’s favorite recipes. Featuring Florida-grown food sources, Emeril’s Florida is a real treat. Effective July 4, 2013, Emeril’s Florida is also broadcast on the Food Network. For more information about Emeril’s Florida, visit: www.emerils.com/emerils-florida/

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CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION 800-591-6098 | sterlingpayment.com F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


A L A C A RTE

VISIT FLORIDA Partners with Google Maps to Showcase State’s Beaches

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team from VISIT FLORIDA has begun a four-month odyssey to capture stunning images of the Sunshine State’s 825 miles of beaches using Google’s Street View Trekker technology. These 360-degree images will be integrated into Google Maps, enabling potential visitors from around the globe to experience interactive views of Florida’s world-renowned beaches before they ever leave home. Governor Rick Scott said, “This technology from Google will allow anyone in the world to see how vast and beautiful Florida’s beaches are, which will create more opportunities for tourism. While this technology will better connect the world to Florida’s beaches, there’s no substitute for the real thing. For anyone who’s interested in Florida’s beaches, this will ultimately be a great tool so they can bet-

ter plan for their next trip to the Sunshine State.” The imagery will be collected by twoperson teams (trained by Google Maps experts) who will use the Street View Trekker and walk roughly 50 miles of beaches each week. The Trekker is a wearable backpack with a camera system on top. Its 15 lenses are angled in different directions to capture a complete picture of a location, and the images are then stitched together into 360-degree panoramic views. The completed imagery, scheduled for release next year, will enable viewers to digitally explore Florida shorelines step by step. With 825 miles of beaches, Florida is the world’s definitive beach destination. Partnering with Google Maps to document the beauty and diversity of Florida’s beaches and coastline using this amazing

Google Maps Trekker Gregg Matthews and a Ft. Walton Beach visitor.

technology will allow people to see parts of the Sunshine State they may never have discovered on their own.

Miller’s Ale House Manager, Server Save Customer’s Life

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ecent actions taken by the quick thinking of Jennifer Schiess (manager) and Andrew Hebding (server) of the Tallahassese Ale House saved the life of a customer. While dining on the back porch of the Ale House, a customer began to be symptomatic of a heart attack. Jennifer and Andrew started CPR on the customer and called 911. Emergency services came to his rescue and got the customer to the hospital. In the words of Robert Quinn, the customer’s friend who was also dining with him:

“Let me tell you why Tallahassee LOVES our Miller’s Ale House! I am a regular at our beloved Ale House, and last night another regular (Geoff Harnett), who is a dear friend of mine, had a heart attack on the back porch. Two of your staff (Jen the manager & Andrew) immediately started CPR and called 911. I was at the hospital shortly after that, when the doctor came out to talk to the family and told us that if the staff at Miller’s hadn’t started CPR, we would have lost our dear friend. They saved his life! He is alive today because of our friends/family at our local Ale House. Please applaud these heroes and pass this information to someone that should know about them. Also, let me tell you that Kevin Adams is the best general manager you have EVER had at this Miller’s Ale House. Please make sure they hear this from their peers, they are a valuable asset for your company.” Mr. Quinn also reported that Mr. Harnett is doing well with his recovery!

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Miller’s Ale House Purchased By Roark Capital Group The highly successful, 65-unit, Miller’s Ale House was recently purchased by Roark Capital Group. This purchase brings the total restaurant partners acquired by Roark Capital to 13. Former FRLA Chairman of the Board and Executive Vice President of Operations of Miller’s Ale House, David Reid, noted that he,“is very motivated to have the opportunity to work with the legendary Phil Hickey and such a world-class alliance such as Roark.” Ray Holden, President and COO of Miller’s Ale House said, “We are very excited to be partnering with Roark capital group and Phil Hickey, and we are confident with their experience and support together we will continue on a successful path as we grow our brand.”

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A L A C A RTE

Florida Tourism on Pace for Third Consecutive Record Year

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overnor Rick Scott recently announced that according to preliminary estimates* released by VISIT FLORIDA – the state’s official tourism marketing corporation – 23.4 million visitors came to Florida in the second quarter of 2013 (April-June), an increase of 2.6 percent over the same period in 2012. This makes Q2 2013 the largest second quarter for visitation in the state’s history. Governor Scott said, “Florida’s tourism industry is critical to Florida families as it serves as a vital source of revenue to the state and a key driver of employment. Florida just experienced its largest second quarter visitation ever, combined with a record first quarter, the Sunshine State is now on pace to generate an unprecedented number of jobs and economic opportunities for Florida’s families.” Through the first half of 2013, Florida welcomed 49.6 million visitors – an increase of 4.2 percent. Visitor spending in Florida for JanuaryMay 2013 (last reported month) was $33.2 billion, representing a year-over-year increase of 5.5 percent from the same period in 2012.

2013 Restaurant Sales Growth* Projected increase in restaurant sales in 2013 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Texas North Dakota Florida California Utah Colorado New York Alaska Oklahoma Arizona

5.0% 4.8% 4.7% 4.3% 4.1% 4.0% 3.9% 3.9% 3.9% 3.9%

*Source: National Restaurant Association

Direct travel-related employment in Florida for January-June rose 2.8 percent, adding 30,200 jobs since this same time one year ago. Each of these figures marks a record, making the first half of 2013 the largest six-month period in the history of Florida’s tourism industry. “We’re up nearly two million visitors who increased their spending by more than $1.7

Scott Signs Paid Leave Preemption Measure

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RLA applauds Governor Rick Scott for signing House Bill 655, a measure to preempt paid leave ordinances to the state level. Carol Dover, President and CEO of FRLA, said, “Thank you to Governor Rick Scott for singing the paid leave preemption legislation and protecting members of the tourism and hospitality industry. Our industry has consistently fought for uniformity and fairness across the state, whether it relates to inspections, licensing fees, or Gov. Rick Scott training requirements. Florida businesses cannot survive with competing regulations on a county by county basis and this legislation now allows for a level playing field for job creation and expansion.” House Bill 655 was sponsored by Sate Representative Stephen Precourt (R-Orlando) and State Senator David Simmons (R-Altamonte Springs) and went into effect July 1, 2013. The new law preempts paid leave ordinances to the state levels. requires a statewide task force to be created to analyze employment benefits and the impact of state preemption of the regulation of such benefits. The findings are to be submitted to the Governor, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives by January 15, 2014. Efforts towards this goal are underway.

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billion,” said Tammy Gustafson, Chair of the VISIT FLORIDA Board of Directors. “This continued momentum is a testament to the strength of VISIT FLORIDA’s marketing efforts, the power of the Sunshine State brand and the dedication of the nearly 1.1 million Floridians who work in the state’s tourism industry.” An estimated 19.7 million domestic visitors came to Florida during the second quarter of 2013, representing a 1.6 percent increase from the same period in 2012. Florida welcomed 2.7 million overseas visitors in Q2 2013 representing a 9.3 percent increase over Q2 2012, and 1 million Canadian visitors during the same period representing a 4.9 percent increase from the previous year. Following up two consecutive record years with back to back record quarters so far in 2013 proves we are well-positioned to make Florida the No. 1 travel destination in the world. Additional Preliminary Data: • Primary data collected at Florida’s 16 major airports in the second quarter of 2013 reflect a 0.1 percent increase in total enplanements from the same period in 2012. • The Average Daily Room Rate rose 2.3 percent to $115.67 and the occupancy rate for Florida hotels increased 2.7 percentage points to 68.3 percent in Q2 2013 compared to Q2 2012. • Nearly 11.5 million Florida residents are estimated to have taken a pleasure trip during Q2 2013. • The share of in-state pleasure trips by residents was 48 percent, resulting in roughly 5.5 million pleasure trips instate – a 0.8 percent increase from the same time last year. • Traffic at the state’s five Official Florida Welcome Centers managed by VISIT FLORIDA was up 2.3% in Q2 2013. To view additional Florida visitor data, go the Research page on VISIT FLORIDA’s media website. *Preliminary estimates are issued 45 days after the end of each calendar quarter. Final estimates are released when final data are received for all estimates in the report. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


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A L A c A rt e

Cool Apps A free new app trademarked by ThermoWorks, Inc. offers a mobile HACCP system. It pairs with a Bluetooth thermometer to enable an iPhone, iPad or iPod to record information for your HACCP program. According to ThermoWorks, the app will: • Store HACCP temps for checklist reporting • Select from pre-loaded corrective actions • Email pass/fail results • Create checklists on PC and emails them to mobile device • Eliminate paper logs This app is designed to be used with a “BlueTherm” Bluetooth temperature probe sold by ThermoWorks, Inc. and is optimized with iPhone 5.

Top Trends* Preparation Methods 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Kanvess will print your Instagram

photos! If you are now a fantastic photographer due to some assistance from Instagram (ha ha), you are now able to print these photos with Kanvess. Your favorite photos will be printed into three-inch squares with a white border. Photos are 25 cents each; you must order at least six photos at a minimum. Check it out!

OUT OF COMPLIANCE?

Fermenting Pickling Sous vide Liquid nitrogen chilling / freezing Smoking

Culinary Themes 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Environmental sustainability Children’s nutrition Hyper-local sourcing (e.g., restaurant gardens) Gluten-free cuisine Health / nutrition

Other Food Items/ Ingredients 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Farm / estate-branded items Artisan cheeses Ethnic cheeses (e.g., queso fresco, paneer, lebneh, halloumi) Non-wheat flour (e.g., peanut, millet, barley, rice) Ancient grains (e.g., kamut, spelt, amaranth)

*Source: National Restaurant Association, “What’s Hot in 2013,” Chef Survey 2012

Contact FRLA to solve compliance issues at 866-372-7233 or www.SafeStaff.org

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Mov e r s a n d Sh a k e r s

Joseph Dantoni GM of Pier House Resort & Spa in Key West

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emington Hotels, a full management and hospitality service company, has named Joseph Dantoni as General Manager of Pier House Resort & Spa. With more than 20 years of experience in luxury hotels and a past recognition as General Manager of the Year by Remington Hotels, Dantoni seeks to elevate the guest experience that embraces authentic Key West charm. With a proven track record of success leading upscale properties, Dantoni recently guided Melrose Georgetown Joseph Dantoni Hotel through a major renovation and reconcepting process. Dantoni’s general manager experience includes the 144-key Historic Inns of Annapolis, a historic boutique hotel in Annapolis, Md. In January 2011 Dantoni was named Remington Hotels’ General Manager of the Year, where he increased revenues to the highest levels in property history and significantly improved guest service scores while leading Historic Inns of Annapolis. “I am excited to join the dynamic team at Pier House Resort. This town has such rich history and Pier House is one of the most iconic landmarks around,” says Joe Dantoni, general manager Pier House Resort & Spa. As part of a collection of luxury hotels and resorts managed by Remington Hotels, Pier House Resort & Spa is nestled among tropical gardens, genuine service and charming accommodations while located steps away from the spirited streets of Key West. The resort provides a distinct guest experience full of authentic island charisma.

Mass Care Specialist Recognized For Excellence

H&R’s Michael Whitehead Wins Craig Irwin Memorial Award

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lorida Mass Care coordinator Michael Whitehead of Tallahassee has recently been awarded the Craig Irwin Memorial Award by FEMA. The Craig Irwin Memorial Award recognizes excellence in service and support with the individual assistance network. “I’m honored to receive such an award,” Whitehead said. “I want to thank FEMA and all the state officers for giving me such a tremendous honor. I promise to continue working to increase our nation’s mass care capabilities.” Following a disaster, individual assistance and/or mass care programs coordinate with federal, state, local, and voluntary/non-profit entities to provide recovery assistance to survivors. Whitehead serves as the mass care coordinator as part of Florida’s State Emergency Response Team and is an employee of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Hotels and Restaurants. In addition to working disaster events in Florida, Whitehead has also assisted other states including Mississippi during Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Louisiana during Hurricane Gustav in 2008, New Jersey during Hurricane Irene in 2011 and Maryland during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Following his work in Maryland, Whitehead took two weeks of vacation time to volunteer with the American Red Cross in New York City to assist with additional Sandy response and recovery efforts.

FRLA Welcomes Mary Alford

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n August, Mary Alford started work at FRLA as a Legislative Analyst. Mary will replace Maggie Gaby. She joins the Government Relations team after working for the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Since starting at DBPR in 2005, she has worked in the Division of Professions, Office of Communications and the Office of Legislative Affairs. Mary and her husband, Gordon, look forward to the Seminole football season every year! Go Noles!

Mary Alford

Cool Web Page Foodsafety.gov Foodsafety.gov is an awesome web page that provides information both to the consumer and to operators. It is bright, fun, current and offers multimedia training opportunities. Covering topics such as dangers of unpasteurized milk, foodborne illness, produce safety, raw sprouts, cooking guidance and many other topics, Foodsafety.gov is an important resource to add to your targeted food safety training tool box. Visit www.foodsafety.gov today! w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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SEPTEMBER IS FOOD SAFETY MONTH

Division of Hotels and Restaurants: Meeting National Standards to Protect Floridians By DIaNN Worzalla, reHS, MPa

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n September 2001, the Division of Hotels and restaurants voluntarily enrolled in the U.S. Food and Drug administration’s (FDa) National retail Food regulatory Program Standards (Standards). These Standards are not simply a list of minimum requirements, but are the gold standard for all retail food safety inspection programs. Utilizing the Standards provides a framework for regulatory entities to voluntarily assess their retail food safety programs using nationally recognized criteria that enumerate the best practices for retail food safety inspection programs. achieving the Standards advances objectives set out in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services “Healthy People 2020” initiative, which lists food safety as one of its 42 priority areas. Currently, there are 558 programs enrolled. enrollment in the Standards provides an inspection program with national thirdparty recognition of the quality of their program. Since enrolling over a decade ago, the Division has achieved five of the nine Standards. We are proud to say that we are the largest restaurant inspection program to reach this accom-

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plishment and no other program of our size in the nation has achieved more. When applied in the intended manner, the Standards enable a regulatory program to: • Identify program areas where the greatest impact on retail food safety can be made and prioritize resource allocations accordingly; • Promote wider application of effective intervention strategies designed to reduce the occurrence of factors that contribute to foodborne illness; • assist in identifying program areas most in need of enhancement; • Provide information needed to justify program resources; • achieve a “Best Practice” model using innovative ideas to implement and administer programs; • Improve industry and consumer confidence in food protection programs by enhancing uniformity within and between regulatory agencies; and

Charles Cox of San Sebastian Winery and Lakeridge Winery & Vineyards; Phillip McDaniel, President/CEO of St. Augustine Distillery; and Ken Lawson, Secretary DBPR, review plans of FRLA members for the new St. Augustine Distillery.

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• enhance program accountability through the establishment of baselines on the occurrence of contributing factors to foodborne illness that can be used to achieve measurable program outcomes. The criteria specified for each of the standards are not minimum standards, but represent a high benchmark to which a regulatory retail food program should aspire. Together, the nine Standards listed below provide a comprehensive set of performance measures representing every facet of the retail food regulatory program. The division has achieved the five highlighted Standards. 1. Regulatory Foundation 2. Trained Regulatory Staff 3. Inspection Program Based on HaCCP Principles (projected to achieve in July 2014, with implementation of risk-based inspection frequency) 4. Uniform Inspection Program (projected to achieve in July 2014, with implementation of risk-based inspection frequency) 5. Foodborne Illness and Food Security Preparedness and Response 6. Compliance and enforcement 7. Industry and Community Relations 8. Program Support and resources 9. Program Assessment The Standards are designed to encompass traditional and cutting-edge food safety program approaches, encourage program enhancement, and promote uniformity. The Conference for Food Protection, with which the division actively participates, recommends improvements to the Standards and the FDa Food Code.

DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS & ECONOMY Florida is the fourth most populous state in the U.S., surpassed only by California, Texas and New york. Despite slower population growth than previous decades, Florida is projected to replace New york as the third most populous state in 2016, reaching an estimated population over 20 million . Demographically, Florida’s population is older, on average, than that of any other state in the nation, with a median age of 40.7 and 17.3 percent of the population 65 years of age and older . according to census data , the counties with the greatest growth percentages are rural. The trend points to continued rural growth and sustained urban population. Florida attracts around 90 million tourists a year , mostly to urban areas. 26  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

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Together, these two facts indicate a steady increase in restaurant and lodging facilities in rural areas, with no reduction of accounts in the urban areas. The industries regulated by the division provide significant impact to Florida’s economy. The National restaurant association estimates the state’s restaurant industry alone will account for $31.3 billion in gross sales in the year 2013. Florida’s $71.8 billion “hospitality” industry represents 23 percent of Florida’s economy, generating $4.3 billion in sales tax revenue and employing more than one million people.

IMPLEMENTATION OF FDA PROGRAM STANDARDS The operation of a statewide food safety program provides extraordinary consistency and standardization from Key West to Pensacola, a factor extremely important to Florida’s hospitality industry and tourism-driven economy. The division enjoys a reputation as a national leader in the food safety community and has significant representation in most national forums and initiatives regarding food safety. These leadership roles are of critical importance to the division’s success in providing quality control and public safeguards for the state’s at-risk populations and 90 million annual visitors who eat in our restaurants and sleep in our lodgings. The division has the goal to become one of the nation’s first statewide restaurant inspection programs to be recognized for achieving all of the Standards. as the cost of traditional regulatory activity grows and the public’s desire to minimize the growth of government increases, regulatory agencies are challenged to maximize the effectiveness of existing staff and resources. Implementation of the Standards, along with a risk-based inspection system, will allow the division to concentrate

its efforts on the most critical aspect of its mission - protecting the public by eliminating sources of foodborne illness. This approach is both cost effective and empowering as it allows inspectors to actively involve restaurant operators in keeping the food supply safe. The net effect, when properly instituted, is equivalent to having an inspector on premises full time.

EXPECTED OUTCOME With full implementation of the Standards, the Division of Hotels and restaurants will realize the full potential offered by the Food Code to protect the public’s health. raising the professional stature and competency of the field staff will increase the quality and effectiveness of the inspections performed as well as the staff’s job satisfaction level. Being recognized by the FDa for “clearly demonstrating a remarkable level of commitment to achieving program excellence” is a source of pride and professionalism that has helped the division not only retain its best employees, but also attract the highest quality applicants for future positions. as more and more consumers use convenience foods purchased in markets or eat-in restaurants, it is important to provide that extra margin of food safety. By hard work and diligent effort, the division will continue to be proactive in the goal of reducing foodborne illness - which ultimately will result in a safer experience for the dining public. Diann Worzalla is Director of Hotels and Restaurants. 1. Florida: An Economic Overview , Office of Economic & Demographic Research, The Florida Legislature, June 19, 2013. 2. Florida: Demographic Trends, Office of Economic & Demographic Research, The Florida Legislature, September 26, 2011. 3. Florida: Demographic Trends, Office of Economic & Demographic Research, The Florida Legislature, September 26, 2011. 4. Calendar Year Visitor Numbers for 2012, Visit Florida.com 5. Florida Restaurant Industry at a Glance, National Restaurant Association 6. The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association F lo R i dA R ESTAU R A n T & lo d G i n G A S So ci AT i o n


Another Perspective

Active Managerial Control By Steven Hoffmann and Cynthia Walker

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ast year around this time, you were reading an article in this publication about “active managerial control” and what it meant to the food service industry. Now, let’s take a look at what it means from the regulator’s point of view. The 2009 Food Code defines active managerial control as an industry responsibility to “develop and implement food safety management systems to prevent, eliminate, or reduce the occurrence of foodborne illness risk factors”. This is a broad concept, but when applied appropriately, helps provide guidance to employees and keeps food safety issues under control. Out of control risk factors can lead to a foodborne illness outbreak. Risk factors include food from unsafe sources, poor personal hygiene, contaminated equipment, inadequate cooking and improper holding temperatures. The Division of Hotels and Restaurants (DHR) conducts risk-based inspections that focus on these risk factors and educates operators on how to control the risk factors. For each of the five major risk factors, the Food Code provides an intervention – or control measure - including hands as a vehicle for contamination, time and temperature parameters for food, use of a consumer advisory, employee health measures, and demonstrations of knowledge. All of these interventions are part of and should be included in active managerial control. Looking back, the original 1976 FDA Food Code devoted fewer than two pages to the responsibility of management. The 2009 Food Code devotes 23 pages and an entire chapter to this subject. As knowledge grows, so does the responsibility to ensure food safety. In the past 16 years, Florida’s restaurant industry has grown by 31%. There are approximately 48,000 licensed public food service establishments in Florida that feed 19 million residents and 80 million visitors each year. Through sustained industry efforts and its partnership with the Division of Hotels and Restaurants, the number of foodborne illnesses in Florida has been reduced by 84% during this same 16-year period. Such a reduction is quite impressive, but there is always room for improvement. In July 2014, DHR will implement a risk-based inspection frequency program. This program will allow regulatory and compliance efforts to be focused on food service establishments that pose a higher risk to the public or have a history of non-compliance. Inspectors will be asking a lot of questions about various processes and how foods are handled in the establishment. Simply knowing the correct answers will no longer be sufficient; inspectors will be checking to see if knowledge is translated into action. Let’s take one risk factor for example - lack of proper handwashing. The food manager may be able to explain why handwashing is important, when it is required and how to do it, but if the handwash sinks are not supplied with soap, running water and paper towels, proper handwashing cannot be accomplished. When proper handwashing does not occur, there is a lack of active managerial control over this risk factor. So as you can see, possessing food safety knowledge is only the beginning. You certainly must know your risk factors, identify your hazards and know how to make corrective actions, but to fully implement active managerial control, you must put action behind that knowledge. In other words, you must practice what you preach. If you do, you can feel confident you have done everything in your power to serve your customers the safest and best food your efforts can provide – and that’s a goal we can all agree upon. Steven Hoffman and Cynthia Walker are Management Review Specialists and FDA Standardized Training Officers with the Division of Hotels and Restaurants, DBPR. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Let RCS Help With All Mandatory Food Handler Training Needs FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services (RCS) provides mandatory food handler training

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ince 1997, Florida law requires that all food handlers (employees whose job involves the occasional or routine handling of food or beverage or the contact surfaces involved in the production, storage, or service of food or beverage products) be provided a course of study utilizing a state approved basic food safety curriculum. The training must be conducted by a certified food manager, and records of the training must be kept on file. Companies trained by RCS can find their training records in the DBPR online database.

The FRLA SafeStaff® Foodhandler Training Program is the contracted program of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) and contains the following six mandated key food safety principles: 1. Ensuring proper personal hygiene 2. Preventing cross-contamination 3. Controlling time and temperature when handling food 4. Proper cleaning and sanitizing 5. The causes and effects of major foodborne illnesses 6. Ensuring proper vermin control FRLA offers food handler training via an online system or via onsite training by FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services’ training team. During onsite training, one of our professional training staff comes to your establishment and provides a live employee food handler training for you. In addition, the trainers assist you in assuring you have the necessary documentation to avoid problems during an inspection. To schedule your SafeStaff® food handler training, call 800-537-9863 or log on to certificationandtraining.frla.org. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g  

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During plan review several key food safety components are evaluated

Aspects of Food Safety in Plan Review By Lydia Gonzalez

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he Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR), Division of Hotels and Restaurants requires all public food service establishments licensed by the Division to undergo a food safety-based plan review. The local municipality conducts their own plan review to check for building code compliance and construction standards. A food safety based plan review provides a basic framework for successfully operating a safe and sanitary food service establishment. Plan review ensures a uniform set of standards is applied to all establishments across the state and each establishment meets the minimum requirements for food safety. Conducting a food safety based plan review prior to a food service establishment being built or remodeled helps operators avoid costly delays in opening and future violations. The plan review process also provides the operator the opportunity to propose a food safety layout that is organized and efficient for their specific operation. A plan review is required for public food service establishments during the following situations: New construction of a building, new build-out in an existing building, or a food establishment transferred to the Division by another regulatory agency Remodeling an existing public food establishment by adding a room or food preparation area, expanding into an adjacent space, removing/adding walls and floor-mounted equipment or other changes that affect safety and sanitary requirements Re-opening a food establishment licensed by the Division after it has been closed for over 1 year During plan review several key food safety components are evaluated. For example, the plan reviewer will examine the proposed menu for approved source, quantity and type of food being served, and the need for a consumer advisory. New operators may not have a food service or food safety background and the concept of ‘approved source’ may not be fully understood. A review of the menu can reveal if an operator intends to use a kitchen in a private home to prepare any menu items. The menu can also help determine the space and equipment (such as sufficient cold-holding and hot-holding units) needed at the food service estab28  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

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lishment for a safe operation. Plan reviewers can assess the configuration of the storage, preparation, and cooking areas and discuss the intended use of each area and the number of employees expected to work in each area at one time to determine if the areas are adequate to safely produce the projected menu items. The proper location of handwashing sinks is a critical food safety component evaluated during plan review. A conveniently located handwashing sink is required in every area where food is prepared (including dispensing food) or clean dishware is handled. Other sinks, such as warewashing, preparation and mop sinks, may not be used for handwashing. The number of handwashing sinks required will depend on many factors, such as the flow of food, number of employees in the area, level of risk inherent to the food or process, accessibility during peak operating hours, visibility of the handwashing sinks to the employees, etc. Having a sufficient number of handwashing sinks conveniently located and easily accessible to all employees will encourage handwashing and reduce the risk of foodborne illness. Handwashing sinks need to be located not just so handwashing is possible, but that it is likely. The plan reviewer will also be looking for possible cross-contamination issues caused by handwash sink placement: splash from a handwash sink could contaminate food, equipment or utensils. Having the proper warewashing capacity is another matter of food safety that it is assessed during plan review. The minimum requirement is to have a three-compartment sink with each compartment large enough to accommodate the largest pot, pan or piece of equipment in the food service establishment. A commercial dishmachine is also an acceptable method for warewashing. Whether equipment and utensils are washed, rinsed and sanitized manually in a three-compartment sink or mechanically in a dishmachine, the warewashing process is not complete until the equipment and utensils are air dried. For this reason, two drainboards or their equivalent (such as racks, shelves or dish tables) must be provided – one for soiled dishware and one for air drying clean dishware. The plan reviewer will determine if adequate warewashing facilities, including air drying, are provided. Removing all food residue and providing the contact time needed for sanitizers to kill existing patho-

gens on food-contact surfaces is an important factor in reducing the risk of foodborne illness. Not having a safe water supply is a potential source of contamination for food, equipment, utensils and hands. Likewise, not having an approved sewage disposal system can increase the risk of diseases transmitted by fecal contamination, pollute ground surfaces and natural water supplies, and provide a breeding ground for rodents and insects. Providing documentation of approved potable water and sewage disposal systems is an essential food safety requirement that is examined closely during plan review. Approval for municipal systems can be in the form of a recent water and/or sewer utility bill showing the address of the establishment. If the establishment is on a well and/or onsite sewage treatment and disposal system (a septic tank system), or a water/sewer bill is not yet available, the operator may complete and submit the division’s Evaluation of Onsite Sewage (septic) and Water Supply Capacity form. This form must be signed by the authority having jurisdiction over the particular system. For well and septic tank systems, the authority having jurisdiction is often the local County Health Department. Due to water and sewer restrictions and limitations, it is recommended that operators verify availability of and/or obtain approval for these systems before investing large amounts of time or money. Disposing of wastewater properly also applies to the next set of requirements reviewed during a plan review – providing a mop/service sink and a bathroom. Plan reviewers verify that a mop/service sink or curbed cleaning facility is available for the disposal of grey water that is produced when cleaning the physical structure and non-food contact components, such as floor mats. Mop water and other similar liquid waste may not be disposed of in handwash, warewash or food preparation sinks; or toilets or urinals. With the exception of mobile food dispensing vehicles and vending machines, each public food service establishment must provide a bathroom for employee and customer use. Even caterers and take-out or delivery only operations have to provide a bathroom that is accessible to customers without entering the food preparation or warewashing area. This ensures human waste is disposed of properly and F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


food service operations are protected from customer contamination. The number of bathrooms and/or toilets needed is determined by the local building or plumbing authority. Plan reviewers also analyze adequate protection of food. All food being displayed, served or held must be protected from splash, dust or other sources of cross-contamination. At times, a simple splash guard/barrier can alleviate a cross-contamination concern. Establishments that offer foods for customer self-service, such as salad bars or buffet stations, are required to provide a barrier that blocks the direct line between the displayed food and the customer’s nose and mouth. This is commonly referred to as a sneezeguard. Ice machines and food preparation areas are also evaluated to ensure that they are located in an enclosed portion of the building where they are protected from environmental contamination and in an area that is not accessible to customers. The type of construction material used in certain areas is examined during plan review as well. This is because in areas of moisture, such as food preparation and warewashing areas, the surface finish of the floor, wall and ceiling must be smooth, nonabsorbent and easily cleanable. These areas may not have exposed studs, joists or rafters; and a coved base is required at floor/wall junctures. Proper construction finishes will ensure the surfaces are durable and easy to clean; no liquid can seep into the surfaces, dust and debris cannot accumulate on rough surfaces and food particles cannot become trapped in cracks or crevices. Unclean floors, walls and ceilings can attract pests and harbor pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes. The above examples of food safety issues addressed during plan review illustrates how a plan review can assist new operators in identifying possible operational problems and ensuring compliance with minimum construction requirements prior to opening/operating. Because many questions regarding plan review can be highly technical in nature, the division created an email address just for plan review questions. Email plan review questions or concerns to dhr. planreview@myfloridalicense.com. Plan reviewers are available Monday thru Friday from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. For more information about the division’s plan review process please visit www.myfloridalicense. com/dbpr/hr/licensing/planreviewindex.html. Lydia Gonzalez is a Management Review Specialist and FDA Standardized Training Officer with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Hotels and Restaurants. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Seafood Fraud

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eafood misrepresentation is a crime. It is fraud. Operators should be aware that serving any misrepresented, mislabeled or misbranded food is illegal. Operators knowingly serving misrepresented food can be found guilty of a second-degree misdemeanor. Fines may also be charged and restaurant licenses can be suspended or revoked.

Seafood “fraud” is an issue that operators and consumers, alike, face frequently Seafood fraud is essentially serving one type of seafood and declaring on the menu or the daily specials board that it is another type of seafood. There are many scenarios in which this violation plays out: wild seafood is substituted for farmed seafood, imitation crab is served and is declared as real crab, one type of fish is served and another is described on the menu, and the like. Typically, the misrepresented fish is a species of lesser value that is imported from another country that may or may not have food safety standards equal to those of the United States.

All seafood must be honestly labeled A recent study conducted by Oceana, an international ocean conservation group, found “…seafood fraud everywhere it tested, including mislabeling rates of 38 percent in South Florida….” In addition, Oceana noted, “Fish on the FDA’s “DO NOT EAT” list for sensitive groups such as pregnant women and children because of their high mercury content were sold to customers who had ordered safer fish: tilefish sold as red snapper and halibut in New York City and king mackerel sold as grouper in South Florida….” When purchasing seafood for your operation, be certain that your supplier is a licensed seafood dealer. If the price for the seafood seems to be less expensive than usual, the seafood may be misbranded or misrepresented. Be familiar with the color and texture of the popular seafood that you serve. If you receive seafood that doesn’t appear to be “legit,” don’t accept it, and return it to the vendor. By following these recommendations, you can help prevent seafood fraud in your operation. Susie McKinley is the Editor of the FR&L Magazine.

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2013 Highlights

FDA’s Oral Culture Learner Project By CoMMaNDer DIaNe KelSCH

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any of you are already aware of or have even used FDa’s oral Culture learner Project materials, but did you know that FDa released new materials this year and has plans to release even more? The FDa’s oral Culture learner Project was initiated in 2008 to develop training materials focused on communicating the consequences of food employees not following safe food preparation practices. The goal of this project is to change food employee behaviors and practices to reduce foodborne illness. The project was based on research conducted by Donna Beegle, ed.D. (2004) that suggested food employees are predominately “oral culture learners,” whereas health inspectors and industry quality assurance personnel are “print culture learners.” The concept of print versus oral culture learning styles has to do with the way we receive and process information. although most people utilize both communication styles, we tend to prefer one style over the other depending on our background, education, and other factors. The workgroup’s initial research suggested that although food employees are predominantly oral culture learners, the majority of food safety training materials and instructional methods were designed by and for print culture learners. as a result, FDa created numerous training materials using oral culture learner principles including storyboards, cause and effect posters, audio testimonials of victims of foodborne illness, and demonstrations and activities. This year, FDa released several foodborne illness testimonial videos, new training posters were created, an oral Culture Display Kit was developed, and the effectiveness of the oral Culture learner training materials will be tested through “Project Google”. • Foodborne Illness Testimonial Videos: In april of 2013, FDa released three foodborne illness victim video testimonials as part of the agency’s efforts to develop and disseminate food safety educational materials for oral culture learners. less than ten minutes each, the videos can be used to educate retail and foodservice employees on the dire consequences of poor preparation prac30  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

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safe food preparation practices. These posters are not copyrighted and are available in nine different languages including arabic, english, Chinese (Traditional and Mandarin), Hindi, Korean, russian, Spanish, and vietnamese. • Oral Culture Display Kits: oral Culture Display kits were developed and will be distributed to FDa Public affairs Cool Food Properly to Prevent Illnesses and Save Your Job Specialists. The kits will be used to display, promote, and discuss the oral culture project and materials at international, national, regional, and state conferences. The kits include banners, printed oral culture posters, DvDs of project materials, continuous running video testimonials, brochures, marketing paraphernalia, and internal briefing documents that explain the oral culture Protect People eople Everywhere. Cool Food Properly. learner project. If you are interested in having an Before you go to work, ask yourself: “Do I feel well today?” oral culture display at a particular conference, please contact me at Diane. Kelsch@fda.hhs.gov. • “Project Google”: FDa, in partnership with Google, will be testing the effectiveness of the FDa’s oral culture learner materials in changing the long term behavior of food employees at the Googleplex – the corporate headquarters complex of Google, Inc. Protect People Everywhere By Not Working When You Are Sick. located in Mountain view, Ca. We are excited about the opportunity to tices and provide tips to prevent foodborne illness. partner with Google on this experiment Two of the videos feature family members of and look forward to presenting the results. zella Ploghoft of athens, ohio, who died of comThe FDa oral Culture learner Project materials plications from a Salmonella infection at age 82. (videos and posters) are available at http://www.fda. The other features Bernadette Jacobs, a mother gov/foodemployeetraining. The videos are available of three who describes how she almost lost her for download on FoodShield: https://www.foodnewborn daughter due to a listeria infection she shield.org/index.cfm/discover-tools-links/trainingcontracted while pregnant. videos/fda-retail-food-safety-educational-videos/ • Educational Posters: eight new postFor additional information regarding the ers related to improper holding of time-temperature FDa’s oral Culture Project, please refer to the control for safety food (TCS food) and inadequate article entitled “FDa’s oral Culture Project cooking temperatures were created based on feedrepresents Innovation in Food Safety education back we received in workshops with food employand Training”, by alan Tart, in Frla’s august/ ees. These posters are currently being reviewed by September 2010 issue of the Food Safety a group of 50+ industry, regulatory, and academia Supplement http://restaurantandlodging.com/storstakeholders. Final posters are expected to be posted age/docs/FoodSafety_Frl_15-04.pdf on the FDa website by December 2013. The posters are directed at improving how indusCommander Diane L. Kelsch is a Regional try and regulatory food safety professionals commu- Retail Food Specialist with the U.S. Food and nicate with front line food employees on the imporDrug Administration, Southeast Region, State tance of food safety. The posters use a minimum of Cooperative Programs. Readers can reach the text, relying on photographs or drawings to show author by E-mail: diane.kelsch@fda.hhs.gov or food employees the consequences of not following Phone: (407) 475-4747. Proper cooling can be done by:

Placing food in shallow pans, uncovered, under refrigeration Separating food into smaller containers Using rapid cooling equipment Stirring the food in a container placed in an ice water bath Other effective methods

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Food Defense Tools Now Available From the US FDA By Susie McKinley

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ccording to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), “Food Defense is the collective term used by the FDA, USDA, DHS, etc. to encompass activities associated with protecting the nation’s food supply from deliberate or intentional acts of contamination or tampering. This term encompasses other similar verbiage (i.e., bioterrorism (BT), counter-terrorism (CT), etc.).” Food defense is one important aspect of the Nation’s protection of food along with food safety and food quality. To assist the US food industry, the FDA has produced a comprehensive array of free tools to assist operators in developing a food defense plan for food establishments. These programs run the gamut from training programs, to food defense marketing campaigns and customizable plans. The FDA has developed a training program titled “Food Defense 101” which provides training to assist in preventing an intentional effort to damage the food supply. Food Defense 101 prepares attendees to develop their own Food

Defense plans. The Food Defense Plan Builder Tool is software that walks users through development of a personalized food defense plan, and in addition to these efforts, the FDA is hosting a series of Food Defense Awareness Workshops to be held around the country. Other related materials offered by the FDA are the Food Related Emergency Exercise Bundle (FREE-B) which is a compilation of tabletop training exercises, and Employees FIRST, which is a front-line food industry training initiative teaching food defense awareness and defining the acronym FIRST - Employees are the FIRST line of food defense. The FIRST program also includes a training CD and a poster written in English and translated into Chinese, French, Japanese, Korean, Spanish and Vietnamese. The “See Something, Say Something” campaign recognizes that front-line employees are often the first to observe something out of the ordinary. This program offers an easy-to-use poster available in English, Spanish and Chinese. The FDA also offers Vulnerability Assessment Software to assist operators in determining vulnerabilities within an operation or system, and the Mitigation Strategies Database to assist food manufacturers and processors in providing a further “…range of preventative measures….”.

Educational materials like these are valuable and difficult to replicate. FDA food defense resources can be customized to suit your needs. To determine which of these strategies works best for you, visit www.fda.gov/Food/FoodDefense for more information.

Conference for Food Protection Comes to Florida Florida is hosting the 2014 Biennial Meeting of the Conference of Food Protection (CFP) at the Buena Vista Palace in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, May 1 to 7, 2014. The Conference is a gathering of industry, local, state and federal regulators, academia, professional organizations and consumers who meet to work on matters of food safety. The CFP is a valuable resource to all interested in the safety of our nation’s food. Watch for more information about the upcoming CFP meeting in future editions of Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine.

Florida’s Integrated Rapid Response Team (FLIRRT) By Rita Johnson

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he Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), in partnership with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and local governments, works to prevent disruption to Florida’s critical food and agriculture sector in the event of an emergency through the Florida Integrated Rapid Response Team (FLIRRT). The FLIRRT is a coordinated statewide response to food safety threats that includes planning, training exercises and maintaining preventative technological capabilities. FLIRRT began as a collaboration among federal and state regulatory agencies involved in the food and feed industries to strengthen Florida’s infrastructure and ability to respond to food and food emergencies. Members of the FLIRRT, including FDACS, Florida Department of Health, Florida Department w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

of Business and Professional Regulations and the FDA, receive training in Incident Command System (ICS), specific commodities and various food processes, as well as investigative techniques in traceback/traceforwards and environmental assessments. This team is equipped with special supplies and gear and can be deployed within a few hours of an event. A FLIRRT Advisory Group maintains communication between the core-involved agencies and develops policies and procedures to guide response efforts. The FLIRRT Standard Operating Guideline (SOG) was developed by the FLIRRT Advisory Group and was most recently activated during the Republican National Convention held in Tampa in August of 2012. Given the size and nature of the event, manpower assistance was requested by event officials to ensure food safety and food defense. FLIRRT provided 21 individuals who represented all the FLIRRT state and federal regulatory stake-

holders and offered the required food safety skill sets to support the event. Despite many challenges at this event, FLIRRT’s comprehensive planning efforts allowed the team to successfully manage the food safety and food defense of this notable event with no reported intentional or unintentional foodborne illness. As demonstrated by the success of the coordinated response during the Republican National Convention, FLIRRT protects the public from or lessens the impact of adverse effects of a foodborne illness. In a state that is highly susceptible to natural or human-made disasters due to its high profile and geographic location, it is critical for FLIRRT to continue to plan, communicate and improve Florida’s infrastructure to respond to threats to food safety and food security. Rita Johnson is an Environmental Consultant for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g  

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3 Years After G Testing Shows G

More than 3,000 Seafood Products Te

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ver the past three years, the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has extensively tested more than 3,000 seafood products from the Gulf of Mexico to ensure they are safe to eat by consumers in Florida and around the world. Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam released results recently highlighting the safety of Gulf shrimp, fish, crabs, oysters and more. “These tests show that Florida seafood is without a doubt safe to eat. Our shrimp, fish and other products continue to be some of the best quality seafood in the world,” Commissioner Putnam said. Between August 2010 and March 31, 2013, the department screened 3,090 seafood samples, including 1,828 finfish, 313 shrimp, 375 oysters, 255 crabs, 261 clams and 58 lobsters for possible oil contamination by testing for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH).

What’s Happening With Gulf Seafood? * By STEVE OTWELL

FR&L Magazine has asked nationally-recognized seafood safety expert Dr. Steve Otwell to share information with our readers about Gulf Seafood since the 2010 BP Oil Spill. He will be answering questions posed by readers and customers about the safety of Gulf Seafood

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onsumer confidence in the safety of seafood harvested from the Gulf of Mexico has largely recovered since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, though for some, concerns still linger. Fortunately, the United States has one of the best systems in the world for testing food safety, but we all have to keep in mind that no food is risk free. We’re reminded of that every time meat gets recalled, or bags of lettuce cause food poisoning. The key is to focus on reasonably minimizing risk. No one can tell you that Gulf 32

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or any other seafood is 100 percent safe—neither can they tell you that about your lettuce or your chicken. But Gulf seafood has now been scrutinized more extensively than most foods sold in the United States. Every scientific study has concluded that there is no sign of risk with Gulf seafood, and there are reams of publicly available data to back this up. As expected there is a segment of the population that is not going to believe anything or anyone making the case that Gulf seafood is safe.

Is Gulf seafood safe? Yes. By all accounts, since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Gulf seafood has been and continues to be thoroughly tested. Even if you’ve heard statements like this before, you may have some doubts, so read on and we’ll explain more about how the testing works and why it’s effective

If Gulf seafood is safe, why can I find information on the Internet from seemingly well-informed people telling me it’s best to avoid it?

How do we know that Gulf seafood is safe?

The Internet offers the opportunity for individuals to say what they believe and have it accessible around the world. So we’d all do well to be initially skeptical of the things we read, particularly the more sensational things. Many negative claims about seafood were based on preconceived ideas about what to expect and “gut feelings.” But science doesn’t work like that. Science involves testing ideas and objectively assessing the available information. Such assessments have repeatedly supported the conclusion that Gulf seafood is safe.

Soon after the Deepwater Horizon spill began, state and federal regulators met and agreed on a set of strict guidelines to follow for closing areas to fishing, deciding when they would be safe to reopen, and ensuring that seafood remained safe after opening. The monitoring and sampling procedures were based on the most current, science-based methods and the advice of leading authorities across the nation including the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and relevant state agencies around the Gulf. The rules followed during the spill are based on well-established policies for seafood monitoring that are

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Gulf Oil Spill, Continued Gulf Seafood Safe to Eat

ested; All Tests Were Well Below Federal Level of Concern for Food Products In the first quarter of 2013, 399 seafood samples were tested, including 308 finfish, 18 oysters, 40 shrimp, 26 crabs and 7 lobsters. In addition to tests for oil contamination, samples have been screened for the dispersant dioctylsulfosuccinate (DOSS) since March 2011. Dispersant is the chemical that was used to help break up the oil in the water. All findings were well below the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s levels of concern; 96 percent had no detectable levels of PAH or DOSS. On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico. In the past three years, Florida has been the leader among Gulf Coast states in testing seafood for effects of the oil spill. The department used $20 million from BP to improve seafood safety and testing and to launch a statewide and national marketing campaign to promote Gulf seafood, an industry that employs more than 10,000 Floridians. Florida ranked among the top twelve states in 2011 for fresh seafood pro-

designed to err on the side of caution. If any oil at all was spotted on the surface in a given area, it was closed to fishing, regardless of whether the fish and other marine life showed signs of oil exposure. In addition to these spill-specific efforts with samples from fishable waters, the FDA and certain state agencies regularly tested for contamination in seafood markets. If any signs of oil had been found in seafood sold, all related shipments would have been seized.

How do federal and state seafood safety tests work? There are two types of standard seafood testing. These are the same basic techniques used for testing all seafood, but the amount of testing run on Gulf seafood after the Deepwater Horizon spill dwarfed anything that has ever been done before. Standard protocols have been expanded to include tests for the presence of the dispersant used during the spill response. For an area to remain

open to fishing and for seafood from an area to be sold, the seafood has to pass both these tests, and continue passing these tests. 1) Sensory testing is the first line of defense because it can be done quickly and is extremely effective. This involves well-trained testers who sniff both raw and cooked seafood samples to detect signs of oil exposure. Though it may seem an odd system to rely on the human sense of smell, it allows for more rapid screen to detect obvious contamination before using more expensive and prolonged analytical testing. Passing the so-called ‘sniff test’ alone does not guarantee an absence of contamination, but it is a widely used initial screening test for rapidly identifying problems. 2) Agencies complement sensory testing with sophisticated chemical analyses. They use well-established techniques to check samples for the presence of 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are key components of oil. There can be hundreds or even thousands of different

duction with more than 107 million pounds harvested and a dockside value of more than $223 million. Florida fishermen catch more than 84 percent of the nation’s supply of grouper, pompano, mullet, stone crab, pink shrimp, spiny lobsters, and Spanish mackerel. One hundred percent of spiny lobster and 97 percent of stone crab are harvested in Florida. Detailed information on the seafood testing is available on the department’s website. Information provided in this article is courtesy the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. For more information about the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www. FreshFromFlorida.com.

chemicals in oil, so it’s not possible to test for all of them. Regulators instead focus on these 12 because, as known carcinogens in high enough doses, they have been extensively studied. They are used internationally as indicators of how the full spectrum of oil chemicals is going to behave. As mentioned, for the Deepwater Horizon spill, because of concerns over the large quantities of dispersant applied to break up the oil, an analysis to detect dispersant in seafood was also added to the testing scheme.

What does it mean for seafood to pass these tests? For the “sniff tests”, detection of any scent from oil or dispersant meant a sample failed and further chemical analysis was not necessary. Any failure meant an area would be closed, or if already closed could not be reopened. No exceptions. For the complementary chemical tests, a sample failed if it had levels of oil PAHs, or an indicator chemical

from the dispersant, that was higher than the levels established as safe based on past research. It’s important to remember that the issue with these chemicals is long-term exposure. A single fish or shrimp dinner is extremely unlikely to cause a health problem even if contamination levels are above the levels considered safe. For the spill, scientists calculated those safety thresholds by assuming that a person might regularly consume seafood with similar chemical levels daily for five years. That offered a large safety factor, because most people eat far less seafood, and it would be all but impossible for any significant contamination to continue for that long. In other words, in reality, even the most frequent seafood consumers almost certainly would never ingest as much of the chemicals in question as assumed for the calculations. Dr. Steve Otwell is the Florida Sea Grant Seafood Safety and Technology Specialist for the University of Florida/IFAS Extension!.

*This feature is an excerpt of a publication of Sea Grant, Florida, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Florida IFAS Extension. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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ALLERGEN AWARENESS POSTER DO YOU UNDERSTAND FOOD ALLERGIES?

It is important for food employees to be trained in food allergen awareness and is required as part of the 2011 update to the 2009 FDA Model Food Code. This includes employees knowing the most common food allergens, how to prevent cross contact of food allergens during preparation and service and how to respond when a customer experiences an allergic reaction to food while dining in your establishment.

ORDER YOUR POSTERS TODAY! FRLA MEMBER: $18

NON-MEMBER: $24 This 18” x 24” laminated poster is an excellent visual reminder to food employees to always take appropriate steps when preparing and serving meals that contain common food allergens.

To order: 1) Complete form legibly. We are unable to ship to PO Boxes. 2) Mail the completed form and payment to: SafeStaff, PO Box 1779, Tallahassee, FL 32302-1779, or fax to 850-224-2871, or call 866-372-7233 to place your order by phone. FRLA Member: $18; Non-Member: $24 First Name ____________________________

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Method of Payment: ❏ VISA ❏ MC ❏ Discover ❏ AMEX ❏ MoneyOrder ❏ Check # ________________________ Account Number: _______________________________________ Expiration Date: _______________ CSV#: ______________ Name_________________________________________________ (Name as it appears on Card)

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Florida’s Food Safety Regulations By SUSIe MCKINley

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s most restaurateurs know, the state of Florida has an excellent food safety framework providing the highest of standards and protection for our nearly 19 million residents and over 90 million annual visitors. From hand-washing frequency, to hair restraints, cooling and reheating methods, and safe receiving and storage practices, just about every move made in a public food service operation has a science-based standard associated with it. They are monitored by several state agencies, depending on the type of business. regulatory activity is essential to ensuring public food safety, and in america virtually every state or local jurisdiction has some sort of food service regulation. What can be a little confusing, is knowing which agency does what, from restaurants to convenience stores to bakeries, groceries, schools, child care and more. Understanding who does what, and how they work together is valuable to navigating the regulatory waters. Here is information explaining these relationships, and how the agencies work together to ensure safe food and effective regulatory guidelines. In Florida, most food safety regulation is implemented by the Florida Department of agriculture and Consumer Services (FDaCS), the Florida Department of Business and Professional regulation (DBPr), or the Florida Department of Health (DoH). The agency having jurisdiction is determined by the licensee’s business activity. FDaCS has authority for food activity from farm and field to packing, warehousing, trucking, and retail grocers and convenience stores. DBPr takes over at “retail, ready-toeat” which includes everything from a hot dog cart to caterers, festivals and

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temporary events to restaurants, and the largest resorts and theme parks in Florida. DoH, working with its County Public Health Units, has responsibility for locations with higher risk populations such as school food service, health care facilities, shelters, civic and fraternal organizations, and camps. other agencies regulating food safety include agency for Health Care administration (aHCa), which regulates food safety in health care institutions such as hospitals; the Department of Children and Families (DCF), which monitors food safety at child care facilities and service programs, the agency for People with Disabilities (aPD), which has authority over food safety in group homes for the disabled. These agencies carefully coordinate their activity. They meet quarterly to ensure no business is overlooked, no duplication of effort occurs, licensees are provided the convenience of dealing with only one regulatory agency, and to effectively integrate emerging business trends into the regulatory framework. Food service regulation starts with a license, which establishes the technical requirements that must be met to safely conduct food service. along with the license comes an inspection program to observe compliance with and when necessary compel adherence to minimum food safety standards. The inspection program conducts enforcement activity for those operators that either cannot (undertrained, under-resourced) or will not (choose not to) implement food safety standards established by the regulator. Inspection programs, rather than being “food cops,” can be very helpful in assisting establishments understand minimum standards, adopt best practices, and design and build facili-

The activity and authority for each regulatory agency is established by the Florida Legislature in Florida Statutes (FS), and the primary laws are: • • • • • •

FDACS, Division of Food Safety - Chapter 500, FS DBPR, Division of Hotels and Restaurants - Chapter 509, FS DOH, Division of Environmental Health - Chapter 381.0072, FS ACHA - Chapters 395, 400, 408, FS DCF - Chapter 402.311, FS APD - Chapter 393, FS

ties that best foster safe food activity. Inspectors can also assist with interpretation of food safety law, sharing food safety knowledge, and assisting operators safely integrate new ideas. additionally, the three primary agencies – DaCS, DBPr, and DoH – use the US Food and Drug administration’s (FDa) Model Food Code to establish highly specific and technical food safety requirements. as new science emerges that impacts food safety, the Food Code is routinely updated by the FDa. This is done through recommendations from the Conference for Food Protection, a national “food safety congress,” comprised of representatives from local, state, federal government, consumer groups, scientific and academic communities, and all segments of the food industry. The Conference of Food Protection meets every other year to debate the current and developing state of food safety and provide recommendations for inclusion in the Food Code. This system provides regulators with a set of fully vetted scientific and technical standards that most would find cost prohibitive to develop on their own. Federal food safety agencies encourage universal adoption of the Food Code to provide the most consistent, highest level of food safety and food protection across all juris-

dictions in the US. While the Food Code establishes ideal standards for food safety and food protection, it has no force and effect of law until adopted into the laws and rules of a regulatory agency. The Food Code provides standards for every area of food safety, from management and personnel, to food, equipment and utensils, linens, physical facilities, and hazardous materials. It includes “annexes,” which provide templates that may also be adopted by jurisdictions covering compliance and enforcement, the public health scientific basis of the standards, how to conduct risk-based inspections, and model forms and guides. Florida food service businesses and our tens of millions of annual patrons can be confident that Florida’s food safety system is state of the art, and equally protects consumers and the industry. Serving more than 10,000 members across Florida, FRLA is committed to safeguarding the needs of the hospitality industry and improving the business climate. Led by Carol Dover, President/CEO, and an active Board of Directors, FRLA has influenced legislation resulting in over $1.2 billion in tax and fee savings over the past decade. To learn more about the FRLA, visit www.frla.org or call 888-372-9119 to find out how you can get involved. Susie McKinley is a the Editor of FR&L Magazine and is a former Director of the Florida Division of Hotels & Restaurants. F lo R i dA R ESTAU R A n T & lo d G i n G  

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Food as a Means of Terrorism

(and How to Defend Against this Low-Likelihood/High-Consequence Threat) By arT JoHNSoN

A

groterrorism is defined as a deliberate attack or hoax targeting the food supply, with the goal of generating fear over the safety of food, causing economic losses, and/or undermining social stability.

What would the consequences be if an act of terrorism, either a hoax or a real event, was aimed at the food items necessary for the success of your business? examples of agroterrorism would include the deliberate introduction of a poison into the food supply, transmission of a disease agent into a commercial food-animal operation, or release of a plant pest or disease onto a farm or grove. The United States government has determined that the possibility of this type of terrorism is real, and much planning, training, and strategizing has been completed by the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and other federal, state, and local agencies in this focus area over the past decade. agroterrorism is characterized by most experts as a lowlikelihood/high-consequence threat, meaning that although the chance of this type of attack occurring in any given jurisdiction is very low, the consequences could be both costly (in terms of economic 36  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

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damage, illness, and/or loss of life) and widespread (with regional, national, or international implications). as a Florida food business owner or manager with many pressing challenges to contend with on a daily basis, how concerned should you be about this particular type of risk? Is it something that should be addressed by individual businesses, or is the risk remote enough to allow it to be handled by government action alone? and if you do indeed determine that this type of risk is high enough to warrant a response, what can be done to prepare for or prevent this type of adverse event? In addressing these questions, it is worth remembering that retail products have been successfully used in the past as a means of attack. In 1982 in Chicago, a tampering incident involving extra-Strength Tylenol® capsules occurred on the shelves of several neighborhood stores, leading to the deaths of 7 people from cyanide poisoning. This incident caused millions of dollars in losses and the almost overnight change of an entire industry (replacement of capsules with caplets, and the widespread use of tamperproof packaging). although this incident did not involve a food product, it serves as a warning of how widespread the effects of a single food tampering incident could be. In 1984 in The Dalles, oregon, a religious cult with

a desire to sicken the local population and gain advantage in local elections deliberately introduced Salmonella into the salad bars of 10 restaurants, causing 751 confirmed cases of illness and 45 hospitalizations. Cult members were able to obtain dangerous biological substances and introduce them into the food supply without detection (the deliberate nature of the outbreak did not come to light until cult members confessed more than a year later). one tragic result of this incident was that the outbreak caused huge financial losses to restaurant owners due to the erroneous perception that it was caused by food handler’s poor hygiene, and all but one of the affected restaurants went out of business or changed ownership within two years. Thankfully, we have not seen any large-scale incidents comparable to these in the past three decades, but modern efficiencies of food distribution and the globalization of the food supply have increased the possibility that similar events today could have significant reach. recent, naturally occurring outbreaks of e. coli, Salmonella, Hepatitis a, and cyclospora, in products as diverse as fresh spinach, peanut butter, organic berries and bagged salad, continue to remind us how widespread contamination can quickly become in today’s complex and interconnected food distribution environment. Given that food has been used as a means of attack in

our country in the past, and that modern food distribution could enable widespread consequences from an intentional attack, what can Florida food businesses do to protect their customers, employees, and their bottom lines? Following are three common sense actions that can be taken, many of them with little or no direct cost to food businesses.

Become More Aware of Food System Vulnerabilities and Mitigation Steps one of the simplest actions food businesses can take to reduce vulnerability is to ensure that managers and employees fully understand the risks inherit in the food supply. The U.S. Food and Drug administration (FDa) recently updated and released several food defense training courses and tools, all available for free at their website (http://www. fda.gov/Food/FoodDefense/ default.htm). additionally, the Department of Homeland Security continues to sponsor free instructor-led agroterrorism prevention training, with many courses offered in Florida on an annual basis. These courses are designed to ensure that vulnerabilities in the food supply are well-understood, and to provide ideas for mitigation and protective actions that can be quickly and easily implemented. (For information on how to obtain notice of these free training opportunities, please see the

F lo R i dA R ESTAU R A n T & lo d G i n G A S So ci AT i o n


contact information at the end of this article). Report Suspicious Activity The Department of Homeland Security and many law enforcement agencies continue to promote “See Something, Say Something” campaigns, designed to encourage citizens to report suspicious activity. If you or your employees come across actions or circumstances that seem suspicious (shipments or containers that appear to have been compromised, suspicious individuals seeking information about your business, or unusual symptoms experienced by food-handling employees or customers), consider reporting detailed information to local law enforcement and public health agencies. If agroterrorism is suspected, you

may also want to reach out to the nearest Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF), a coordinated effort by federal and local law enforcement agencies in 103 cities nationwide, tasked to investigate potential terrorist activity. They can be reached by contacting your local FBI resident agency (http:// www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field). Have a Food Defense Plan in Place Food businesses, particularly those with a regional or national reach, should consider having a written food defense plan. Responding proactively and quickly to threats or events affecting your food business could have a significant bearing on long-term recovery following a terrorism incident or hoax impacting the food supply. A food defense plan can be a stand-alone plan, or

it can be added as an appendix to your existing HAACP or business recovery plans. A free copy of the FDA’s Food Defense Plan Builder tool can be downloaded at (http:// www.fda.gov/Food/FoodDefense/ ToolsEducationalMaterials/ ucm349888.htm). Even with the best of efforts, we may not be able to stop individuals or organizations committed to an attack upon the food supply, since terrorists willing to risk all to commit their crimes can sometimes be very difficult to detect and stop. By utilizing the free and low-cost tools that have recently been made available, however, Florida businesses may be able to reduce some of the risk faced by their customers and employees, and find themselves better able

to weather even this extreme type of human-induced storm. Art Johnstone spent seven years coordinating food defense in Florida as the Director of Agricultural Emergency Preparedness for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. He currently serves as President of Grant Partners Inc., providing consulting services in the areas of Food Defense, Homeland Security Training, and Grant Acquisition and Management. He is based in Tallahassee, FL and can be reached at (850) 251-4184. (If you would like to be made aware of the free Department of Homeland Securitysponsored agroterrorism prevention training courses currently scheduled throughout Florida in 2013, please send your name and email address to ajohnstone@grantpartnersinc.org.)

The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) How Does It Impact My Operation? By Susie McKinley

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he Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law in January 2011 by President Obama, is touted as the most comprehensive reform of food safety in the United States in decades. It focuses on modernizing the US food safety system primarily by mitigating food contamination - preventing rather than reacting to food safety failures. It is now known that virtually any food can generate foodborne disease. Full implementation of FSMA will promote prevention of foodborne disease in both domestically grown and processed food, as well as imported, internationally sourced food. Farmers will be required to avoid known hazards to food during production, food processors producing food and animal feed will have to establish and monitor preventative controls during prow w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

cessing, and importers of food produced internationally will be required to verify food safety practices of their imports. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also been given expanded jurisdiction to recall food that jeopardizes consumers, and also to freeze shipping of food believed to threaten public health. In response to the new law, the FDA recently proposed rules revising oversight of foods imported from other countries to implement mitigating aspects of FSMA. The FDA noted, “This shift is designed to help prevent safety problems before foods arrive in the United States, rather than rely primarily on inspections at US ports of entry.” In addition, the FDA reports that the “… law calls for science-based changes to the food safety system to

prevent foodborne illnesses…”. The proposed rules are intended to make importers more accountable for food safety, and establish standards for third-party audits of foreign food producers, bringing them more in line with best practices used in the US. This will strengthen FDA’s ability to monitor foreign facilities and quickly identify then act on unsafe practices. As much as 15% of food consumed in the US is imported, including nearly half our fresh fruit and 20% of our fresh vegetables meaning these proposed rules have a tremendous potential benefit to consumers, including restaurants and other commercial producers. These new rules would bolster federal food safety oversight along with two others proposed in January 2013. First is the proposed “Preventive

Controls for Human Food” rule, which sets safety requirements for processing, packaging, and storage facilities. Additionally, the proposed “Produce Safety” rule would establish science-based standards for safe growing, harvesting, packing, and holding of produce on farms. These proposed rules have already been published in the Federal Register, and Florida’s state and local government, commodity associations and the private sector are in the process of developing comments. Upon full implementation, FSMA will provide food service operators with safer food, protecting them and their millions of patrons. For more about FSMA and how it may impact you or your business visit www.fda.gov/fsma for links, videos, toolkits and more. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g  

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Florida DBPR to Implement Risk-Based Inspection Frequency System By KEN LAWSON

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ith more than 47,000 licensed food service establishments, Florida is a state where more than 19 million residents and 80 million visitors enjoy eating out. And whether it’s a five-star restaurant or a hot dog cart, the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) is responsible for its licensing and regulation. Food safety is one of our top priorities. With so many Floridians and visitors eating out, the Division of Hotels and Restaurants — DHR — has continually strived to improve health, safety and sanitation inspections over the years. And we have seen results. Last year, DHR was recognized for reducing the number of food-borne illnesses in Florida by 90 percent over a 15-year span. These continued reductions in food-borne illnesses indicate that DHR’s aggressive attention to science-based policies and effective enforcement strategies is achieving results and improving public health and safety. Currently, DBPR is required to inspect food service facilities twice a year. In addition to those regular inspections, DHR investigates each consumer complaint it receives. DHR received more than 4,000 food safety complaints in the past fiscal year. Recently, you may have seen a video on YouTube that received national attention because of apparently dangerous food-handling practices by a buffet restaurant in Port Orange. Once this was brought to our attention, a complaint was filed and DHR responded within 24 hours. In such instances of great public health concern, we know the importance of a quick response. Over the past 15 years, Florida’s restaurant industry experienced a 32 percent growth. This growth is an indication that despite any economic factors, food service establishments will remain an industry that requires DHR’s full attention. Each year, we continue to improve our processes and procedures. In January,

DHR adopted the Food and Drug Administration’s 2009 Food Code, which effectively improved inspection processes and made it easier for all food service establishments and the public to understand inspection results. And, more recently, Gov. Rick Scott signed into law new legislation, supported by our Department which would enable DHR to implement a risk-based inspection frequency system. The new law will allow us to focus on our regulatory and compliance efforts on food service establishKen Lawson ments that pose a higher risk to the public, effectively reducing the regulatory burden for businesses that have a positive compliance history. Beginning July 1, 2014, our food service and sanitation inspectors will be able to conduct inspections one to four times each year using the following criteria: - The inspection and compliance history of each establishment. - The type of food and food preparation style of the establishment. - The type of service provided. Over the next 12 months as we undergo the rulemaking process, we want input from all stakeholders, including the public. We invite you to email us with your questions, comments and concerns at DHR. Rules@myfloridalicense.com. Florida is at the forefront in adopting improved food safety and sanitation inspection procedures. At DBPR, we intend to continue to lead the way, while working to preserve the integrity of food service establishments and protecting each of you who enjoy eating out. Ken Lawson is the secretary of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation.

Division of Hotels and Restaurants Celebrates 100 Years of Public Safety Centennial Timeline (1913-2013) of Important Events, Business Dates and Milestones

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F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


®

46. A good food service operation’s facility layout and design will have all of the following except?

For more information visit FRLA’s web page www.frla.org/tools-and-solutions/emergency-a-disaster-preparedness

T

o prepare Florida businesses for disaster, the Frla traveled across the state this summer to present a series called “Bulletproof your Business.” The free business continuity workshops were in collaboration with the Florida Division of emergency Management and the University of West Florida Small Business Development Center. The workshops were designed to teach local hoteliers, restaurateurs, and businesses how to create a continuity and disaster preparedness plan,

how to utilize a property protection checklist, and how to protect their establishments in the event of a natural disaster. The program is a part of Frla’s dedication to emergency preparedness. as an emergency Services representative serving Support Function 18 for the state of Florida, the association helps coordinate local, state and federal agency actions that will provide immediate and short-term assistance for the needs of business, industry and economic stabilization. The goal is to help businesses to

develop a plan prior to a disaster and then assess the community’s ability to restore business operations as quickly as possible after an emergency. With hurricane season in full swing, Frla is closely monitoring the risk of areas that could be impacted. The association’s primary objective is to coordinate and communicate with members to determine hotel and restaurant availability and needs. Frla strongly encourages businesses to develop a detailed blueprint to ensure a prompt and effective reaction during an emergency.

Cleaning accessibility Good workflow Cross-contamination prevention FDA Food Code violations

ANSWER: D

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Bulletproof Your Business Workshops

A. B. C. D.

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CIFOR

Produces New Foodborne Illness Guidelines for Owners, Operators and Managers of Food Establishments

T

he Council to Improve Foodborne outbreak response (CIFor) is a collaboration of federal, state and local regulatory partners engaged in improving methods at all regulatory “… levels to detect, investigate, control, and prevent foodborne disease outbreaks….” CIFor partners include members of the association of Food and Drug officials (aFDo), association of Public Health laboratories (aPHl), association of State and Territorial Health officials(aSTHo), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Council of State and Territorial epidemiologists (CSTe), Food and Drug administration

(FDa), National association of County and City Health officials(NaCCHo), National association of State Departments of agriculture(NaSDa), National association of State Public Health veterinarians (NaSPHv), National environmental Health association (NeHa) and the United States Department of agriculture (USDa).

after looking at the numbers, it is acknowledged that foodborne disease (illness) is something that can’t be ignored. It impacts the health and welfare of citizens, changing lives, damaging businesses, and causing other unforeseen problems for anyone touched by it. In an effort to assist the food industry, CIFor has developed a comprehensive set of guidelines to “…help outline, clarify, and explain industry’s recommended role in a foodborne illness outbreak investigation. The document provides step-by-step approaches to important aspects of outbreak response such as preparation, detection, investigation,

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC), foodborne diseases in the U.S. cause an estimated: • • • • •

- 47.8 million illnesses >1,000 reported outbreaks 6% of outbreaks are multi-jurisdictional 128,000 hospitalizations) 3,000 deaths

control, and follow-up. By using the CIFor Industry Guidelines and its tools, Industry can take an active and educated role in outbreak response and investigation thereby reducing negative health impact to the public and negative economic impact to their businesses….” If you are concerned about being fully prepared to manage your response to a foodborne illness outbreak in your operation, this document should not be missed. It provides a food establishment selfassessment, information about the media, policies and procedures for closing and opening a location, control measures, commonly used terms and definitions used during an investigation, sample forms and logs, posters, a product sampling procedure and many other useful tools to help the operator manage through a foodborne illness investigation. For further information about the Guidelines, visit www.cifor.us/ projind.cfm.

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The Angus Restaurant has been a presence in Pensacola for 45 years — owned by the same family since its founding. Try to imagine offering a filet mignon for $1.49. At opening, the Angus offered the filet at that price. Since then, the restaurant has made some changes, and at 10,000 square feet, is now a Pensacola landmark, with a dining room, bar / lounge and banquet rooms hosting memorable events for patrons. New Chef, George Makris, has revamped entrees and added some new menu items as well. Please describe your menu for FR&L readers. The Angus Restaurant is one of Pensacola’s longest standing restaurants. This establishment was opened in 1968 by Chris Bithos’ family. Since then he has hosted memorable banquets and many warm nightly meeting experiences for both our new patrons and regular, repeat friends. All of our seafood comes from local Gulf fish markets which provide nothing but the freshest catch available. We serve only the highest quality USDA Certified Black Angus beef! Our Mediterranean-influenced

menu is a blend of both our Greek roots and our local Florida Gulf Coast Cuisine. We present Signature dishes which have been on our menu since opening day, enhanced with newly created recipes by Chef George Makris. We are sure to wow each and every customer! How do you keep your menu fresh and interesting to returning guests? Being a locally owned restaurant, we can listen to each customer’s desires and recommendations of what they love to eat, and want to see on our menu. We offer nightly specials in addition to changing our menu up to four times a year. This creativity presents guests with many pleasurable experiences in tasting our evolving flavor profiles. We serve what is in season. We serve what our patrons desire. We serve what they look forward to returning to order. What is your most popular dish? Our TWO most popular, and original menu items, are the Shrimp and Crab au gratin, AND the Petite Filet Mignon buried under our luscious Royal topping of sautéed

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shrimp and crabmeat in EVOO! What is your most popular cocktail? Our signature cocktail is called the “Scenic Blue” which is a cool, refreshing and light martini. Have you seen the tastes of your guests change over the years? The tastes of our guests may change and have evolved over time, however, their desires remain the same. They wanted the flavor bursts of our freshly caught fish and delicious steaks in 1968, and they want the same today. Plus they expect it at a great value too. We delight in delivering on both counts! What is the most important thing you emphasize to staff about your customers? We strongly believe, and create the environment where every customer is special. Our staff welcomes each guest as a part of the ANGUS Family. We do everything for our guests to experience our welcoming hospitality from the moment they walk in door, and often lasting long after leaving. Our managers share conversation with each and every guest, ensuring F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


they have a delightful and memorable experience at The ANGUS. What do you think is critical to your employee training? Simple… Keeping them! Our employees are trained in knowing the menu, proper serving techniques, and especially customer appreciation. Our intensive training process emphasizes that not only is our food special, but our reputation is stellar, and we expect to keep it that way with our dedication to you. How do you reduce employee turnover? Each staff member is made to feel as a part of The ANGUS Family. It’s their home too. We strive to keep it that way with Loyalty and Attitude being rewarded at The ANGUS. Many of our staff have been with us for just as many years as our w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

repeat customers. That says a lot in the hospitality industry and for our dedication. What is your tip to staying in business for such a long time? Our secret to success since 1968 emanates from the hard work and reputation which we have built at home in the Pensacola area. We hear stories daily about how first grandparents, then parents, and now their children are visiting The ANGUS. It is a rebirth of making these visits a new family tradition. So many within the Pensacola area (and far away too!) have shared the wonderful memories of graduation parties, wedding rehearsals, wedding receptions, and the most special of all birthday gatherings here at The ANGUS… and not forgetting to mention it’s just an all around great meal and dining experience!F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g  

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Hawks Cay

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awks Cay is a destination resort located midway down the Florida Keys towards Key West. The 60-acre resort, which is located on Duck Key is the perfect location for having a lot of fun! The Resort offers the best the Keys have to offer, and then some. It is accessible by road, airline and boat. •

Hawks Cay Marina has 85 boat slips and offers many options to boaters, including full resort amenities if staying overnight.

The Resort maintains rooms in a variety of accommodations, including three and four bedroom villas with splash pools and vacation rentals.

From hiking, snorkeling, kayaking, fishing and kite-boarding to scavenger hunts, swimming in Hawks Cay Lagoon or in one of five of the Resort’s pools, Camp Hawk will keep the kids entertained. The Pirate Ship pool is a favorite! The teen program hosts a Teens’ Night Out as well.

The Dolphin Connection: Guests can swim with Atlantic bottlenose dolphins, participate in dolphin educational programs or just observe these playful creatures.

A Dive Center is on Resort property and offers SCUBA diving, SNUBA, spear-fishing, wreck and night diving, an open water certification class and a resort course.

Fishing trips include: off-shore, flats and back-country. Anglers can expect to fish for bonefish, tarpon, blackfin tuna, grouper, mahi-mahi and snook.

Weddings, reunions and other gatherings are special at Hawks Cay and provide a tropical ambiance.

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The Calm Waters Spa is a Travel + Leisure award-winning oasis of relaxation with massage, facials, body treatments, and salon services for everyone.

Tennis, kayak tours, paddle-boarding, parasailing, jet ski rental, sunset cruise, Segway tours, boat rental, rod and reel rentals, party barge rental.

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FRLA’s Marketing/ Operations Summit

The 2013 FRLA’s Marketing/ Operations Summit took place in Tampa, Florida, at the Hilton Downtown and was very successful. For a full review of the Summit, visit

www.FRLA.org/events

Leaders presenting at the Marketing/Operations Summit (left to right): Nick Vojnovic, Little Greek; Frank Paci, McAlister’s Deli; John Ludwig, Push Marketing (moderator); Patrick Fore, Tijuana Flats; Chris Elliott, Beef O’ Brady’s/Brass Tap; Steve Erickson, PDQ; Don Fox, Firehouse Subs; and Steve Lieber, BurgerFi.

Eric Byrd, David Davidson and Adam Corey (101 Restaurant) take a break at the FRLA Operators’ Summit.

Are You a Manager

Under 40? 46  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

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Sarasota Members from the Chiles Group left to right - Sandbar GM, Joe Rogers, Chiles Group Marketing Director, Caryn Hodge, BeacHhouse manager Lisa Beshures, Chiles Group COO, Steve Ananicz, Dannette Lynch, FRLA Regional Director, Mar Vista GM, Anthony Cucci and BeacHhouse Chef Will Manson.

FRLA is starting a Young Operators Council for restaurant & hotel managers under 40. This council will help FRLA engage a younger audience and provide insights when communicating with a young generation. As a founding council member, you will help shape the mission and goals of this group like mentorship, education, etc. The first meeting of the council will be at the FRLA Trade show in Orlando this September. If you’re interested in participating, please contact Alliah Sheta at Asheta@frla.org. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


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e m PL oY e e r e L At Ions

NLRB Keeping an Eye on Social Media By: MarK BoNFaNTI The National labor relations Board (“NlrB”) has serious concerns with social media policies used by many employers and the hospitality industry should take note. In recent years, numerous individuals that were reprimanded for their use of social media in the workplace and social media policy violations contacted the Board. The Board’s opinion is that many of the policies under which these individuals have been sanctioned, and the disciplinary actions taken against them, violate the National labor relations act (“Nlra”). In a series of the Board’s General Counsel’s recently released advice Memos, the NlrB takes issue with policies they believe specifically and unlawfully violate an employee’s

Section 7 rights under the Nlra. Generally, Section 7 protects employees’ right to self-organize, and collectively bargain. The issue as it relates to social media, is that any restriction on employees’ right to communicate with one another could be a violation of this Section. one particular advice Memo, affirmed this position regarding social media policies employed by Giant Food, llC. The Memo stated that the Company’s social media policies, with prohibitions against disclosing confidential or nonpublic information, using the Company’s logo, trademark or graphics, and photographing or video recording the Company’s facility, were unlawful. The NlrB determined that the policy could reasonably be

10 ISSUES TO CONSIDER WITH YOUR COMPANY’S SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY 1.

Verify that no provisions of your social media policy interfere with current collective bargaining agreements. 2. Specify whether permission is needed to access social media via work computers. 3. Specify the time and place, if any, during working hours where employers may access social media. 4. Specify the general parameters of “offensive content” and be sure it is in line with conduct protected by the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). 5. Identify employees’ responsibilities concerning confidential information and social media. 6. Specify policies concerning list-serves and social media sites 7. Specify procedures for addressing work-related disputes, encouraging direct communication over the use of social media 8. Specify policy concerning contact with media outlets. 9. Identify individuals responsible for the administration of the social media policies. 10. Review all social media policies with your employment lawyer to verify compliance with federal and state law.

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construed to restrict employees’ Section 7 rights under the Nlra. vagueness throughout the policy led to the NlrB’s concern. Without particular limiting language that specifically preserves employees’ Section 7 rights, the Board is likely to find a company’s social media policies to be in violation of the act. Further, the NlrB would also rule any disciplinary action taken pursuant to these policies are violations. additionally the NlrB issued several reports stating policies regarding social media should not be so sweeping that they prohibit federally protected activities under existing labor laws. This includes concerted actions such as the discussion of wages or working conditions among employees. However,

CuCumber

the NlrB stated that an employee’s comments on social media are generally not protected if they are mere gripes not made in relation to group activities among employees. To avoid falling victim to potential violations of the Nlra, it is important that all social media policies are clear and concise. Policies should specifically preserve the employees’ rights under Section 7 of the act. above all else, policies cannot have a “chilling” effect on the rights of employees. Below are ten guidance points for effective social media policies. Mark Bonfanti is an attorney with Allen Norton and Blue in Tallahassee, Florida. Please contact Mark directly with any questions via telephone or email at (850) 561-3503 or mbonfanti@anblaw.com.

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Broward Chapter

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MEM BER BENE F I TS

Impact Banners and Signs Increase sales with easy-to-create custom banners and signs The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association is pleased to partner with Impact Banners and Signs as an Allied Member. Impact Banners and Signs has created a new website for FRLA members, which allows members to create custom banners and signage using pre-established art backgrounds. These products can be used by restaurant and lodging establishments to promote various events, specials and more. Impact Banners and Signs offers these custom products at a fraction of the cost of other banner and signage companies. Plus FRLA members receive an extra 20% off Impact’s already low prices. Impact Banners and Signs, a division of the J. Nissi Corporation, has been providing the latest and best in banners and signs since 1991. Innovative, low cost manufacturing techniques, including state-of-the-art, eco-friendly printing capabilities on a host of indoor and outdoor materials, are a hallmark of the company. One of the largest providers of banners and banner-related products, Impact Banners and Signs assures customers that they will receive the best quality and most competitive prices in the industry. All banners, even billboards, can be printed on eco-friendly materials using water-based inks. Also available: standard vinyl banners, elegant fabric banners and vinyl mesh banners for high-wind, outdoor areas. Sizes range from a 2’ x 3’ banner to 30’ x 60’ billboards. Products being added in the near future: posters, wall and window clings, tote bags, and trade show displays. “Our goal is to offer FRLA members top quality products at a reasonable cost, with a focus on increasing their sales and protecting the environment,” says Drew Trotman, company president. “Yes, all of these goals can be accomplished at the same time.” There are customizable banner backgrounds for the various holidays and promotional events on the calendar, plus several options of promoted special menu items, such as food and beverage specials. Members can also choose to send Impact their own design to get produced. Using the website is quick, easy, and fun, and it saves money. Impact also boasts top-notch in-house graphic designers who can assist members in creating a completely custom look for projects. “We are adding new customizable background designs on a weekly basis.” Trotman says. “So there will never be a shortw w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

All in one: Impact Banners and Signs offers a host of great eye-catching designs to help you promote your business.

age of ideas to help with your marketing efforts. However, if you don’t see what you are looking for, we can design something from scratch just for you.” The banner and sign service is open to all FRLA members and can be found by visiting the website at http://www.impactbannersandsigns. com/FRLA. The staff at Impact Banners and Signs is available to support the process, but the website is easy to use and available anytime you need it. “We are very excited about the price and variety of the image products offered by Impact Banners and Signs,” said Dan Murphy, vice president of

Corporate Relations and Membership at FRLA. “We have used their products for events and are very impressed by the quality and cost.” “The whole Impact team is thrilled at the chance to work with FRLA to serve the hospitality industry in Florida,” Trotman adds. “We know how important this business is to Florida’s economy, and we know we can save them money and provide great image products that can help increase business.” To find out more or to get started on your own custom siganage project go to www.impactbannersandsigns.com/FRLA or call toll-free, 1-888983-1588. F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g  

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PROSTA RT

Florida’s LMP Program By LISSETTE ALBELO

W

Blue Skies & Silver Spurs Kissimmee was host to another Endless Summer Music Series event this summer and it was a great success! Carolina Story, the Adam Craig Band, the Tyler Reeve Band and the Brent Cobb Band offered a fun getaway weekend for attendees. FRLA, along with ViSIT FLORIDA, Share A Little Sunshine, the Silver Spurs Rodeo and the Kissimmee CVB, sponsored the event.

hen I first started high school, I was looking forward to being in the Academy of Hospitality and Tourism simply because I traveled a lot as a child. As I got involved, I realized it was something that I wanted to do. The Lodging Management Program (LMP) really helped me understand that there is more to hotels than just traveling to a random place and sleeping there. There is so much work involved in managing a hotel successfully. As I learned more, I got more and more interested and studied hard every day to learn about the industry. My teacher noticed how much work I put in and asked me to consider joining the LMP team. Lissette Albelo My upcoming senior year will be my second year of being part of the team. Last year, I woke up at 6:00 A.M. every day just to get to school early to practice for the competition. We practiced everything from role-playing to having mini-knowledge bowls just to be ready for the competitions. I never felt tired or bored because I had so much passion for the industry. My team ended up winning 1st place in Florida’s LMP Competition and 3rd place at EI’s International LMP Competition. Working in a hotel, you put to use everything that you are taught, including the fine details that you learn in these competitions and in the curriculum. Working in a hotel isn’t only about checking someone in and showing them where their room is, but it is also about the fundamentals. There are many departments in a hotel that keep it running. Every single person that works in a department is special, and we learn that in LMP through hands-on experience like field trips and attending lunch meetings. Everything from basic concepts to the little things I learned in these programs also helped me when it was time to do a summer internship at a hotel. I worked in the hotel the entire summer and was interested in learning new things every day. I already had some industry knowledge through the learning opportunities LMP and the HTMP textbooks gave me. We also gained so much knowledge through videos that are supplied by HTMP. There is a lot to learn about hotel management, and I’m eager to find out more every day as I work my way into becoming a general manager and owner of my own hotel chain one day. Lissette Albelo is a student in FRLA’s Lodging Management Program.

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EZ Menu Design provides custom restaurant menus made specifically for your establishment to create ambience while being profitable. With in house printing, we cut out the middle man to save you money and time. Custom Made Menus Without Leaving Your Kitchen!

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1-800-604-1842 www.CookingOilDisposal.com 54  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

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SOC I A L MEDI A

Search Engine Optimization and Social Media Optimization

A Fundamental Platform for Success

A

By Meghan Stuart

s hospitality consultants, we are always looking for new and innovative ways to improve our clients’ businesses. For owner/ operators in the restaurant and hotel field, we see that one of the most important aspects of business these days is online presence, reputation and interaction with patrons. The online “social environment” of business has become so important that most companies would suffer, if not managed in a correct and prompt fashion. There are two very important aspects to this online “social environment”, and they go handin-hand. The first is Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and the second is Social Media Optimization (SMO). SEO is important to any business because without the presence of your establishment online, you could be losing a very valuable share to your market. The SMO aspect of online importance can have just as much impact as SEO... without it, you go unseen, and patrons will be more likely to visit your competitor’s establishment. If we look at these two aspects of online marketing individually, we can see how they can, solely, have a great impact on your business. Having a search engine friendly, optimized website is a key to online marketing. It starts with the basics. Every website needs to be user friendly, have great pictures, and engage the audience. The internal components of a website are so highly important that most SEO experts agree that the critical areas of SEO depend on: • Content that is well written, relevant, engaging and frequently updated • Title, meta description, and header tags should contain terms that accurately reflect the site content • URLs, or website addresses, should be short and should contain relevant keywords. There are of course, other aspects of a website’s success rate that depend on things such as: longevity online and reputation among popular websites with related content (which is indicated by shared content, links to your site, and references to your site). We are all familiar with the importance of keywords and using them throughout our websites to create organic optimization online. Did you know that keyword optimization could w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

also hurt us? Websites can be penalized for using keywords excessively and providing content that lacks depth and substance. Social Media Optimization We often get bogged down trying to keep up with a Facebook page, Twitter account and blog updates. SMO has a very heavy influence on

SEO, as search engines are increasingly utilizing the recommendations of users from social networks Facebook, Twitter and Google+ to rank pages in search engine results pages. The implication is when a webpage is “shared” or “liked” by users on social networks, it counts towards a “vote” for that webpage’s quality. Continued to Page 57

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s o c I A L m e dI A Continued from Page 55

With that said, by giving patrons the ability to share and like our information, we are creating a string of organic optimization, from a social standpoint. The target audience must always be kept in mind. We need to ensure that we are posting, sharing, blogging and/or tweeting relevant and engaging articles that won’t bore followers. This provides the audience with the “want” to share with their social circles because most likely they are interested in the same topics. listening to followers is also a key to SMo. If they are asking for something, you need to be providing answers. responding to your followers is very important as well. as the owner/operator of a restaurant, you want to ensure that when someone posts on your Facebook page to inquire about your hours of operation and/or menu specials, someone should be available to respond right away to provide an answer to that patron; it is very possible that they are counting on you for dinner. It’s always important to conduct an audit on your SMo efforts to ensure you are providing enough information to your patrons. It’s a great idea to focus on the following items when conducting an SMo audit: • Traffic Source and visitors to site • Size of your networks (followers, fans, etc.) • Content that your establishment is posting (Correct true content of your brand, product & service) • Blog responses • Bounce rates from traffic that was driven from social media sources • Most importantly – your competitors’ SMo efforts. The Internet is constantly updating and developing new tactics for businesses to communicate with consumers. By giving consumers the ability to be present on social media platforms, we give them the ability to provide their thoughts and opinions of your company and/or brand. By conducting SMo effectively, it can bring in more traffic to your establishment; therefore, giving you the ability to capitalize from this very low-cost marketing tool. To summarize, both Seo and SMo are critical to a business’s success. It’s encouraged to have an Seo and SMo campaign and/or plan for your establishment and to be active in what you project online. Seo and SMo are cost-effective marketing tools and with the fast growing popularity of Social Media channels we can see that this is not just a fad, but something that will be around for a long time to come. Meghan Stuart is the Vice President of Operations for Interessant Hospitality & Hotel SEO Pros. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd lodgi ng.com

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Metro Deli™ has a way of making customers line up to get their hands on your latest sandwich creation. Made from the finest ingredients, our deli meats are just naturally big on flavor.

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F R L A’ s E duc at ion al fou n dat ion

High School Teachers Go Back to School During Summer Vacation FRLA Educational Foundation Hosts 17th Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute at Johnson & Wales University

Stuart Gray, Sue Bullard and Calvin Lewis. Peter Diulio (inset) is from Nature Coast Technical High School in Hernando County.

Tallahassee – Over 90 Florida high school foods instructors become students again for one week during their summer vacation. The teachers participated in the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Educational Foundation’s (FRLAEF) 17th Annual ProStart Teacher Training Institute this summer. This important training event took place at Johnson & Wales University’s (JWU) North Miami Campus. Participating instructors are involved in teaching FRLAEF’s two-year ProStart School-to-Career curriculum.

The instructors returned to school to fine-tune their culinary skills and foodservice knowledge during this weeklong event. While the teachers were able to have a little fun, there was no skipping class! They spent countless hours hitting the books and studying hard. The teachers were divided into four groups based on their past attendance at the event. First year attendees learned the basics of kitchen essentials, knife skills, dining room service, kitchen safety and sanitation and stocks. Second year ProStart instructors covered topics

T h i s e v e n t woul d n o t b e p o s s ibl e w i t hou t t h e s upp o r t o f t h e F R L A E F ’ s pa r t n e r s

such as nutrition, storeroom operations, desserts & baked goods and salads & garnishing. There was no slacking off, as third year participants learned how to identify and cut meats, cake decorating, advanced kitchen design and special event planning. The fourth year attendees finished off their experience with business accounting, strategic marketing, French pastries, candies and cookies. All participants will take the information learned during the weeklong training back to the classroom and share it with their students.

G L OB A L S P ONSORS

U N I VERS A L S P ONSOR

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MEM BERSH I P

FRLA Welcomes New Regional Managers

Ray reen

2013 Regional Directors’ Territories Northwest Florida Regional Director– Ray Green Cell 850-545-5901 Fax 850-224-1590 Rgreen@frla.org Northeast Florida Regional Director – Corkey Bergamo Cell 904-993-6287 Fax 904-880-6964 Cbergamo@frla.org Central Florida Regional Manager – Lisa Howard Cell 407-375-6941 Lhoard@frla.org Tampa Bay/Southwest Florida Regional Director – Dannette Lynch Cell 727-642-3404 Fax 727-953-6803 Dannette@frla.org Hillsborough Regional Manager – Katie Bone Cell 813-293-2428 Kbone@frla.org Southwest Florida Regional Manager – Christine Brosh Cell 239-470-3978 Cbrosh@frla.org South Florida Regional Director– Lynne Hernandez Office 305-598-FRLA (3752) Cell 305-710-3962 Fax 305-598-3753 Lhernandez@frla.org

Christine Brosh

Lisa Howard

F Corkey

LRA is strengthening its local efforts with the addition of four new regional managers. They will help support members, mobilize grassroots operations and bolster ongoing communications between FRLA headquarters and local offices. These regional managers join FRLA’s four current regional directors to represent 20 chapters across the state. Christine Brosh joins FRLA as the Southwest Florida Regional Manager representing Glades, Charlotte, Lee, and Collier County after working at Cooper Hotel Group where she served as a Sales Manager. Prior to her work in Southwest Florida, her career was in corporate event management and she independently owned and operated her own catering business. Lisa Howard joins FRLA as the Central Florida Regional Manager representing Orange, Seminole, Brevard, Volusia, Flagler, Lake, and Sumter County after 17 years as a sales executive in the financial sales industry. In her previous

Bergamo

Katie Bone

Dawn Wilson

career, Lisa maintained a multi-million dollar sales record, consistently achieving and surpassing sales goals. Lisa also took on the responsibility of arranging and coordinating a variety of trade shows and fundraising events. She’s been a resident of Central Florida for 28 years. Katie Bone is FRLA’s new Tampa Bay Regional Manager representing Pinellas and Hillsborough County. She started with the association in 2010 as the Corporate Events Coordinator working in Tallahassee, eventually moving to Tampa to begin her new role. Dawn Wilson is FRLA’s new Palm Beach Regional Manager representing Indian River, Okeechobee, St. Lucie, Martin, Hendry, and Palm Beach County. She began with FRLA almost four years ago as a volunteer for the Monroe Chapter. With 19 years invested in the hospitality industry, Dawn has served in a variety of roles and has experience ranging from hostess to manager while working in hotels and restaurants.

Jennifer Reed

Enjoy Arts & Tastes St. Pete Food and Wine Festival

E

njoy Arts and Tastes St. Pete is a new three-day food arts festival that will be in St. Petersburg benefitting FRLA’s ProStart program. Signature events will feature celebrity, local and regional chefs and restaurants, wine tastings, dinners, seminars, and the like. Events will be held throughout the region at venues including: The Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort & Golf Club, the Mahaffey Theater at the Progress Energy Center for the Arts, The Dali Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts and The Club at Treasure Island. E.A.T. St. Pete will be held November 15 - 17, 2013. For more information about the Festival visit www.eatstpetefestival.com.

Dannette Lynch

Lynne Hernandez

Palm Beach Regional Manager – Dawn Wilson Cell 561-284-9342 Dwilson@frla.org 60  AU G UST/SEPT EM B ER

2013

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no tWo tAnkS ArE AlikE.

MAX fIlled A lWAyS r E t U r n S MAX heAtIng tIMe.

What’s inside matters and today many tanks are under-filled. Suburban Cylinder Express tanks are hand filled to the MAX, at least 18lbs (If your tank label doesn’t say 18lbs. it’s under-filled.) Under-filled means your heaters stop sooner and you buy more tanks than you need to.

Florida’s Premier Dairies

ezpropanetanks.com Call suburban Cylinder express today and get MAX filled and MAX heating time from your heaters.

800.782.7222

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2013

800.432.4872

Broward County | David Pascarella | 561-756-3971 JaCksonville | Mark lipko | 904-450-0239 orlando | Jim nastasi | 407-721-6475 Palm BeaCh County | John Dovas | 561-901-9475 Pinellas County | richard Gerber | 727-480-4571 sarasota | John Gregorio | 941-348-0561 tamPa | David James | 813-416-2301

F lo r i da R estaura n t & Lo d g i n g A sso ci at i o n


s A F e s tA F F

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule www.safestaff.org To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. Registration for training begins at 8:00 a.m. and for exam at 12:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Dates subject to change. SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

LOCATION

LOCATION ADDRESS

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

25

16

20

18

Springhill Suites

205 W Highway 436

BRANDON

CITY

25

30

20

18

Embassy Suites

10220 Plam River Rd Tampa FL 33619

CLEARWATER

9

7

4

2

St. Petersburg Marriott Clearwater

12600 Roosevelt Blvd N St Petersburg FL 33716

COCOA BEACH

19

-

21

-

Hilton Cocoa Beach Oceanfront

1550 N Atlantic Ave Cocoa Beach FL32931

DAYTONA BEACH

19

9

13

11

Best Western Plus Int’l Speedway Hotel

2620 W Int’l Speedway Hotel Daytona Beach FL 32114

4

1

1

4

DoubleTree by Hilton

100 Fairway Drive

FT LAUDERDALE

24

29

19

17

Embassy Suites

1881 SE 17th St Causeway Ft Lauderdale FL 33316

FT MYERS

12

17

7

19

Hilton Garden inn

16410 Corporate Commerce Way Ft Myers Fl 33913

FT PIERCE

5

3

7

12

UF Indian River Research

2199 S Rock Rd, OC Minton Hall, Rm 219, Ft Pierce FL 34945

DEERFIELD

FT. WALTON

10

8

5

10

Holiday Inn Resort

573 Santa Rosa Blvd Ft Walton Beach FL 32548

GAINESVILLE

17

8

5

10

Best Western Gateway

4200 NW 97th Blvd Gainesville FL 32606

ISLAMORADA

23

22

21

-

Islander Resort

82100 Overseas Highway Isalmorada FL 33036

JACKSONVILLE

10

1

5

3

Wyndham Riverwalk

1515 Prudential Drive Jacksonville FL 32207

Quality Suites Oceanfront

11 North 1st Street Jacksonville Beach FL 32250

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

3990 S Roosevelt Blvd Key West FL 33040

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

18

9

13

11

KEY WEST

10

10

18

3

KISSIMMEE

30

21

18

16

LAKELAND

11

2

6

4

MANDARIN

25

16

20

MELBOURNE

12

17

14

MIAMI

19

24

14

5

3

7

NAPLES

26

31

OCALA

24

15

MIAMI SPANISH

Seralago Hotel & Suites

5678 West Irlo Bronson Hwy.

Holiday Inn Express

4500 Lakeland Park Drive

18

Ramada Inn

3130 Hartley Rd Jacksonville FL 32257

5

Holiday Inn

8298 N Wickham Rd Melbourne FL

12

Homewood Suites

5500 Blue Lagoon Drive Miami FL 33126

5

Homewood Suites

5500 Blue Lagoon Drive Miami FL 33126

21

12

Quality Inn & Suites

4100 Golden Gate Pwky Naples FL 34116

19

17

Homewood Suites

4610 SW 49th Rd Ocala FL 34474

9

7

4

9

Embassy Suites

8250 Jamaican Ct Orlando FL 32819v

ORLANDO SPANISH

30

28

18

16

Embassy Suites

8250 Jamaican Ct Orlando FL 32819

PANAMA CITY

18

9

6

4

Gulf Coast State College

5230 West US Hwy 98 Panama City FL 32401

PENSACOLA

24

22

19

17

Pensacola Bay Center

201 E Gregory St Pensacola FL 32502

PORT RICHEY

18

9

13

11

Days Inn & Suites

10826 US Highway 19 N Port Richey FL 23668

ORLANDO

5

3

7

2

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

6231 Lake Osprey Dr Sarasota FL 34240

ST. AUGUSTINE

11

2

6

4

Holiday Inn Express

2300 State Road 16 St Augustine FL 32084

TALLAHASSEE

26

24

21

19

Four Points by Sheraton

316 W Tennessee St Tallahassee FL 32301

TAMPA

18

16

13

11

Clarion Hotel

2701 E Fowler Ave Tampa FL

TAMPA SPANISH

9

14

4

2

Clarion Hotel

2701 E Fowler Ave Tampa FL

VENICE

9

7

18

-

Best Western Ambassador Suites

400 Commerical Ct Venice FL 34292

16

14

4

9

Holiday Inn Airport

1301 Belvedere Rd West Palm Beach FL 33405

SARASOTA

WEST PALM BEACH

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lighting

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To get the savings started, schedule a free Business Energy Check by calling 1.877.372.8477.

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©2013 Duke Energy Corporation 13-0353LU 3/13

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