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Outdoor rooms ALL THE LATEST FURNITURE, FABRIC & ACCESSORIES

Fab foliage From lush layering to native grasses

Frank Lloyd Wright’s CHICAGO RENOVATION SPECIAL

POWER WHY IT’S TIME TO KEEP CALM AND RENOVATE


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Renovation special

OCTOBER Cover stories 35

All the latest furniture, fabrics and accessories

87 138

Photograph by Claire Takacs.

From lush layering to native grasses 177 S Why now is the time to keep calm and renovate 167 209 On our cover Stylish and comfortable outdoor furniture and an easy indoor-out flow make this zone in a Sydney home a family favourite. Styling by Melissa Heath. Photograph by Chris Warnes. More outdoor inspiration on page 198.

Decorating & design 23 I October’s earthy neutrals and rich greens. 24 A Architect Michael Artemenko’s Melbourne semi is a linear progression from old to new. 35 G Chic outdoor decor inspired by exotic settings, from Palm Springs to Morocco. 45 Lavish love on the humble laundry with a stylish update.

46 P Invaluable pointers for transforming your interior space room by room. 57 S Shipshape decor capped with subtle glints of gold. 58 P Spring’s new power shade meets its match in white. 61 A A new book by Karen McCartney explores the ‘had to have it’ passions that inform the homes of collectors here and abroad.

Insider 71 N A pair of discerning antique dealers shows us their favourite finds. 72 Design news and reviews. 79 Architect Le Corbusier expressed his talent in many forms, from chairs to churches. 81 Curator Anne Ryan pours art and soul into her work at the Art Gallery of NSW.


88 H In Sydney, a growing family carves more space and potential from a vintage bungalow. 96 A neglected inner-Melbourne home ups the ante with a well-considered renovation. 104 C Divested of its constricting layout, a 19th-century Victorian home comes full circle. 112 How a dark, draughty Sydney semi became a light and lovely modern home. 120 Professional renovators refresh a classic Queenslander on the Gold Coast.

Gardens 131 138 142 151 234

Mayfield Garden in NSW has been laid out according to a grand vision. H A Sydney garden zoned for outdoor living, lawn space and lush plantings. Ornamental grasses. Garden news and to-dos. It’s lilac time.

Living 155

Noted chefs put fab, fresh salads on the menu for spring. 163 Victorian chardonnay.

167

A tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural icons. 171 Health breakthroughs. 172 Clever beauty tools.

Advice 178 O Need-to-know renovating advice from the pros. 186 N An eco-smart, creek-side home project in Melbourne. 190 DIY without danger. 193 Windows and doors. 198 I Outdoor rooms to suit every taste and style. 205 Financing renovations. 206 Garage sales for fun, profit and environmental benefits.

Shopping 209 B Fling yourself into spring with 50 top buys under $150. 215 All-weather textiles. 216 H Fine figures. 219 Outdoor furniture. 225 Stockists’ details.

Community 18 226 229

Readers’ letters. What’s happening.

Subscriptions offer 174 S and save 31 per cent off the retail price!

Photograph by Mindi Cooke.

Houses


Architect: Scale Architecture

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EDITOR’S LETTER H G

RENO R

Love that look…

Photograph by Maree Homer (Lisa).

Rattan and soft blue decorate up a storm. FROM TOP ‘Sunflower’ decorative woven rattan mirror (60x30cm), $29, Target; target.com.au. ‘SEE-YA’ suitcase in Mint (40x26x17cm), $99, Olli Ella; au.olliella.com. ‘Fausta’ terracotta planter in Blue Glaze, $55, Jones & Co; jonesandco.com.au.

Follow the H&G team on Instagram @houseandgarden

COVER STARS Love our cover colours? Make the palette your own with these Dulux paints:

Pure Apple

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Radiant Orange

’ve written before about the e influx, only this year I think in May. In fact, let’s just say activity and be done with it. &G property writer Harvey s plenty of people are putting p in favour of spending some on the home they’re in. ays Harvey, is that a good d out in uncertain times will ger term – while you enjoy the short term. rket has peaked it’s not a great Harvey. “You sell your home, py p ty on a new joint and then risk the value of your new home falling to less than the amount you paid. It has already happened to some home buyers in Sydney and Melbourne. That $50,000 stamp duty you forked out could have been spent on a new bathroom and kitchen or more space.” One of the core renovation messages canvassed in our pages over the years and again this month is the importance of flow, function and light (see report p177). For years, the solution to renovating a home in a heritage area was to retain the frontage and pop a modern, glazed box on the back. So the front rooms were still inclined to be light-challenged, while the back required sunglasses to be worn ’til the sun went down. There is still a bit of that approach at play, but it seems to be less blunt and a tad more nuanced. And increasingly impressive window and door solutions are meeting this need. Highlight windows positioned beneath a raked roof to catch northern light. Slide-away or tilt windows and doors open to adjacent outdoor living spaces. Glazed staircases draw light from

an upper floor or act as passageways from one section of the home to another. Curvaceous feature windows in eco-friendly glass and overhead glazing in windowless bathrooms also bring light and drama. It’s always fascinating to see the adaptation of homes to better suit a site possibly occupied for a century or more. It’s never a case of one size fits all because every home and location is different, but one item on most renovation briefs today is a request for a connection to the garden and barbecue area or, when space permits, a fully equipped outdoor room. This is particularly true of urban family homes where connection yet separation is essential for all concerned. Says Anna of her renovated Bondi semi (p112): “I love being able to move freely between indoors and out. Lying on the sofa reading a book while the kids play in the garden is my idea of heaven.”

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H G LETTERS

H&G social

The posts that made your month. Facebook

Instagram

YOUR H&G

Your foresight in running the My Ideal House design competition with Mirvac was inspired. The winning home is ageless, practical, beautifully set out and environmentally aware. Architect Madeleine Blanchfield has much to be proud of. Designers like her who are planning for the future will have a huge impact on our planet, and enable the people who live in their homes to make a difference. Congratulations to all involved. Catherine Youngberry, Mackay, Queensland

Pinterest

Facebook followers loved a Melbourne renovation by veterans of The Block, Instagram fans homed in on a great example of open-plan living, and Pinners applauded a transformed cottage. Facebook facebook.com/ australianhouseandgarden Highlights from each issue + links to our favourite home tours. Instagram @houseandgarden View the most inspirational images from the month at H&G’s HQ and out and about. Pinterest pinterest.com.au/ houseandgardenau Picture-perfect images from our pages and sensational products to covet. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our e-newsletter at newsletter. houseandgardenmag.com.au.

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September H&G made me fall in love again, with flowers! The whole issue was so fresh and vital – I counted 152 pages with brilliant blooms, plants or trees. They really gladden my heart after winter. I ran outside and picked a branch of magnolia blooms to decorate the bevelled pink-glass windows in my kitchen. Next, I put violets and bright poppies in the fruit bowl. Now I’m full of energy and choosing new paint shades to make my home look and feel even brighter. Ann Howard, Dangar Island, NSW

Dishing up praise An attractive tea-towel offer with every purchase of August H&G? Talk about a win-win outcome! Congratulations on the competition that led to My Ideal House. I was so pleased to see the magazine promoting innovative use of space that’s not on a mega-mansion scale. We live in a leafy suburb, but increasingly the tree canopy is being sacrificed to huge dwellings. I hope many home buyers and builders see the

article and realise that less can be more when good architectural design is practiced. I will certainly be buying H&G again, tea towel or no tea towel. Helen Berryman, Wembley Downs, WA

A fine vintage Having been married for over 50 years, it does our hearts good to see beautiful pieces of old furniture living new, useful lives in your featured homes, instead of ending up as scrap. Please keep showing how well-made old pieces can work with new furniture and provide a talking point for years to come. Ron & Jill McFayden, Mermaid Waters, Qld

Touching tribute Feel The Need (August) resonated with me as I can’t walk past a textile or wooden carving without wanting to run my hand across it. It’s good to appreciate the beauty in natural materials and simple things. I find that having stone or timber pieces and plants around is a great antidote to a techno world. Jayne Mullen Narre Warren South Vic

WRITE IN TO WIN The author of every letter published receives $5 Our favourite also wins a fabulous prize. This month, Catherine Youngberry of Mackay, Queensland wins a plush ‘Chanel’ armchair, valued at $599, from Focus On Furniture; focusonfurniture.com.au. Email your letter to H&G@bauer-media.com.au with your full name and address or post to Your H&G, PO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028.

Letters may be edited for length and clarity.

Darling buds


VERA V

AL

WAR

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M.AU


EDITORIAL Editor in chief Lisa Green Creative director Melissa Heath Deputy editor & travel John McDonald Interiors & houses Kate Nixon

ART

STYLE

Art director Katrina Breen Deputy art director Shayne Burton Junior designer Sophie Wilson

Senior stylist Kayla Gex Market editor Sarah Maloney Editorial & stylists’ assistant Sara Åkesson

FEATURES

SUB-EDITORS & WRITERS

Senior features editor Elizabeth Wilson Features Sarah Pickette Gardening Helen Young

Chief sub-editor/writer Deborah Grant Deputy chief sub-editor/production Tamarah Pienaar Sub-editor/writer Rosa Senese

CONTRIBUTORS Domenic Bahmann, Laura Barry, Toni Briggs, Stephen Crafti, Sarah Ellison, Tom Ferguson, Martina Gemmola, Paula Goodyer, Nic Gossage, Susan Gough Henly, Belinda Graham, Julia Green, Harvey Grennan, Armelle Habib, David Harrison, Maree Homer, Elisabeth King, Natasha Levak, Georgia Madden, Michele Mandalinic, Karen McCartney, Shannon McGrath, Megan Morton, Toni Paterson, Chris Pearson, Cricket Saleh, Anson Smart, Kristina Soljo, Claire Takacs, Nicholas Watt, Michael Wee, Libby Williams, Paolo Zoioglou

ADVERTISING & PRODUCTION Homes commercial manager Rhonda Maunder (02) 9282 8687 Advertising production manager Kate Orsborn (02) 9282 8364 Homes manager Kimberly Anderson (02) 9338 6103 Brand executive Jennifer Burke (02) 9288 9145 Victoria, SA & WA sales director Jaclyn Clements (03) 9823 6341 NSW head of agency sales Karen Holmes (02) 9282 8733 Victoria head of direct sales Will Jamison (03) 9823 6301 Queensland head of sales Judy Taylor (07) 3101 6636 New Zealand enquiries +61 2 9282 8505 General manager – production services Ian McHutchison Production controller Sally Jefferys Advertising production controller Dominic Roy (02) 9282 8691 Senior event manager Cate Gazal (02) 8226 9342

MARKETING & CIRCULATION Marketing director Louise Cankett Senior marketing manager Jillian Hogan Circulation manager Nicole Pearson Subscriptions campaign manager Lauren Flinn Assistant brand manager Nicole Pearson Marketing enquiries homes@bauer-media.com.au

SUBSCRIPTION SALES & ENQUIRIES Magshop, GPO Box 5252, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia Phone 136 116 (Mon-Fri, 8am-6pm AEST) Web magshop.com.au All other Australian House & Garden enquiries: (02) 9282 8456

BAUER MEDIA CORPORATE Chief executive officer Paul Dykzeul Chief financial officer Andrew Stedwell Chief marketing officer Paul Weaving General manager – publishing Fiorella Di Santo Commercial director Paul Gardiner Group brand & partnerships director Brigitte Guerin Acting head retail & circulation Andrew Cohn General manager – subscriptions & e-commerce Sean McLintock Commercial analyst Marisa Spasich Syndications syndication@bauer-media.com.au Published by Bauer Media Pty Limited (ABN 053 273 546), 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. The trademark AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN is the property of Bauer Media Pty Ltd and is used under licence. © 2018. All rights reserved. Printed by PMP Moorebank, 31-37 Heathcote Road, Moorebank, NSW 2170. National distribution by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd. 1300 650 666. ISSN 0004-931X. No material may be reproduced in part or in whole without written consent from the copyright holders. Bauer Media Pty Ltd does not accept responsibility for damage to or loss of freelance material submitted for publication. Allow several weeks for acceptance or return. For enquiries regarding subscriptions, call 136 116 Monday-Friday 8am-6pm AEST, email magshop@magshop.com.au or mail letters to: Australian House & Garden, Reply Paid 3508, Sydney, NSW 2001 or subscribe online at magshop.com.au/hg. Subscription rate*: Australia $79.99 (one year, 12 issues); NZ A$120 (one year, 12 issues); other countries A$180 (one year, 12 issues). All overseas subscriptions sent air speed. *Recommended price, Australian House & Garden.


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INSPIRED BY H G

October ‘Earthy neutrals, rich greens and spicy cinnamon and sienna set up a palette very much grounded in nature. It hints at personal growth and fresh beginnings.’

Styling by Kayla Gex. Photograph by Kristina Soljo. For Where to Buy, see page 225.

A N D R E A LU C E N A- O R R , D U L U X C O L O U R E X P E R T

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT ‘TBK8134’ terracotta tile, $129/m², ‘TBK2455’ glazed ceramic tile in Avocado, $89/m², and ‘TBK2441’ glazed porcelain tile in Rust, $109/m², all Tiles by Kate. ‘Morado’ clay brick in Blanco, from $3/brick, PGH Bricks & Pavers. 3Beaches ‘Beach Stripe’ acrylic fabric in Hedges, $83/m, White Verandah. ‘TBK24255’ glazed porcelain tile in Mustard, $109/m², Tiles by Kate. 3Beaches ‘Palm Paisley’ acrylic fabric in Morganite, $126/m, White Verandah. #

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Melb ourneIn updati a spa archite ng his yo ce-ma ct Mic ung f S TO RY S hael A amily x i m t e ph i s en C ing po rtem ’s 1912 rafti | ST rtal fr enko h cottag YLIN G Ju om pa as cr e, li a G re e n e st to p ated | PH OTO resen GRA PHY t. Ar m

ALON G TH E LIN ES ell e H

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ab i b


Stylist’s assistant: Mandy Murray.

HOUSES H G

DINING Owner/architect Michael had a clear design direction: to create a not-so-little pocket of calm in the city. The upcycled dining table made from old floorboards is ideal for the bright, newly expanded space. Artek stools. Pendant light, Ross Didier. ‘Bei Emerald’ glass and ‘Veneziano’ carafe, Jardan. Engineered French oak flooring in Aged Smoked & Limed finish, Royal Oak Floors. LIVING/VERANDAH Ruby and mum Emma play on the velvet-covered day bed. On the enclosed adjacent verandah, Dichondra spills softly from hanging planters. Terracotta pots, Pinewood Quality Nursery. The exterior battens are silvertop ash. >


H G HOUSES

ocated at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac in Melbourne’s inner south-east, this semidetached worker’s cottage presents a charming picture. Looking at the painted timber exterior, sitting behind a traditional picket fence, little appears to have changed since it was built circa 1912. But inside, a multitude of surprises awaits. Michael Artemenko, director of FIGR Architecture, and his wife Emma bought the property in 2011, in the tightly held neighbourhood they’ve lived in and loved since they married. The proximity of Michael’s office – just a stone’s throw away – is an additional bonus. “The area was fairly grungy when we first rented here,” says Emma. “Now, as you can see, it’s gentrified.” The couple rented out their new property for a couple of years before moving in and planning the next logical step. “We loved the original house, but it had been leased for so long that it needed a major overhaul,” says Michael. In 2014, spurred on by a failing roof and water damage, they began the design and documentation phase. Soon afterwards, the couple discovered they were expecting daughter Ruby, now two, which put even more pressure on their timeline. The 10-month renovation by Grundella Constructions, in conjunction with sustainability experts Natural Build Vic, was eventually finished in February, 2017. In the front section, the cracked original floorboards had to be replaced, but the pressed-tin ceilings remain. The three bedrooms were retained and slightly scaled down, making room to install a concealed laundry and enlarge the main bathroom. In addition, the front room was reconfigured to fit in wardrobe space and an ensuite. In Ruby’s room, a distinctive arched window has been restored. The third bedroom is currently used as an office.

L

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Once past this 100-year-old section, there’s a clear break with the past. The veneer-clad corridor functions as a portal, drawing the eye to the brightness of the living room and kitchen/dining zone beyond. Michael opted to express these as not one open space but two separate yet interlinked rooms. “We’ve loosely kept to the original floor plan, but obviously moved it on,” he says, pointing out the highraked, timber-lined ceilings and highlight windows that now make the most of the northern light. In the kitchen, as with the living area, the ceilings peak at nearly 5m. Smoky mirror panels above the joinery also increase the sense of space, as does the connection to the enclosed verandah. “We use these two areas as though they’re one,” says Emma, pulling back the bifold doors separating inside and out. Both look out to a pocket-sized, green-bordered rear garden. While modest in size, this house is big on considered details. Steel, for example, forms a dramatic linear element in the living room, in a modern iteration of timber picture rails. Silvertop ash and fibre-cement sheets line the walls, a brilliant foil for the modern artworks and curated decor inspired by Australian, Scandinavian and Japanese design. Above all, it’s a triumphant example of space used to its maximum potential. “A lot of homes built in Australia are rather large,” says Michael. “We find that many conversations about people’s needs for their homes and lifestyles revolve around needing more space. Perhaps > it’s a question of having smarter spaces instead.” FIGR Architecture, Cremorne, Victoria; (03) 9913 9396 or figr.com.au. Grundella Constructions, Carlton North, Victoria; (03) 8388 7233 or www.grundella.com.au. Natural Build Vic, Melbourne, Victoria; 0422 070 337 or nbvic.com.au.


‘ T H E L I G H T C O N S TA N T LY C H A N G E S T H E C H A R AC T E R O F T H E L I V I N G S PAC E .’ Emma Artemenko

LIVING Michael and family love this contemporary corner, where a photograph by Tom Blachford presides. The walls are clad in silvertop ash and CSR fibre-cement panels. Sofa, Ross Didier. Side table, GlobeWest. Ottoman/coffee table, Anaca Studio. Throw, Zara Home. Rug, House of Orange. Pendant light, Christopher Boots. KITCHEN/DINING High-set windows bring in extra light over the party wall. Befitting the sunny social space is a mix of materials: Russian birch veneer joinery, honed Elba marble atop the benches and mirrored panelling above the cabinetry. Smeg appliances. Blanco tapware.


H G HOUSES

LIVING These artworks by Kate Ballis are a colourful feature on the cool grey fibre-cement wall. The steel railings can be read as a witty reference to traditional picture rails. ‘Kelly’ armchairs, Jardan. Side table, Anaca Studio. Floor lamp, Dowel Jones. Glass and vase, House of Orange. CORRIDOR This darker, liminal passageway signals the progression from the old house to the new sections. Armourply joinery in spotted gum conceals a European-style laundry at left. Above, you can see part of an original pressed-tin ceiling. The plaster on the original wall in the foreground (far right) had crumbled, so the owners removed it entirely and left the brick wall bare as a richly textural contrast. ‘Castore’ pendant light, Artemide. >

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‘ THE CORRIDOR IS ABOUT THE JOURNEY F R O M O L D TO N E W, A P OINT OF REFLECTION WHERE CHANGES OCCUR .’ Michael Artemenko


H G HOUSES

MAIN BEDROOM Dulux Natural White creates a clean, serene backdrop. Custom bedside table, Tescher Forge. ‘Tolomeo’ lamp, Artemide. Cushions, Barnaby Lane. For similar throw, try Country Road. Artwork by Julia Ward. ENSUITE top right and bottom right A marble splashback elevates this skylit space. The digital control is for the underfloor heating. Basin, Swan Street Sales. Vanity taps, Wood Melbourne. Towels, Bedouin Societe. BATHROOM Penny-round mosaics from Tiento Tiles and a Kado ‘Lux Petite’ bath from Reece amp up the luxury. Tapware, Astra Walker. Pendant light, Mark Douglass Design. EXTERIOR An olive tree grows in the concrete pot, while Virginia creeper twines over the verandah. Weatherboards in Dulux Lamb’s Ears Half. For Where to Buy, see page 225. #

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KITCHEN PERFECTION

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Photography by (clockwise from top) Georg Roske/casacook.com, Sharyn Cairns/bauersyndication.com.au, Laurie Frankel & theparkerpalmsprings.com.

ROAMING

Global

Use cosmopolitan outdoor furniture and accessories to bring favourite destinations to your doorstep.

P R O D U C E D BY Kayla Gex


PALM SPRINGS soirée S U M M O N A L I T T L E G L A M O U R F O R T H E PAT I O OR POOLSIDE WITH MODERN-LEANING DESIGNS I N S U N N Y C O L O U R S A N D C H E E RY P R I N T S .


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Photograph from theparkerpalmsprings.com (opposite). Plant not included.

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1 Network Rugs ‘Merey’ recycled-PVC rug in Turquoise (150x220cm), $119, Temple & Webster. 2 Santa Barbara Designs ‘Double Decker’ aluminium beach umbrella with Sunbrella canopy in Cabana Yellow Stripe (2.7m), $5652, White Verandah. 3 Serax ‘Marie’ ceramic cactus vases, $50-$149 each, Telegram Co. 4 ‘Tidal’ stainless-steel sunlounger with cushion in outdoor fabric, from $3960, Tait. 5 ‘Benson’ powdercoated-steel side table, from $110, Pillow Talk. 6 ‘Palm Trees’ water-resistant fabric cushion cover (35x50cm), $70, Escape to Paradise. 7 ‘Duet’ recycled-polyester indoor/outdoor rug in Golden Rod (152x244cm), $349, West Elm. 8 Kenneth Cobonpue ‘Hagia’ polyethylene and aluminium side chair with muslin-covered cushion in Whitewash/Daffodil, $1275, Ke-zu. 9 ‘Palm Springs’ powdercoated-metal planter, $104, Lightly. 10 ‘Lattice’ ceramic accent table, $264, Pottery Barn. >

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H G DECORATING

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1 ‘Rue Du Bac’ acrylic fabric in Gris, $150/m, Ici et Là. 2 Janus ‘Pagoda’ aluminium outdoor umbrella with polyester canopy in Magnolia (2.5m), $3544, Janus et Cie. 3 Santa Barbara Designs ‘Smeaton’ metal dining chair, $379/pair, Brosa. 4 ‘Herbs’ cement pot, $25, French Country Collections. 5 Maiori ‘Huggy’ aluminium table, $1530, Obodo. 6 ‘Ytterön’ polyester seat cushion, $25, Ikea. 7 Cotto ‘Etrusco Nepi’ porcelain tiles in Naturale (250x250mm), $148/m², Di Lorenzo Tiles. 8 Salt&Pepper ‘Alfresco’ iron and glass hurricane candleholder, $79, Domayne. 9 ‘Havana Mosaic’ iron side table with tiled top, $329, Pottery Barn. 10 ‘Summer’ rattan and woven-synthetic outdoor sofa, $1499, Naturally Cane. 11 Crushed-limestone footed urn (45cm), $230, French Country Collections. 12 Aerin ‘Fairfield’ melamine salad plate, $18, Williams-Sonoma. >

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Photograph by Sharyn Cairns/bauersyndication.com.au (opposite). Plants not included.

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FRENCH affair M I X I R O N E L E M E N T S , B LU E N OT E S A N D B I S T R O F U R N I T U R E F O R A T I M E L E S S C O U RT YA R D S E T T I N G T H AT W I L L S E D U C E G U E S T S A L L S U M M E R L O N G .


H G DECORATING

MOROCCAN moment F O R A N O U T D O O R ZO N E T H AT O OZ E S M Y S T I Q U E , L O O K TO L O W- P R O F I L E S E AT I N G I N A R I C H PA L E T T E . J E W E L - L I K E AC C E S S O R I E S M A K E I T P O P.

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Styling by Hillary Robertson; photograph by Laurie Frankel/courtesy Sunbrella (opposite). Plants not included.

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1 ‘Starfire’ wool kilim (267x142cm), $2350, Tigmi Trading. 2 ‘Moroccan’ iron pendant light, $299, Temple & Webster. 3 Expormim ‘Senso’ aluminium and Batyline outdoor dining chair, from $1262, Ke-zu. 4 ‘Verona’ concrete coffee table, $595, Coco Republic. 5 Roda ‘Piper’ aluminium and Batyline sofa, $20,575, Domo. 6 ‘Neptune U’ ceramic pot (36cm high), $55, Garden Life. 7 Oly ‘Beijing #2’ resin vase, $225, Coco Republic. 8 ‘Swirl’ melamine salad plate, $10, Pottery Barn. 9 Antique encaustic-cement tiles, $425/m², Jatana Interiors. 10 ‘Abstract’ polyester cushion, $10, Kmart. 11 ‘Lena’ upholstered ottoman, $299, Brosa. 12 ‘Rustic’ ceramic pot (1m high), $1195, Martin Kellock Pots & Planters. >


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1 Home & Lifestyle ‘Laguna’ plastic rug in Black & White (238x150cm), $79, Temple & Webster. 2 ‘Kusila’ alang alang grass pendant light, $749, Uniqwa Furniture. 3 ‘Mexican’ terracotta pots, $830-$2520 each, Robert Plumb. 4 Avery ‘Croft’ rattan occasional chair, $795, GlobeWest. 5 ‘Vivo’ cedar coffee tables, from $1180 each, Fanuli. 6 ‘Parker’ synthetic indoor/outdoor rug (158x244cm), $334, Pottery Barn. 7 Southport ‘Ripple’ teak stool, $680, GlobeWest. 8 ‘Fraser’ teak sunlounger, $1490, Bay Gallery Furniture. 9 ‘Element’ steel fire pit, $590, Tait. 10 ‘Black Rock’ wooden beach umbrella with UPF30+ fabric canopy (2m), $249, Sunday Supply Co. 11 ‘Zulu’ synthetic-wicker stool, $690, Satara. 12 ‘Alicante’ synthetic-wicker two-seater sofa, $499, Brosa. #

Styling by Michael Schickinger/Lambs & Lions with Annabell Kutucu; photograph by Georg Roske/casacook.com (opposite). Plant not included. For Where to Buy, see page 225.

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ISLAND escape W I T H A C L E V E R M I X O F E A RT H E N WA R E , T I M B E R A N D RA F F I A D E S I G N S , YO U C A N B R I N G A N E XOT I C LO C A L E I N TO V I E W.

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I n k r e d i b l e 18 5 5 - 6 0

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DECORATING H G

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LAUNDRY UPDATE

Linen/storage

H&G READER VIVIAN LAI’S LAUNDRY

Laundry design by Ascot Living (main image). Styling by Kate Nixon (main image). Photograph by Maree Homer (main image).

Great ideas & easy updates ✚ If your layout allows, put a washing machine and dryer side by side, with practical bench or shelf space above. ✚ In laundries and other small spaces, a decorative floor tile delivers character in spades – a cost-effective way to add impact. ✚ An attractive paint colour or wallpaper can add a welcoming design element. ✚ Practical open storage – shelves, hooks, hanging rails – offers another opportunity to combine functionality and design flair.

Transform this essential work space with fresh functionality and eye appeal, writes Kate Nixon.

All in the details

e (15x15cm), $189/m², Teranova; teranova.com.au. ‘Orange Banksia’ wallpaper, $99/m², Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor; wallpaperdecor.com.au. Storage boxes, $12/pair, Kmart; kmart.com.au. ‘Mirror’ powdercoated aluminium hook in Brass Antique, $99, Zakkia; zakkia.com.au.

OR TRY THESE… Sparkk Fun wallpapers, including custom prints; sparkk.com.au. Harvey Norman Huge range of laundry brands; harveynorman. com.au. Bauwerk Colour Modern limewash paints for feature walls; bauwerk.com.au. Loop Design Studio Sweet floating shelves and wall hooks; loopdesignstudio.etsy.com.

Q

Our laundry space [left] is about 2.8m long by 1.65m wide. While it isn’t tiny, it’s pretty tight. On one side we have a sink in the corner, a washer/dryer and a linen cupboard, which we also use for storage. The other side is just a walkway [see plan, above left]. Do you have any ideas on how to renovate this room so it’s more functional and pleasant to work in? Vivian Lai, Clifton Beach, Queensland Your current layout actually sounds optimal for the shape of the room, with the washer/dryer, sink and storage arranged along one wall, keeping the other side clear for easy access. To make your laundry space feel lovely to walk into and work in, consider introducing colour and some decorative features and finishes in your update. You could opt for beautiful wallpaper, complementary floor tiles and fresh window treatments. Baskets are invaluable for increasing storage space while adding extra warmth and character. #

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Send decor dilemmas (with name and address) to H&G Advice, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028, or email H&G@bauer-media.com.au.

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10 steps

Perfect

BALANCE Form, function and vision take a dance in this Victorian home.

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ppearances can be deceptive. At first glance, this red-brick home in Geelong, Victoria, looks vintage, but in fact it’s only a little more than 20 years old. It was built by the previous owners in convincing Georgian style, with beautiful architectural details throughout, including grand windows and high ceilings. Subsequent owners decided it needed some additional character and polish. Interior designer Rebecca Jansma of Space Grace & Style was called upon to execute a largely cosmetic makeover. “I had excellent bones to work with, and the project was a rapid one – just three months,” she says.

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ART START Every room needs a starting point. Here it’s a painting by David Beaumont, one of Rebecca’s favourite artists. “We picked up the golden thread at top and the dark mass at the base of the work and ran with it,” she says. A Zuster ‘Jewel Halo’ sideboard grounds the scene and decorative items reference colours in the artwork. Repeated circular forms provide a pleasing visual rhythm: a Christopher Boots ‘Prometheus II’ pendant light, Moda Piera ‘Arancini’ floor lamp, Reduxr ‘Rollon’ and Vico Magistretti ‘Atollo’ table lamps (left and right, respectively) and those bold buffet handles.


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2 Text by John McDonald. Styling by Megan Morton. Photography by Cricket Saleh. Artworks by Shane Drinkwater (this page, both works at right); others unknown.

SIMPLE COMPLEXITY Artworks were selected from the owners’ collection; for this area, Rebecca chose monochromatic pieces with an emphasis on simple lines. The grouping is small, interesting and offset by a sculptural luminaire. “I love tampering with scale and balance,” says Rebecca, “so an asymmetrical light [‘O’branch II’ by Reduxr] is a natural choice to accompany a structured art hang and symmetrical banquette.”

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SUPER SEATING

The banquette setting is a handy way to gain great seating while conserving space. “Full-aniline leather is the best material for this buttoned style and will just get better with age,” advises Rebecca. She chose Thomas Maxwell ‘London Club’ leather in Clove from Warwick Fabrics. The brassy notes shown opposite continue with the Sarah Ellison ‘Stacey’ dining table. >

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KITCHEN UPDATE In the galley kitchen, Rebecca customised the existing joinery with battens (a great money-saving idea) to arrive at what she calls a “modified Shaker” look. She added drawers and painted the lot in Porter’s Paints Dusty Mule, a dusky green-grey shade that makes a better alternative to white in this relatively low-light space. She also replaced the existing benchtops with slick Calacatta marble in a curved lambs-tongue profile. Brass elements are repeated throughout the home; here, the cabinetry has been customised with ‘Bronte’ handles and ‘Atticus’ knobs in Brushed Brass, from Hepburn Hardware – such items are the simplest and easiest way to add highlights, says Rebecca. Illumination comes from a large ‘Easterly’ pendant light in an antique burnished-brass finish from Tigger Hall Design. The Persian rug, an unusual touch for a kitchen, delivers warmth and character.

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MOULDING CHARACTER Effective use of panelling is home-specific, says Rebecca. “You require a good ceiling height and a certain gravitas in order for it to have context. I start by roughly marking the panelling on the walls with masking tape, to quickly get a sense of whether it’s an appropriate match for the doors, windows, furnishings, art, window coverings, scale and balance of the space.” Here, Rebecca used timber mouldings from Mitre 10 and painted them and the walls in Dulux White Duck Quarter.

Artworks (top, from left) by Andrew Pye, Jiri Tibor Novak & Amber Creswell-Bell.

I N T H I S H O M E , A E U R O P E A N A E S T H E T I C M E E T S A S E N S E O F E A SY AU S T R A L I A N S T Y L E A N D E L E G A N C E .

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A MIX THAT WORKS Balance comes more easily when you include texture and pattern in the scheme, says Rebecca. “The bone-inlay coffee table from Ruby Star Traders is a complete surprise. Soft grey sheer linen curtains reference colours in the silk Kashmiri rug from Hali Handmade Rugs and act as a bit of a foil to the white expanse of the sofa [‘Joe Deep’ design from MCM House].” The Chinese chest is a dominant form in the room. “It was imperative to include other elements of black or it would have felt off balance,” says Rebecca. Cue the curtain rails, Gubi floor lamp (from Luke Furniture), table stripes and artwork frame. >


H G DECORATING

I T ’ S I M P O RTA N T TO C H A L L E N G E E X P E C TAT I O N S S O A S PAC E I S N E V E R B O R I N G O R P R E D I C TA B L E .

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PLAY IT WITH PATTERN

WHEN ERAS COLLIDE (above left)

When picking out wallpaper, Rebecca often chooses pattern over texture. “You have a unique opportunity to really inject some whimsy and a bit of storytelling,” she says. For this room, she selected non-woven Passepartout paper in Black/ Grey from Eurowalls, a rich match for the sumptuous leather bedhead.

“We love to juxtapose old and new, and there are many eras represented in this home,” says Rebecca. “The trick to getting them working together is to ensure the materials are sufficiently different but still compatible.” Case in point is the dining room, where an existing French timber door makes friends with a table crafted from recycled Chinese elm, artisanal Studio Bartoli ‘1085’ leather and timber chairs from Fanuli, a serenely modern wool rug by Armadillo & Co and the crystal-encrusted form of the Christopher Boots pendant light shown previously. Another tightly packed art hang provides a focal point and draws the eye down from the lofty ceiling.

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What a great chair! The owners purchased it at an antiques store years ago and have no intention of restoring it. A true character in its own right, it serves a purpose, jumping out from the moody grey wall (Resene Fuscous Grey) and Godfrey Hirst ‘Green Square’ carpet in Ashen, and complementing the antique gilt mirror. “Private spaces such as bedrooms, studies and dining rooms beg to be painted dark,” says Rebecca. “We’d happily paint any room dark, but I think that you achieve the greatest results in naturally darker rooms – there’s a synergy that seems to work.” >

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Shell cross by Jai Vasicek.

DEEPER PURPOSE (above right)


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RECURRING THEMES

For Where to Buy, see page 225.

The classics never go out of style, and Rebecca and her team use vintage and antique pieces in many of their projects. “Try to tie these pieces into a contemporary space by reupholstering or refinishing in a more relevant fabric, colour or finish,” she suggests. “The beauty of these pieces is that they’ve had a life already, and you have the opportunity to extend it and write another chapter. It’s exciting and unexpected to see old pieces reimagined, and they are often the items people gravitate towards in a room.” Here, the vintage bust and crystal pendant light add a sweet touch of whimsy. ‘Bellewood’ custom wall mural in Grey Toile by Rebel Walls. ‘Jensen’ side table in gold and malachite from James Said. Linen bedding from Society of Wanderers. #

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THE

LOOK A STORY OF RENOVATION TO RELAXATION


“When we first bought our house, Joe actually hated it. It didn’t always look like it does now. It used to be a brick bungalow with a bad 80’s reno but I had the vision of turning it into a Hamptons style home. Thanks to LineaTM weatherboard, lots of patience and some tears and laughter along the way, we got the forever home we dreamed of, somewhere our kids can always come back to.” Our renovation was built by Nulook Homes and designed by Paramount Design. Visit scyon.com.au to see more beautiful homes and advice on how to transform your home.

Copyright © 2018 James Hardie Australia Pty Ltd ABN 12 084 635 558. ™ and ® denotes a trade mark or registered mark owned by James Hardie Technology Ltd.


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Trend

STOR WATE

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In darker hues with glin these nautical pieces bayside and beyo

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Produced by Kayla Gex. Photograph (centre) courtesy Captains Rest guest cottage, Lettes Bay, Tasmania; captainsrest.com.

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1 ‘Linea Weatherboard’ fibre-cement cladding (available in 150mm and 180mm profiles), POA, Scyon; scyon.com.au. 2 American walnut and brass pendant light with glass globe, $1185, Specified Store; specifiedstore.com. 3 ‘Port Hole’ mirror in metal frame, $270, French Country Collections; frenchcountrycollections.com.au. 4 Fishscale ceramic mosaic tiles (20x20cm) in Farouzi Light Blue, $695m², Earp Bros; earp.com.au. 5 ‘Hook’ brass doorknocker, $65, The Society Inc; thesocietyinc.com.au. 6 ‘Changki’ cotton throw in Navy/White, from $390, St Barts; st-barts.com.au. 7 ‘The Vinnie’ polyurethane foam and fibreglass surfboard, $1345, McTavish Surfboards; mctavish.com.au. 8 ‘Norma’ rattan armchair with removable seat cover, $529, Oz Design Furniture; ozdesign furniture.com.au. 9 Australian House & Garden ‘Myola’ stoneware bowl, $10, Myer; myer.com.au. 10 ‘Iwu’ maize-fibre placemat in Blue, $7, Freedom; freedom.com.au. 11 Teak rocking stool in Black, $295, St Barts (as before). 12 Brass side table, $599, House of Orange; houseoforange.com.au. 13 ‘Pier Rope’ metal and manila-rope table lamp with cotton shade, $149, Freedom (as before). #

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POWDE BLUE

Tinged with grey, this soft pastel has emerged as a power shade. Pair with white for a total refresh.

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Dalvic distressed polypropyle and polyester leaf garland in Mix Luumo; luumodesign.com. 4 ‘Pod top3.com.au. 6 Normann Copenhagen ‘Analog’ powdercoated steel magazine rack in Blue/Grey, $199, Arrival Hall; arrivalhall.com.au. 7 ‘Lagoon’ powdercoated aluminium three-seater outdoor sofa with acrylic upholstery in White/Spa, $4375, GlobeWest. 8 New Balance ‘574’ women’s sneakers with chambray uppers and leather detailing, $130, The Iconic; theiconic.com.au. 9 Insulated stainless-steel water bottle in Shadow, about $48, S’well; swellbottle.com. 1O ‘Hailey’ dining chair with metal frame and fabric upholstery in Sky Blue, $99, Lounge Lovers; loungelovers.com.au. 11 ‘Sandy Bay’ cotton cushion in Sea Mist, $80, Sheridan; sheridan.com.au. 12 Boråstapeter ‘Poème d’Amour’ wallpaper, $140/10.05m roll, Wallpaper Trader; wallpapertrader.com. #

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Produced by Sarah Maloney. Currency conversion correct at time of printing.

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LIVE

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Martyn Lawrence Bullard Collection

From unique in-house designs, to the world’s leading luxury brands, find the perfect wallpaper at Porter’s.

Featured: Cole & Son wallpaper from the Martyn Lawrence Bullard Collection in Patina Haze 113/9028.


INSIDER H G Every corner of gallerist Don Cameron’s Sydney home is a visual feast. RIGHT In Didier and Clémence Krzentowski’s arty Paris apartment, a Konstantin Grcic dining table is teamed with Robin Day chairs and a Giampiero Aloi chandelier.

ARTFUL COLLECTING

Styling by David Harrison. Photography by Michael Wee.

The drive to acquire rare and beautiful objects can produce visual magic, writes Karen McCartney in her new book on the homes of passionate collectors.

T

he Alchemy of Things is a book about collections and collectors, but not in the way you might imagine. While the subtitle is ‘Interiors shaped by curious minds’, it could equally be ‘Those with collecting in their DNA’, as it seems to be a deeply ingrained impulse in many of the featured homeowners. Exploring the collectors’ personal histories, it is clear that the desire to collect is something inherent, something practised from an early age, a drive within them that has morphed and shifted, gathering nuance and depth as time has passed. All are extremely knowledgeable and buy accordingly, but there is often more heart than head involved in a purchase, with admissions that the sense of ‘had to have it’ overrode practical emotions. What these collectors don’t do is obsessively zone in on one item. There are no instances of one particular fetish – no walls covered in licence plates or shelves filled with snow globes, for example. Rather, their passions span different design eras, made liveable with the addition of a modern piece or two. But just

when you have a handle on their style, they throw you off the scent with something unexpected from the 1970s, or even 1870s. It is this dynamism of the unexpected that creates all sorts of decorating dualities. For example, in the Paris apartment of Michael Coorengel and Jean-Pierre Calvagrac there is a 19thcentury bed in which Napoleon once slept. It’s topped with an array of cushions, one of which – a bright orange banana – was designed by Andy Warhol. Closer to home, Sydney gallerist Don Cameron has a creative brain set to overdrive as he seeks out pieces as rare as they are diverse. Only in Don’s oeuvre can a cluster of Vico Magistretti floor lamps, a panel from an Angolan initiation hut, a Gothic statue of Jesus and a 1970s tiled table by Roger Capron comfortably share the same space. One of the most passionate collectors in the book is Didier Krzentowski of Galerie Kreo, whose Paris apartment overlooks the Eiffel Tower. Didier is philosophical about the relationship between collecting and neurosis. “I have always been a collector, since I was very young, starting with keychains,” he says. >

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H G INSIDER

While the intensity of his collecting is most likely the same today, the nature and value of his collections have expanded exponentially to include contemporary art, photography and design, as well as vintage lighting, a subject on which he is a twice-published author. Didier’s wife and business partner Clémence is no less passionate. She draws a comparison between collecting and completing a puzzle where there is a ‘treasure hunt’ to find the rare, elusive pieces required to fill the gaps. Two other remarkable homes in the book, both located in Australia, are those of Rodney De Soos and Geoffrey Hatty. The men are friends and, while Rodney is retired, Geoffrey is still very much in the game of dealing vintage furniture. Both know when something is good, even if it never finds a buyer, and both have kept pieces they love, with and without pedigree. While curatorial know-how is one thing, Rodney and Geoffrey also understand how to place objects, art and furniture together for effects that are often theatrical, empathetic and beautiful.Theword‘stylist’cansoundsuperficial, but their instinct for placement soars above the

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It is possible to mix eras, materials and object types, but the line between eclecticism and chaos comes down to the care you put into it. Be confident and please yourself rather than follow trends. Acquiring thoughtfully and choosing pieces with merit pays decorative dividends. Some people are keepers and hoarders, others are hunters and traders. It is useful to understand which camp you fall into. I am a keeper who wants to be a trader! – KM

prosaic, as they find visual commonalities in all sorts of pieces, regardless of their provenance or monetary value. Herein lies the alchemy. ‘Decorating’ as a term doesn’t really do the featured interiors justice; the rooms are often the result of a lifetime of acquisition, care or a devil-may-care approach to space and the things that inhabit it. This book does not deliver ‘how-tos’ or ‘ideas to steal’, although, of course, you are welcome to do so. It is more an attitude, a sense of freedom and permission that can be absorbed and applied in a new personal way. The takeaway is that, with care and conviction, an interior can be anything you want it to be. ‘Care’ is about informing yourself and buying from a position of knowledge; ‘conviction’ is having the courage to surround yourself with what pleases you. To quote Rodney: “Letting someone into your houseislikeallowingthemtoreadyourdiary–your obsessions become apparent.” An interior should besopersonalthatitexposesyourpassions,quirks andinterests.Collectionsplayakeyroleinrevealing # who we are and what we love. The Alchemy of Things by Karen McCartney, $59.99, published by Murdoch Books.

Styling by David Harrison. Photography by Michael Wee.

LIVING & LEARNING

In a rural NSW cottage Rodney De Soos has juxtaposed one of his first acquisitions, a colonial timber table, with a chair by Clement Meadmore. LEFT Modern lighting illuminates monochromatic art in the Milan apartment of stylist Elisa Ossino.


LAKE Butler Sink parisi.com.au


sweet dreams

Wrap yourself up in luxurious textures, cosy cushions and qualit y linens with a mix of exclusive bedding from Domayne. These dreamy summer collaborations with Shannon Fricke and Linen House, combined with lush pieces from the Domayne Luxuries range, will make you want to stay in bed all day long.


TONAL TEXTURES ELEVATE YOUR BEDROOM BY L AYERING RICHLY TEXTURED FABRICS WITHIN THE SAME COLOUR PALETTE, OR CHOOSE TWO CONTRASTING HUES FOR A STRIKING ST YLE STATEMENT.

shannon fr icke + linen house FOR THE ULTIMATE IN LUXE L AYERING, MIX TOGETHER QUALIT Y BEDDING FROM LINEN HOUSE WITH PIECES THAT SPEAK TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL ST YLE, LIKE TAC TILE THROWS, LUSH VELVE TS AND FRINGING FROM DOM AYNE’ S EXCLUSIVE COLL ABORATION WITH SHANNON FRICKE.

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ROYAL BLUSH INDULGE IN L AYERED ACCESSORIES WITH A SOFT BLUSH PALETTE THAT ADDS WARMTH AND TEXTURE TO ANY SPACE.

domayne luxur ies + linen house TAKE NEUTRAL TO THE NEXT LEVEL WITH A CONSIDERED MIX OF THE H I G H E S T-Q UA L I T Y FA B R I C S , PAT T ER N S A N D W E AV E S F R O M D O M AY N E LUXURIES AND DOMAYNE’S EXCLUSIVE LINEN HOUSE COLL ABORATION. ADD INTEREST BY USING PILLOWS IN VARIOUS SIZES AND TRIMS SUCH AS FRINGING TO ADD MORE DEPTH TO THE LOOK.

OPPOSI TE L i n e n H o u s e C a n y o n q u e e n q u i l t c o v e r s e t ^ $ 2 1 9 ; S e n e c a S a n t o s c o m f o r t e r w h i t e $ 3 3 9 ; European pillowcase white $49; Linen House Michiko linen cushion $59.95; Betsy macr ame rectangular cushion $49; Aur a linen throw mist $179; Industr y bed frame queen $1499; Industr y bedside table with o p e n s h e l f $ 3 9 9 ; A B OV E L i n e n H o u s e M i c h i k o q u i l t c o v e r s e t ^ $ 2 9 9 . 9 5 ; H a z e q u e e n q u i l t c o v e r s e t ^ m i l l e n n i a l p i n k $ 2 8 9 ; D o m a y n e L u x u r i e s Ve l v e t E u r o p e a n p i l l o w c a s e d u s k y p i n k $ 8 9 ; L i n e n H o u s e Wo n d e r p l a n t 4 8 x 4 8 c m c u s h i o n $ 5 4 ; E u r o p e a n p i l l o w c a s e $ 3 9 ; L y n e t t e c u s h i o n $ 8 9 ; D o m a y n e L u x u r i e s M a r c o s t r i p e d Tu r k i s h t o w e l $ 5 4 ; R i c h m o n d s i n g l e - d r a w e r b e d s i d e t a b l e $ 6 2 9 .


natural selection COMBINE LIGHTWEIGHT LINENS WITH UNEXPECTED DETAILING, LIKE FRINGING, FOR A BREEZY SUMMER S A N C T UA R Y W I T H H OT E L- L I K E I N D U LG E N C E .


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BREEZY BLUES EMBRACE A BREEZY, COASTAL FEEL IN YOUR ROOM WITH AN ARRAY OF ACCESSORIES IN COOL , TONAL BLUES AND FRESH WHITES, L AYERED IN RICH TEXTURES FOR ADDED CONTRAST.

linen house + domayne luxur ies BREEZE INTO SUMMER WITH A BLEND OF HIGH-QUALIT Y BEDDING, WORKED BACK WITH A CL ASH OF PRINTS IN TONAL SHADES FROM LINEN HOUSE AND DOMAYNE LUXURIES. KEEP THE LOOK STREA MLINED BY CHOOSING A PALET TE OF ONLY A FEW SIMIL AR SHADES, USING PAT TERN AND TEXTURE TO ELEVATE THE LOOK.

OPPOSITE L i n e n H o u s e O m a r i q u e e n q u i l t c o v e r s e t ^ i n d i g o $ 1 7 9 ; E u ro p e a n p i l l o w c a s e $ 4 9 , 3 5 x 5 5 c m cushion $49, 48x48cm cushion $49; Aur a Denim queen quilt cover set^ indigo $299; Domayne Luxur ies 3 0 0 T C q u e e n s h e e t s e t †, i n d i g o $ 1 0 9 ; w h i t e $ 1 0 9 ; L i n e n H o u s e O m a r i 3 5 x 5 5 c m c u s h i o n i n d i g o $ 4 9 ; 4 8 x 4 8 c m c u s h i o n i n d i g o $ 4 9 ; D i s t r i k t q u e e n b e d f r a m e $ 4 9 9 9 ; AB OVE A c a c i a q u e e n q u i l t c o v e r s e t ^ $279; Okinawa quilt cover set^ blue $269 (pillowcase shown); Academy cushion navy $99; Lakota macr ame tassel cushion navy $39.


summer accents BRING A TOUCH OF SUMMER INDOORS WITH TROPICAL PRINTS, REALISTIC GREENERY THAT LOOKS SO RE AL AND LIGHT, NATURAL TEX TURES FROM DOMAYNE.

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Visit domayne.com.au to browse our full r ange of fur niture , bedding and homewares. Domay ne stores a re oper ated by independent fr anchisees. Adver tised pr ices valid at New South Wales stores only. Pr ices may var y b etween sta tes due to additional freight costs. Mattresses shown are optional extr as. Promotion ends 18/12/2018. ^Single and king single quilt cover sets each consist of 1x quilt cover and 1x standard pillowcase. Double, queen, king and super king quilt cover sets each consist of 1x quilt cover and 2x standard pillowcases. †Single and king single sheet sets each consist of 1x fitted sheet, 1x flat sheet and 1x standard pillowcase. Double, queen, king and super king sheet sets each consist of 1x fitted sheet, 1x flat sheet and 2x standard pillowcases.


PHOEBE NICOL & JEREMY BOWKER Co-owners, The Vault Sydney

Text by Elizabeth Wilson. Styling by Sarah Maloney. Photograph by Nic Gossage.

Interior architect Phoebe and antiques expert Jeremy live in an inner-Sydney cottage with their dog, a brussels griffon named Harvey Nicol. The discerning duo source and sell antique and vintage wares from their eclectic Rosebery store. Read about their own favourite pieces over the page.


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AUSTRALIAN STORY

Caroma

This iconic Australian brand progressed from making plastic toys and medical supplies to producing some of the most significant fixtures in our bathrooms.

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ost Australians would be surprised to learn that Caroma began as a small firm manufacturing plastic toys. Founder Charles Rothauser went on to invent the first plastic hypodermic syringe and became a pioneer of plastic-injection moulding, leading to the first plastic one-piece toilet cistern. “This curiosity and pioneering spirit is at the core of Caroma and prevails strongly in all we do, resulting in some of the most significant, globally impactful water-saving initiatives today,” says Dr Steve Cummings, Caroma’s director of innovation. “Our first Dual Flush toilet in 1984 reduced water usage per flush from 11 litres to five. In 2004, we introduced Smartflush, which established a new industry standard of water-usage levels, down to four-and-a half litres on full flush and just three litres on half flush.” Caroma’s water-conservation efforts go beyond toilet suites; it also supplies showers, tapware and urinals that actively minimise consumption and meet the highest WELS water-efficiency ratings. “We strive to match sustainability with style, amazing design and

the highest quality,” says Dr Cummings. “Caroma’s commitment is to make life better through the design and delivery of products, services and technologies that create superior solutions for people to enjoy and sustain water, our planet’s most precious resource.” Today, Caroma employs more than 300 staff across Australia and has two flagship stores: one in Adelaide, the brand’s birthplace, and the other in Sydney’s Alexandria (above). There are also concept stores, in Brisbane, Perth and Melbourne. caroma.com.au >

Text by Laura Barry (Caroma). Photography by Nic Gossage (portrait, artworks).

FAVOURITE THINGS “Our interiors are comfortable and layered, with a nod to classicism. We believe in mixing older periods with contemporary design,” says Jeremy, who let us in on these specific details: Mirror A Louis XVI style with giltwood frame. Phoebe wouldn’t let me sell this one! Artworks Ricochet 1 #4 [bottom right], by Liam Garstang, is a slab of clay shot with a .22 bullet. The other, Introspect, in acrylic and sand render, is by our friend, artist Angie Pai. Sofa From GlobeWest. Cushions These were made by Phoebe. Coffee table A vintage Italian piece in travertine. White tray Luke Edward Hall ceramic design from Alex Eagle. Silver trays Inherited from Phoebe’s grandmother. Ornamental-horn box Sourced from 1stdibs. What do you love most about your home? It’s a true reflection of our personalities, a collection of bold and interesting objects that make our place our home. Where do you shop? Becker Minty in Potts Point for homewares; the boys there have great style. And Hermetica Flowers – we always have fresh flowers in the house. For food, Chester White Cured Diner in Potts Point is cosy and serves delicious pasta, cured meats and wine. thevaultsydney.com


www.ara-anz.com

WE LOVE FASHION & FUNCTION.


FROM LEFT ‘Sand Dune’ hand towel in Wave, $45, and ‘Geo Pestamal’ towels/ throws in Grey and Black, $139 each, Loom Towels.

RETAIL NEWS H ATC H E S , M ATC H ES …

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Designed by Mario Ruiz for Punt, the ‘Malmö’ storage unit (above) is a study in sophistication. It’s available from Cafe Culture+Insitu in a range of configurations, in oak, walnut veneer or textured lacquer, from $5200. cafecultureinsitu.com.au

Making breakfast m cheerful, DeLonghi h released a line of ke and toasters in Aga Blue (right) and oth happy hues.From $99. delonghi.com/

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With plump cushioning over gentle curves, this sofa is a chic addition to Ross Gardam’s Noon collection for StylecraftHome. Available as a two- and three-seater, plus a single-arm style to allow for modular arrangements. Prices start at $8668. stylecrafthome.com.au

Meet the maker MIKALA JAMES, LOOM TOWELS Describe your creative process? I design in my Melbourne studio and occasionally travel to the workshop overseas. I blend inspiration from traditional craft with a modern vibe and my own sense of style. I use paint swatches to create mood boards, and look for artistic patterns in tiles for weave inspiration. How are your towels made? I continue to work with the same small workshop of weavers in southern Turkey. Everything is made

on traditional shuttle looms, most of which date back to 1918.

Where do you source the material for the towels? The cotton we used is grown in Gaziantep, Turkey, and is certified organic by GOTS [Global Organic Textile Standard]. What does a typical day look like? No two days are the same. Right now, I’m organising a photo shoot for my new collection. Like to share any plans for the future? My goals are to keep exploring with new products and designs, to have fun, and to work with awesome people and companies. loomtowels.com

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Norwegian brand Ekornes has launched the world’s first reclining and tilting dining chair, perfect for keeping families around the table for longer. The ‘Stressless’ chair is available with a high or low backrest, and a choice of legs. From $550 each. ekornes.com.au

THREE GREAT DESIGN READS 1 Peek at the eclectic homes and quirky profiles of inventive types around the globe in BOHEMIAN LIVING by Robyn Lea. It explores what it means to live an authentically creative life. $65, Thames & Hudson. 2 Reissued in a new, compact format, THE TERRACE HOUSE celebrates the appeal of the terrace house in Australia and how it’s been reinvented for modern living. $45, Thames & Hudson. 3 From Yotam Ottolenghi, the maestro of great flavour combos, comes SIMPLE. Full of recipes to please vegetarians and meat-lovers alike, most require just 10 or fewer ingredients. $49.99, Ebury Press. >

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Text by Elizabeth Wilson and Laura Barry (Loom Towels). Photograph by Annika Kafcaloudis (towels).

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skin happiness tone

moisturise

cleanse

3 easy steps to happy, healthy, radiant skin with Natio’s gentle Aromatherapy skincare. For all skin types. www.natio.com.au Available at Myer, David Jones and selected Pharmacies.


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Young talent time

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Exploring Victoria’s countryside as a child sparked a love of nature in Bruce Slorach, co-founder of Utopia Goods. Catch his Botanica exhibition of works in diverse media at Hamilton Regional Art Gallery, 300km west of Melbourne, until October 21. hamiltongallery.org

WA-based outdoor furniture firm Alboo has opened a Brisbane flags store in Newstead.It’s fi with the brand’s distinct products in lightweight aluminium and summery all-weather textiles.A Sydney store is coming soon.Pictured is the ‘Foxy’ dining table from $3095 alboo com au

PRIZE SPECIMENS

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Choosing exterior colours for your home can be daunting, so PGH Bricks & Pavers has collaborated with Melbourne studio Nexus Designs to create mood boards for eight complete palettes, covering everything from bricks to the garage door. Themes include Dark and Stormy, Sophisticated Neutrals and Red Revival (pictured). pghbricks.com.au

Picture yourself on this adjustable sunlounger,new to the Trace collection by Australian designer Adam Goodrum for Tait.From $5225.madebytait.com.au

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Australia’s design future is in good hands, judging by the innovative entries for the Vivid Design Awards at the recent Decor+Design event in Melbourne.

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ow in its 15th year, the Vivid program celebrates the work of new and emerging Australian designers. On show this year was an abundance of talent. Winner of the award for furniture design was young Victorian designer Marinos Drakopoulos, for his beautifully crafted ‘James’ timber dining chair (right). Marinos was a double winner, also taking out the award for object design with his ‘Arion’ rocker, a modern reimagining of a rocking horse (bottom right). Thomas Yeend scooped the award for colour with his handblown ‘Kilo’ lamps (centre), while Fran White’s resin ‘VaryVases’ (top left) triumphed in the concept-designer category. The Judges’ Choice award went to Dean Toepfer for his ‘Rebel Futurism’ lighting (top right). See more at decordesignshow.com.au. #


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A. Pete Cromer Kookaburra mug, Gift boxed, $9.95 RRP B. Pete Cromer Echidna mug, Gift boxed, $9.95 RRP C. Pete Cromer Azure Kingfisher coaster, $2.95 RRP


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Design moment

LE CORBUSIER Steely adherence to the ethos that form follows function changed furniture design forever, writes Chris Pearson.

Photography from Alamy (portrait) & Cassina.

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wiss-born architect Charles-Édouard Jeanneret (right), aka Le Corb wanted furniture with the effic of a precision watch to complemen whitewashed buildings. Since the mid-1920s, he and fello luminaries such as Marcel Breuer an van der Rohe had been experiment tubular steel. So, too, had unknown and architect Charlotte Perriand, w him to hire her for the Paris studio h founded with his cousin Pierre Jean “We do not embroider cushions” was his dismissive reply – but, after seeing her sketchbooks, he put Charlotte in charge of prototype production. It would prove a potent and prolific partnership: in 1928, the trio unveiled the game-changing ‘LC1’ slingback chair, ‘LC2’ and ‘LC3’ sofas and armchairs, and the ‘LC4’ chaise longue. In their minimalism, these tubular belles, many fashioned for Le Corbusier’s Villa Church in Ville D’Avray, were a reaction to the decorative styles that had gone before. Just as his buildings were strong, robust and no-nonsense, so too was his furniture. Products of the machine age in their materials and philosophy, these “machines for living in” were pared back to their basics, embracing function and proportion. “Buy only practical furniture, never decorative pieces,” he preached. A champion of ergonomics, Le Corbusier extensively measured the human body to devise optimum proportions for his furniture while rigorously exploiting geometry. In the 1940s, he developed Le Modulor, a system of proportions based on the so-called ‘golden ratio’ used in classical architecture.

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‘LC2’ Still one of the most popular pieces, ‘LC2’ juxtaposes monumentality and lightness.

‘LC3’ Cloud-like seat, back and arm cushioning is a direct result of Le Corbusier’s function-oriented approach.

‘LC4’ One of the most iconic pieces in the LC collection, the ergonomic, adjustable chaise revolutionised modern furniture design.

While his working name (an adaptation of his maternal grandfather’s surname) was taken from the past, his austere Modernist designs were like nothing seen before. After Italian company Cassina acquired rights to the LC range in 1964, it powered up production and began global distribution, “making them the familiar icons they are today”, says spokesperson Sara Nosrati. First off the line were the ‘LC1’ slingback, the ‘LC2’ and ‘LC3’ seating and the chaise, with Cassina later adding other models. Each piece made by the company is numbered to confirm its authenticity.

WHAT IT MEANS TO US The four in the original quartet, especially the ‘LC2’ and ‘LC4’, are still the most recognisable and bestselling. Cassina now employs a less toxic chroming process to make the frames, and the seats come in diverse colours and materials (such as the ‘LC2 Poltrona’, above). One of these is a soft seat fabric resembling leather, which uses 70 per cent less water and generates 35 per cent less carbon dioxide in its production. Matt Lorrain, head of design and product development at Australian furniture studio SP01, has been a fan of Le Corbusier’s work since studying design at university. Sadly, he doesn’t have room for the chaise in his own home, but does own an ‘LC7’ swivel desk chair, his favourite in the line. “It’s a sweet piece from the 1920s,” he says, “but it could be from any era. “This furniture has purity of form but not at the expense of beauty. I would never kit out a whole room in LC pieces, but when mixed in with contemporary interiors, they are still remarkably relevant. If someone walked into a Cassina showroom and had never seen an ‘LC4’ before, they would think it was a brand-new design.” Pretty amazing for a nonagenarian. # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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Women in design

ANNE RYAN

A love of art and its role in “communicating who we are as human beings” is an enduring interest for this curator of Australian works on paper at the Art Gallery of NSW. STO RY Elizabeth Wilson | P H OTO G R A P H Y Kristina Soljo

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s a young girl, Sydneysider Anne Ryan was always immersed in books. She loved the storylines, but was just as captivated by the black and white illustrations that accompanied them. “They introduced me to the power of drawing to tell a story,” she says. While studying art history at uni, Anne worked as a volunteer at the Art Gallery of NSW, in the print room, where she “fell in love with the notion of working in a museum and caring for objects”. She gained a masters in art administration, which led to an internship at the Art Institute of Chicago in the mid-1990s. Back in Sydney, she landed a job cataloguing the AGNSW collections, then a role as assistant curator.

In 2005, she was promoted to Curator of Australian Prints, Drawings and Watercolours, overseeing a collection of 7500 drawings, 5500 prints and 1000 watercolours. In tandem with being responsible for protecting the physical condition of these works, Anne advocates for the moral rights of the artists (living and deceased) she represents, determines which works to purchase and exhibit, and fields queries from the public and media about the objects in her care. “The traditional definition of a curator is a ‘keeper’ of objects and I have the pleasure of looking after one of the major collections in the country,” she says. “I feel very privileged and lucky to do that.” > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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9am PRINT ROOM, ART GALLERY OF NSW Anne and assistant curator Hannah Hutchison meet in the print room where 22,000 limited-edition artist’s prints, drawings and photographs are stored. “We come here often, when we’re formulating an exhibition, cataloguing works or researching an artist,” says Anne, shown discussing female interwar printmaker Dorrit Black, whose linocut, Nocturne, Wynyard Square 1932, appears below left.

10am PAPER CONSERVATION DEPARTMENT, AGNSW “Studying these works closely is fascinating and helps me understand them better,” says Anne. “Under the microscope I can see the type of paper and paint used, and whether the artist used pencil underdrawings.” She studies a watercolour by Impressionist John Russell (1858-1930).

6pm ARCHIBALD, WYNNE AND SULMAN EXHIBITION As curator of the Archibald, Wynne and Sulman Prizes (the gallery’s highestprofile show), Anne performs a lot of public-facing work: liaising with media, presenting talks to benefactors, sponsors and stakeholders… and attending evening functions. “It’s challenging, fun and exhilarating,” she says. The Dobell Australian Drawing Biennial runs until October 21. John Russell: Australia’s French Impressionist runs to November 11. The Brett Whiteley show Drawing is Everything opens December 15. artgallery.nsw.gov.au

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12 noon BRETT WHITELEY STUDIO, SURRY HILLS The former studio and home of artist Brett Whiteley (19391992) is now a museum run by the AGNSW. Anne meets with assistant studio coordinator Michela Angeloni to discuss an exhibition she’s developing, dedicated to Whiteley’s drawings. “All of Whiteley’s artworks were underpinned by drawing,” says Anne. “This will be the first drawing-focused show of his work in many years.” Whiteley’s workspace (below) displays unfinished paintings and art equipment, just as the artist left them.

3pm PRE-LAUNCH, THE DOBELL AUSTRALIAN DRAWING BIENNIAL Anne chats with artist Jason Phu, whose mixed-media installation (pictured left) appears in the Biennial and whose work Anne collects for the gallery. “As a curator, I’m very curious to talk to artists, to hear what they are saying and how they’re pushing ideas and boundaries in their works. A gallery has to preserve and protect our history and our past, but it also has to engage with the present.” Jason has designed a limited-edition scarf in conjunction with the Biennial and is pictured signing the cards that will accompany them.

‘A museum collection is something that grows and lives and is carried into the future. Curators are keepers of those cultural memories; we’re responsible for keeping those objects safe for generations to come.’


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1. Gentlemen’s Hardware charcoal shoe shine kit 2. Personalised name blanket in grey and pink with pompoms 3. DOIY Cyclops large wall mirror 4. Adventurer’s brass sundial and compass 5. Personalised leather ring box 6. Bartender’s Choice collection (set of 4 cocktails) 7. Tainted love embroidered blouse in ecru 8. Australian animals kids’ personalised cushion 9. Luca metal wall clock in white 10. ‘This guy needs beer’ men’s slogan T-shirt 11. ‘Soup of the day: Prosecco’ print 12. Bodysurfing handplane – stringer moontail 13. Personalised large carved heart chopping block 14. Rose gold heart initial luggage tags (set of 2) 15. Australian whisky tasting set 16. Personalised leather wash bag with strap 17. Cameron tee with yellow blooms 18. Memory suitcase keepsake box 19. Personalised mixed gold Russian ring necklace 20. Audio Pro wireless Bluetooth speaker 21. Kids’ white drop-waist lace dress 22. Personalised solid oak guitar wall stand 23. Men’s personalised layered leather straps bracelet 24. Carousel cup and saucers tea set with spinning stand


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N O T YO U R AV E R A G E G I F T. 4 0 , 0 0 0 + G E N U I N E LY D I F F E R E N T F I N D S . w w w. h a r d t o f i n d . c o m . a u


Photograph by Maree Homer.

In a Sydney home expanded for a growing family, sunlight streams in, front and back. Turn the page to see more. >

Five contemporary renovations deliver bright new possibilities.


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High

FIDELITY

Fresh from apartment living, the new owners of this Sydney bungalow were keen to explore all the spatial possibilities of their home while respecting its 1920s provenance.

STO RY Rosa Senese | STYLI NG Natasha Levak | P H OTO G R A P H Y Maree Homer

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KITCHEN/DINING Shaker-style joinery in American oak and handpainted MDF attests to the owners’ love of classic American design. Interior designer Natasha Levak had the family’s hardwood dining table stripped and stained to suit the tonal palette. She also designed the stools, pendant light and platter (on island). Benchtops in honed ‘London White’ marble, Mediterranean Marble & Granite. ‘Phoenician’ tapware, Perrin & Rowe. Splashback tiles, Academy Tiles+Surfaces. Chair covers in Westbury Textiles ‘Outdoor Linnen’ fabric. The flooring is custom-stained brushbox. >


H G HOUSES ight from their very first visit, there was no doubt about it: this was the home for Nicole and Asfandiar Pestonji. When they walked into the three-bedroom property on Sydney’s north shore in 2010, they knew they’d found something special. Standing proud on a ridge, the 1920s bungalow with a rear extension was a beguiling blend of heritage and modern living – and it suited their young family down to the ground. “We remember visiting the house and the sun beaming into the back,” says Asfandiar. “We were also attracted to the fact that, while the home was already comfortable and ready to live in, we could always extend upstairs if we needed more space.” As fate would have it, a few years later the arrival of a third child kicked their extension plans into gear. “We were looking for one more bedroom and another

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bathroom,” says Nicole. “We were also keen to have another living space, and to capture water and city views.” Architect Jon Hellowell drew up plans covering improvements to the first floor as well as the new level. Interior designer Natasha Levak, on board from early in the project, implemented and oversaw the design specifications and finetuned the room layouts. On completion of the nine-month construction by Built by Lucas, she worked closely with the owners to select every element inside, from art to furnishings. The sole exception was an existing hardwood dining table, deemed rugged enough to cope with the rough and tumble of sons Oliver, now 12, Oscar, 10, and Noah, five. “From the start, I sought to respect the 1920s-era bungalow build while also ensuring that the interior and exterior selections, from the front door to the backyard, were consistent,” says Natasha.


A long flight of sandstone steps up to the front door creates an air of anticipation; once inside, the curated interiors don’t disappoint. Rich materials and muted colours are set against a backdrop of pale walls and dark timber floors, with a nod to the classic American East Coast aesthetic the owners love. Upstairs, soft blue and grey accents reference newly captured views of the water. The effect is timelessly elegant, yet uniformly inviting. “It was my intention to keep the overall feel relaxed, comfortable and fresh,” says Natasha. “Not too formal or overly precious.” Past the entrance, the two original front rooms are designated Oliver’s and Oscar’s bedrooms. Continuing along the hall, there’s a bathroom, study zone and – a special inclusion requested by the wine-loving owners – a generous stone-clad wine cellar. The rear is given over to a refreshed and reconfigured kitchen, dining and

family living space, which looks out to the pool and outdoor entertaining area. Upstairs is Noah’s room and a powder room, plus a formal living area and the main suite. It’s a wonderful outcome for the couple’s first renovation, and a testament to the power of creative minds striving towards a common goal. “Nicole and Asfandiar were very trusting of the design/build process and the merit of architect, builder and interior designer interacting and working as a team,” says Natasha. “What struck us is how taking a holistic view can bring everything together so well, giving the home an amazing feel and aesthetic,” says Asfandiar. “We love it and could > not be happier with the results.” JP Hellowell, Newcastle, NSW; 0431 050 215 or jphellowell.com. Natasha Levak Interior Design, Sydney, NSW; natashalevak.com or @natashalevak. Built by Lucas, Alexandria, NSW; 0434 629 638.

THE PALETTE

Porter’s Paints Haloumi (downstairs living)

‘Calacatta Stat’ marble mosaics (ensuite)

Westbury Textiles ‘Amsterdam’ linen (sofa)

DOWNSTAIRS LIVING “The simplicity of the palette allows the green of the garden beyond to be drawn inside,” says Natasha. ‘Benson’ armchair, Arthur G. Custom sofas in Westbury Textiles ‘Amsterdam’ linen fabric (centre) and Chivasso ‘The Switch’ linen blend from Unique Fabrics. Side table, coffee table and lamps, all Natasha Levak Interior Design. Soapstone sculpture (on buffet), Manyara Home. White vessels, Barebones Art Space. Curtains are in heavyweight Belgian linen twill. Hunter ceiling fan, Prestige Fans. Artworks by Matthieu Paley (photograph) and Michaye Boulter (landscape). Designer buy: ‘Demian’ buffet, $5865, Coco Republic. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G HOUSES

This is the life

“The extra space, and having two living zones, means that if someone needs quiet space, it’s easy to find,” says owner Nicole. “Overall, the house has a beautiful feel to it, which we just love.” The revamped downstairs space has also proven itself ideal for social occasions. “Our kitchen, dining and living areas open up directly to the outdoor entertaining area and pool, which is perfect in summer,” says Asfandiar.

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‘ O N R E F L EC T I O N , T H E N I N E M O N T H S T H E R E N OVAT I O N TO O K WA S P R E T T Y Q U I C K , B U T A S W E HAD O R I G I N A L LY S C H E D U L E D S I X M O N T H S , I T F E LT L I K E W E W E R E G O I N G S L OW ! ’ Nicole Pestonji, owner

HALLWAY This bright space’s custom wall panelling works with the 1920s style of the house. The slimline table was a vintage find. Jennifer Dumet vase, Floral Craftsman. Oil painting by Michaye Boulter. Designer buy: for similar console table, try the ‘Tivoli’ console, $1730, GlobeWest. DOWNSTAIRS LIVING An attenuated metal floor lamp balances the round outline of the leather-framed mirror, both from Natasha Levak Interior Design. Cuttings of eucalyptus on the coffee table and dusty miller ( Jacobaea maritima) in the hall (above) bring life to the neutral setting. Thriving in the faux-stone planter from Garden Life is a hardy rubber plant (Ficus elastica). Side table, Laura Kincade. Rug, Cadrys. Artwork by Adrian Lockhart. >


H G HOUSES

‘ T H E PA L E T T E O F T H E N E W U P STA I R S L I V I N G R O O M – W H I T E , S O F T B LU E A N D G R E Y – WA S S E L EC T E D TO R E F E R E N C E T H E WAT E R V I E W S .’ Natasha Levak, interior designer

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THE LAYOUT

Bath

Bath

Bed

WIR Living

BEFORE Bed

Reno snapshot

FIRST FLOOR

Bed

Cellar Kitchen Study Laundry

Entrance

Dining

Bed

Bath

GROUND FLOOR

Living

Outdoor living

Pool

Pivotal decision “Adding a new storey for much-needed space. Council planning restrictions limited us to the existing footprint,” says Asfandiar. Unexpected blowout “Our costs were higher than expected, as a result of us prioritising the quality of the build and finishes once we started the process.” Splurge “The cellar, but we’re delighted with the result.” Favourite room “A toss-up between the main bedroom and the kitchen/living/dining space.” Words of wisdom “Manage your expectations of how long the project will take.” #

MAIN BEDROOM Soft, cosseting elements here include walls in Dulux Mt Aspiring and a bedhead in Rossetti Fabrics ‘Reform’ fabric in Duck Egg. Barbara Barry lamp. Striped cushions in Pierre Frey ‘Octave’ fabric. The wool carpet is a herringbone loop-pile. MAIN ENSUITE Marble, ceramics and linen round out the textural palette. Victoria+Albert basin, Candana Bathroomware. Wall tiles, Academy Tiles+Surfaces. Smart buy: ‘Calacatta Stat’ marble mosaic floor tiles, $29/300x315mm sheet, Bisanna Tiles. UPSTAIRS LIVING An ideal place to enjoy the water, city and bridge views. Armchair and ottoman in Pierre Frey ‘Leopold’ fabric. Sofa in Camengo ‘Bruges’ fabric. Coffee table, Laura Kincade. Custom rug. Artworks by Melinda Schawel (left) and Rebecca Jones. STUDY The American oak joinery was stained to match the floors. Desk and rug, Natasha Levak Interior Design. ‘Broadway’ armchair, Laura Kincade. Blind in James Malone Fabrics ‘Jimena’ linen blend from The Textile Company. POWDER ROOM Bronze finishes are a signature of all the bathrooms. Basin, stand and taps, The English Tapware Company. Towels, L&M Home. Sandberg ‘Astrid’ wallpaper, Ascraft. For Where to Buy, see page 225.


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Drawn

TO THE LIGHT

After years of neglect, this Melbourne home emerged from the darkness with a bright new wing. STO RY Stephen Crafti | P H OTO G R A P H Y Shannon McGrath

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FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Cercis chinensis ‘Avondale’ Ornamental pear (Pyrus ‘Capital’) Crepe myrtle (Lagerstroemia) Lilly pilly (Waterhousea floribunda) Pigface (Carpobrotus) Renga renga lily (Arthropodium cirratum)

WINDOW SEAT The living room in the new section looks out to the courtyard on one side and back garden on the other (opposite). A deep window seat is part of the custom oak cabinetry and shelving running the length of the room. “I love being surrounded by books,” says owner Michael, whose family once owned a bookstore called Sunflower. Turquoise plate from Greece. Designer buy: For similar sheepskin, try ‘Icelandic Glacier’ sheep rug, $241, Temple & Webster. PATIO One of black labrador Ivy’s favourite spots. Gardens by Kate Patterson of KPLA Landscapes. >


ia Abrahams and her husband Michael Boltman were keen to remain in St Kilda when they were searching for a family home. Both had grown up in the area and have relatives nearby. However, while the position of their new abode, a traditional California bungalow, was perfect, the house was less than desirable. “It hadn’t been lived in for years,” says Michael. “The windows were blacked out and you couldn’t see the back fence for the trees.” Location box ticked, the couple began to focus on the extensive work required. Yes, there were charming 1920s leadlight windows and stucco walls, but the kitchen was a rudimentary addition and the one bathroom was original and basic. “We had to make a number of improvements before the house was liveable, but knew it would be worth it,” says Pia, referring to the potential of the generous 800m2 site, facing north at the back. The couple, who have three children – Freya, 17, Ravi, 15, and Theo, 13 – lived in the house for nine years before they engaged Clare Cousins Architects to rework it. “I loved the home’s bay

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windows and leadlight glass, but there was a lot to do,” says principal architect Clare, who put the entrance’s cracked terrazzo floor and 1950s awning on the to-do list, along with the 1930s lean-to at the rear, which blocked light and access to the garden. In the end, Clare completely removed the lean-to and added a light-filled contemporary wing clad in recycled red bricks. It comprises the open-plan kitchen, dining and living areas, framed by four large sliding glass doors and steel-framed windows, with a slightly raked ceiling over the living room. This room looks to the garden on one side and a courtyard with the old house beyond on the other. “We wanted to strengthen the connection to the original part of the house, but allow for a variety of spaces – indoors and out – that the family could use,” she says. The couple’s brief for the kitchen was unusual in that it left out overhead cupboards. “Not having cupboards above the benches can be quite liberating,” says Clare, who created a neutral backdrop of white-painted bagged brick instead. A large adjacent pantry reduces kitchen clutter even further. Style-wise, Pia and Michael


HOUSES H G wanted a modern look that wasn’t too clinical. While Clare chose concrete for the benches and floors, using blackbutt timber for the ceiling and joinery has balanced any perceived coolness. One of the dilemmas faced by many who renovate and extend period homes is the allocation of bedrooms. Some retain and enhance the original main bedroom and create a new children’s wing, but in this case Clare kept the original three bedrooms for the children and added a first-floor retreat for the parents. From the upper deck, Michael and Pia now have views of Port Phillip Bay and, on occasion, whales. “If we have friends over for dinner, we love coming up here for a drink beforehand,” says Pia. Another strong feature of the home is the void and stairwell between the old and new parts. Pia says the huge, angled-glass panels create a constant play of light. “One thing’s for sure, the quality of light we have in the house now is a far cry from the > blacked-out windows we first saw all those years ago.” Clare Cousins Architects, North Melbourne, Victoria; (03) 9329 2888 or clarecousins.com.au.

LIVING In the centre of the room is a 1950s Schulim Krimper sideboard inherited from Pia’s grandmother, an avid art and furniture collector. ‘Wilfred’ armchair, Jardan. Glass coffee table, Grazia & Co. Beni Ourain rug, Loom. Rosenthal candlesticks, also from Pia’s grandmother. White jug, Market Import. Artwork by Daniel Moynihan. Local hero: ‘Nook’ sofa, from $9645, Jardan.


This is the life

“Our home is at the end of a narrow cul-de-sac and feels like an oasis,” says Pia. “We love our top-deck views of Luna Park, the Palais Theatre and over the bay. And we feel embraced by the house’s warmth and mix of public and private spaces, especially our adults’ retreat. I also really love sitting in the living room’s window seat and gazing out at the gardens on both sides. There is always something new to look at.”

THE PALETTE

Dulux Whisper White (interior walls)

Dulux Bleaches (exterior)

Dulux Briar (powder room)


Artwork by Jon Campbell (pantry wall) and framed handmade tiles (beside extractor fan). Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

HOUSES H G

HALLWAY The off-white concrete floor with snowstone aggregate is by Mentone Premix. STAIRCASE More beautiful blackbutt, framed by a powdercoated steel balustrade. STUDY NOOK There are two home offices, plus this niche in the kitchen. Joinery by T&T Cabinets. FORMAL LIVING Now mostly used for watching TV. ‘Joe’ sofa, MCM House. Rug, Loom. Artwork by Bruno Leti. KITCHEN/DINING Not having overhead cupboards has freed up wall space. Qasair extractor with joinery in Dulux Cub Scout. Minjary honed concrete island bench, Rutso Concreting. Hay ‘About a Stool’ stools, Cult. Table, Arranmore Furniture. Thonet chairs. >

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For Where to Buy, see page 225.

ENTRY Pavers and pebbles lead up to the side entrance of the home. FRONT HALL Glass doors to the luxuriously wide entry hall. Danish sideboard and Eames ‘Hang-It-All’, both Luke Furniture. Rug, Loom Rugs. MAIN BEDROOM From the corner, you can see Melbourne’s Eureka Tower. Designer buy: ‘Eggcup’ stool, from $550, Mark Tuckey. POWDER ROOM Topcer unglazed porcelain tiles from De Fazio embrace the darkness. Duravit ‘Happy D’ basin, Mary Noall. COURTYARD Echoing the front garden’s round pavers is this large exposed-aggregate slab. Recycled bricks, Paddy’s Bricks. Massproductions ‘Tio’ table and chairs, Luke Furniture.

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THE LAYOUT

Living Dining

Courtyard

GROUND FLOOR

Entry Formal living

Pool Kitchen

Pantry/l’dry

Bath Bed Bath

FIRST FLOOR Bath Main bed

Study Study Deck

Bed

Bed

BEFORE

Reno snapshot

Pivotal decision “Meeting Clare, seeing her house and knowing she was The One!” says Pia. Unexpected blowout “The underground bunker in the back garden. We still don’t know why it was there, but it cost a fortune to stabilise, fill and build over.” Where to save “Good design saves money over time – and does wonders for the soul.” Favourite room “The northfacing living area filled with beautiful things and surrounded by an ever-changing garden.” Words of wisdom “Hold onto your dream. You’ll never regret the whale-watching tower!” #


LASSIC C CURVES A redesign of this multilayered Victorian home heralds a new era when it’s hip not to be square. STO RY Stephen Crafti | ST Y L I N G Toni Briggs P H OTO G R A P H Y Martina Gemmola

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DINING this page and opposite Homeowner Elizabeth Wilmott in front of the room’s double-glazed feature window, made from Viridian ‘Thermotech’ low-e glass. ‘Icelandic Pampa Mariposa’ shorn black chair and footstool, Curious Grace. Vintage ‘Saturn’ floor lamp, Grandfather’s Axe. Curtains in Unique Fabrics ‘Dalton’ linen. Blockwork, Austral Masonry. The dining table is a repurposed tailor’s bench. Oak chairs, Mark Tuckey. Terrazzo and marble floor tiles, Signorino. Cladding in silvertop ash. Sliding doors, Saxon Windows & Joinery. Designer buy: ‘Madera’ side table, $745, Curious Grace. >

HOUSES H G

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Pencil pines (Syzygium ‘Pinnacle’) English lavender Euphorbia ‘Silver Swan’ Echium wildpretii Rosmarinus ‘Blue Lagoon’


KITCHEN A wall of Tasmanian oak joinery provides ample storage; the new laundry and downstairs bathroom are tucked in behind. The rangehood is wrapped in a sheet of burnished bronze from Astor Metal Finishes. Concrete benchtop. Terracotta tiles (on island), Artedomus. Gaggenau stove and oven. The paintings are by Elizabeth, a fan of Lucian Freud who studied fine art before pursuing a career in advertising. Designer buy: ‘Yokato’ mixer tap in weathered brass finish, $965, Brodware.

‘ W E WA N T E D A N E X T E N S I O N T H AT RESPECTED AND R E S P O N D E D TO THE HOME’S H I S TO RY, INCLUDING ITS Q U I R K S .’ E L I Z A B E T H W I L M OT T, OWN E R


HOUSES H G his magnificent two-storey home in Melbourne’s north is steeped in history. Built in 1886, the house remained in the same family until its current owner, Elizabeth Wilmott, bought it in 2005. Design-wise, it’s a melting pot of Victorian, Art Deco, Mid-Century and modern elements – something Elizabeth, who lives here with her partner Takis Scordas and 17-year-old son Joey, is passionate about. “It took a while to find the right architect, someone who wouldn’t turn their back on its layered past,” she says. That person was Fiona Dunin of FMD Architects. The front of the house – with separate but connected formal and informal living rooms on the ground floor, and two bedrooms, a study and family bathroom on the first floor – was stylish and jam-packed with character. But an ad-hoc lean-to at the rear, accommodating the kitchen and laundry, completely disconnected the living spaces from the large north-facing backyard. “It also blocked a lot of light from entering the core of the home,” says Fiona. Her solution was to demolish the existing lean-to and replace it with a single-storey timber and glass extension, which contains the kitchen/dining area, a laundry and an additional bathroom, with a private terrace on the roof. “The design was inspired by Victorian women’s fashion,” says Fiona. “Seen from the street – the original structure and extension as a whole – the house evokes a formal dress with a bustle at the back.” A ribbon-like picket fence, winding its way > along the boundary line, adds to the couture effect.

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THE PALETTE

Tasmanian oak (kitchen cabinetry)

Porter’s Paints Sea Lion (balustrade)

Signorino terrazzo and marble tiles (dining)

FORMAL LIVING A smart sofa bed transforms this room from cosy sitting zone to guestroom in a flash. The Baltic pine floorboards are original; the steel-framed windows were added in the 1950s. Coffee table, Gordon Mather Industries. Vintage ‘Falcon’ chair, Grandfather’s Axe. Muuto ‘Tile’ cushion, Luke Furniture. Velvet cushions and ‘Nord’ mini cushion (on sofa), L&M Home. Bench seat, a roadside find. Floor lamp, Ikea. Curtain in Clarke & Clarke ‘Nomad’ fabric. Moooi ‘Non Random’ pendant light and Kasthall ‘Fogg’ rug, both Space. Vintage poster. Smart buy: 6ixty ‘Rio’ sofa bed, $1199, Zanui. STAIRCASE The treads are painted with Viponds Paints paving paint for a non-slip finish, colour-matched to Porter’s Paints Sea Lion, which is used on the balustrade.

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THE LAYOUT Main bed Bath Bed Study Hall

Roof terrace

FIRST FLOOR

Living Dining Entry GROUND FLOOR

Kitchen

Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

L’dry Bath

The materials are considerably more robust than the satin and lace used in Victorian dressmaking, however. The kitchen’s island bench, for instance, is made from concrete and faced with terracotta tiles. There’s also a built-in timber shelf for cookbooks, artwork and pottery. Equally sturdy is the dining table, a late 19th-century piece that – coincidentally – was once a dressmaker’s, used for cutting fabric and laying out patterns. The garden, designed by Jo Ferguson, features curvaceous, ruffle-inspired walls by Elizabeth’s brother, stonemason Andrew Wilmott. It is lushly planted with a thoughtful mixture of waterwise plants, plus pencil pines and Syzygium ‘Pinnacle’ along the boundary, which will eventually screen out the neighbouring property. The centrepiece is a lovely old apricot tree, which is heavy with fruit from November. In the 1930s, the then-owners modernised the house by installing a bathroom on the first floor – with an on-trend all-green colour scheme, right down to the pedestal basin and embossed mirror with whimsical sailboat motif. “You can just imagine how excited the family would have been when their new bathroom was finished,” says Elizabeth. Today, it’s Fiona’s renovation that evokes that feeling of excitement in its owners. “The house always had great bones,” says Elizabeth. “And now it’s also beautifully dressed.” > FMD Architects, Melbourne, Victoria; (03) 9670 9671 or fmdarchitects.com.au.


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FORMAL LIVING An old ladder found in the garage is the perfect pairing for the ‘library’ by Michael Smith of CabinetSmith. The artwork is a Le Corbusier print. Wood heater, Ultimate. DINING Australian terrier Bobby makes himself at home. Artek ‘H55’ cushion, Luke Furniture. DOWNSTAIRS BATHROOM Reflected in the mirror, the mosaic tiles have a terrazzo-like effect. Concrete benchtop. ‘Yokato’ tapware, Brodware. Designer buy: ‘Adeona’ mosaic tiles in #79364, $173/m², Academy Tiles+Surfaces. MAIN BEDROOM The wroughtiron balcony railing is a 1950s addition. ‘Mondo’ bed linen and ‘Soho’ quilt, L&M Home. Marimekko cushions. GARDEN The ruffle-esque railing on the roof terrace, by metal fabricator Wade Fab, ties in with the ‘bustle’ theme. External cladding in silvertop ash. Landscaping by Jo Ferguson Landscape Garden Design. For Where to Buy, see page 225.


BEFORE

Reno snapshot

Pivotal decision Opening the kitchen/dining area to the garden. Unexpected blowout “The curves definitely added to the cost!” says Elizabeth. “They were a bit of a luxury, but I just had to have them.” Where to save “I bought the terrazzo tiles on sale a year before we needed them. They informed the colour scheme.” Favourite room “The dining room. The table is at the centre of everything in our house.” Words of wisdom “Be brave, be true to the house, follow your instincts and think of what you are leaving behind.” #

This is the life

Elizabeth and her family lived in the house for 12 years before undertaking this renovation, enjoying the quirks and charms of their 130-yearold surroundings. To their surprise and joy, more layers of history revealed themselves during the renovation. One such treasure is a 1903 electoral map of Melbourne showing its growing suburbs, found under layers of lino when refinishing the floors and now framed and hanging on a wall.


BETTER HALF

A smart conservatory-style extension brought this Sydney semi into its own. STO RY Tamarah Pienaar | P H OTO G R A P H Y Tom Ferguson


REAR EXTENSION The new owners fell in love with the Federation home’s high ceilings and replicated that openness at the back with soaring ceilings and full-height glazing. HardieGroove fibre-cement cladding from James Hardie delivers the look of traditional weatherboards, without the maintenance. The deck is made from blackbutt that’s been left to weather naturally. Artwork (in kitchen) by David Band. FACADE A hedge of Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis ‘Oriental Pearl’), a plant that thrives in coastal locations, adds to the home’s kerb appeal. Landscaping by Adam Robinson Design. >

HOUSES H G

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Dragon tree (Dracaena marginata) Slender weavers bamboo (Bambusa textilis ‘Gracilis’) Giant bird of paradise (Strelizia nicolai) Jade plant (Crassula ovata)

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fter four years in an east London apartment, including “a couple of miserable British summers”, Sydneysiders Anna Saunders and her husband Tim were pining for Australia. They yearned to live by the beach, in a home with a garden where they could have friends over for barbecues. Perhaps with a dog to complete the picture. Come August 2013, they were back in Sydney and seriouslyhousehunting.Annaspottedthis three-bedroom Federation semi in the city’s east one morning on her way to work and popped in to check it out. “The house was a deceased estate – dated, a little makeshift and not in great condition, but Tim and I knew instantly that it was exactly what we were looking for,” she says. “It had a great feeling, very relaxed, a bit like living in your grandad’s beach house.” The home had been added to over the years by its late owners, who had lived there for 55 years. The floor plan was rather awkward: bedrooms at the front, separate living and kitchen/dining rooms in the middle, and bathroom and laundry bringing up the rear. The couple settled into the house as it was – dark, draughtyandahavenforhuntsmanspiders – for 18 months while they planned their dream home with the help of architect Eva-Marie Prineas. “We wanted an open-plan kitchen/living room that opened onto the garden and lots of light,” says Anna. “It was also important for the extension to be contemporaryyet complement the design of the original house,” adds Eva-Marie. Reworking the floor plan was the first goal. The second bedroom was converted to a bathroom and a walk-in wardrobe for the main bedroom, while the living room became a third bedroom/study. The existing kitchen/ dining room, bathroom and laundry were demolished to make way for a fabulous open-plan kitchen/dining/living room that flows out to the garden and its new deck. Opting to glaze the north wall of the extension was a turning point. “We were a little nervous about having such huge windows, but they work beautifully,” says Anna. Landscaper Adam Robinson planted a screen of slender weavers bamboo down this side of the house, which filters the light into the living zone and provides >

A

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LIVING Anna spent a lot of time deciding on the finish of the full-wall shelves, eventually choosing the warmth of timber over cooler white. ‘Nook’ sofa and ‘Jarvis’ upholstered chair, Jardan. Custom ottoman in Febrik ‘Triangle’ fabric. Heat&Glo fireplace from Jetmaster with bespoke surround. Tasmanian-oak veneer joinery and American oak flooring. Custom rug, Armadillo & Co. Wall below window clad in HardieGroove lining boards. Glazing by Airlite. Market umbrella (on deck), Cosh Living. Designer buy: ‘Spanish’ leather chair, from $8650, Great Dane.


screening from the neighbours. “The bamboo acts like a green curtain – it’s transformed the room,” says Anna. Crisp white and warm timber are used throughout, unifying the heritage and modern elements. “We didn’t have much furniture since we’d been living overseas,” says Anna. “Shopping was a bit of a challenge as we had to buy a lot of the pieces before the spaces were even finished.” Anna’s friend, interior stylist Bianca Martin of Editor Interiors, offered invaluable advice and helped the couple to source key items, such as the bespoke rug in the living area and the custom-upholstered bedhead in the main bedroom. By the time the project was completed in October 2015, Anna and Tim had welcomed their first child, a daughter named Isobel, now three. The family has since expanded to include son Harvey, one, and that longed-for puppy, a lively black labrador named Betsy. “Our home is everything we dreamt of,” says Anna. “I love being able to move freely between indoors and out. Lying on the sofa reading a book while the kids play > in the garden is my idea of heaven.” Studio Prineas, Rushcutters Bay, NSW; (02) 9332 2006 or studioprineas.com.au.

Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

H G HOUSES


THE PALETTE

Dulux Vivid White (throughout)

KITCHEN/DINING this page and opposite top Built-in storage keeps all the kitchen equipment under wraps. Cabinetry, Blum. Marble benchtops. Mirrored splashback. Smeg undermount sinks, Winning Appliances. Mixer tap, Rogerseller. Fisher & Paykel oven and stove. Dining table, Chris Colwell Design. Chairs, Urban Couture Design+Homewares. Artwork by David Band. Local heroes: ‘HS750’ Tasmanian oak and powdercoated steel stools, $349 each, Hunt Furniture. LIVING “I’m a journalist, and Tim and I are avid readers, so we wanted shelves to accommodate all our books,” says Anna.

Popham ‘Plain Hexagon’ tiles (bathroom)

American oak flooring (living)

This is the life

The lovely light-filled living area is the centre of this family’s universe, says Anna. “The built-in bookshelves are here – one of my absolute favourite features in the house – as are the children’s toys, so we all spend a lot of time here. Added to that, there are heaps of trees along the rear boundary fence, so there’s always the sound of birds or swishing leaves in the background. It’s just a very relaxing space for everyone to be in.”

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H G HOUSES

THE LAYOUT Deck & barbecue

Living

Kitchen/ dining

Study/ guest bed GROUND FLOOR Bed Bath WIR Main bed En ry


DECK “Although the landscaping was a small piece of the overall renovation, it made a big difference to the feel of the house,” says Anna. ‘Jil’ coffee table, Tait. Designer buy: ‘Nomah’ outdoor sofa, $4699, and ‘Heaven’ lounge chair, $999, both Eco Outdoor. MAIN BEDROOM A walk-through wardrobe is located behind the wall containing the original fireplace. Drawers and door fronts, Blum. ‘Flynn’ (round) mirror, Middle of Nowhere. Full-length mirror, Ikea. Porcelight lamp, Cult. BATHROOM Opting for a walk-in shower saved precious floor space in this compact family bathroom. Bath and tapware, Rogerseller. Wall tiles, Classic Ceramics. Wall shelf and towel rail, Madinoz. Popham ‘Plain Hexagon’ floor tiles, Onsite Supply+Design. For Where to Buy, see page 225. BEFORE

Reno snapshot

Pivotal decision “Opting for a galley-style kitchen, which influenced the layout of the rest of the extension,” says Anna. Unexpected blowout “Some extra plumbing work was needed, but that didn’t really affect the budget.” Where to save “We concreted down the side of the house, rather than spend money landscaping a space we wouldn’t use. We also staggered the costs, completing the deck about six months after the rest of the house.” Favourite room “The living area.” Words of wisdom “Take the time to get it right.” #

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Time traveller Beginning life in another part of the state, this relocated Queenslander has been stylishly updated to make the latest owners feel at home. STO RY Deborah Grant | ST Y L I N G Sarah Ellison | P H OTO G R A P H Y Mindi Cooke

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ENTRY Opposite the front door on the first floor is a nook for coat, bag and shoe storage. The cabinetry is Polytec Ultra White. Stippled fabric (on built-in seat) from These Walls. Smart buy: ‘Geo’ multi hook with antiqued brass finish, $89, West Elm. VERANDAH After years in a country town, the house now sits contentedly in a green pocket of the Gold Coast. >

FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Bangalow palm Bird of paradise Murraya Frangipani Agave attenuata


THE PALETTE

Dulux Vivid White (throughout)

Quantum Quartz Calacatta (benchtop)

Paint colours are reproduced as accurately as printing processes allow.

Dulux Tranquil Retreat (kitchen cabinetry)


HOUSES H G

KITCHEN Classic features and colours make for an elegant, ageless look. Quantum Quartz Calacatta benchtops, Southport Stone. Subway tiles, Burleigh Tiles. Smeg ‘Victoria’ cooker. ‘Bailey’ stools, The Block Shop. Wedgwood ‘Blue Bird’ crockery, Myer. Grey cups, Coffee Parts. Designer buy: ‘Southampton’ pendant light in Antique Black, $795, Beacon Lighting. DINING ROOM Carlene under one of the home’s darkness-busting skylights. ‘Parquetry’ elm dining table and ‘Provincial’ chairs, Village Stores. Rug, DecoRug. Antique pendant light. Artwork by Kimmy Hogan.

rom a pristine part of the Gold Coast, husband and wife ‘team’ Carlene and Michael Duffy run a home renovation, design and styling service called Cedar + Suede. They also have a thriving media career as TV presenters and brand ambassadors, launched after their 2014 stint as contestants on The Block Glasshouse. It was that first foray into TV that led to their latest gig: the full renovation of a 1927 Queenslander owned by local businessman Matt and his wife Vali. “We met Matt at the airport while grabbing a pre-flight coffee,” says Carlene. “He struck up a conversation with us as an employee of his had been one of the electricians on The Block in Melbourne. A few months later he engaged us to design their home renovation.” The beauty of the job was its proximity to their own home, in a semi-rural pocket near Currumbin. The area is mostly comprised of acreage properties, with mature trees and grassy paddocks populated by cows and horses, all under 15 minutes to the beach. There are a number of health retreats nearby. Matt and Vali had purchased the 1.4-acre (0.56ha) property in 2015, after years of living in a very modern home. It was love at first sight for them and their two young children, mainly because the two-storey Queenslander had the family feel they’d yearned for. They were surprised to learn that the house was originally built in the heritage area of Ipswich and relocated by the previous owners. Two >

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years later, Matt hired the Duffys with the following brief: to renovate the interior in an architecturally sympathetic way. “Often the integrity of these old buildings is lost during the update, so we were excited to show how this house could be transformed while celebrating its history,” says Carlene. Michael, a carpenter and builder, took the lead on the small layout changes and Carlene chose the materials, palette and furniture. Their plan was to retain as many original details as possible, so they began by restoring decorative elements such as the archways and fretwork, as well as the windows and doors. Upstairs, the 90-year-old hoop-pine flooring was sanded back and restained; downstairs, they used new hoop-pine boards. Easycraft VJ panelling was affixed to the walls throughout, and light was maximised wherever possible. “Natural light wasn’t in abundance in this house,” says Carlene. “We added skylights to the kitchen and dining area, and worked with the moodiness by opting for a rich, saturated wall colour.” Matt and Vali adore the results of the sixmonth renovation. “The brief was nailed and the house feels very homely and warm,” says Matt. “We love that the floor plan of the upstairs living room was retained, and that the kids now have their own domain downstairs in the media/rumpus room.” Proud renovator Carlene has a number of soft spots for this house. “The living room has my heart,” she says. “The wall colour feels like a warm hug and allows the art to pop off the walls. I also love the floor-to-ceiling bookcase. My favourite aspect, though, is one I’m not responsible for – the beautiful stained> glass windows at the entry.” Cedar + Suede, Tallebudgera, Queensland; cedarandsuede.com.au.


HOUSES H G

This is the life

Tasked with fixing up previous attempts to restore the place, interior expert Carlene loved this renovation because the owners weren’t tempted to go up or out as many people do with old Queenslanders. The slightly tweaked layout now works for every member of the family. Having a pool, a large outdoor entertaining area and pizza oven has topped things off, bringing the space and lifestyle they’ve always wanted.

LIVING ROOM This is where the family love to gather in the evening. Sofa upholstered in Warwick Fabrics ‘Husk’ fabric in Steel and armchair in ‘Axella’ Denim, both from Molmic. ‘Ink Round’ side table, Early Settler. ‘Calais’ floor lamp, Emac & Lawton. Artworks by Kara Rosenlund (pandanus and kangaroos), Kimmy Hogan (foliage) and Elizabeth Barnett (jar with nasturtium and jug). Smart buy: ‘Hypnose’ vintage wash rug in Grey-Blue, from $359, DecoRug. DINING ROOM (As before).

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For Where to Buy, see page 225.

BATHROOM A ground-floor space where Murphy the mini labradoodle is welcome. Bath and basin, Abey. Floor tiles, Burleigh Tiles. Towel, Nikau Store. POWDER ROOM Each of the bathrooms has a soft monochrome palette. ‘Manhattan’ pedestal basin, Early Settler. Local hero: ‘Grasstree’ wallpaper in Charcoal, $72/m, These Walls. ENSUITE Dado rails feature in all the wet areas. Basins, Abey. BEDROOM A drawing by the eight-year-old occupant works perfectly in this cool green space. ‘Willow’ bed, Fantastic Furniture. ‘Creature Features’ quilt cover, Target. ‘Elise’ bedside table, Provincial Home Living. BACK DECK Lush tropical surroundings are the drawcard here. ‘Sonoma’ sofas, coffee table and dining chairs, GlobeWest. Cushion fabrics, 3Beaches.

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THE LAYOUT FIRST FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR Verandah Storage

Entry

Main bed

Bed

Bath WIR

Bed

Living Dining

Rumpus

Bath

Bath

BEFORE

Patio Bed Laundry Kitchen

Deck

Carport

Reno snapshot

Pivotal decision “Knocking out the wall between the kitchen and dining room,” says Carlene. Unexpected blowout “Nothing major… good skylights are an investment but always worth it.” Where to save “Cabinetry. Advancements in MDF products and a bigger range of colours (in Laminex and Polytec) make them a good alternative to two-pack.” Favourite room The living room. Words of wisdom “Work with what you have. The living room was a low-light area so white paint would have felt cold and insipid. Saturated colours work better in low-light spaces.” #


In partnership with Australian House & Garden

Romance is born Look beyond white to bring comfort and charm to bedrooms for young and old.

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hen Vali and Matt were refreshing their Queensland home, they were keen on bringing in colour, and could see no reason why it should stop at the bedroom door. Interior decorator Carlene worked with the couple on a palette of bold block colours, which appear in various parts of the house, as well as in the master bedroom shown below, and in the children’s rooms, one of which is shown opposite. Applied to character-filled wall panelling, the deep blue in Vali and Matt’s room creates a feeling of luxury and romance, but in a very affordable way. A fresh green was used in their son’s room, while the daughter’s bedroom, opposite, was treated to a pretty pink. This shade was chosen from a selection by the youngster

HELP AT YOUR FINGERTIPS

You’ll find painting tips, techniques and advice, and a live chat service at the Dulux website. Plus, the Dulux Colour Design Service connects you with qualified interior designers to help you choose colour palettes and make carrying out your projects plain sailing.

and everyone is delighted with the result. “We are really thrilled with what could be achieved with budget-friendly panelling and well-chosen paint,” says Vali. “At all times of year, our home is a beautiful place to be.” What you’ll need Tape measure; pencil; long ruler; mouth, eye and ear protection; two trestles; circular saw; Easycraft Easy VJ MDF panels in 2400mm and 900mm (pink wall) – these are available at hardware stores, including Bunnings; stud finder; acrylic stud adhesive; putty scraper; builder’s wedges; hammer and 40mm anti-rust nails; dado rail – this one is Easycraft primed pine; skirting board; dropsheet, paintbrush and roller.


‘The rich colours make it feel like home – our home. They set our place apart from other Queenslanders and we really love that.’ VA L I, H OMEOWN E R

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ere are three projects you can conquer in a weekend. Panel cladding is an easy way to add character to your home and it’s also a great quick-fix solution for walls that have seen better days. The panels can be attached to any type of wall, including brick and concrete; here, they’ve been put up over existing Gyprock stud walls. They are also a snap to paint. Need to know The panelling may have to be pre-ordered, so call your supplier before locking in a project date.

WONDER WALLS Project 1: Install full-wall panels

The panels are 1200mm wide and come in various lengths. The legal minimum ceiling height in Queensland is 2400mm, so the room opposite has been fitted with 2400mm Easycraft panels. Installing the panels is not difficult, but you will need to refer to the full manufacturer’s instructions and call in a friend to help. A how-to video can be found at easycraft.com.au. In a nutshell, you measure from the floor to the cornice, subtract 10mm (to allow for expansion) and trim the panel by 10mm. Next, locate the wall studs – this will be where you nail the panels to the wall, after applying stud adhesive all over the first 1200mm-wide section of wall. With a friend, lift the panel and place against the wall (the edge you have cut needs to be at the floor end). Align top of panel with cornice edge. Hammer

nails at top, middle and bottom of panel where the studs are. Repeat with the next section – the V-groove panels will click together for a seamless finish. Attach skirting boards to the base of the panel to hide the 10mm gap at floor level. Project 2: Dado-rail wall The pink wall

at right uses 900mm panels, which are attached as before. Paint the panels and the dado rail before affixing to the wall. Project 3: Paint the panels The panels

come pre-primed. Make sure they are clean. Lay down a dropsheet. Fill any nail noles with putty, let dry, then sand putty for a smooth surface. Paint along the grooves using a paintbrush. Then paint the flat panels using a roller. If paint gets into the grooves, tidy with brush as you go. Allow to dry. Repeat the painting process.

Moody blue (left) Contrary to popular belief, darker colours can open up a room. Small rooms, or rooms with limited light sources, like this beautiful main bedroom, really come alive when painted a dark, saturated colour.

Project palette

Dulux Wash&Wear Low Sheen in White Mystery

BEFORE YOU START Dulux Wash&Wear Low Sheen in Light Lily

Dulux Wash&Wear Low Sheen in Tidal Wave

It pays to check how a colour looks at different times of the day. Sample pots can be ordered on the Dulux website to help you to trial the paint colour before buying in bulk. You can also order A4 colour swatches to see how they look in situ throughout the day and into the evening. Matt paint is great for bedrooms and out-of-the-way zones. Low-sheen paint is ideal for living areas and hallways.

F O R I N S P I R AT I O N A N D A DV I C E , V I S I T D U LU X .C O M . AU F O R L I V E C H AT O R C A L L 1 3 2 5 2 5


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Imagine creating your own park-like garden. That’s what the Hawkins family did at their intriguing property in NSW, west of the Blue Mountains. The red Chinese pagoda and bridge are just two of the follies to be found here. Turn the page for more on this special garden. >


H G GARDENS

Sweeping

STATEMENT

From its unlikely location in prime grazing land to its immense and immersive proportions, everything about MayďŹ eld Garden is truly out of the ordinary. STO RY Elizabeth Wilson | P H OTO G R A P H Y Claire Takacs


With its hipped roof and wide verandah, the Hawkins’ six-bedroom home was inspired by Australian colonial-style Georgian architecture. In one direction it looks out to an ornamental pond, an 80m cascading waterfall and carpet-like lawns dotted with pencil pines. In the other direction is a mature Chinese elm (Ulmus parvifolia) and a woodland planting of golden and English elms. Beyond the woodland are paddocks bordered by windbreaks of radiata pine. >

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othing can prepare the first-time visitor for the scale and spectacle of Mayfield Garden. “You need to set aside most of the day,” says its CEO, Hamish Keith. “This is not a garden you can rush.” It certainly isn’t. Spread over a site of 65ha, this is the largest privately owned garden in the Southern Hemisphere, so it takes time to traverse its grounds and digest the property’s story. Located near the small town of Oberon, in the cool-climate Central Tablelands region of NSW (140km from Sydney), this is a garden of delights and surprises. There are arena-sized lawns bordered by pencil pines, intricate woodlands, a series of lakes and ponds, cascading waterfalls, a 600-seat terraced-lawn amphitheatre, a hedge maze, filigree-style topiary and networks of curvilinear granite-gravel pathways. It’s a project of such boldness and manicured perfection that it appears almost like a mirage amid the undulating grazing land around it. Mayfield is the grand vision of Sydney-based businessman Garrick Hawkins, who bought the property in 1984, attracted to the pretty rolling countryside. He originally purchased 800ha but, as more surrounding land became available, he increased

his investment in the area. The holding now covers more than 2000ha, on which he runs premium beef cattle and sheep. In 1985, Garrick and his wife Evelyn, an artist and art historian, began building a residence on the property: an elegant, Georgianstyle home on a hill with 360-degree views of the landscape and a deep wraparound verandah. Initially, they’d planned for a 2ha garden around the home, but as the property grew, so too did their plans for the landscaping. Inspired by their overseas travels, Garrick and Evelyn designed the garden along the lines of a European country estate. Starting with their own sketches, they turned to teams of local tradespeople and landscapers to carry out the earthworks and construction. The garden now spreads out in all directions from the home, following the rise and fall of the land. There are terraced lawns, kilometres of clipped hedges, tree-lined avenues and thick copses of beech and maple. Added to this splendour is a charming array of follies, most notably the Chinese-style pagoda and redpainted bridge, built over a lake occupying the site of an existing dam. Garrick and Evelyn also designed a hedge maze – Australia’s second-largest – as well as a parterre garden, fruit orchard >

Located in the Hawkins Family Garden, this park-like vista is referred to by senior garden supervisor Leon Howarth as the ‘heath and heather’ garden. It features varieties of Calluna (heather) and Erica (heath) as well as dwarf conifers. The lawn is dotted with Tilia cordata (linden) trees and bordered by a wall of Thuja conifers. In the distance, a row of poplars punctuates the landscape. OPPOSITE clockwise from top left Espaliered ‘Gravenstein’ apple trees form a tunnel-shaped orchard. The lawn amphitheatre can seat 600 for charity events. Dahlia and salvia plantings. Water lilies floating in the Water Garden. Hydrangea flowerhead. A pied cormorant pays a visit to the Water Garden, where the 20m-high waterfall with stone wall is a focal point.

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FEATURE TREES & PLANTS Pencil pine (Cupressus sempervirens ‘Glauca’) Silver birch (Betula pendula) Golden elm (Ulmus glabra ‘Lutescens’) Copper beech (Fagus sylvatica ‘Atropurpurea’) Maple (Acer) English box (Buxus sempervirens) Rhododendron sp Hydrangea sp


H G GARDENS

WAT E R I S A R E C U R R I N G F E AT U R E : 2 . 5 H A A R E D E D I C AT E D TO T H E WAT E R G A R D E N , A S E R I E S O F P O N D S F E D BY B O R E WAT E R .


and cut-flower garden of dahlias, zinnias, poppies and delphiniums. All these elements – referred to collectively as the Hawkins Family Garden – stretch over a staggering 50ha. In 2008, the local Red Cross branch asked the family to open their garden for a fundraiser, with aims of raising $2000. People from all over the region flocked to view the much talked-about property: 10,000 filed through the gates, raising tens of thousands for the charity. Garrick and Evelyn were inundated with letters urging them to open the garden on a regular basis. “The idea to create a public garden grew from there,” says Hamish. In 2009, the couple started developing an additional 15ha dedicated to a public garden. Almost a decade on, Mayfield Garden has matured beautifully, offering year-round colour and many horticultural wonders. Water is a recurring feature: 2.5ha are dedicated to the Water Garden, a series of ponds fed by bore water, encompassed by groves of oak, copper beech and maple. A mid-storey of rhododendrons (40 different varieties ) explodes into flower in spring, along with thousands of flowering bulbs, peonies, hostas, lilacs and irises. Another showpiece is a waterfall that tumbles down a stone wall, modelled on the sandstone cliffs of local landmark Kanangra Walls. Nearby is a 160m-long Hydrangea Walk, where raised garden beds formed from basalt rock are filled with thousands of plants showcasing 100 different cultivars. It’s a short stroll from here to the Valley of the Five Ponds, a woodland scheme of deciduous oaks, maples, birch and beech, with an understorey of shrubs including viburnum, Mollis azaleas and dogwoods.

Most recently opened is the Camellia Walk, a winter-flowering path weaving around more than 2ha of land. “Garrick and Evelyn want it to be one of the best seasonal gardens in the world,” says Hamish. “It changes throughout the year, and looks so different from season to season.” At 1080m above sea level, Mayfield receives frosts and occasional snowfall in winter, with temperatures rising to the high 30s in summer. “Most of the trees and plants are European, so they’re suited to the climate,” says Hamish. “However, we are in Australia, experiencing the worst drought in 14 years, so the plants also have to be hardy survivors.” Senior garden supervisor Leon Howarth, who oversees a team of 24, says the garden has survived the extended dry with extensive mulching and efficient use of water. Mayfield Garden opened to the public full-time in 2014 and now employs 60 people working across the garden and plant nursery as well as the produce-stocked cafe and shop. The Hawkins family has spent tens of millions building this dream and legacy. It’s impossible to talk about Mayfield without listing numbers and statistics, and Leon has an impressive figure of his own to add. “One of the guys on my team recently wore a pedometer and clocked up 20km in just one day,” he says. “You won’t find # any overweight gardeners out here.” Mayfield Garden is open 363 days a year. The Hawkins Family Garden is open 16 days each season, including this year’s Spring Festival, October 13-28. Entry charges apply. For more information, go to mayfieldgarden.com.au.

Hedges of English box (Buxus sempervirens) and English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) snake all around the property. Beyond them, Leon has planted an avenue of hornbeam trees, which will eventually become a stilted hedge. He estimates the project will take 10 years. OPPOSITE A boardwalk winds through the Water Garden, an aquatic wonderland of water lilies, water irises, canna lilies, Moss White birch trees and weeping willows.

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Corner spot Resplendent in the corner is purple-blooming mist flower (Eupatorium megalophyllum). “It’s a shade-tolerant, medium-sized shrub that’s really adaptable and grows quickly,” says Matt. “People often forget to plant shadetolerant perennials. This one’s a beauty – pretty whether it’s in flower or not.”

How to achieve

BALANCE & EASE

Once its pebblecrete stepping stones were removed, this Sydney garden could be rezoned into equal parts lawn and outdoor living. STO RY Elizabeth Wilson | PH OTOGR A PH Y Nicholas Watt


GARDENING H G

Fresh foliage “I love lots of green foliage in a garden,” says Matt. “I aim for subtle colour variations between foliage types.” A boundary hedge of lilly pilly (Syzygium australe ‘Resilience’) offsets the glossy leaves of an evergreen magnolia, which itself contrasts with the standard weeping maple (Acer palmatum), underplanted with strappyleafed clivias.

Points of interest Sitting on one side is an angel’s trumpet tree (Brugmansia) underplanted with star jasmine (Trachelospermum ‘Tricolor’) and Japanese aralia (Fatsia japonica). “Brugmansia can be scrappy, but once it comes into flower, all is forgiven,” says Matt, referring to the sumptuous, trumpet-like blooms that appear from early summer to autumn.

Forever flowers Clivias may be a bit old-fashioned but they’re very reliable, says Matt. “They thrive in areas that are dry and shady, and provide dense greenery.” The lawn is Sir Walter buffalo turf, chosen for its tolerance to shade and rich green colour all year round.

Surface matters These steps leading to the main bedroom are paved in travertine. The stepping stones (above) are in Sydney sandstone, while the crushed gravel section is a mix of white, grey and pink stones.

MATT CANTWELL Director Secret Gardens

The project When Matt Cantwell first saw this rear garden in Sydney’s north, it was overgrown and dated. Pebblecrete stepping stones led through a “1970s-era native rainforest” and there was little connection to the house. By contrast, the front garden was formal. The homeowners’ brief was for a back garden that would be easy to enjoy and maintain. Priorities were to declutter, bring in sunlight and allocate space for outdoor dining and lounging. They wanted a balance of lawn, plantings and tiled surfaces, in a design that respected the architecture of their heritage-listed harbourside home. The solution Matt divided the L-shaped space into two zones: a 16x7m lawn fringed by planting and a 10x10m return with two paved terraces. Plant-wise, he didn’t stray far from the formality of the front garden, using classics such as Buxus, agapanthus, clivias and lilly pilly trees to provide structure and softness. An existing hedge of slender lady palms allowed him to introduce bolder, more tropical plants such as blue ginger, elephant’s ears and ginger (Alpinia). Designer statement “The garden is a blend of classic and modern, with a wonderful balance of hard and soft surfaces, structure and softness, foliage and flowers.” > AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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H G GARDENING JOURNEY THROUGH THE GARDEN

Matt used 1000x400mm pavers in Sydney sandstone to connect the lawn to two travertine-paved terraces. The first leads to the main bedroom; a few steps further on, the second is an outdoor dining space. “Using stepping stones rather than a solid path alleviates the impact of the hard surfaces,” says Matt. He also made a feature of an existing paperbark tree (left) by planting a low hedge of Korean box around its base and filling it in with salvia.

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Harmonious mix

Lovely layers

“I call this a semi-formal Sydney garden,” says Matt. “We have the climate to mix tropical plants with more classic, structured plants, to create lovely harmonies of complementary foliages.”

A hedge of slender weavers bamboo (Bambusa textilis var. Gracilis) blurs the boundary edge. Next to it is a clump of shell ginger (Alpinia zerumbet ‘Variegata’) with striking leaves streaked in yellow and lime.

Bold choices

Old favourite

Soothing sight

An existing clump of slender lady palm (Rhapis humilis) was Matt’s cue to add similarly bold foliage, including elephant’s ears (Colocasia), large peace lilies (Spathiphyllum ‘Sensation’) and striking Calathea plants.

The species in front of the giant pot is aspidistra, a “classic plant”, according to Matt. It’s known as the cast-iron plant for its easy-care, hardy nature, but also has lush and opulent foliage, he says.

Matt’s overarching mission was to create a green and serene space. “When you walk in here, it’s soft and easy on the eye. There’s enough visual interest to make it engaging, but it’s still very calming and soothing.”

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


“ This garden is all about balance, in both its proportions and plant combinations,” says Matt. Here are his tips for creating balance in your own precious plot:

✚ The most common mistake is to use more hard surface than needed. Think about the number of people you want to fit at your outdoor dining table, carefully assess the hard surface required to accommodate that, and avoid expanding it any more than you need to. ✚ Whatever space you don’t need for hard surfaces or lawn should go to plants. ✚ Divide your space into subtly demarcated zones. Use stepping stones to mark transitions between spaces and soften the impact of hard surfaces. ✚ Mix structural plants with strappier forms in a blend of ordered and free-form elements. ✚ Combine foliage and flowers. “I love subtle foliage contrasts sprinkled with a little colour.” 2 4

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Paved sitting area Hedge of slender lady palm (Rhapis humilis) Travertine steps leading to master bedroom Sir Walter buffalo lawn Purple-flowering Eupatorium megalophyllum Stepping stones of Sydney sandstone Travertine-paved terrace leading to bedroom White-flowering angel’s trumpet tree (Brugmansia) 9 Paperbark tree 10 Travertine-paved outdoor dining and lounging spaces 11 House 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

A Sandstone stepping stones mark the transition from lawn to paved terrace. B A tall-stemmed cluster of blue ginger (Dichorisandra thyrsiflora) planted in the outdoor dining area. The adjacent bed contains Agapanthus ‘Ice Blue’ and Cordyline glauca, edged with Buxus. C Matt made a feature of this evergreen magnolia by surrounding it with crushed gravel in tones of white, grey and pink, to echo the colours of the nearby paperbark tree trunk. D The paved dining zone is surrounded by soothing layers of green. #

Secret Gardens, Botany, NSW; (02) 9314 5333 or secretgardens.com.au.


H G GARDENING

SWAY TO GO

Garden designers love using ornamental grasses, and you will too when you see how easy it is to create a beautiful show, writes Helen Young.

Leading the way Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf is credited with popularising the ‘new wave’ style of perennial planting, which mixes drifts of flowering perennials with ornamental grasses in a natural style. It’s all about texture rather than colour. Oudolf’s landscaping of New York’s High Line, a disused freight railway line-turned-public space, is one of the most famous examples. Here in Australia, designers such as Ian Barker, Michael Cooke, Michael McCoy, Fiona Brockhoff and Myles Baldwin also use ornamental grasses of various sizes as key elements in their designs. Splendour in the grass Small Blue fescue grass (Festuca glauca) has blue-silver foliage in a neat tuft up to 20cm tall, while Lomandra ‘Little Con’ has a ball of lime-green foliage to 40cm. Japanese sedge (Carex oshimensis) is especially decorative, with glossy, arching leaves; the cultivar ‘Everest’ has handsome white and green stripes to 40cm, and ‘Evergold’, reaching 30cm, features yellow and green stripes. 142 |

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Medium In the 50-100cm range, there are several native lomandras to choose from. ‘Tanika’ is a proven performer, with fine, bright green leaves to 50cm. ‘Nyalla’ is bluer and a little taller, while ‘Lime Tuff’ is perkier and forms a neat lime-green mound to 50cm. Also native are Poa labillardieri ‘Eskdale’, with fine blue-green, upright foliage to 80cm, and Poa poiformis ‘Kingsdale’, whose bluish, arching foliage reaches 50-60cm. Miscanthus ‘Adagio’ (70cm) features silvery, feathery seed heads. For fat, furry plumes, choose Pennisetum ‘Nafray’, a foxtail grass with fine, green foliage to 80cm and creamy plumes. Tall Stately grasses over 1m really command attention. Purple foxtail grass (Pennisetum advena ‘Rubrum’) has dark burgundy leaves stretching to 1.5m and prolific plumes. There are many tall varieties of silvergrass (Miscanthus sinensis), most of which offer an autumn show of foliage colour. The ‘Gracillimus’ cultivar has narrow, striped blades in green and white to about 1m; ‘Zebrinus’ features bold gold bands on the leaves and can top 2m; ‘Flamingo’ (1.8m) has prominent, purplish seed heads and is particularly lovely in autumn; and ‘Sarabande’ displays fine, silvery foliage to 1.2m that turns tawny bronze in autumn, topped with fan-shaped seed heads. Switch grass (Panicum virgatum) varieties are stiffer and more upright but produce a froth of seed heads; ‘Heavy Metal’ is a favourite cultivar for its steel-blue leaves to 1m and pinkish flower spikes. Reed grasses (Calamagrostis) are similarly stiff and upright; ‘Karl Foerster’ is a standout for its dark green foliage to 1m and elongated, feathery seed heads that are nearly as tall again. It has strong vertical lines and is long flowering. ‘Overdam’ is similar but has variegated leaves. #

GRASS-ROOTS SUPPORT Spring Fresh growth surges as the weather warms up. Fertilise grasses now. Summer The vibrant foliage reaches full height and flowering starts. Keep up the water in dry spells. Autumn The tall flower spikes mature to seed heads, commanding attention. In some varieties, the foliage changes colour. Winter The foliage slowly dries and browns, but still looks beautiful glinting with frost. In late winter or early spring, cut clumps close to the ground to remove congested foliage and make way for renewal. Use the prunings as mulch or chook litter, or add them to compost.

Best in show: Sun-loving Miscanthus ‘Adagio’ and purple Verbena bonariensis at this year’s Melbourne International Flower & Garden show, in a prize-winning garden designed by Eckersley Garden Architecture in collaboration with Australian House & Garden.

Photograph by Claire Takacs.

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rnamental grasses give so much and demand so little. They add unique character with their graceful, arching forms. Stirred by breezes, their movements make the whole garden come alive. They have low maintenance and water needs and are not prone to pest or disease problems. In addition, they soften hard surfaces and add a wealth of textural interest. Most change through the seasons, marking the passage of time, while their abundant seed heads are a magnet for small birds. A sea of grasses is a fast and low-effort way to fill a large space, and they’re also ideal for gravel gardens and slopes.


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S There’s nothing quite like Aus tralia n summer: the spa rkling sunshine, the cool ocea n bre eze, the endles s days wi th friends tha t s tre tc h long in to balmy nigh t s. In summer time the living – a nd the enter taining – a re easy with Ha r vey Norma n.


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AB O VE T it a n 3- P i ece M o d ul ar L o u n g e S e t t i n g ^ , $ 1 9 9 9 ; I n d y R u g La rg e , $ 4 6 9 ; H a l i O u t d o o r S t r i p e d a n d P la in S c a t t er C us hi o n i n O r a n g e, $19.9 5 e a . RI G H T Q u a y 5 - P i e c e S q u a re B a r S e t t i n g i n G u n m e t a l, $ 1 1 9 9 . B AC K PAGE C o nco rd e 3- Seat er S o f a , $ 8 9 9 ; C o n c o rd e 2 - S e a t e r S o f a , $ 6 9 9 ; C o n c o rd e A r m c h a i r, $ 3 9 9 ; Con c ord e C o ff ee Tab l e $399 ^ ; H a l i O u t d o o r S t r i p e d a n d P l a i n S c a t t e r C u s h i o n i n L e m o n , $19.9 5 e a . (^Available in store only) (Additional decoration: stylist’s own)


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S H O P AT Y O U R L O C A L S T O R E , O N L I N E AT H N . C O M . A U O R C A L L 1 3 0 0 4 6 4 2 7 8 Furniture prices displayed are valid in state capital metropolitan areas only (excluding Northern Territory). ^Available in store only. Prices in country areas will be higher due to additional freight charges. See in store for full range. Harvey NormanŽ stores are operated by independent franchisees. Ends 30/11/18. Additional decoration: stylist’s own.


GARDENING H G

CLIPPINGS

Produced by Elizabeth Wilson. Photograph by Annabel Reid (Cloverdale Garden) & courtesy Busselton Camera Club (Calectasia & Drosera wildflowers).

GA R DEN S

PLANTS

3 OF A KIND

Gardening books

BOOKS

Milkwood ($45, Murdoch Books) recounts Kirsten Bradley and Nick Ritar’s experiences of permaculture farming with hands-on instructions and recipes for a home-grown life.

BEAUTY SP OTS C L OV E R DA L E G A R D E N I S A R I OT

Wondrous wildflowers The famed wildflowers of WA’s south-west burst into bloom from August to October. If you can’t physically ‘go bush’ for the experience, enjoy seeing them at the Busselton Wildflower Exhibition, October 4-5, at the Uniting Church in Kent St, Busselton. There will be hundreds of unique species on display, chosen by licensed ‘pickers’, plus photos of many more. Phone (08) 9754 6409.

OF ROSES, IRISES AND SEDUMS ON THE BANKS OF L O L LY P O P C R E E K AT W E R R I B E E , V I C TO R I A . TA K E T H E O P P O RT U N I T Y TO WA L K T H R O U G H T H E F O R M E R PA D D O C K W H E N I T O P E N S TO T H E P U B L I C O N O C TO B E R 2 0 - 2 1. F O R T H I S A N D OT H E R L OV E LY GA R D E N S , V I S I T O P E N GA R D E N SV I C TO R I A .O R G . AU.

Fun of the fair Historic Bolobek garden in Victoria’s Mount Macedon is the venue for the annual Garden Lovers’ Fair, October 6 -7. Browse stalls of plants, artisan garden tools, outdoor furniture and more. $12 entry; gardenloversfair.com.au.

Just in time for the busiest period in the garden, Stihl has released a range of compact yet powerful – and affordable – cordless garden tools, including this MSA 120 C-BQ chainsaw, $459 (including battery and charger). All tools in the range can be powered by the one interchangeable battery. stihl.com.au

The Village ($45, Plum), by Grown & Gathered duo Matt and Lentil Purbrick, details the skills needed to grow, preserve and prepare nourishing food for your village of loved ones.

In Mr Guilfoyle’s Shakespearian Botany ($45, Melbourne Uni Press), William Guilfoyle, Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne director from 1873-1909, muses on the bard, gardens and art.

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Styling by Sarah Maloney. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

Salad days are back, and we couldn’t be happier.


H G ENTERTAINING

Best

DRESSED

Hot & sour duck liver salad with mint, coriander & lime – Chin Chin, Melbourne 156 |

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

Photography by William Meppem (this page) & Ben Dearnley (opposite).

These easy-to-make creations from some of Australia’s best chefs cast the humble salad as the hero of any gourmet meal.


Celeriac & shaved fennel salad with crushed walnut dressing – Matt Moran, Chiswick, Sydney


H G ENTERTAINING

Radish & preserved lemon salad – Analiese Gregory, Franklin, Tasmania

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AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN


Chargrilled asparagus with sugar snap peas, bulghur wheat & grilled lemon – Hetty McKinnon, Arthur Street Kitchen, ex Sydney, now Brooklyn, NY

Radicchio salad with blistered grapes, shallots & za’atar – Clayton Wells, Automata, Sydney

Photography by Chris Chen (radish salad, radicchio salad), John Paul Urizar (asparagus salad) & William Meppem (farro salad).

Farro with broad beans, ricotta salata, mint & lovage – Danielle Alvarez, Fred’s, Sydney

FRESH & FAB The possibilities are endless when it comes to salad ingredients. Begin with whatever veg, carbohydrate or protein you have to hand and build with complementary flavours.


HOT & SOUR DUCK LIVER SALAD WITH MINT, CORIANDER & LIME

CELERIAC & SHAVED FENNEL SALAD WITH CRUSHED WALNUT DRESSING

Prep: 30 mins. Cooking: 5 mins. Serves 4.

Prep: 25 mins. Cooking: 1 hr 20 mins + cooling. Serves 6 as a side.

2 tbsp vegetable oil 200g duck livers (about 10), trimmed 2 golden shallots, thinly sliced on a mandolin 2 Thai eggplant, thinly sliced on a mandolin and placed in acidulated water until needed (see note) 1 cup loosely packed coriander leaves, torn ½ cup loosely packed mint leaves, coarsely torn 3 chive flowers, coarsely torn (optional, available from Asian grocers) 30g ground roast rice (available from Asian grocers) 1 tbsp roasted chilli flakes, crushed 1 long red chilli, thinly sliced into rounds 5 small red chillies, coarsely chopped ¼ cup loosely packed sawtooth coriander, coarsely torn (available from Asian grocers) Hot & sour dressing 150ml lime juice, or to taste 50ml fish sauce, or to taste ½ tsp roasted chilli flakes, or to taste

1 large celeriac (about 1kg), trimmed, skin on 5 brussels sprouts 1 fennel bulb, thinly shaved on a mandolin and placed in acidulated water, fronds reserved 1 tbsp thinly sliced chives Salt dough 1½ cups (330g) fine salt 165g plain flour 65g egg white (about 2 small eggs) Crushed walnut dressing 25g walnuts 1 tbsp chardonnay vinegar 1 tbsp Champagne vinegar ½ tsp Dijon mustard 65ml walnut oil 65ml grapeseed oil

1 To make hot and sour dressing, place all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well. Adjust flavours to taste and set aside. 2 Heat oil in a wok over high heat until very hot. Add livers and cook, turning occasionally, until golden but still pink in the centre, 2-3 mins. Remove from heat and thickly slice. Add to dressing, toss to coat. Drain eggplant, then add to livers along with remaining salad ingredients. Toss to combine. Serve warm. NOTE Acidulated water is a mixture of cold water and a small amount of vinegar, lemon or lime juice, used to prevent the discolouration of fruit and vegetables.

1 Preheat oven to 190˚C (170˚C fan). To make dough, place salt, flour, eggwhite and 90ml cold water in a bowl. Mix until a dough forms. Roll dough on a lightly floured surface to 5mm thick; use to wrap celeriac, pinch edges to seal and place on a baking paper-lined tray. Bake until dough is golden and celeriac is tender when an inserted skewer withdraws easily, 1-1¼ hrs. Cool to room temperature, then break and discard crust. Peel celeriac and slice into thin rounds. 2 Meanwhile, make dressing. Place walnuts on a baking tray and roast until golden, 6-8 mins; finely chop. Combine vinegars and mustard in a small bowl, add oils, whisk to combine, season, then add walnuts. 3 Remove outer leaves of sprouts; reserve. Thinly slice inner leaves, place in a bowl with drained fennel and chives, drizzle with dressing, season and arrange on plates. Fold celeriac slices in half, then half again, and arrange over salad. 4 Blanch reserved sprout leaves until bright green and tender, drain on paper towel and arrange over salad. Spoon more dressing over, scatter with fennel fronds and serve.

RADISH & PRESERVED LEMON SALAD Prep: 20 mins. Cooking: 2 mins. Serves 8-10 as a side.

600g assorted heirloom tomatoes, halved Caster sugar, to serve Extra-virgin olive oil, to serve 1 bunch (about 8) radishes, halved or quartered if large 20 Sicilian green olives, cheeks removed 15 lemon verbena leaves, for garnish (optional) Pickled radishes ½ cup (125ml) distilled vinegar ¼ cup (55g) caster sugar 1 bunch radishes (8 radishes), halved or quartered if large Preserved lemon vinaigrette ⅓ cup (80ml) chardonnay vinegar 60g caster sugar Peel from ½ preserved lemon, rinsed and finely chopped 100ml extra-virgin olive oil 1 To make pickled radishes, combine vinegar, caster sugar and ¾ cup water in a saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Set aside to cool; add radishes and marinate 1 hr. 2 To make vinaigrette, place chardonnay vinegar, caster sugar and preserved lemon in a small saucepan and bring to a simmer. Simmer until mixture has a nice balance of sweet, sour and salty, about 2 mins. Set aside to cool, then add olive oil and season to taste. 3 To serve, place tomatoes in a bowl and season well with salt, caster sugar and olive oil. Add raw radishes, pickled radishes and olives. Dress salad with preserved lemon vinaigrette, garnish with lemon verbena leaves and serve.


ENTERTAINING H G

CHARGRILLED ASPARAGUS WITH SUGAR SNAP PEAS, BULGHUR WHEAT & GRILLED LEMON Prep: 20 mins + cooling. Cooking: 15 mins. Serves 4-6 as a shared dish.

Photograph by Julian Kingma (background).

2 cups (500ml) vegetable stock 1½ cups (250g) medium-fine bulghur wheat 3 bunches asparagus, trimmed and halved crossways 250g sugar snap peas, trimmed 1 lemon, halved 2½ tbsp extra-virgin olive oil ¼ cup firmly packed flat-leaf parsley leaves, torn ¼ cup firmly packed mint leaves, torn 100g firm fetta, crumbled 1 Place vegetable stock in a small saucepan; bring to the boil, then immediately remove from heat. Add bulghur wheat, stir, cover and stand 15 mins. Once liquid is absorbed, remove lid and fluff grains with a fork. Set aside to cool slightly, about 10 mins. 2 Meanwhile, heat a barbecue or grill pan over high heat until smoking hot. Place asparagus, sugar snap peas and lemon in a bowl and drizzle with 2 tsp olive oil. Season to taste and toss to coat. Grill vegetables in batches, turning often, until just tender and starting to char, about 3-5 mins for greens and 2 mins for lemon. Transfer to a bowl, add bulghur, remaining olive oil and sea salt to taste; toss to combine. To serve, crumble fetta over and garnish with charred lemon wedges.

RADICCHIO SALAD WITH BLISTERED GRAPES, SHALLOTS & ZA’ATAR

FARRO WITH BROAD BEANS, RICOTTA SALATA, MINT & LOVAGE

Prep: 45 mins. Cooking: 5 mins. Serves 6 as a side.

Prep: 20 mins. Cooking: 30 mins + cooling. Serves 6-8.

3 banana shallots, thinly sliced into rounds (see note) 500g seedless red grapes ⅓ cup (80ml) extra-virgin olive oil Juice of ½ lemon 1 tbsp za’atar 2 heads radicchio, leaves separated and torn 1 bunch chives, cut into batons

1 cup (240g) farro (available from select delicatessens) 2kg broad beans, podded 150g ricotta salata, coarsely grated 1 cup loosely packed mint leaves, coarsely chopped, plus extra to serve 4 spring onions, finely chopped 4 stems lovage, leaves coarsely chopped 100ml extra-virgin olive oil 50ml red-wine vinegar

1 Place shallots in a bowl and cover with cold water. Set aside to soak 10 mins, then drain and repeat twice more. Drain well. 2 Meanwhile, heat a frypan over high heat until smoking hot. Add red grapes, then use a plate or tray (slightly smaller than the diameter of frypan) to press down firmly on grapes for about 30 secs, allowing juice to seep out and caramelise in pan. Remove plate or tray, use tongs to turn grapes and repeat. Transfer cooked grapes to a bowl, then add olive oil, lemon juice and za’atar. Season with sea salt flakes and, while still warm, toss to combine. 3 Add radicchio, chives and shallots to grape mixture and serve. NOTE Banana shallots are available from select greengrocers. If unavailable, substitute large golden shallots.

1 Cook farro in a saucepan of boiling salted water until al dente (25-30 mins), then drain and spread on a tray to cool. 2 Meanwhile, blanch broad beans in a large saucepan of boiling salted water for 15 secs, then plunge into iced water (this makes the beans easier to peel). Drain and slip beans out of their skins. 3 To assemble, combine cooled farro and peeled broad beans in a bowl, add remaining ingredients and season to taste. Toss to combine, scatter with extra mint and serve. NOTE Lovage has a distinctive flavour somewhere between parsley and celery. If unavailable, substitute with flat-leaf parsley or rocket. #

TIP For a gluten-free option, substitute bulghur wheat with quinoa or millet.

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1800 685 899 • andico.com.au


GREAT SOUTHERN BRANDS

LIVING H G

Drinks

WHITE MAGIC

Victorian chardonnay is remarkable for its overall quality and wonderfully diverse range of flavours, writes Toni Paterson.

Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

V

ictoria is home to some of Australia’s great chardonnays. The state has many regions where chardonnay flourishes, plus a culture of top winemakers making the best wines possible from this variety. In a quest to produce more refined and sophisticated drops, many of these makers have been paring back the inherent fruitiness of chardonnay and introducing more savoury elements. The result is wines with many layers to their personality. This makes them incredibly interesting to drink, as well as exceptional partners to food. The style of wine made from chardonnay can differ widely between regions and producers. And there’s an extra layer of diversity at the local level, with producers bottling small parcels from individual vineyards. It’s fascinating to see wines made from the same variety, in the same region, by the same maker, that are

completely different from one another. That’s because each vineyard has its own distinct microclimate and soil profile, and sunlight, wind, altitude and temperature can all affect the flavours that develop in the grape. The clone planted can also have significant impact on the character of the resulting wine. Stonier Wines, located on the Mornington Peninsula, specialises in single-vineyard wines. Look out for its beautifully restrained Jimjoca Vineyard Chardonnay, $38, with fresh cream and citrus flavours, and the refined, complex Gainsborough Park Chardonnay, $45. Cool-climate viticulture is the secret to Victoria’s success with premium chardonnay. Flavours sit in the lemon and grapefruit sphere, with restrained stone-fruit flavours in the milder zones. In the north, meanwhile, the hot, dry climate of the Murray-Darling region produces large volumes of generously flavoured and affordable wine. #

Try these 2015 STONIER GAINSBOROUGH PARK VINEYARD CHARDONNAY, $45 A wildly complex and detailed chardonnay, with pink grapefruit and sweet-lemon flavours, plus a mealy complexity. The palate is long and fine. 2017 SOUMAH SINGLE VINEYARD HEXHAM CHARDONNAY, $40 An intensely flavoured drop with strong citrus tones as well as nuances of clotted cream. The palate is assertive and satisfying. 2016 CURLY FLAT CHARDONNAY, $46 Richly flavoured, displaying a mix of dried fig and citrus with supportive oak and balancing acidity. 2017 SEPPELT JALUKA CHARDONNAY, $27 This one is a reserved and faintly nutty wine that features lemon and grapefruit flavours.

Treasure map Lovers of top chardonnay are spoilt for choice when they visit Victoria. Start with the Yarra Valley, home to outstanding producers such as Oakridge, Coldstream Hills, Giant Steps, Yering Station and Seville Estate. On the Mornington Peninsula, look for wines from Dexter, Yabby Lake, Montalto, Port Phillip and Stonier. Brokenwood Wines’ Indigo Vineyard chardonnay is a highlight from the Beechworth region, as are the wines by Giaconda and Savaterre. In Geelong, try wines from Scotchmans Hill, By Farr and Oakdene. Bass Phillip is a premier producer from Gippsland, but for something more affordable, try excellent Gippsland chardonnay from Wickhams Road. While in the Macedon Ranges, sample chardonnay from Curly Flat and Bindi. Fine chardonnay can also be found in the Henty and Grampians regions. Blue Pyrenees Estate chardonnay represents great value from the Pyrenees. De Bortoli’s Victorian vineyards also make great chardonnay. AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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LESS IS MORE OUT OF SIGHT Custom cabinetry makes the most of the space in the breezy, open kitchen, but dosen’t stop at just the pantry and cupboards. Integrated appliances disappear into the Americanoak so as not to distract from the overall textural effect.

A minimal material palette is punctuated by stainless steel and crisp white benchtops, providing a clean, contemporary look. Softer accents in the form of cushions and upholstery offer a cosy touch.

“This space is like being on the prow of a ship sitting over the water” PAUL CLARKE, STUDIO2 ARCHITECTS

COMFORT VIEW The built-in bench seat runs the length of the kitchen, framing the breathtaking views and ensuring visibility from anywhere in the open-plan space. It also provides a handy spot for guests and family members to relax with the cook during meal prep.


BRAND PROMOTION

BEHIND THE SCENES For a refined look, the Fisher & Paykel ActiveSmart™ French Door fridge sits flush with its surroundings and features customisable front panels, allowing it to seamlessly blend into the wall of cabinetry for an unobtrusive finish.

Built-in pyrolitic oven (76cm), RRP $5299.

ActiveSmart™ integrated French door refrigerator (900mm), RRP $6499.

Integrated double DishDrawer™ dishwasher, RRP $2,299.

Text by Louisa Bathgate. Photography by Simon Wilson

ULTIMATE DESIGN FREEDOM Wall-to-wall timber and sleek integrated appliances are at one with the stunning outlook from this luxury holiday home

L

ocated moments from the seashore and offering sweeping ocean views from expansive second-storey windows, Studio2 Architects capitalised on the rich natural surrounds of this holiday home to create the ultimate escape for a family of five. Open-plan living sets the tone in this light-filled space on New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula, while Scandinavian-style interiors create a welcoming effect. Floor-to-ceiling American oak surfaces are the hero, providing textural appeal throughout. The timber continues through the kitchen, where the family is greeted by a large island bench and cleverly

integrated Fisher & Paykel appliances, tucked behind custom panelling for a seamless look. A pair of built-in ovens offers the ultimate in flexibility, featuring a generous 115L capacity and self-cleaning pyrolitic functionality, making them the smart choice for both keen entertainers and busy families. Designed to match the rest of Fisher & Paykel’s kitchen appliance family, the stainless-steel finish is complemented by up-to-the-minute technology, ensuring perfect cooking results. Hidden above the cooktop is a powerful 90cm rangehood, offering three fan speeds for quick, quiet extraction of smells, steam and smoke.

For more inspiration, visit fisherpaykel.com


M A JE S TIC PRINCE S S

ÂŽ

Arriving in Sydney, September 2018

11 night Australia & New Zealand cruise in an Interior Stateroom from $2,199pp twin share*

*Fares are per person, in NZD, in complete twin accommodation, based on lead interior stateroom available at time of publication on voyage departing Auckland on 2 March 2019, returning to Sydney on 13 March 2019, inclusive of all discounts, taxes, fees, and port expenses (which are subject to change). Princess Cruises has set aside a reasonable number of staterooms which are available at these fares. Once these staterooms are sold, fares may revert to $%#$!.".!Ĉ10)5(/+! %/+1*0! ćĆš!.!* /ÿý0+!.Þßýąć(% "+.*!3++'%*#/* *+0+)%*(!3%0$*5+0$!.+Ćš!.ćƸ((+Ćš!./.!/1&!0 0+2%(%(%05ćĆš!.%/*+00.*/"!.(!Ĉ*+0.! !!)(!"+./$* )5*+0!+)%*(!3%0$+0$!./!(!0+Ćš!./+.+0$!.+*+. .! %0/ć+!.!  in conjunction with the Booking and Passage Conditions available at princess.com/legal/passage_contract which passengers will be bound by. A credit . /1.$.#!+"ýćýĿ"+.%/*  /0!.. * ÞćÿĿ"+.Ƹ Ĉ* ýćßĿ/1.$.#!"+.5(3%((,,(50+ %.!0++'%*#/) !0$.+1#$+1.3!/%0! +.((!*0.!ć.2!(#!*0/)5$.#! %0%+*("!!/Äœ$!'3%0$5+1.0.2!(#!*0ćĆŽ.*%2(,(0. %*#/.%*!//ĆŽ.1%/!/ćƸÇ?ÞÿýߥĆĆąÄ Ä ĂżPR02.2


LIVING H G

Travel

ON THE WRIGHT PATH No trip to Chicago is complete without taking in the built heritage of architect Frank Lloyd Wright, writes Susan Gough Henly. hen high-Victorian architecture was still the rage, in the late 1800s and early 1900s, a young architect in Chicago, Illinois, almost singlehandedly revolutionised the family home. He got rid of formal parlours and eliminated doors to create free-form, open-plan houses. Along the way he created many ubiquitous elements of our everyday lives, from family rooms and walk-in wardrobes to the kitchen workstation. Frank Lloyd Wright has been hailed as America’s greatest architect, and the city of Chicago has the largest collection of Wright-designed homes. It boasts an extensive array of his early buildings, a collective laboratory for his ever-evolving ideas. Today, thanks to the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust, you can visit a number of these structures, most notably in Oak Park’s Frank Lloyd Wright Historic District. The best place to start is Wright’s own home and studio, designed and built in 1889, when he was just 22. He would live there for the next 20 years with his wife Catherine and six children, constantly remodelling, expanding and experimenting with the space to accommodate his growing family and office. I drive to Oak Park with a local friend on a bright spring day. It’s now the first suburb west of the city, but when Wright moved here it was still a rural village overlooking open prairie. Armed with audio guides, we take a walking tour of the neighbourhood, which features 25 buildings designed or remodelled by Wright. When I hear a recording of the architect’s voice stating, “Form and function should be one, joined in a spiritual union,” I am struck by the way his designs stand apart from the other houses. His open, light-filled homes, with their unadorned exteriors and geometric themes, seem to connect with the natural world. His own Shingle-style home isn’t particularly revolutionary, but it does feature one of his signature elements: a front door that is not immediately obvious. You find it by following what Wright described as a ‘path of discovery’ through the landscape. Once there, you feel embraced by the house. Inside, our guide explains how Wright rethought concepts of space and light with his box-breaking floor plans. His central fireplace with inglenook (a hearthside recess that’s ‘a room

Portrait from Frank Lloyd Wright Preservation Trust/Getty Images.

W

within a room’) is the spiritual core of the home. Built-in furniture creates more space in the rooms, which are painted in the olive and mustard hues of the prairiegrasslands.Butthemostgobsmacking innovation is the domed playroom, with its lightdiffusing skylight and baby grand piano. Here, ladies and gentlemen, is the first family room. Moving from the secular to the sublime, we next visit Wright’s Mayan-style Unity Temple. Constructed from reinforced concrete in 1908, this is the first house of worship built of a material normallyreservedforfactories.It’snowdesignated a National Historic Landmark, and many architects consider it to be the world’s first true modern building. Wright’s design compresses us through a low-ceilinged foyer before we expand out into the community area. The congregation’s seats encircle a central space, creating a sense of tender intimacy. Yellow skylights glow warmly above, even on cloudy days, I’m told. We’ve just begun to appreciate the full extent of Wright’s brilliance as we head to the Frederick C Robie House, in the Hyde Park neighbourhood of the city’s South Side. This 1910 Prairiestyle masterpiece has been named one of the 10 most significant buildings of the 20th century by the American Institute of Architects. It is Wright’s ode to the American home. Our guide first takes us across the street, so we can appreciate just how sleek, open and flowing the house is. It sits low to the ground, with a horizontal roofline and large, overhanging eaves, because this is flat prairie land and subject to high winds. Wright’s mantra was that a building must suit its environment and be a product of its place, purpose and time. Approaching the house, we once again encounter a tuckedaway front door. From there, we move through a compressed transitional space and up some stairs to an expansive open living and dining area. The freeform space within is anchored by a central, low-slung fireplace and bathed in natural light. It comes from a continuous ribbon of 175 jewel-like art-glass windows, which shield the people inside from outside eyes and filter the light in ever-changing patterns as the sun charts its course through the day and seasons. Yet another ‘path of > discovery’ in Wright’s outstanding architectural legacy.

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THINGS TO DO IN CHICAGO

FROM TOP The Magnificent Mile is home to many Chicago landmarks old and new. Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate sculpture at Millennium Park. The Robert P Parker house, a Wright commission from 1892. OPPOSITE Wright at 38.

Tour Wright’s major Chicago buildings with the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust. flwright.org Don’t miss the Art Institute of Chicago, the s ond-largest art museum in the US. artic.edu Take a Chicago Architecture Foundation River Cruise, featuring volunteer docents giving passengers the inside story on 50 buildings that define one of the world’s most interesting cityscapes. architecture.org Walk the prestigious Magnificent Mile shopping precinct along Michigan Avenue from the Chicago River to Oak Street. themagnificentmile.com The Windy City is also home to the blues, so drop into the award-winning Kingston Mines club in Halsted Street. kingstonmines.com

WHERE TO STAY AND EAT The Langham Chicago is a five-star hotel in a landmark tower created by another feted architect, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. langhamhotels.com A 1920s gem offering five-star accommodation, the InterContinental Chicago is right in the heart of the city’s Magnificent Mile. icchicagohotel.com Check into Palmer House and check out its historic lobby and fresco. palmerhousehiltonhotel.com Recently named the world’s best restaurant by Elite Traveller, Alinea offers diners a tasting menu of provocative modern cuisine, backed by three Michelin stars. alinearestaurant.com Lou Malnati’s is the place to try Chicago-style deep-dish pizza. loumalnatis.com #

168 |

AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN

FROM TOP Wright’s home, studio and design lab in Oak Park. His Frederick C Robie House, now nestled in a University of Chicago campus. Another Oak Park home by Wright, showing the low, horizontal form of the Prairie aesthetic.

Photography from Getty Images (Magnificent Mile), Alamy (Cloud Gate, Wright House, Robie House) & Susan Gough Henly (Oak Park House).

H G LIVING


OCEAN CRUISING STORYBOOK

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How will your ocean cruise story unfold? Pick up your free copy in-store today or call 13 70 71.

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“Cruising offers an ideal way to see the world, enjoy new experiences, feast on delicious cuisine, make new friends and bond with your family. My recommendation is the 14-night New Zealand cruise on Celebrity Solstice from $3165* in a Balcony cabin.� ADAM CROSSMAN | Travel Associates Glenelg, SA

With over 100 locations Australia wide, book an appointment with an experienced travel adviser today.

13 70 71 travel-associates.com.au/ocean-cruising

*Travel restrictions and conditions apply. Price is per person, twin share and subject to availability. Valid for sale until 7 Oct 18, unless sold out prior. New Zealand Cruise (deal 5287343): Price based on 29 Mar 19 departure. Flight Centre Travel Group Limited (ABN 25 003 377 188) trading as Travel Associates. ATAS Accreditation No. A10412 TA18001


ever wanted to try something new?

For a limited time, Tetley are giving away one FREE full of feel good experience with every specially marked pack purchased - try one or try them all! Open to Australian residents aged 18+. Maximum one claim per promotional product purchased. Promotion opens on 1st of August 2018 and closes on 30th November 2018. Each experience code / eVoucher entitles the customer to either one (1) free entry, session, experience or lesson at a listed venue of their choice. Full terms are available at www.tetleyfullofeelgood.com.au


LIVING H G MUSCULAR MEDICINE

Health

BODES WELL Scientists and researchers are working hard to create a healthier tomorrow, writes Paula Goodyer.

Illustration by Domenic Bahmann.

W

‘What we know is that a diet based on naturally occurring foods… is important for health, and that it is mostly the whole diet that counts, not single foods.’ Dr Amy Loughman

Researchers are learning more about why exercise is so good for us. Moving muscles, it seems, causes the body to release chemicals called myokines, which have many benefits. They may protect against cancer, says Professor Mark Febbraio from Sydney’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research, who’s looking into how myokines released during exercise may help prevent breast-cancer cells from spreading.

hat does the future hold for our health? It’s impossible to know, but there are exciting discoveries and innovations on the horizon. Allergies affect about one in five Australians and are on the rise, but what if a single injection could deliver lifelong protection against allergic reactions? This could be the reality in 10 years’ time, say researchers who’ve found a way to stop the immune system’s T cells from overreacting to otherwise harmless substances, such as dust mites, pets or food. The problem is that T cells develop a memory of an allergen and mount an attack each time they encounter it, says Associate Professor Raymond Steptoe of the University of Queensland’s Diamantina Institute. “We’ve been able to ‘wipe’ the memory of these T cells in animals using gene therapy, so that the T cells can tolerate the allergen,” he explains. The next step will be to trial this in human cells. It’s one of many revolutionary treatments now being developed, including a way to plug holes in teeth using stem cells that regrow dental tissue. Yet some of the most intriguing breakthroughs

have less to do with high-tech wizardry and more to do with understanding how food and exercise can keep us well. Gut microbes are a hot area of research, with evidence that too much over-processed food and too little fibre can change the balance of these microbes. This, in turn, may influence the risk of health problems as diverse as inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, heart disease and even mental wellbeing. Friendly microbes thrive on ‘prebiotic’ fibre from foods such as lentils, chickpeas, rye, barley, some nuts and fruits, producing beneficial short-chain fatty acids that may help to keep body and brain healthy. And that’s only one way in which gut microbes may influence brain health. There’s still much to learn, says Dr Amy Loughman, a researcher with Deakin University’s Food & Mood Centre, which studies how foods influence the brain, mood and mental health. “What we know is that a diet based on naturally occurring foods, and high in vegetables and fruit, is important for health,” adds Dr Loughman, “and that it is mostly the whole diet that counts, not single foods.” # AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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Beauty

KIT PARADE Smart tools take grooming to the next level, writes Elisabeth King.

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Remington Air3D hair dryer ($200) Many women are guilty of blow-drying their hair on the fastest, hottest setting, resulting in increased frizz and flyaways. This high-tech appliance, light but well-balanced in the hand, is designed to produce uninterrupted airflow and negatively charged ions for smooth-as results. It comes with three attachments, including a push-lock diffuser to boost volume. When you’re done, use the cool-shot feature to set your hairstyle. Conair Illuminations LED Lighted mirror ($80) The right lighting is mandatory for flattering make-up application. Too many women apply it in a dimly lit bedroom or harshly illuminated bathroom. This light-up mirror with energy-saving LED bulbs offers three light-intensity settings and a hinged base for viewing from multiple angles. The 10x magnification option is useful for ultra-precise make-up, contact-lens insertion and tracking down stray hairs. Manicare Perfect & Correct sponge kit ($21) Sponges are the secret to making foundation look flawless and dewy. This travel-friendly pack contains three of Manicare’s bestsellers. The doublesided foundation sponge is ideal for both base and concealer. Use the contouring and highlighting version to enhance cheekbones and facial features. And if you make a mistake, the flat edge of the handy eraser sponge will whisk it away.

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Foreo UFO Smart Mask ($395) Most face masks require 15 to 20 minutes to deliver results, but this silicone tool, combining Swedish technology and Korean beauty expertise, claims to provide spa-quality treatments in just 90 seconds. It blends sonic pulsations with thermo (heat) and cryo (cold) therapy, with the aim of opening pores, delivering active ingredients and firming skin. The three LED light wavelengths are meant to enhance skin benefits: choose red for anti-ageing, green for brightening or blue to combat acne-causing bacteria. The UFO is meant to be used in conjunction with Foreo’s targeted masks, priced from $15/pack of seven. Revlon Extra Curl eyelash curler ($16) Eyelashes inevitably – and regrettably – become thinner and shorter as we age. This curler is specially designed to curl each individual lash for maximum definition. Use it with a volumising or lengthening mascara for high glamour, or to groom bare lashes for a natural look on casual days. EcoTools Six Piece Day to Night Collection ($45) Quality brushes are the easiest way to upgrade your make-up routine. A few minutes with this collection of synthetic brushes (cruelty-free and vegan-friendly) will transform results from ordinary to great. The bonus clutch holds five must-haves: concealer brush, angled blusher brush, lipliner brush, eyeshadow brush and a fan brush for highlighting. #

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Saving time and stress while achieving professional results is a win-win scenario.

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Styling by Sophie Wilson. Photograph by Kristina Soljo.

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nything that makes everyday grooming and applying make-up easier, and produces a more professional result, can be classified as a beauty tool. The category has expanded far beyond brushes and tweezers to include smart-technology electronics that duplicate salon-style results for face and hair. Here are some investment pieces to help you look your best with minimum time and effort.


BSH Group is a Trademark Licensee of Siemens AG.

Fill up once, and let i-Dos take care of the next 26 washes.* Siemens Home Appliances recommends

Imagine a washing machine so easy to use you don’t have to add detergent each time you wash. Simply fill the 1.3L integrated chamber with OMO Ultimate Liquid and the Siemens iQ800 with i-Dos will do the rest. Intelligent sensors detect the load size, degree of soiling and fabric type, and the correct dose of detergent is dispensed automatically. For amazing stain removal first time, Siemens recommends OMO. siemens-home.bsh-group.com.au The future moving in.

Siemens Home Appliances *Based on 1 Cap (50ml) for a normal load.


Photograph by Chris Warnes.

Professional advice to guide all would-be renovators.

Let the experts show you how to create a home that looks good and works just as hard. Turn the page for some real-life scenarios‌


H G ADVICE

Special report

ON GOOD AUTHORITY

Between them, an architect, a professional renovator and a real-estate agent can teach you almost everything you need to know about renovating a home. Belinda Graham brings their best advice to the table.

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he path to a successful renovation is smoother when you’re armed with helpful information. Whether you’re making home improvements for yourself or looking to flip a property and make a quick profit, it’s vital to consult the experts. We asked architect Scott Weston of Scott Weston Architecture Design, professional renovator Lana Taylor of Three Birds Renovations, and John McManus, the principal of LJ Hooker in Willoughby/ Artarmon, NSW, to spill their top tips for transforming all areas of the home.

FLOW, FUNCTION & LIGHT “Light forms the foundation for how a space feels. If you miss the mark here, no amount of rugs or cushions will right it,” says Taylor. That’s why north-facing homes with views

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are so sought after, offers McManus. “People want something nice to look at from their window, such as water or a pretty garden.” If the orientation of your home is less than ideal, or the view is of a freeway, a lightfilled, visually appealing aspect can still be achieved with design and landscaping, says Weston. It might come down to rearranging rooms, or moving or adding windows to improve the functional planning and flow, but it will be worth it to get that link to an external landscape. “In addition, get to know the seasons and the sunlight coming into the existing home, and work out how to capture natural cross-breezes.” For Taylor, there’s no such thing as too many windows or doors: “Chat with a structural engineer to find out what’s possible, before you submit any plans.”


PLAN FOR THE FUTURE If you’re renovating a home that you intend to live in for a long time, creating a floor plan that will still work 15 years from now is a must, says Taylor. “Families grow up. In the early years you’ll probably want a playroom under your nose – near the kitchen, perhaps. But once your children are teenagers, you – and they – will prefer somewhere to escape to.” Plan for multifunctional spaces that can adapt. HEAP & CHEERFUL TRICKS In spaces with low ceilings, swap the downlights for good lamps and uplighting fixtures (lighting from below, as with an upward-pointing light), advises Weston. plighting gives an illusion of greater space.” If the flooring is poor quality and the budget is tight, paint the perimeter dark walnut or black and overlay with rugs until u can refinish or replace it, says Weston. Paving paint can transform outdoor areas: concrete pathways, pool surrounds, even garage floors. “We also love using paving paint in alfresco spaces where tiling is too expensive,” says Taylor. That goes for patios and verandahs, too. “Just add an outdoor rug and some fresh furniture.”

Photography by Maree Homer.

TOP 5 FOR VERSATILITY 1 Hume 10-lite french doors “These beauties from Bunnings are the most affordable doors to use in alfresco spaces.

They make them feel special, even in the most low-budget renos,” says Taylor. Use singularly, in pairs, inside or out, or as a fixed window. You can even hinge them together to create affordable bifolds. 2 Porcelain panels A new alternative to tiles, these large slabs (up to 1500x3000mm) are “an ideal solution to avoid grout joins and mould in a bathroom”, says Weston. Use them for splashbacks, on floors or walls, in showers, or as benchtops. 3 Scyon cladding “We love Scyon walls and use the cladding inside, outside, horizontally and vertically,” says Taylor. “Choose Scyon Linea weatherboard for a coastal feel on the outside, and vertical Axon panels for grooved texture inside.” 4 Anaglypta wallpaper Ideal for concealing imperfect plaster, this classic embossed covering adds a textural layer to walls and can be painted, says Weston. 5 Gas-strut windows Cheaper than bifolds, these windows open out and up, creating an awning when open, without taking up precious walkway space. They also obstruct less of the view than bifolds. “They’re really easy to open. You literally nudge the window and it opens up as if it’s motorised,” says Taylor. “Just don’t make the window too high, otherwise you might need a stool to help you close it!”

A WELCOMING ENTRANCE Mark the way to your front door with some well-placed stepping stones or another form of path. And don’t assume you need to spend a fortune on rendering ugly old brick to transform a property’s exterior, says Taylor. “Spraying the brick with a premium exterior paint is much cheaper than render and can be completed in a couple of days. Plus, it looks great.” Inside, create a handy place for daily essentials or borrow an idea from country homes and include a mud room near your entry or internal garage access, suggests Taylor, with space for schoolbags, shoes, hats and sports equipment. According to McManus, buyers love an entryway that isn’t too narrow and, ideally, has an alarm system. “If you’re selling, remove any grilles from windows so it doesn’t look like there could be a security issue,” he advises. >

RENO COMMANDMENTS DO… Your research before you purchase a property: check whether it’s heritagelisted, in a flood or bushfire zone, or has any other restrictions. “Find out if the house has the potential to be altered or added to by running it past council as a pre-DA,” says Weston. “You don’t want to make the purchase and then find out ou can’t add that second storey.” Understand the architectural style of the home and let that guide you to come up with an overall style and aesthetic, rather than forcing an nsuitable look onto the property. Speak to your window and door supplier about the different kinds of glass available to make your home more comfortable. “There’s glass to reduce heat loss in winter, UV glare in summer an noise all year round,” says Taylor. Have your rangehood ducted externally rather than recirculating the exhaust, to ensure cooking smells are always confined to the kitchen.

DON’T… Contrast guttering or downpipes against exterior walls. “They’re not a feature, so don’t make them stand out,” says Taylor. Paint them the same colour (or very similar to) the exterior walls, as shown below. Use tiles from different batches as they can have noticeable variations in colour. Ensure boxes or individual tiles have the same batch number. Buy a plant just because it’s pretty. Do your research and make sure it will be in a suitable environment, inside or t, with the right amount of sun. Choose a dark floor covering if you want your home to look and feel bigger than it is. A lighter floor will trick the eye and make the house appear more spacious.


H G ADVICE FLIPPER VS FOREVER HOMES When renovating a property to sell, your priorities will be different to those for a long-term home. But all experts agree on the things you shouldn’t compromise on: light, flow and storage. A flip house needs to appeal to the masses, and the budget should be super-strict; most flippers spend about 10 per cent of the purchase price on cosmetic renovations so they don’t overcapitalise. “These rules change when you’re renovating your forever home,” says Taylor. “Then the question becomes what can you afford and how much is that special design feature worth to you?”

RENO TOOLKIT Sketchup.com Easy-to use software for 3D modelling. Therenoschool.com All the ins and outs of renovating. Buildbits.com.au Buy and sell excess building materials. Rapid Reno Mate Free app with a host of useful tools. Kaboodleplanner.com Plan and design your flatpack Kaboodle kitchen in 3D.

Photograph by Maree Homer.

MAKE KITCHENS FUNCTIONAL, NOT JUST PINNABLE If you decide to sell your renovated home in the future, an updated, spacious and functional kitchen will ensure the best return, says McManus. Ensure that you have plenty of cabinet storage and benchtop space. “Prospective buyers will remember if your home has enough kitchen bench space or not,” he says. Weston suggests skipping hinged doors and corner cabinets, and opting instead for pull-out extension drawers, which are easier to access and clean. Internal joinery in Laminex Lamiwood will last longer than melamine finishes, he points out. REMEMBER, LIVING SPACES While integrating appliances is popular, ARE FOR EXACTLY THAT replacing them can be costly, and For this reason, make sure your living space it may be hard to replace them with new will suit you and your family and their ones of the same size down the track. interests. Love a good movie or Netflix binge Instead, consider installing a small undersession? Weston suggests installing Bowers counter fridge and a full-size one in a nearby & Wilkins built-in ceiling speakers for great scullery. If that’s not an option, ensure the surround sound minus the eyesore clutter. cabinetry is deep enough (700-850mm) Open-plan living spaces are still the ideal for the fridge to sit flush with the cabinetry set-up, and a living room that spills out onto on either side, suggests Taylor. Choose an entertaining deck is always going to be a model before you renovate so you can worth the money it cost to build. “One factor in the exact dimensions. Above all, trick to making the outside feel like a make realistic choices that will work for you continuation of inside is to use the same and your family, she adds. “Don’t sacrifice ceiling lining,” says Taylor. This could be a what you would prefer to live with every panelled ceiling with exposed rafters, or day for the sake of what looks nice when a flat plaster ceiling with downlights. visitors stop by once a month.” >

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The latest in bathroom innovations

Welcome to a new world of bathrooms, with new trends and advancing technologies. Everything from smart toilets to unseen textures and colour. We’re becoming introduced to a new level of personalisation. Discover the game changers.

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A new texture in colour

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Moving beyond chrome, colour is evolving into a new realm of tone and texture. Tapware, basins and even toilet buttons are diving into shimmering hues and texturised finishes.

Roca In-Wash® Inspira Smart Toilet The latest in toilet technology, the Roca In-Wash® Inspira Smart Toilet features simple wash and drying functions in a sleek, minimalist design to suit any bathroom space. With variable temperature, pressure and positioning settings, the toilet can be customised for optimal hygiene and comfort.

GROHE SmartControl Shower Personalise your shower experience through individual water pressure control of the multiple spray functions. With the pre-set thermostatic temperature control, enjoy the same consistent temperature every time at the push of a button.

Finer proportions Fine lines are in. We’re seeing more ultra-thin profiles crafted by revolutionary ceramics; creating sleeker, more elegant bathroom designs.

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Roca Inspira FINECERAMIC Basins Made from FINECERAMIC, an innovative vitreous china that enables thinner edges than ever before.

01 Mizu Drift Twin Waterfall 300 ABS Overhead Matte Black WELS 3 Star/9L per min $789.99 | 02 Mizu Stream Wall Basin Mixer Set Brushed Nickel $490 03 Hideaway+ Thin Button/Plate Inwall ABS Champagne $119 | 04 Alape Circa Vessel Basin 360mm Dark Iron $849 05 GROHE SmartControl Rainshower System WELS 2 Star / 12L per min $2,799.01 | 06 Roca Inspira Soft Vessel Basin No Taphole 370mm White $446.77 07 Roca Inspira In-Wash Smart Toilet BTW Wels 4 Star / 3.3L per fl ush $3,490

Find more bathroom inspiration at reece.com.au/bathrooms/inspiration


H G ADVICE MAKE BEDROOMS LUXE AND COMFORTABLE Four bedrooms with an ensuite off the main bedroom is the magic formula for realestate sales, says McManus. “The ensuite vanity should be able to accommodate toiletries and have a big enough mirror to fit two people getting ready at the same time,” he says. For comfort, luxe fittings and temperature control are paramount. Weston recommends a soft- to mid-grey 85oz carpet for any style home, while Taylor says combining wall sconces by the bed with a practical and attractive ceiling fan can make a space feel more relaxed, as well as control the temperature. #

BATHROOM BLITZ A well-renovated bathroom is a big selling point and incredibly satisfying when it functions properly. “It might be cheaper to keep things where they are, but if you’re going to bother with the mess, dust and money of a bathroom reno, make it count by getting the layout right,” advises Taylor. That means making the space as practical as possible, preferably with a separate bath and plenty of storage, all things high on a buyer’s wishlist, says McManus. Building low (1100mm high) stud walls can make it less of a hassle to relocate the plumbing services, while giving you the bonus of having a storage/display shelf on top. Large tiles with minimal grout lines, and wall-hung toilets and vanities will all make cleaning easier, says Weston. Taylor says having a skylight in the bathroom is a must. “It floods the room with natural light and doesn’t take up any space on your floor plan. Above a bath or shower, it also creates a resort vibe.”

Photograph by Armelle Habib.

SMARTEN UP YOUR DINING ROOM Like the kitchen, the dining room is often a multifunctional space, so make it cater to all its jobs with a few bonus inclusions: dimmer lights for mood lighting while eating, a bench seat by the window for entertaining, and storage in the bench seat or nearby sideboard for art and office supplies. For those in small homes that don’t have the luxury of a separate dining room, the kitchen island often becomes the dedicated gathering place, so “allow for powerpoints and USB ports in the island bench to cater for these flexible requirements”, says Weston.

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DISCOVER MORE AT HARDIEDECK. COM. AU


H G ADVICE

Renovator’s notebook

NATURAL WONDER Perched on the side of a creek, this home has been lovingly rebuilt to make the most of its unique location. STO RY Sarah Pickette

uilding designer Peter Earnshaw was extremely well placed to redesign this eastern-Melbourne home: he lived in it for almost three years. “When the owners bought it, they asked me to assess its renovation potential,” he says. “My wife and I had sold our home and were looking for somewhere to rent, so we took the opportunity to move in.” It quickly became apparent to Peter that, as charming as the 1956 home was, this project was more rebuild than renovation. The house sits on a 1400m2 block and is perched on the banks of a creek that floods regularly. “Neither the timber nor the external stone were in any condition to be reused,” he says, “but the owners wanted to retain the feel of the home, with its expansive windows and connection to the bush.” It took more than five years for development approval, with the rebuild finally beginning in 2015.

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The new house essentially utilises the existing footprint, but expands the living space with a second storey and double garage. Set on steel piers sunk 4m into the ground, the home’s floor sits 1.5m above the floodline. This height makes maintenance tricky, so Peter opted for durable render and Scyon Linea fibre-cement cladding on the exterior. Overall, the home boasts some impressive green credentials – solar panels, a 10,000L water tank under the house, a heatexchange system and outstanding insulation – but the star feature is undoubtedly its glorious windows. “The bush views become beautiful, living artworks,” says Peter. Even though he knew the house well, he was speechless the first time he walked through it on completion. “I took in the vistas up and down the > creek, across to the mature gums, and was blown away.”


Styling by Designs to Inspire Home Staging + Interior Design, Nunawading, Victoria.

Picture windows ensure the bush setting is the first thing you see in every room.

‘Shady trees and the location of the creek limited what we could do, but we still included many green features.’ Peter Earnshaw AT A GLANCE Who lives here A family of five Rebuild time 10 months Building designer Peter Earnshaw, Earnshaw & Associates; eadesignedforliving.com Builder Anton Engelmayer, Calm Living Homes; calmlivinghomes.com.au Before 2BR, single level with enclosed space underneath After 4BR, double storey with rumpus, study and garage AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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Windows on the natural world Generous, energy-efficient windows were always going to be an essential inclusion in this home, says building designer Peter Earnshaw. “We used Stegbar Siteline composite windows in most of the rooms because they allowed us to have cedar frames on the inside and durable aluminium on the outside.” A soaring 4.5x2m plate-glass window is sited directly across from the entrance. It spans both storeys of the home and immediately creates a connection to the bush and creek beyond. Thoughtfully positioned windows frame the northeasterly views from the key rooms and, because most of the windows are double glazed, they boost the home’s eco cred. Two butt-joint corner windows flank the fireplace in the living room. “They are single glazed, as opposed to double glazed, so we ended up with a clear corner and uninterrupted views,” says Peter. OPPOSITE TOP A Stegbar Siteline awning window captures the breeze in the upstairs rumpus room. The sofa and artwork are both from Designs to Inspire. OPPOSITE BOTTOM The centring of a square picture window in the main bedroom turns the tree view into a living artwork. Main walls painted British Paints Refined Stone, feature wall is Taubmans Silver Mink. Bedding from Adairs and Freedom. Bedside lamp, Early Settler. Occasional chair, Freedom. Floor lamp and pendant, Designs to Inspire. BELOW Slate sourced from Slate Discounts surrounds the fireplace in the living room and connects inside and out seamlessly.

FIRST FLOOR Bed Bed

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Main bed

Bed Bath

Deck Bath

Bath

Bath

Rumpus L’dry

Family Dining

Study

Kitchen Living

GROUND FLOOR

Entry

Peter’s tips for rebuilding a home ✚ Go into every rebuild with a good understanding of what your council requires. This will save you a lot of heartache, expense and frustration later. ✚ The consensus is to allow five per cent for contingency in the budget, but if you’re dealing with a tricky site you might need to allow for more, perhaps 10 per cent. ✚ Work with the right materials. For example, we knew that the raised height requirements for building in a flood-prone area would make maintenance difficult downthetrack.WeusedScyonLineacladdingontheexterior because it’s incredibly durable and requires very little upkeep. ✚ Biggerisn’talwaysbetter.Viewanyspacerestrictionsyou might have as a challenge to design your home smarter within its footprint. ✚ Include some ‘escape’ areas, if you can. In this house we designed a small seating area under the home that’s quiet, protected and a lovely sun trap in winter. #

For Where to Buy, see page 225.

THE BUDGET Site preparation and demolition Piering, subfloor and garage Frame and scaffolding Roof trusses and roof Cladding Insulation Electrical and plumbing Windows Doors Plaster and render Slate (interior and exterior) Brickwork and blockwork Floorboards Carpet

$35,000 $30,000 $96,000 $49,000 $26,000 $15,500 $36,000 $29,000 $12,500 $44,000 $22,500 $18,000 $16,000 $6000

Tiling Joinery Kitchen (including appliances) Bathroom fixtures Staircase Lights Heat-exchange system Photovoltaic system Landscaping Decking materials Garage doors Labour Other project fees TOTAL

$19,000 $16,000 $35,000 $6850 $12,500 $2800 $22,000 $8500 $45,000 $5600 $3600 $120,000 $36,650 $769,000

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Special report

Do-it-yourself renovation comes with risks, but the right information and preparation can keep you out of harm’s way, writes Georgia Madden.

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ackling renovation tasks yourself may seem like a good idea, but even simple projects have the potential to be surprisingly dangerous. According to a report last year by the Australian Institute of Health & Welfare, more than 3000 Australians were hospitalised for a DIY injury in 2013-14. Ladder falls were the most common cause (38 per cent), followed by accidents caused by powered hand tools and household machinery (27 per cent). “It’s of the utmost importance to think about safety before starting a DIY job, and implement strong controls on site to protect everyone involved,” says renovating expert and educator Naomi Findlay. “Ultimately, you’re risking your life and the lives of those around you.” Here’s how to stay safe…

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INVEST IN A GOOD LADDER “Choose an appropriate ladder for the job and its duration, and set it up correctly,” says Lenny Tanuwidjaja, sales representative at Oz Ladders. “Consider which type you need: a standalone ladder, one to lean against a wall, or a standing-platform style? Any job that will take more than a few minutes requires a standing platform.” Also factor in the approximate load, including tools, he adds. If you have the skills and qualifications to do any work that involves electricity (see point 10), you’ll want to invest in an electricity-resistant fibreglass model.

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PROTECT YOUR EYES AND EARS “Protective eyewear is a must, as there is so much debris that can get in your eyes on a renovation site,” says Findlay. “Buy shatterproof eyewear that meets Australian standards for impact. Polarised eyewear is ideal for working outside, or choose a style with full-face coverage if you’ll be working with dust. Use goggles if you’re dealing with liquids or spraying water.” Around noisy tools, protect your hearing with earplugs or earmuffs. “Earmuffs that connect to your phone via Bluetooth will allow you to listen to music while you work.”

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DON’T RUSH IN Preparation is the key, says Cherie Barber, a veteran renovator who runs Renovating For Profit courses. “Before starting, make sure you have all the safety gear you need, including eye protection, gloves, kneepads and respirator or disposable dust masks,” she says. “Scope out the work that needs doing and make the necessary checks. If you just dive in with a sledgehammer, you risk breaking pipes, hitting wiring or even smashing into asbestos you didn’t realise was there.”

ESTABLISH A WORKSPACE Where possible, set up a dedicated space you can work in, suggests DIY specialist and professional renovator Natasha Dickins of Little Red Industries. “Having a clear space to work in allows you to operate tools safely and avoid nasty accidents, such as inadvertently leaving things switched on or having trailing cords around the site that can be a trip hazard.”

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DON’T NEGLECT YOUR HANDS “Quality gloves are not something to skimp on,” says Dickins. “In fact, you may need more than one pair: snug-fitting gloves with grip for carrying things, and waterproof gloves with long sleeves for mixing liquids,” she explains. “In addition to these, buy a box of disposable gloves for applying paint and varnish. Make sure that your gloves are a good fit, as poorly fitting ones can be a safety hazard.”

SAVE YOUR OWN SKIN Dust, powdery chemicals, scrapes and scratches can all irritate or damage your skin. “Cover up as much skin as possible. Wear long sleeves and pants in tough, tear-resistant fabric, and covered shoes,” says Dickins. Tie back long hair and remove any jewellery or accessories, she adds. “Also, avoid working when you’re hungry. You can lose concentration and that’s when accidents happen.”

Photograph from Getty Images.

PLAYING IT SAFE


‘Safety is paramount, whether it’s a simple DIY job or a multi-million-dollar project.’ Simon Croft, Housing Industry Australia

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BE MINDFUL OF FUMES Paints, adhesives, silicones, cleaning agents and power tools can all create unpleasant – and sometimes even toxic – fumes, which you definitely don’t want to breathe in. “Wear a mask when you’re sanding, cutting or working with dust, plaster, cement or chemical cleaners,” advises Findlay. “A half- or full-face respirator will give you more protection than a disposable mask. Limit the amount of time you are exposed to fumes and ventilate the area well by opening windows and doors, supplemented with a fan or exhaust if necessary.”

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USE TOOLS SAFELY “Every tool is capable of causing injury, even non-powered ones,” says Simon Croft, executive director of building policy at Housing Industry Australia. “Make sure you know how to operate tools properly by reading the instructions or seeking advice online,” he urges. “And never use power tools with damaged cords, or operate them near gas or flammable liquids.”

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BE OLDER-HOME SAVVY “If you’re renovating a pre-1980s property, there’s a good chance it will contain asbestos,” warns Barber. “When asbestos sheeting is disturbed, such as when you’re drilling or cutting into it, the fibres become airborne, which poses a serious health risk. It’s particularly problematic in bathroom renovations, as the sheeting is often hidden behind tiles. Engage asbestos professionals to safely remove and dispose of it.” Lead paint, widely used until 1970, is another hazard to be wary of, says Findlay. “Sanding or scraping old lead paint scatters the toxic residue, which can be dangerous. You can test for the presence of lead paint, and there are safe removal methods available, generally requiring professional help.”

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ELECTRICAL WORK IS NOT FOR AMATEURS “An electrical injury can be silent, instant and deadly, so leave the electrical work to the professionals,” says Findlay. “Also, be aware that some types of electrical and gas-fitting work will require the appropriate licence.”

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CHECK SUPPORTING WEIGHTS “A ceiling will never support the weight of a person, so stay on the rafters when you’re up there,” says Findlay. “And be aware that old houses have had a lot more wear and tear than newer ones, so tread very carefully. Look for signs of decay, gaps between the skirting boards and floor, and any ‘bounce’ in the floor as warning signs that support may be compromised.”

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ZONE OFF LIVING AREAS Should you choose to live on site during the renovation work, keep your living areas clean and clear, says Croft. “Contain waste, fumes and dust by sealing off those parts of the house you’re not renovating. Cover the floor with plastic sheets and ask your neighbours to seal their windows and doors, too.”

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KEEP A TIDY SITE “If you have trailing cords and mess everywhere, someone is bound to get injured, so keep the site tidy,” says Barber. “Clean up materials and put away tools as you go, and disconnect power tools when not in use,” advises Croft. You should pay particular attention to keeping walkways free from debris, dirt, offcuts and tools, adds Findlay. Vacuuming up accumulated debris and fine dust at the end of each working day is a good habit to get into, says Brad Raftery, product training manager at Kärcher. He recommends a wet-and-dry vacuum cleaner with high suction power for the job.

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SECURE YOUR TOOLS “Prevent tools from being stolen or falling into the hands of kids by storing them in a secure place,” says Findlay. “A locked garage or shed is best. Or make one room the tool locker and keep it locked.” #

ENSURE YOU’RE INSURED Before embarking on a renovation or building project, check that you will be covered by insurance for the duration of the work, advises Naomi Findlay. “Some standard contents policies don’t cover renovation work above certain price points, over certain lengths of time, or if your property is unoccupied for a certain length of time,” she explains. “There are many variables involved and every insurance company is different, so it’s best to contact your insurer to find out. Make sure you have the right information to hand before you call: namely, the value of the renovation, the duration of the job and the occupancy details.”


STARTS WITH CORINTHIAN THE BLONDE OAK COLLECTION Featuring an American White Oak veneer, the pure versatility and simple elegance of each Blonde Oak entrance door makes them perfect for creating a clean, contemporary feel for your home. For further door inspiration, visit corinthian.com.au


ADVICE H G

Smart shopper

WINDOWS & DOORS

From near-invisible frames to statement doors, the openings of our homes just got a lot more interesting, writes Georgia Madden.

A strong grid structure ensures these windows deliver character to a new build. From the Loft series by A&L Windows and Doors, they’re a little bit country farmhouse and a little bit industrial style. Turn the page for more.

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‘ I N A R E N OVAT I O N P RO J EC T, W E WO U L D T Y P I C A L LY A L LOW 5 P E R C E N T O F T H E C O N T RAC T S U M F O R W I N D OWS A N D D O O R S , A N D 7. 5 P E R C E N T I N A N E W B U I L D.’ Rebecca Naughtin, architect

In this Melbourne home renovation by architecture and interior design practice Multiplicity, a former bedroom was transformed into a living space with the addition of timber sliding doors leading to a rear patio and garden. The steel column is structural.

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ADVICE H G

1 4

2

5

*Supply only. All dimensions are HxW. Photograph by Martina Gemmola (opposite).

3

A

beautiful window or door does more than provide access or let in a breeze – it can boost your indoor-outdoor connection, frame a view and even reduce your home’s overall energy consumption. Windows, in particular, have undergone a serious upgrade in recent years. “Many people don’t realise how impressive they have become,” says Victoria-based architect Rebecca Naughtin. “And we’re talking more than just energy efficiency; the latest highperformance windows can help regulate noise, provide security and privacy, and even minimise cleaning time.” Doors, meanwhile, have moved beyond the purely functional, and are making a bold visual statement in contemporary homes – think interior doors clad in exotic wood veneers and super-sized pivoting front doors with surfaces in metal, concrete, terracotta and stone.

“Architects and interior designers are increasingly using personalised designs in doors to make them as much installation art as a functional piece,” says Kris Torma, managing director at Axolotl. “Nickel is trending right now – it has a warm, grey hue and isn’t as bold as bronze or copper.” Our passion for a seamless indooroutdoor flow and uninterrupted views has resulted in ever-larger windows and exterior doors. “Architects are removing more wall space and designing larger glass panels that go from floor to ceiling and span the full width of an opening, which can be up to 4.5m wide by 2.6m high,” says Michael Canturi, director at Vitrocsa Australia. “They’re loving huge panel sizes, minimal frames, and flexibility in design and configuration.” Christine Evans, director of marketing at Stegbar, concurs, adding: “While bifolds are still popular and allow >

1 Architectural Timber Range white-painted picture window, from $3135/1500x2200mm*; and tilt-and-turn window, $2891/ 1500x900mm*, Paarhammer Windows & Doors; paarhammer. com.au. 2 Moda Collection PMOD4 painted-MDF door, from $362/2040x820mm*; and Quickslide PMOD1 painted-MDF sliding doors, from $270/ 2040x520mm*, Corinthian Doors; corinthian.com.au. 3 ‘Cortex’ bronze-coated entry door, from $5000/2100x900mm*, Axolotl; axolotl.com.au. 4 AR41D painted Vulcan-timber door, $1100/ 2340x870mm, and Classic Barn Door Track, $300, Parkwood Doors; parkwooddoors.com.au. 5 ADL ‘Piana’ double sliding doors with anodised-aluminium frame and safety glass, $11,352/ 2700x2350mm*, Exclusive Doors; exclusive-doors.com.au.


DOOR DECIDER It’s important to choose the right exterior door style for the application, says Christine Evans Stegbar. The main ones include: Bifold doors Great for entertaining as you can open up completely. Can combine with a retractable insect screen. Stacking doors Ideal for larger openings and where you want to maximise a view. Can combine with a lockable security screen. Hinged and french doors A more traditional style for smaller openings, such as off a bedroom. Sliding doors An easy-tooperate style that lets in plenty of light. Best for small openings. Cavity sliders These disappear into wall cavities altogether. Specify during building stage.

SMART LOCKS With the introduction of keyless front-door locks, you’ll never worry about forgetting your keys again. “Most digital locks have multiple easy-to-use access methods, including a PIN code, swipe card and key-override system,” says George Issa, spokesperson for Digital Locks Sydney. “Other systems use fingerprint access or can be controlled via Bluetooth/NFC [near field communication] on your phone,” he adds. “One of the latest trends is to integrate a keyless door lock into your smart-home system, such as Apple HomeKit, which allows you to control the locking device from anywhere in the world.”

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a greater opening, we’re seeing more sliding and stacking doors because they’re streamlined and easy to operate. Cavity stacking options, which disappear into a wall cavity, are also appealing.” Versatility is key: the latest windows tilt and turn, wrap around room corners and offer multiple opening options, while external doors slide around corners, can be opened from left or right, or lift up and disappear from view altogether. According to Evans, other window styles gaining traction include louvres, which are great for air flow, and sashless windows that feature two frameless, moving panels of glass for an unobstructed view. Automation is making window control easier than ever, especially in hard-toreach spots. “Powered louvre, awning and casement windows can be opened or closed using a switch on the wall or an app on your phone, providing a cleaner, more streamlined look,” says Athina Solomou, marketing director at Trend Windows & Doors. Frame styles are embracing both ends of the spectrum. “Minimalist window frames and tracks, which blur the lines between inside and out, are trending,” says Naughtin. At the same time, Evans reports a surge in the popularity of bold profiles and chunky frames. Choose from

timber frames, which have a warm, natural appeal; low-maintenance aluminium styles; and composite frames, which combine wood (inside) and aluminium (outside). Or opt for black steel, with a refined industrial feel. While vast swathes of glass might be perfect for capturing light and views, poorly chosen or fitted windows can add significantly to your heating and cooling costs. According to the government’s Your Home website, up to 40 per cent of heat energy can be lost through windows. To compare the latest energy-savvy designs, it helps to understand U values. These measure how well windows retain heat in winter and keep heat out in summer; the lower the U value, the better the performance. “New developments include soft-coat low-E [low emissivity] as part of double- or triple-glazed panes, with wide air gaps that help lower U-values and increase energy efficiency,” says Tony Paarhammer of Paarhammer Windows & Doors. “The latest product is sun-activated tinted glass that automatically increases shading and lowers energy consumption.” Doors and windows don’t come cheap, so you’ll want to allocate a decent portion of your renovation or build budget – about 5 to 7.5 per cent – from the get-go. The end result will be well worth it. #

CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW Lift-slide doors, stacker lift-slide doors and corner lift-slide timber doors, POA, Paarhammer Windows & Doors; paarhammer.com.au. ‘Yale Assure’ keyless digital deadbolt by Assa Abloy, $495; yalelock.com.au. ‘Alumiere’ aluminium stacking door, POA, Stegbar; stegbar.com.au.

Photograph by Peter Hyatt (courtyard), courtesy Viridian.

H G ADVICE


FSA/TWD0249/01

SET YOUR OWN TREND WITH BOTANICA. Your home is the ultimate reflection of who you are. The design decisions you make and the materials you choose will determine your lifestyle. With timber windows and doors, your possible palette is almost unlimited, whether you want a traditional feel or are looking to add an organic touch to a sleek modern design. So set your own trend. Explore the Botanica range at trendwindows.com.au

BOTANICA Timber series


In focus

OUTDOOR ROOMS Warmer days invite us to step outside, so take inspiration from these beautiful spaces.

T

oday, the distinction between indoors and out can be a little blurry. That’s a good thing, says interior designer Ann King, because it means we’re giving our outdoor living areas the attention to detail they deserve. “If it’s designed well, you gain an extra living space that’s comfortable, inviting and flexible,” she adds. To achieve this result, approach the outdoors as you would the indoors: consider light and temperature; think about scale and materials, and how they relate to your interiors; and have a clear idea of the way you want to use this part of your home.


ADVICE H G

Text by Sarah Pickette. Styling by Melissa Heath (opposite). Photography by Matt Lowden (this page, top), Prue Ruscoe (this page, bottom) & Chris Warnes (opposite).

D E S I G N C E N T RA L T H E P E RT H H O M E O F E X T E R I O R D E S I G N C O N S U LTA N T A S C H E R S M I T H W RA P S A R O U N D A C O U RT YA R D ( L E F T ) W H E R E A N O R N A M E N TA L G RA P E V I N E P R OV I D E S DA P P L E D S U M M E R S H A D E . C O M F O RT COMES IN THE FORM OF AN ECO O U T D O O R S O FA A N D C H A I R F R O M E M P I R E H O M E WA R E S . A C O P P E R B AC K E D G R E E N WA L L I S H O M E TO F E R N S , E XOT I C S A N D S U C C U L E N T S . “ T H E F E R N S H AV E S U R P R I S E D M E ,” S AYS A S C H E R . “ T H E Y R E A L LY L OV E T H E WA L L .” A S C H E R S M I T H .C O M . AU

HARBOURSIDE HAVEN The harbour view is everything to the owners of this Sydney home (opposite), so making the most of the incredible aspect was top of their brief to interior designer Thomas Hamel. “Simplicity and textural interest were key to the outdoor area of this urban beach cottage,” says Hamel. “They’re delivered via linen and timber, creating a relaxed coastal vibe.” The Giati teak sofas were specially imported from the US and teamed with a Cavit & Co table and cushions in outdoor fabric from Ascraft, The Textile Company and Milgate. thomashamel.com MODERN MED “Our goal was to bring a traditional space to life with modern touches,” says Michelle Macarounas, interior designer and principal of Sydney’s Infinite Design, of this beautiful vinecovered terrace (right). She and her team brought in handmade terracotta tiles from Italy, then sourced a stone table from Parterre and teamed it with chairs from Ke-zu. “The end result is a space that’s open yet intimate; it’s my favourite spot in the home.” > Infinite.design AUSTRALIAN HOUSE & GARDEN |

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‘A good outdoor area responds to its surroundings. On this project, that meant embracing the rock wall this home is built into.’ Ann King, interior designer 200 |

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Photography by Amanda Prior (this page) & Steve Ryan (opposite).

T H R O U G H T H E R O O F BY I N V E ST I N G I N A V E R G O L A O P E N -A N D - C L O S E R O O F SYST E M , T H E OW N E R S O F T H I S SY D N E Y H O M E I N S TA N T LY M A D E T H E I R O U T D O O R A R E A M O R E U S E A B L E , S AYS I N T E R I O R D E S I G N E R A N N K I N G . P LU S H F U R N I T U R E F R O M C O S H LIVING IS THE PERFECT FOIL FOR THE TILES A N D T H E D RA M AT I C R O C K WA L L T H AT COCOONS THE HOME. A N N K I N G .C O M . AU


LASTING IMPRESSION The design team at Verandah House Interiors had trouble tracking down the perfect outdoor sofa for this Brisbane property, so they designed and manufactured their own. “We wanted something light so it was easy to move around,” says Jess Bandeira, the company’s interior designer and director. “We opted for plain, ultradurable fabrics so our clients could add pattern to suit the season.” The furniture is positioned on silvertravertine pavers and complemented by oriental stools, also from Verandah House Interiors. “Living in Queensland is all about embracing the connection between indoors and out.” > verandahhouse.com.au

Classic shapes ensure outdoor furniture stands the test of time.


‘ Your home’s outdoor area should offer a variety of experiences and ways to use it.’ Shaun Lockyer, architect

F U L L C OV E RAG E W H E N L A N D S C A P E A R C H I T E C T M A RY- C L A I R E DA L L I N G O F B OTA N I C A G A R D E N S T Y L I N G REDESIGNED THE 16X3.6M DECK AT T H E R E A R O F H E R M E L B O U R N E H O M E ( R I G H T ) , S H E B U I LT I N P L E N T Y O F P R OT E C T I O N . “ TO L E T T H E L I G H T I N , B U T N OT TO O M U C H , I O P T E D F O R A P O LYC A R B O N AT E R O O F,” S H E S AYS . “ B O STO N I V Y G R OW S OV E R O N E E N D, W H I L E A N AW N I N G B L O C K S T H E W E S T E R N S U N AT T H E OT H E R . I T ’ S I N VA LUA B L E I N S U M M E R .” ## B OTA N I C AG A R D E N S T Y L I N G .C O M

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Photography by Scott Burrows (top) & Anna Robinson/bauersyndication.com.au (bottom).

BEST FEATURE The poolside entertaining area of this new build in Brisbane (left) has a magnificent ‘chimney’ and elevated fire pit as its centrepiece. “We wanted to position the fire so it’s at eye level when you’re seated by it,” says architect Shaun Lockyer, who was behind this design. “This spot is visible from inside the house and so the chimney creates a de facto bookend for the outdoor living space.” The stone might be the star inclusion in the outdoor area, but the fire bricks in the hearth add richness and even more texture to the materials palette. “A good outdoor space strikes the right balance between function, good looks and character,” says Shaun. lockyerarchitects.com.au


BRAND PROMOTION

POOLSIDE PICNIC Head poolside for a sun-soaked picnic with outdoor tableware from the Australian House & Garden range, only at Myer

A pastel and navy colour palette keeps your outdoor escape modern and clean, with soft throws, woven placemats and a classic wicker picnic basket adding a touch of homestyle comfort.

Clockwise from bottom left 4-person wicker basket, $129.95.

‘Wongarra’ fringed cotten-linen throw, $149.95. ‘Jervis Bay’ premium jacquard velour beach towel, $39.95 (available in store from October). ‘Thar’ woven placemat in White, $12.95. ‘Firewheel’ melamine dinner plate, $10.95. ‘Eyre’ striped yarn-dye tea towel in Red (21x21cm), $19.95/two. Melamine side plate, $7.95, dinner plate, $10.95, and small bowl, $7.95. Cutlery from wicker basket set. Clear acrylic wine glass, $7.95. ‘Mission’ acrylic jug, $24.95. Wooden cheese board $29.95.

See more of the new and exclusive Australian House & Garden collection instore and online at myer.com.au


Property

PAY YOUR WAY

WE’VE FOUND YOUR FUTURE COLOUR

Renovations don’t come cheap, so look into all financing options first, writes Harvey Grennan.

H

ome renovation is a $33-billion-ayear industry in Australia and set to get even bigger, given that the number of houses in the key renovation bracket of 30 to 35 years old will rise substantially in the next few years. But where does all the money come from? How do you find the readies to pay for that upgrade to your daily lifestyle? The best option, but perhaps the least realistic for most people, is to save up the cash. Next best is to extend your existing home loan. The worst is to use a credit card or personal loan; interest rates on both of these are much higher, so they should only be considered for small works or if you’re in a position to pay them off quickly. Also worth considering is a line of credit from your bank or another lender. In this case, you pay interest only on the money you use and, as you pay off the balance, you can re-borrow up to a set limit without reapplying. There are two approaches to using an existing mortgage to finance a reno. If you’ve been making extra payments along the way, you may be able to redraw those funds. But of course, that may not be enough, and not all home loans have a redraw facility. The other option is applying to increase your existing loan. A danger here is that this step may take your loan above 80 per cent of the home’s valuation and incur costly lender’s mortgage insurance (which only protects the bank, not you). If you can borrow the money based on existing home equity, a simple way to refinance is to increase your loan and place the renovation money in a 100-per-cent offset account. This way,

you’re effectively not paying interest on that money until you use it, advises loan-comparison website Canstar. You may, of course, look for a new lender and refinance an existing loan for a larger amount if you can find a better deal – that is, a lower interest rate and/or better features. But refinancing can incur additional costs, such as upfront valuation and application fees, plus exit fees or other bank charges. Before you do anything, decide on a sensible figure for the renovation budget. “It’s important not to overcapitalise,” says Chad Egan of Sydney’s Cobden & Hayson property group. “Unless you’re looking to stay in the property long term, cosmetic renovations should generally come to about 10 per cent of the property’s value. “Keep a common theme throughout and think carefully about what will appeal to the widest range of buyers,” he adds. “Don’t get too attached to making the renovation personal. Areas that generally add the most significant value are kitchens, bathrooms, carpet or floorboards, painting, light fixtures and blinds/curtains. “In more expensive suburbs, however, there’s generally a demand for higherend renovations. Providing that the style and theme suit the marketplace, increasing your budget could prove to be a worthwhile exercise.” #

The Dulux® Wash & Wear® Pretint Range is expertly curated from our most contemporary and popular colours, like Dulux Natural White. The colours are on-trend, on the shelf and ready to go on your walls. Easy.

Dulux Natural White

EXPLORE THE RANGE, AND LEARN ABOUT THE SUPERIOR WASHABILITY OF DULUX WASH & WEAR AT dulux.com.au

First things first… It’s always a good idea to have a pre-renovation building survey by a reputable inspector. This could pick up any faults in the building that haven’t been factored in by the architect or builder, which could lead to expensive variations in the plans later on.

Please note due to limitations of printing process, photographic and printed images and swatches may not represent the true colour. Dulux, Wash & Wear and the Sheepdog device are registered trademarks of DuluxGroup (Australia) Pty Ltd


H G ADVICE

Green house

UP FOR SALES

Divert goods from landfill and earn a little cash by joining the annual Garage Sale Trail – it makes dollars and sense, writes Sarah Pickette.

W

ith spring clear-outs happening across the nation, a question inevitably arises: what to do with the perfectly good stuff you no longer want? “The answer is to host a garage sale,” says Darryl Nichols, co-founder of the Garage Sale Trail. This year’s event takes place on the weekend of October 20-21 and an estimated 400,000 Australians are expected to take part, either as sellers or potential buyers. The reasons to sign up are pretty compelling, says Nichols. “Last year there were 15,151 registered garage sales and stalls, with the average household sale making $379 on the day, community groups $650 and schools $1500.” In total, some $3.9 million changed hands in 2017. Furthermore, 93 per cent of participants say they’d do it again and 86 per cent say they’re now more conscious of the role they can play in reducing the waste. “A lot of us are becoming overwhelmed by our ‘stuff’,” says Tanya Lewis, an eco-conscious decluttering expert (ecoorganiser.com.au) and Garage Sale Trail ambassador. “I think there’s also more appreciation for the fact that finite resources are being used and manufactured in an energy-intensive manner to create the things we need and want.” There are a few secrets to hosting a successful garage sale, says Lewis, and the first is to start getting organised early, three or four weeks ahead of the sale date. “Place a box in each room and ask everyone in your home to place items deemed suitable for sale in them,” she advises. “Then sort everything into the good, the bad and the ugly. Anything beyond repair is ‘bad’ and should be recycled or responsibly disposed. And remember, ‘ugly’ might be beautiful to someone else.”

RESELLING CAN EXTEND THE USEFUL LIFE OF THINGS YOU OWN BY GIVING OTHERS A CHANCE TO ENJOY THEM, KEEPING THEM OUT OF LANDFILL AND SAVING MATERIALS THAT WOULD OTHERWISE BE USED TO MAKE NEW ITEMS.

Everyone loves a bargain, so once you’ve decided what you’re selling, check out how much similar stuff is selling for at garage sales, op shops or online. Consider how best to display it all and start gathering boxes and bags for your buyers. Think about where to locate your signs and prepare for what you’ll need on the day. “This might include saving up small notes and coins for change, organising music, buying stickers for price labels, asking friends or family to be an extra set of hands, and arranging tables, tarps and chairs to sit on,” advises Lewis. Finally, get ready to haggle, laugh and have fun. “At the end of the day,” Lewis says, “you can sit back, count your money and feel good about the unwanted stuff you’ve decluttered and diverted from landfill.” # To register for this year’s Garage Sale Trail, go to garagesaletrail.com.au.

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3 SMART BUYS

Made from bamboo and safe from BPA chemicals, the ‘Bambu’ meal set, $49, features a pretty bird-and-butterfly design. bbbyokids.com

Packing soup or stew for lunch is no problem, thanks to this Black+Blum 400ml insulated flask with BPA-free spoon, $50. everten.com.au

Great for lunchboxes, picnics or camping, this ‘Light My Fire’ spork in Cyan Blue, $4, is made of tough, BPA-free Tritan plastic. biome.com.au


Easy!


W H AT ’ S T R E N D I N G

LIG HT & SHADE With over 30 years’ experience, Spotlight are Australia’s Curtain & Blind Specialists. With a huge range of ready-to-hang curtains & blinds plus DIY fabrics and custom made options – we have the perfect window treatment to finish your home no matter your style or budget.

Shop now at spotlightstores.com

/spotlightstores

@spotlightstores


Open the door to spring and embrace it, boots and all.

‘The Collector’ wall shelves, $500, ‘The Lake House’ panels with hooks, $350, and ‘The Traditional’ bench, $450, all Willow & Wood. ON SHELVES from left House Doctor nesting basket, $149/set of three, Telegram. ‘Jazmin’ scarf, $20, French Knot. Brass mister, $55, Quality Products. ‘Fejka’ faux plant,

$10, Ikea. Serax ‘Moss’ plant pot, $15, Telegram. Panama hat, $85, The Society Inc. ‘Nomad’ Turkish towel, $59, Atolyia. ‘Coral’ fleece throw, $6, Target. ON HOOKS from left ‘Riviera’ Turkish towel, $47, Farmer Drew. Porthole mirror, $80, Tara Dennis Store. Ruffle Hem denim jacket, $140, and ‘Eva’ tote, $60, both Seed Heritage. ON BENCH Faux orchid, $128, Florabelle. ‘Favorite’ cushion cover, $135, French Consul. Nesting baskets (as before). ‘Traditional’ Turkish towel, $30, Loomed. ON WALL Green Leaf ‘Volkameria fragrans’ print, $60 (framed), Alfresco Emporium. Eggshell Acrylic paint in Triple Strength Newport Blue, $46/L, Porter’s Paints. For similar panelling, try EasyRegency, Easycraft. ON DOOR Aqua Gloss Enamel paint in Antique Blue, $55/L, Porter’s Paints. Victorian ‘0912’ lever latch, $92, Early Settler. ON FLOOR Willow Tree golf umbrella, $25, Umbrellas & Parasols. ‘Positano’ umbrella stand, $90, Florabelle. ‘Honeysuckle’ gumboots, $94, Products of Excellence. ‘Art Select Parquet’ vinyl planks, from $90/m², Karndean Designflooring. >


H G SHOPPING

BUSY SEASON Spring ushers in a flurry of activity around the home and garden. These beaut buys will have you whistling while you work. STYLI NG Sarah Maloney P HOTO GRAP HY Kristina Soljo

50+ FAB finds under $150

‘Macedon’ buffet, $1899, and faux hydrangeas in pot, $37, Provincial Home Living. ‘Ekby Hemnes’ shelves, $50 each, Ikea. ‘Telltale’ brackets, $35 each, The Society Inc. House Doctor bin, $139, Telegram. ON BUFFET from left ‘Anne’ basket, $20, and ‘Provincial’ tea towels, $10 each, all Provincial Home Living. Acacia paddle board, $9, Kmart. ‘Blanco’ cake stand with dome, $85, French Country Collections. Morphy Richards ‘Accents’ 1.5L electric kettle, $139, Harvey Norman. ‘Fleur’ paddle board, $70, Tara Dennis Store. Glass canister, $40/set of three, and spice jars, $69/set of 12, all Little Label Co. Countertop spice rack, $45, The Timba Trend+Folk. ‘Nomad’ garlic keeper, $20, Salt&Pepper. Paper towel stand, $42, Heaven in Earth. TOP SHELF from left Kinto ‘Kakomi Donabe’ pot, $149, Telegram. LLC flip canisters, from $15 each, and pantry labels, $2 each, all Little Label Co. Mason Cash Original mixing bowls, from $40 each, Alfresco Emporium. BOTTOM SHELF from left Canisters and labels (as before). ‘Hemingway’ clip-top jars, from $25 each, Howards Storage World. ‘Cowrie’ cheeseboard, $30, and ‘Aster’ mortar and pestle, $50, both Papaya. ‘Stream Line’ kitchen scales, $58, Tara Dennis Store. ‘Mode’ canisters, from $15 each, Salt&Pepper. ON WALL Chunky Decorative coat hook, $13, Schots Home Emporium. ‘Manor’ apron, $40, Raine & Humble.

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Rubberwood citrus reamer, $5, Alfresco Emporium.

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‘Estate Rose’ cott o glove, $13, Raine n oven & Humble.

Agee silicone and wood spatula spoon, $20, Raine & Humble.

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Marble and mangowood board (33cm), $45, Alfresco Emporium.

‘Halifax’ brass hooded-cup cabinet pull, $32, Hepburn Hardware.

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Bee (inc ch an lud d zin ing full c-alloy -siz e br dustp oom an ), H set, eav $60 en i n Ea r

‘Bamboo’ brass handle, $28, Hepburn Hardware.

Stonewall Kitchen Blueberry pancake & waffle mix, $16, Alfresco Emporium.

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Onya recycled-plastic bulk food bags, from $8 each, Farmer Drew. >

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m), $25, Nel Lusso.

Stylist’s assistants: Libby Williams, Michele Mandalinic & Paolo Zoioglou.

Beeswax reusable food wraps, $30/pack of four, Bee Wrappy.

Stonewall Kitchen Maine maple syrup, $27/250ml, Alfresco Emporium.

Agee Queen glass lidded jar, $9, Raine & Humble.

‘Nomad’ ceramic canister, $30, Salt&Pepper.


ent.

Laura Ashley Garden ‘Kimono Olive Sand’ heavy-duty leather gloves, $40, Products of Excellence.

Gardeners body wash, $28, and body lotion, $32, Crabtree & Evelyn.

Cellfast fibreglasscomposite hand fork and trowel, $16 each, Quality Products. Brass topiary hand shears, $30, The Lost + Found Department.

Pot brush with wooden handle, $45, Heaven in Earth.

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Gardener’s soap, $18 each, Heaven in Earth.

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+ Lost e h T Burgon & Ball ash and aluminium mid-handled shrub rake, $39,

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‘2970’ aluminium pruning shears, $50, Products of Excellence.

Powdercoated-steel Seed Packet Storage tin, $52, Quality Products.

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t.


SHOPPING H G

‘Haven’ bar table, $499, Early Settler. Tool rail, $71, Heaven in Earth. Ecopots ‘Hanging Brussels’ planter, $44, Quality Products. Faux ivy, $18/110cm vine, Florabelle. ON TABLE from left Faux succulent in pot, $40, Florabelle. ‘Herbs’ pot, $12, French Country Collections. Burgon & Ball twine dispenser, $24, Quality Products. Zinc bucket, $55, Red Fox Runs. ‘Corfu’ pot, $40, Papaya. Vintage florist’s bucket, $95, Scout House. Indoor watering can, $122, Quality Products. ‘Lithic’ planter, $150, Salt&Pepper. Faux lavender in pot, $20, Bed Bath N’ Table. ON RAIL RHS digging fork and spade, $125 each, and Cellfast hand fork, $16, all Quality Products. ‘Honeysuckle’ tool bag, $31, Products of Excellence. ON WINDOWSILLS clockwise from top left Serax ‘Moss’ pot, $13, Telegram. Haws mist sprayer, $48, The Potting Shed. ‘Antique’ string and scissor set, $30, Bed Bath N’ Table. House Doctor shelf, $40, Serax flower pots in Blush Pink and Forest Green, from $15 each, and orchid planter, $20, all Telegram. Linen cord twine, $25/500g, Scout House. ON FLOOR from left AW18 gumboots, $90, Hubble + Duke. ‘Mira’ basket, $70, Tara Dennis Store. Scratch Protectors gloves, $44, Quality Products. Prism lantern, $50, Bed Bath N’ Table. ‘Barcelona’ stool, $229, Provincial Home Living. ‘Kimono Olive Sand’ garden hat, $40, Products of Excellence. For Where to Buy, see page 225. #

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BRAND PROMOTION

Eden by Warwick is a large-scale, floral-print cotton for colour lovers.

MAKE A STATEMENT

1

Use fabrics to create layering and depth in your home. Within the Warwick range you’ll find a versatile range of plains, textures, woven patterns and prints.

2

Updates are easy with the latest releases from Warwick. Fabric in a statement print or on-trend colour will instantly refresh a room.

3

Scaled-up florals capture the beauty of the natural world. The vibrant new prints in the Warwick range would be perfect on an ottoman or armchair.

Have a little fun playing with prints and colours from Warwick’s many fabric collections.

Express yourself Today’s beautiful fabrics provide the fast route to comfort, layering and a signature style for your home. Personal style comes from the heart, so when you’re choosing fabrics for your home, always stick to what you love. Today, there are no hard-and-fast rules for decorating your home – the days of having everything strictly matching have passed. Instead, it’s all about experimenting, having fun and confidently embracing the colours and prints that make you smile.

COLOUR CODE

The secret to teaming multicoloured and graphic fabrics is to ensure they’re tonally compatible.

Be bold when it comes to colour. Here, a cushion in a Warwick floral from the Eden collection is teamed with rust-coloured and deniminspired plains. By picking up on colours in the floral print, this is a winning combination.

PRINT PERFECTION

SURPRISE ELEMENT

Have fun with pattern. Warwick has a wealth of wonderful prints, including this Simona Tropical fabric, which pops with vibrancy against its dark background. When you use a bold fabric make it the star of the space.

Embrace the unexpected. Mix patterns, prints and plains from the Warwick range – you might be surprised at how well they work together. The secret to pulling this look off successfully is to ensure there’s tonal harmony.

Go to warwick.com.au for your fill of fabric inspiration, or visit @warwickfabrics on Instagram


SHOPPING H G

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9 by design

OUTDOOR FABRICS

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Styling by Sara Åkesson. Photograph by Kristina Soljo. For similar vintage kite reel, try Etsy.

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1 ‘Vol’ polyester outdoor fabric in Mint, from $72/m, Sparkk; sparkk.com.au. 2 ‘Malindi’ polypropylene outdoor fabric in Sand, $73/m, Warwick Fabrics; warwick.com.au. 3 Karkahna ‘Quatrefoil’ polyester outdoor fabric in Biscaya, $199/m, Tigger Hall Design; tiggerhall.com. 4 Jab ‘Elephants’ polypropylene outdoor fabric (top), $281/m, and ‘Casbah’ polyester outdoor fabric in Dark Blue/Grey, $336/m, Seneca Textiles; senecatextiles.com.au. 5 Pintura Studio ‘Mallorca’ Sunbrella acrylic outdoor fabric in Celadon, POA, Motivo Textiles; motivo.net.au. 6 ‘Larapinta’ polyester-polypropylene outdoor fabric in Cumquat, $69/m, No Chintz; nochintz.com. 7 ‘Saylor’ polyester-canvas outdoor fabric in Navy, $30/m, Spotlight; spotlightstores.com. 8 3Beaches ‘Palm Paisley’ Sunbrella acrylic outdoor fabric in Sapphire, $126/m, White Verandah; whiteverandah.com.au. 9 Designers Guild ‘Soraya’ acrylic outdoor fabric in Graphite, $153/m, Radford; radfordfurnishings.com.au. Backdrop in Eggshell Acrylic paint in Dew (top) and Pretty in Pink, $102/4L each, Porter’s Paints; porterspaints.com. #

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H G SHOPPING

9 by design

mer/gypsum house y( g ), , ; sland.com.au. 2 Copper house er (13cm high), from $72, Mother of Pearl & Sons Trading; motherofpearl.com. 3 Sandleford ‘Slimline’ rcoated-steel house number (12cm high), $22, Bunnings; bunnings.com.au. 4 Stainless-steel house number high), from $35, QT Home Decor; qthomedecor.com. 5 Tradco 1395PB brass house number (7.5cm high), L Keeler; sclkeeler.com.au. 6 ‘Wire’ steel house number in White (10.6cm high), $39, Finnish Design Shop; designshop.com. 7 Blackened-steel house number (8.5cm high), $8, The Society Inc; thesocietyinc.com.au. 8 Planet X’ concrete house number in Blue with exposed-aggregate finish (12.7cm high), about $19, Concrete Digits; concretedigits.com. 9 ‘Knockout’ ceramic house number (11.5cm high), $75, Robert Plumb; robertplumb.com.au. #

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Produced by Sophie Wilson. Currency conversion correct at time of printing.

HOUSE NUMBERS


proudly australian since 1947

quality cast outdoor aluminium furniture lifetime warranty - timeless designs

FREE DELIVERY AUSTRALIA WIDE only available at: www.colonialcastingslifestyle.com


ADVICE H G

Buyer’s guide

OUTDOOR FURNITURE

Get set for summer with the latest high-performance designs in natural timbers, sleek metals and luxe fabrics, writes Georgia Madden.

‘Hunter’ teak easy chair with canvas upholstery in Rickshaw, $799, Eco Outdoor; ecooutdoor.com.au. >

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W

ith our enviable climate, it’s little surprise that Australians love spending time outside. “We use our outdoor spaces all year round – gathering by a barbecue, reading on loungers or lazing on day beds in summer, and huddling around a fire pit with a glass of red wine in winter,” says Jen Stumbles, owner of Eco Outdoor. As such, the outdoor furniture we choose really needs to deliver. “In Australia, we are presented with salty sea air, searing heat and freezing temperatures, so it’s important to select pieces made from quality, sustainable materials that will retain their beauty over time,” says Gillianne Griffiths, interior designer and creative director of Melbourne firm Studio Griffiths. When it comes to seating, the latest styles are all about comfort. “We’re seeing relaxed, generous and organic pieces coming through, which invite you to sink into them,” says Susan Tait, creative director of Tait. Unexpected detailing adds to the appeal; rather than hard or fully upholstered backrests, these pieces feature woven belting or strapping that gives the furniture a wonderful visual lightness. A sense of honesty and simplicity in design has become more apparent, notes Tait. “Outdoor furniture is being pared back to basics, with more focus given to raw materials. There’s real attention to detail in the craftsmanship, with features such as exposed-seam stitching, stunning timber joinery and materials that age gracefully.” With this relaxed aesthetic comes an acceptance – and an appreciation – of the effects of time and weather, says Fiona Lyda, managing director of Sydney retailer Spence & Lyda. “Progressive exteriors are embracing the notion that weathering occurs, especially in Australia, and are allowing for, and even encouraging, it.” With many of us swapping backyards for balconies and courtyards, we’re also

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seeing the emergence of compact pieces characterised by sleek, contemporary lines and lightweight materials. These pieces tend to be visually quite minimal, low-maintenance and versatile. Key materials to look out for include durable and lightweight aluminium; soft-touch, easy-care polyurethane; and Fenix, a high-tech acrylic-resin material. Designers are adding impact to small-space pieces by combining unexpected materials, such as timber with powdercoated aluminium, or using luxurious surfaces you’d normally expect to find indoors, including resin, marble and decorative concrete forms. Meanwhile, plasticky outdoor fabric has also had a major upgrade, says David Hartikainen, NSW showroom manager at Space. “From B&B Italia, for example, you can now choose from luxe velvets and woven and textured fabrics in all manner of subtle colours and patterns, all designed for outdoor use.” When selecting furniture, think first about where and how it will be used. In a small space, rather than having separate dining and lounge settings, you might create one sociable setting with dual-purpose pieces, such as a deep lounge, an oversized low table and floor cushions or stump stools. The large coffee table makes the perfect dining table for casual meals, and the stump stools can double as side tables. When it comes to materials, consider your local climate. “In a coastal area where wind, salt and sun are factors, opt for tough, rust-resistant materials, such as stainless and powdercoated steel,” says Stumbles. “Teak is another good choice and will suit a coastal aesthetic.” As always, it pays to be smart about where you splurge and where you save. “What you lounge on is your big-ticket item, because that is where all your guests will gravitate to,” says Griffiths. “You can then save money on affordable side tables, stackable chairs and changeable accessories.” >

SOFT SPOT “Cushions should be made from suitable outdoor foam, so they drain easily and breathe when your skin is in contact with them, in all weather conditions,” says Jane Novembre, marketing director for Domo. “If your furniture is sheltered from the weather, generous Dacronwrapped cushions in reticulated foam, which has open cells for drainage, provide a really soft seat,” says Jen Stumbles of Eco Outdoor. (Dacron is a synthetic material that rounds cushion surfaces, reducing wear and making them more comfortable.) “If the cushions are exposed to full sun or heavy rain, we recommend less Dacron wrap, to aid ventilation and drainage.”

TEAM EFFORTS Designer collaborations with iconic Australian brands are creating new directions in outdoor furniture. This year, Tait launched the Seam collection by Adam Cornish, based on the idea of a chair shell tailored in the same manner as a piece of fabric, soon to be followed by an addition to the Trace seating line by Adam Goodrum. SP01 and Tom Fereday have put a fresh spin on ’50s patio furniture; next up is a range with Tim Rundle, plus more from Fereday. Eco Outdoor also joined forces with Fereday to produce the ‘Ibsen’ dining table and ‘Arc’ chair. Stylecraft recently worked with Seaton McKeon on the Paperclip seating range, and with Justin Hutchinson on the Raft Assemble and Arbor seating and tables.


ADVICE H G Outdoor chairs

Outdoor tables

SPO1 ‘Chee’ chair in Green, $515 Lightweight and stackable, this Tom Fereday design boasts curves in all the right places. It’s made of steel, with a protective coating to help it withstand the elements, and comes with a low-profile cushion (not shown) for extra comfort.

‘Mareba’ dining table, $299 Constructed from FSC-certified eucalyptus hardwood with a natural oil finish, this six-seater with traditional slatted surface looks equally at home in classic and contemporary settings. Bunnings; bunnings.com.au

Space; spacefurniture.com.au

‘Seam’ stacking chair in Pale Eucalypt, $750 Conceived by Melbourne designer Adam Cornish, this chic and clever seat is crafted from recyclable aluminium and stainless steel. An intriguing seam detail along the spine aids in draining water. Available in a choice of colours.

‘Terrazzo’ table in Sky Grey, $710 With its round form rising from a solid terrazzo base, this cafe-style table makes for a simple yet eye-catching feature, plus a great spot to place glasses and nibblies. The body is powdercoated, electro-galvanised steel for long-term durability.

Tait; madebytait.com.au

Hay; hayshop.com.au

Paperclip’ lounge chair in Headland, $1048 Crafted in perforated, powdercoated mild steel with merbau armrests, this design won’t ramp a smaller space. And it’s pecially treated for harsh Australian conditions.

‘Crete’ dining table, $1499 The smooth concrete surface of this substantial eight-seater will give any outdoor area a contemporary edge. And with a base in rust-resistant aluminium, it’s low-maintenance, too. Barbecues Galore; barbecuesgalore.com.au

StylecraftHome; stylecrafthome.com.au

Tribù ‘Nodi’ easy chair, $1936 With slender lines and interlaced rope back and seat, this easy chair will impart a sense of casual luxury to your outdoor area. The frame is powdercoated stainless steel and the rope detailing is made from Canax, a blend of hemp and PVC.

‘Elephant’ dining/side table in Anthracite Black, $1909 Clean, modern lines and a folding top distinguish this Italian design. With a lacquered aluminium base and laminate top, it’s a versatile piece that’s also resistant to stains, scratches and extreme weather.

Cosh Living; coshliving.com.au

Fanuli; fanuli.com.au


H G ADVICE ‘Kungsholmen’ sofa in Black-Brown/Beige, $575 An attractive and affordable three-seater, this design features a light and airy plastic rattan weave over a rustproof aluminium frame. The polyester covers are easily removed and can be machine-washed.

‘Sunview’ sofa, $2199 Perfect for an outdoor room, this funky armless three-seater has deep, foam-filled cushions over a marine-grade plywood frame and webbed base. The price includes two lumbar cushions (not shown).

Ikea; ikea.com.au

Harvey Norman; harveynorman.com.au

‘Perry’ sofa, $1899 There’s a welcoming vibe to this three-seater in karri gum with woven rope detailing. Seat, back and lumbar cushions are included. Complete the look with a matching armchair and coffee table from the range.

‘Mac’ sofa in Deep Sea, $4629 Galvanised steel and aluminium come together in this slim three-seater with spotted-gum armrests. The cushions are fast-drying reticulated foam in removable all-weather covers.

Domayne; domayneonline.com.au

Jardan; jardan.com.au

‘Bella’ sofa in White/Navy, $2995 This bamboo-look three-seater can stay outside in all seasons, thanks to its powdercoated aluminium frame, weather-resistant Sunbrella covers and high-performance foam cushioning, which drains and dries quickly.

‘Nomah’ sofa in Dove Tale, $4699 Smooth teak frames this timeless three-seater featuring easy-dry foam cushions. The luxe linen upholstery shown is best suited to undercover areas, but more robust fabrics are also available.

Alboo Outdoor Furniture; alboo.com.au

Eco Outdoor; ecooutdoor.com.au

‘Delta’ Outdoor III Package 1 modular sofa, $3390 With a hard-wearing steel frame, multi-layer foam cushions and removable Sunbrella covers, this elegant setting seats up to four. The configuration can easily be changed to suit an occasion.

Roda ‘Network’ sofa, $9625 Perfect for relaxing with a drink on the side, this FSC-certified teak two-seater has open-cell polyurethane foam cushions (with a Dacron layer) and covers in high-quality outdoor fabric. #

King Living; kingliving.com.au

Domo; domo.com.au

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Scatter cushions and other accessories not included unless specified.

Outdoor sofas


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STOCKISTS H G

WHERE TO BUY

Locate your nearest stockist by contacting the following suppliers.

# 3Beaches (07) 5578 6991; 3beaches.com.au A Aalto Colour 1800 009 600; aaltocolour.com Abey 1800 809 143; abey.com.au Academy Tiles+Surfaces (02) 9436 3566; academytiles.com.au Adairs 1300 783 005; adairs.com.au Adam Robinson Design (02) 8354 1077; adamrobinsondesign.com Airlite 1300 804 220; airlite.com.au Alfresco Emporium (02) 9919 0601; alfrescoemporium.com.au Anaca Studio 0407 159 893; anacastudio.com.au Armadillo & Co (02) 9698 4043; armadillo-co.com Armourply bigrivergroup.com.au Arranmore Furniture (03) 9818 7635; arranmorefurniture.com.au Artedomus (02) 9557 5060; artedomus.com Artek, available from Anibou (02) 9319 0655; anibou.com.au Artemide 1300 135 709; artemide.com.au Arthur G (03) 9543 4633; arthurg.com.au Ascraft (02) 9360 2311; ascraft.com.au Astor Metal Finishes (02) 9727 5622; astormetalfinishes.com.au Astra Walker (02) 8838 5100; astrawalker.com.au Atolyia 0401 818 157; atolyia.com Austral Masonry 1300 627 667; australmasonry.com.au B Barbara Barry, available from Laura Kincade (02) 9667 4415; laurakincade.com Barebones Art Space (02) 6687 1393 Barnaby Lane barnabylane.com.au Bauwerk Colour (08) 9433 3860; bauwerk.com.au Beacon Lighting 1300 232 266; beaconlighting.com.au Bed Bath N’ Table (03) 8888 8100; bedbathntable.com.au Bedouin Societe bedouinsociete.com Bee Wrappy beewrappy.com.au Bisanna Tiles (02) 9310 2500; bisanna.com.au Blanco 1300 739 033; blanco-australia.com

Blum (02) 9612 5400; blum.com.au Bristol 131 686; bristol.com.au British Paints 132 525; britishpaints.com.au Brodware (02) 9421 8200; brodware.com.au Brosa 1300 027 672; brosa.com.au Burleigh Tiles (07) 5535 0688; burleightiles.com.au C CabinetSmith cabinetsmith.com.au Cabot’s 1800 011 006; cabots.com.au Cadrys (02) 9328 6144; cadrys.com.au Camengo, available from The Textile Company 1300 852 994; textilecompany.com.au Candana Bathroomware (02) 9389 8631; candana.com.au Chris Colwell Design www.chriscolwelldesign.com.au Christopher Boots (03) 9417 6501; christopherboots.com Classic Ceramics (02) 9560 6555; classicceramics.com.au Coco Republic 1300 000 220; cocorepublic.com.au Coffee Parts 1300 129 129; coffeeparts.com.au Conair 1800 650 263; conairaustralia.com.au Cosh Living (03) 9281 1999; coshliving.com.au Country Road 1800 801 911; countryroad.com.au Covered in Paint (02) 9519 0204; coveredinpaint.com.au Crabtree & Evelyn (03) 8551 1000; crabtree-evelyn.com/au CSR csr.com.au Cult 1300 768 626; cultdesign.com.au D De Fazio Tiles & Stone (03) 9387 2300; defazio.com.au DecoRug 131 784; www.decorug.com.au Designs to Inspire 1300 883 762; designstoinspire.com.au Di Lorenzo Tiles (02) 8818 2950; dilorenzo.com.au Domayne domayneonline.com.au Domo (03) 9277 8888; domo.com.au Dowel Jones doweljones.com Dulux 132 525; dulux.com.au E Early Settler earlysettler.com.au Easycraft (07) 3906 7200; easycraft.com.au

Eco Outdoor 1300 131 413; ecooutdoor.com.au Ecolour 1300 326 568; ecolour.com.au EcoTools (02) 9526 0777; chemcorp.com.au Emac & Lawton (02) 9517 4455; emac-lawton.com.au Escape to Paradise 1436 472 567; escapetoparadise.com.au Euroluce (02) 9356 9900; euroluce.com.au Eurowalls (02) 9310 2300; eurowalls.com.au F Fantastic Furniture fantasticfurniture.com.au Fanuli (02) 9908 2660; fanuli.com.au Farmer Drew (07) 5474 9802; farmerdrew.com.au Feast Watson 1800 252 502; feastwatson.com.au Fisher & Paykel 1300 650 590; fisherpaykel.com.au Florabelle florabelle.com.au Floral Craftsman (02) 9969 3870; floralcraftsman.com.au Foreo foreo.com Freedom 1300 135 588; freedom.com.au French Consul frenchconsul.co French Country Collections 1800 000 496; frenchcountrycollections.com.au French Knot (02) 9146 4720; frenchknot.com.au G Gaggenau 1300 170 552; gaggenau.com.au Garden Life (02) 8399 0666; gardenlife.com.au GlobeWest 1800 722 366; globewest.com.au Gordon Mather Industries (03) 9585 5528; gordonmatherindustries.com Grandfather’s Axe grandfathersaxe.com.au Grazia & Co (03) 9589 4398; graziaandco.com.au Great Dane (03) 9699 7677; greatdanefurniture.com H Hali Handmade Rugs 1300 131 120; www.hali.com.au Harvey Norman 1300 464 278; harveynorman.com.au Haymes Paint 1800 033 431; haymespaint.com.au

Heaven in Earth (02) 4423 2041; heaveninearth.com.au Hepburn Hardware hepburnhardware.com House of Orange (03) 9500 9991; houseoforange.com.au Howards Storage World 1300 479 479; hsw.com.au Hubble+Duke hubbleandduke.com.au Hunt Furniture 0422 995 004; huntfurniture.com.au I Ici et Là (02) 8399 1173; icietla.com.au Ikea (02) 8020 6641; ikea.com.au Inspirations Paint 1300 368 325; inspirationspaint.com.au J James Hardie jameshardie.com.au James Said (08) 6180 3615; jamessaid.com.au Janus et Cie janusetcie.com Jardan (03) 8581 4988; jardan.com.au Jatana Interiors jatanainteriors.com.au Jetmaster 1300 538 627; jetmaster.com.au Jo Ferguson Landscape Garden Design jofergusonlandscapedesign.com K Kaboodle Kitchen kaboodle.com.au Karndean Designflooring 1800 331 170; karndean.com.au Ke-zu (02) 9669 1788; kezu.com.au Kmart 1800 634 251; kmart.com.au KPLA Landscapes 0438 779 944; kpla.com.au L L&M Home (03) 9419 6800; lmhome.com.au Laura Kincade (02) 9667 4415; laurakincade.com Lightly (03) 9417 2440; lightly.com.au Little Label Co littlelabelco.com Loom Rugs loomrugs.com Loomed loomed.co Luke Furniture (03) 9999 8930; luke.com.au M Madinoz madinoz.com.au Manicare 1800 651 146; manicare.com.au Manyara Home (02) 9997 4462; manyarahome.com.au Marimekko (02) 9281 6519; marimekko.com Mark Douglass Design 0414 540 110; markdouglassdesign.com Mark Tuckey (03) 9419 3418; marktuckey.com.au >

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H G STOCKISTS

Martin Kellock Pots & Planters (03) 9701 8699; martinkellockpots.com.au Mary Noall (03) 9690 1327; marynoall.com.au MCM House (02) 9698 4511; mcmhouse.com Mediterranean Marble & Granite medmarble.com.au Mentone Premix (03) 9584 2863; mentonepremix.com.au Middle of Nowhere middleofnowhere.com.au Mitre 10 1300 001 010; mitre10.com.au Moda Piera 0425 707 967; modapiera.com Molmic (03) 9335 2413; molmic.com.au Murobond Paint 1800 199 299; murobond.com.au Myer 1800 811 611; myer.com.au N Naturally Cane (02) 4957 2908; naturallycane.com.au Nel Lusso 1800 147 538; nellusso.com.au Nikau Store (02) 6680 9792; nikaustore.com O Obodo (02) 8399 1416; obodo.com.au Onsite Supply+Design (02) 9360 3666; onsitesd.com.au P Paddy’s Bricks (03) 9687 2338; paddysbricks.com.au Paint Place 1800 008 007; paintplace.com.au Papaya (02) 9386 9980; papaya.com.au Pegasus Antiques (03) 52218290; pegasusantiques.com.au Perrin & Rowe, available from The English Tapware Company 1300 016 181; englishtapware.com.au PGH Bricks & Pavers pghbricks.com.au Pierre Frey, available from Milgate (03) 9421 2122; milgate.com.au Pinewood Quality Nursery pinewoodnursery.com.au

Polytec 1300 300 547; polytec.com.au Porter’s Paints 1800 656 664; porterspaints.com Pottery Barn 1800 232 914; potterybarn.com.au Prestige Fans prestigefans.com.au Products of Excellence (02) 9939 0566; gardenproducts.com.au Provincial Home Living 1300 732 258; provincialhomeliving.com.au Q Qasair condari.com.au Quality Products (02) 9999 0684; qualityproducts.com.au Quantum Quartz (02) 9772 9888; wk.com.au R Raine & Humble (03) 9375 7184; raineandhumble.com.au Red Fox Runs (03) 5975 9609; redfoxruns.com.au Reduxr reduxr.com.au Reece 1800 032 566; reece.com.au Remington 1800 623 118; www.remington-products.com.au Resene 1800 738 383; resene.com.au Restoration Online (02) 6355 2003; restorationonline.com.au Revlon 1800 025 488; revlonanz.com Robert Plumb (02) 9316 9066; robertplumb.com.au Rogerseller (03) 9429 8888; rogerseller.com.au Ross Didier (03) 9459 1893; rossdidier.com Rossetti Fabrics (02) 9968 3774 Royal Oak Floors (03) 9826 3611; royaloakfloors.com.au Ruby Star Traders (02) 9518 7899; shoprubystar.com.au S Salt&Pepper 1800 246 987; saltandpepper.com.au Sarah Ellison sarahellison.com.au Satara (03) 9587 4469; satara.com.au Scandinavian Wallpaper & Décor (08) 9444 2717; wallpaperdecor.com.au Schots Home Emporium schots.com.au Scout House (03) 9525 4343; scouthouse.com.au

Scyon scyon.com.au Seed Heritage 1800 118 889; seedheritage.com Sikkens 1300 745 536; tenaru.com.au Slate Discounts (03) 9706 9767; slatediscounts.com.au Smeg (02) 8667 4888; smeg.com.au Society of Wanderers societyofwanderers.com Solver Paints (08) 8368 1200; solverpaints.com.au Southport Stone (07) 5563 3033; southportstone.com Space (02) 8339 7588; spacefurniture.com.au Stegbar 1800 681 168; stegbar.com.au Sunday Supply Co sundaysupply.co Swan Street Sales swanstreet.com.au T T&T Cabinets (07) 3823 1733; ttcabinets.com.au Tait (03) 9419 7484; madebytait.com.au Tara Dennis Store taradennisstore.com Target 1300 753 567; target.com.au Taubmans 131 686; taubmans.com.au Telegram Co (03) 9318 0822; telegramco.com Temple & Webster templeandwebster.com.au Terrace (02) 9362 5196; terraceoutdoorliving.com.au Tescher Forge tescherforge.com The Block Shop theblockshop.com.au The English Tapware Company 1300 016 181; englishtapware.com.au The Lost+Found Department 0414 474 686; thelostandfound department.com.au The Potting Shed 0410 475 364; thepottingshedtools.com.au The Society Inc (02) 9331 1592; thesocietyinc.com.au The Textile Company 1300 852 994; textilecompany.com.au The Timba Trend+Folk thetimbatrendandfolk.com.au These Walls thesewalls.com.au

Thonet 1800 800 777; thonet.com.au Tiento Tiles tiento.com.au Tigger Hall Design (03) 9510 2255; tiggerhall.com Tigmi Trading 0418 602 231; tigmitrading.com Tiles by Kate (02) 9949 4300; tilesbykate.com.au U Ultimate (03) 9706 9866; ultimatefires.com.au Umbrellas & Parasols 1800 155 233; parasolumbrellas.com.au Unique Fabrics 1800 145 855; uniquefabrics.com Uniqwa Furniture (07) 5596 0884; uniqwafurniture.com.au Urban Couture Design+Homewares (02) 9698 0736; urbancouture.com.au V Village Stores villagestores.com.au Viponds Paints (03) 9350 4188; viponds.com.au Viridian 1800 810 403; viridianglass.com W Warwick Fabrics 1300 787 888; warwick.com.au Wattyl 132 101; wattyl.com.au West Elm 1800 239 516; westelm.com.au Westbury Textiles (02) 9380 6644; westburytextiles.com White Verandah 0433 121 904; whiteverandah.com.au Williams-Sonoma 1800 231 380; williams-sonoma.com.au Willow & Wood (02) 9188 1572; willowandwood.com.au Winning Appliances (02) 8767 2301; winningappliances.com.au Wood Melbourne woodmelbourne.com Z Zanui 1300 668 317; zanui.com.au Zara Home 1800 121 095; zarahome.com/au Zuster (03) 9427 7188; zuster.com.au

PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of Australian House & Garden magazine is published by Bauer Media Pty Ltd (Bauer). Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at www.bauer-media.com. au/privacy. It also sets out on how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauer-media.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney NSW 2000.

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Tasted & rated 90+ by Halliday!

High-scoring wines from Australia’s No.1 wine authority Australian House & Garden readers are personally invited to partake in a very special offer. Thanks to Laithwaite’s Wine People, you can enjoy a superb collection of very fine Australian wines, all tasted and rated by the great James Halliday, Australia’s No. 1 Wine Authority. Normally between $18 and $28 a bottle, you can enjoy all 12 for just $14.99 a bottle - only $179.88 a case. You SAVE $87 plus enjoy FREE DELIVERY! There’s a roll-call of prestigious producers here - eight of them have been awarded Halliday’s highest rating of 5 Red Stars. In whites, taste a Delatite Riesling with “considerable presence”, Howard Park’s “passionfruit & gooseberry” Margaret River Sauvignon blend, a “scintillating” WA Chardonnay from Willow Bridge and more. In reds there’s the triumphant, “juicy” FIVE-time Goldwinning Blue Pyrenees Shiraz, Chalk Hill’s “fragrant, gently spicy” McLaren Vale Shiraz, d’Arenberg’s “seriously good value” Goldmedal d’Arry’s Original and more. It’s a superb collection, and incredible value for the quality. Plus you receive FREE tasting notes on every bottle in your case and FREE DELIVERY. Don’t miss this!

YOUR ORDER INCLUDES: 12 FINE WINES FOR ONLY $179.88 Choose a mix, all-red or all-whites FREE DELIVERY FREE TASTING NOTES 100% MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE

Call 1300 683 446 quoting ‘4276001’ or visit www.winepeople.com.au/4276001

brought to you by

(Lines open Mon-Fri 7am-7pm, Sat 8am-6pm AEST) Terms and conditions: Offer available while stocks last. Valid for new customers only. Order acceptance and the contract between you and us will only be formed on the dispatch to you of the product(s) ordered. Orders not accepted (nor will wine be delivered to) persons under the age of 18 years. If a wine becomes unavailable, a similar wine of equal or greater value will be supplied. If you are unhappy with the substitute we’ll refund you. $87 saving is off normal retail prices of the mixed case only as provided by the wineries at time of printing. Please see our full Terms and Conditions of Sale and Privacy Policy available here: www.winepeople.com.au/terms or call us on 1300 683 446. Wine People Pty Ltd (licence No. 514 00724, LIQP770016550) 200 Chalk Hill Rd McLaren Vale SA 5171.


COMMUNITY H G

WHAT’S ON TH I N GS TO DO, S E E , E N J OY

1

With a line-up of artists from far and wide, Sculpture in the Paddock is a major country-NSW event. Having outgrown its original site at Yass, the exhibition has relocated to the refurbished Shaw Vineyard Estate in Murrumbateman, 40 minutes from Canberra. September 22 to October 7. sculptureinthepaddock.com.au

2

Text by Rosa Senese, Laura Barry, Deborah Grant & Lisa Green. Photography by Anson Smart (Bills).

City and country folks will be gathering at RAST Showground for this year’s Royal Hobart Show, October 25-27, to celebrate Tasmania’s agricultural riches and catch family entertainment from rodeos to fireworks. hobartshowground.com.au

Show & tell S HARI N G

N EWS

IDEAS

GORGEOUS NEW DIGS FOR BILL That warm glow emanating from the Crown Street dining strip in Surry Hills, Sydney, is the new bills restaurant (above), next door to Bill Granger’s previous inner-city eatery. Designed by architects Meacham Nockles, longtime bills collaborators, the inviting room is a customfitted haven, from paint to tiles and furniture. Bruce Nockles even fashioned the wall art, lights and door handle himself. The food? Classic bills – so good! bills.com.au

The Adelaide Film Festival, October 10-21, at GU Film House and Samstag Museum screens groundbreaking works in feature film, documentary and virtual-reality formats, originating from Australia and overseas. adelaidefilmfestival.org

4

A global sell-out, the family-friendly Potted Potter stage show manages to pack the entire Harry Potter series into a side-splitting 70-minute parody, complete with a game of Quidditch! October 2-7 at Brisbane’s Playhouse. qpac.com.au

5

As light installations illuminate views of the MacDonnell Ranges, Indigenous artists, storytellers and filmmakers will create an unforgettable cultural experience at the Parrtjima festival, taking place nightly in Alice Springs Desert Park until October 7. parrtjimaaustralia.com.au

6

Wunderbar! Raise your stein at Melbourne’s Oktoberfest in the Gardens bash on October 13. Revellers can enjoy German food and beverages, sideshow attractions and traditional entertainment. melbourne.oktoberfestinthegardens.com.au

7

Featuring more than a million bulbs and annuals, Canberra’s annual Floriade presents a botanical extravaganza by day and a wonderland of activities by night. The event’s in full bloom at Commonwealth Park until October 14. floriadeaustralia.com

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H G COMMUNITY

I N T H E A B ST R AC T THE EXPRESSIVE STYLE OF SYDNEY ARTIST ANTONIA MRLJAK EVOKES AN EMOTIONAL RESPONSE. HER ABSTRACT PAINTINGS ARE FULL OF MOVEMENT AND VARY FROM LIGHT AND BRIGHT TO DARK AND STRIKING. AT RIGHT IS AN INK AND ACRYLIC WORK CALLED GIFT 35. SEE MORE AT ANTONIA MRLJAKART.COM.

Design paradise

Based in Crete, architect and designer Eleni Psyllaki curates images of timeless interiors – serene, simple and lovely – created by herself and others. Her Instagram feed 0ffers endless inspiration for fans of natural, neutral and minimalist decor. @myparadissi

BOOK NOOK

1

From a luxury chicken coop to a 3D-printed fish tank, Pet-tecture presents ideas from architects and designers for playful accommodation suited to four-legged, feathered, finned and other animal companions. An ideal volume for style-conscious pet-lovers. $29.95, Phaidon

Few Australian travel guides look at the country through the eyes of its Indigenous people, yet that’s one of the most meaningful ways to discover this ancient continent. In Welcome to Country, Marcia Langton presents the local culture, customs, history and etiquette of Australia’s original custodians with respect. $39.99, Hardie Grant Travel

3

In Lands of the Curry Leaf, chef Peter Kuruvita plates up a rich menu of vegetarian recipes recreated and adapted from his childhood home of Sri Lanka, and from cultures in and around the Subcontinent. It’s spiced with recollections of his travels in the region, as well as practical tips for home cooks. $49.99, Murdoch Books

Stay in touch

We love hearing from readers, so please share your news and views with us. Call (02) 9282 8456, email h&g@bauer-media. com.au or post a letter to Australian House & Garden, GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 1028. Subscribe to the digital edition of H&G at magshop.com. au/hgn. For weekly news and inspiration, subscribe to our e-newsletter at newsletter.houseandgardenmag.com.au. And head to homestolove.com.au/ahg for fab home tours, gardens and galleries.

Share in our home and garden finds: Facebook facebook.com/australianhouseandgarden Instagram @houseandgarden Pinterest pinterest.com.au/houseandgardenau 230 |

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Featuring the latest in colour, design and texture, the MOOD Collection from Choices Flooring is a range of window furnishings that’s the perfect addition to your interior. choicesflooring.com.au.

Bring life to your outdoor area and provide a conversation piece for many years to come thanks to Colonial Castings. This Park Bench is absolutely perfect. colonialcastingslifestyle.com.

ILVE always offers innovative designs for the kitchen. The latest Fusion cooktop melds an integrated downdraft hood and cooktop into one exciting appliance. ilve.com.au/cooktop.

H&G ESSENTIALS Updating your space has never been easier with the Colour by Temple & Webster paint range. The 20 bespoke, premium-quality shades work together seamlessly. templeandwebster.com.au.

Create a beautiful lifestyle and home with these must-have products.

Unique, distincitive and so very comfortable. The Maretlli by La-Z-boy is the perfect solution for any modern-day home. Plenty of space for all the family and available in fabric or leather. la-z-boy.com.au.

This lovely bed bench from Domayne comes in small (100x45x45cm), $899, and large (140x45x45cm), $999, and is upholstered in Warwick ‘Chambray’ fabric. Visit domayne.com.au.

Lago sofa, harmoniously coordinated with furnishings and accessories by Natuzzi Italia. Aesthetics meet sublime comfort, so look no further. natuzzi.com.au.

The new family-sized Fisher & Paykel WH1060P1 10kg washing machine features SmartDrive technology and provides gentle, effective washing for every load. Fisherpaykel.com.

Welcoming Majestic Princess, our newest and most luxurious ship to call Australia home for the summer season in 2018/19 and 2019/20. Visit princess.com for details.

OMO EcoActive is OMO’s most sustainable laundry detergent, with 70% plant-based cleaning ingredients. This product is “tough on stains, not on nature”. omo.com/Eco/Active.

Travel Associates has been creating bespoke travel itineraries for more than 20 years. To speak with an experienced travel adviser, call 13 70 71 or visit travel-associates.com.au/houseandgarden.


Next month DON’T MISS H&G’S TOP 50 ROOMS!

Plus

WELLNESS FOCUS ✚ Feel-good homes ✚ Healing gardens ✚ Calming interiors

ON SALE October 8th

Inspiration lives here…


Throughout 2018, H&G’s 70th anniversary year, leading florists have been invited to create special pieces for every issue. Don’t miss the floral artistry each month.

Fleeting beauty

M

any lovely flowers make their annual appearance in spring, but few are as ephemeral as sweet-scented lilacs. With panicles covered in tiny, delicate flowers, displaying tones from palest mauve to deep purple, lilac is a cool-climate beauty that blooms for only a few weeks in Australia, usually in October. Its fleeting lifespan makes it all the more special, says Sydney florist Sean Cook, who creates bespoke floral works under the moniker of Mr Cook. Sean is an avid admirer of the mauve beauty and keenly awaits its brief season. “I adore lilac, firstly because of its beautiful perfume,” he says. “I also love all the different shades it comes in, especially the variegated ones and the rarer white-flowering variety.”

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For this display, created specially for H&G, Sean has combined lilac with flowering gum, allium flowers and the intriguing addition of stringy Catalpa (Indian bean tree) pods, arranged in a vase by Sydney-based ceramicist Gretel Corrie. “I like to use unexpected elements together,” he explains. “And keeping the flowers clustered creates strong shapes and textures.” As the local season for lilac is such a short one, it can be quite an expensive flower, Sean admits. But, he adds, the splurge is always well worth it. “For something truly decadent and luxurious, you can’t go past a mass of lilac stems on their own in a vase.” #

Mr Cook; mrcook.com.au or @mrcooktheflorist

Text by Elizabeth Wilson. Photograph by Maree Homer. All ceramics by Gretel Corrie (gretelcorrie.com). Artwork by Gary Heery.

H G BOTANICA


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