Page 1

Get the leading edge call ....

13 11 37

9(5.,à ®=(3<,à ®+0@à ®:;965.à ®:(-,à ®+<9()3,à ®:/(7,()3,à ®),:762,à ®,3,.(5; FormBoss® Steel Garden Edging can be supplied for most applications, select from a large range of stock gauges, ðQLVKHV DQG SURðOH KHLJKWV )RUP%RVV® VDYHV WLPH DQG PRQH\ ZLWK IDVW DQG HDV\ LQVWDOODWLRQ &UHDWH D JDUGHQ WKDWâV HDV\ WR PDLQWDLQ DQG DGGV ODVWLQJ SURSHUW\ YDOXH 3HUIHFW IRU XSGDWLQJ H[LVWLQJ JDUGHQV RU OD\LQJ RXW WKH IUDPH ZRUN IRU D QHZ JDUGHQ $YDLODEOH $XVWUDOLD ZLGH VHH RXU ZHEVLWH IRU D IXOO OLVW RI ORFDO VWRFNLVWV DQG D JDOOHU\ RI FRPSOHWHG projects to keep you informed and inspired!

FormBoss®LVSURXGO\KDQGFUDIWHGLQ$XVWUDOLDQXVLQJ%OXH6FRSHVWHHODQGLVVWURQJHUWKDQDOXPLQLXPDQGWUDGLWLRQDO HGJLQJPDWHULDOV7KHUROOHGWRSOLSLVH[FOXVLYHWRDOO)RUP%RVV®HGJLQJPDNLQJLWFRPSOHWHO\VDIHIRUFKLOGUHQDQG SHWV6WUDLJKWOLQHVñDZOHVVFXUYHVDQGLQWULFDWHVKDSHVZLWKOD\HUHGWHUUDFLQJFDQEHFUHDWHGZLWKHDVH)RUP%RVV® ZLOOQRWFUDFNVSOLWURWGLQWRULQYLWHWHUPLWHVDQGLVVWUXFWXUDOO\JXDUDQWHHGIRUDPLQLPXPRI\HDUV$ZDUGZLQQLQJ FormBoss® is precision made and engineered to create YLUWXDOO\ VHDPOHVV OLQHV DQG MRLQV 6SHFLDO FXVWRP PDGH GHVLJQHUHGJLQJULQJVDQGIHDWXUHVPDNHWKHSHUIHFWFRPSOLPHQWIRUGRPHVWLFDQGFRPPHUFLDOSURMHFWVRIDQ\VL]H

www.formboss.com.au


TV show 7.30pm Friday

Top jobs fr your SPRING GARDEN

October 2018

JACKIE FRENCH

How to cope when you can’t garden for a year!

Growing suces •

PETREA • BEANS IN POTS • CAPE PRIMROSE • SPRING ONION • KANGAROO PAW

fr

INSPIRATION, IDEAS & PRACTICAL ADVICE

n

9 312966 128997

10

ONLY $7.20

Tino Carnevale Few plants give as generously as good old zucchini

Costa Georgiadis 10 fun ways to get kids hooked on gardening


EDITOR’S LETTER FROM TOP Jenny with some more natives for her garden, including a dwarf kangaroo paw which she has learnt does best in the pot; her shed surrounded by summer greenery.

elc e

y d is small, neat, and looks at a distance like painted wood. I can walk into it and put my hand on the tools I want; animals do not seem to make a home in it. Having lived for a number of years with a shed so chaotic I had to clamber over a lawnmower and a crate of paint tins to reach a pruning saw (this was not a shed under my control, you understand), my current shed makes me nothing but happy. Do you have a shed you love? Or are you shed-less and not sure which type to buy? This month, we bring you inspiration and practical advice for setting up your own shed, and invite those of you who already have a special shed to share your story and pics with us for a future issue. You’ll find our first shed feature on page 44, with more to come next month, when we look at storage solutions for a small space. Although my summer garden provides a certain amount of colour around the shed, I’d like to have something scrambling over it. One good option in my climate is petrea – a vigorous vine with glorious purple flowers. It’s one of our feature plants this month (page 26) and it’s a plant that I actually have a cutting of, courtesy of our

S TAY

IN

TOUC H

PHOTOS ISTOCK, BRENT WILSON, JENNY BALDWIN

M

Phil Dudman. What Phil doesn’t yet know (as he’s currently overseas, wandering through the sort of gardens featured in our ‘gardener’s bucket list’ series) is that I completely neglected the cutting over winter and it’s now a poor brown thing with a sad demeanour. Oops. Another mistake I’ve made is planting the smaller kangaroo paws in the ground, thinking that as they’d done so well in pots, they’d do extra well in the garden. Wrong! For more dos and don’ts with these fabulous plants, turn to page 20 for advice from breeder Angus Stewart. I’ve learnt many other things this issue, but possibly the most exciting is what Leonard Cronin reports on page 54. The latest research on bee intelligence suggests that not only are these creatures very smart (we sort of knew that) but they can be trained to do tasks, and they may even feel emotions such as happiness. How amazing is that!

CALL

MAIL

Magazine oice (02) 9901 6325

Email yoursay@gardeningaustralia.com.au

TV oice (03) 8646 2875

Post Your Say, Gardening Australia, nextmedia, Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590

SOCIAL MEDIA facebook.com/ ABCGardeningAustraliamagazine @gardeningaustraliamag

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

OC TOBER 2018 3


Create a garden your family will enjoy all summer long At the world-famous garden of Heronswood we grow tough summer perennials that survive 40°C and look good from December until April. Rarely available in nurseries, our 40°C toughened perennials are available to Diggers Club members online and at Diggers shops located in our gardens. Potted colour is like fairy loss compared to Diggers perennials. Pick up your free seeds and save. Come visit and shop in our beautiful gardens. Visit our new plant-sex gallery at Heronswood. You will never stop laughing at the sexual antics plants get up to create seeds.

Join our Club — $69 for two years! Diggers perennials

Aerial view of Heronswood, Dromana

Evening Primrose ‘Pink’

Delphinium ‘Blue Sensation’

Achillea ‘Hella Glashoff’

Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’

Complete garden guide and plant selector

Pink Statice

Shop inside our world-class gardens

Create a cool and refreshing garden during the hottest Australian summer with Diggers selections of perennials and trees … “here is no excuse for ugliness” says Clive Blazey. he Plant Selector is Australia’s most complete list of herbs, perennials, roses, bulbs, annuals, trees and shrubs that are anything but commonplace and includes detailed growing descriptions for gardeners from Cairns to Hobart.

Heronswood dromana 105 Latrobe Parade, Dromana VIC 3936 Garden Shop: 03 5984 7321

his is a book for both the beginner and the passionate gardener that explains the basics of garden botany for gardening success. RRP $29.95 (just $19.95 with a two year membership). his mysterious garden is at St Erth, Blackwood

St Erth blackwood 189 Simmons Reef Road, Blackwood VIC 3458 Garden Shop: 03 5368 6514

Cloudehill olinda 89 Olinda-Monbulk Road, Olinda VIC 3788 Garden Shop: 03 9751 0584 Adelaide Botanic Garden Schomburgk Pavilion, North Terrace Adelaide SA 5000 Garden Shop: 08 8232 8671


JUST

…and support he Diggers Foundation We are Australia’s most popular garden magazine and our club has more members than our leading AFL club. Our members are inspired by visiting three of Australia’s inest summer gardens with espalier orchards and subtropical food borders full of heirloom produce.

$69

for 2 YEARs

We trial and grow more food plants and summer perennials than any other grower. We can show you how to grow heirloom vegetables, space-saving subtropical fruit trees and rare herbs like capers and wasabi, all delicious varieties, full of ibre and free of nasty chemicals.

Eight magazines a year Innovative, informative and provocative ideas about how to be self-suicient in a tiny mini-plot space or country orchard, whether your garden is in subtropical Brisbane, Perth, Darwin or cold Hobart.

Eight free packets of seeds

he vegetable parterre at Heronswood, Dromana

Members receive four packets of seed in spring and autumn.

Over 40 heirloom tomatoes

Over 30 different berries

Biggest citrus range

“Just 5 hours gardening a week is all it takes to grow your tomatoes, avocados, citrus and lowers, if you follow our advice from our best selling Diggers book he Australian Fruit & Vegetable Garden” says founder of he Diggers Club Clive Blazey. “Grow heirloom fruit and vegetables organically — our varieties are full of ibre, never tasteless or bland like supermarket produce. All plants are sent directly to your door from our mail order nursery.”

3 easy ways to join! Call 03 5984 7900, visit diggers.com.au/ga10 or use this coupon!

SAVE $10 WHEN YOU JOIN

Membership options

Mail this coupon to The Diggers Club PO Box 300, Dromana VIC 3936 Phone: 03 5984 7900 Email: info@diggers.com.au

The Diggers Club and our gardens are owned by The Diggers Foundation.

Name _______________________________________

One year

$59.00

Two year (save $49.00)

$69.00

Address _____________________________________

Special book offer when you join for 2 years!

__________________ Postcode __________________

Diggers 40 years of the best garden ideas (rrp $19.95) $9.95

Email _______________________________________

here Is No Excuse For Ugliness (rrp $29.95) Book postage Total

$19.95

Phone ( _____ ) _______________________________ Charge my

Mastercard

Visa

$8.95 $

Expiry

Signature ______________________ Code: PG10


Grass Reinforcement GR11

...TO THIS!  Ideal for permeable porous driveways and carports

 Prevents soil compaction, protects grass root zone

 Fast and easy to install, a permanent solution

 Reduce water run off, increase earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hydrology

FREE

Delive *

he valu up to t

e of $6

0

Phone 1300 130 123 or visit

www.grassreinforcement.com.au


OCTOBER 2018

CONTENTS

38

For all your top jobs in the garden this month, turn to page 66

32 ON T

H

OVER EC

COVER STORIES 20 Kangaroo paw 26 Petrea 28 Cape primrose 38 Costa Georgiadis: get kids hooked on gardening 44 Sheds for every garden 62

Jackie French: How to cope when you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t garden

66

Top jobs for spring

80 Beans in pots Most gardeners need a shed, and they come in many sizes, shapes and materials. his wooden shed is lanked by a profusion of plants, including roses, fennel and daisies. For inspiration and practical tips on setting up a shed, turn to page 44. Photo: Gap Photos

81

Spring onion

82 Tino Carnevale: zucchini

COMPETITIONS + READER OFFERS 64 Subscribe this month and receive a bonus gift of a 2019 Gardening Australia diary or calendar, worth $17.95 each 91 Win 1 of 6 watering packs from Gardena valued at $95 each, including an Aquazoom sprinkler 92 Solve the crossword this month and you could win 1 of 5 Neta hose ittings packs, worth $102 each

72 G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

OC TOBER 2018 7


OCTOBER 54

58

20 78

86

44 FEATURES 20 Paws to consider Expert advice on growing, dividing and caring for kangaroo paws 26 A glorious tumble The spectacular flowering petrea vine is known as the ‘tropical wisteria’ 28 Beautiful bloomer Cape primroses are cute enough, but there’s also one with a giant leaf

82

32 Best of both worlds A harmonious mix of native and exotic plants in a Melbourne garden 38 Pass on the gardening bug How to instill a love of nature in kids 44 I love my shed Tips and inspiration for setting up a new shed or repurposing an old one 51 Spring tidy up Practical tips for keeping your garden looking good through spring 54 The secret life of bees It appears that bees can be trained, and feel emotions such as happiness 58 The gardener’s bucket list Longwood Gardens in the US

-

REGULARS Marketplace Plants, products, books Calendar What’s on in October At home with Jackie Action planner What to do in your garden in October 77 In the patch • Plant tomatoes • Grow ginger • Need a helping hand? • Plant beans in pots • Sow spring onions • Grow zucchini 84 Backyard visitors Bandy-bandy snake and wildlife making sheds their home 86 Pets Plants that can be toxic to animals 88 Mailbox Your letters, photos, questions 92 Crossword 95 The directory 105 TV & radio guide Your ABC 106 The big picture 10 16 62 66


N O E V I L O T S N W A L MOWING MADE EASY ies™ Select SerM OWERS RIDE-ON

S 100 SERIEM WERS O N O E RID E 1 1 0 F R OM

$ PLUS

29

$

PER # WEEK

FINAANBCLEE

#

% AVAIL P.A.

0

. DECK X350 42 IN

3 0 M ON T H

S TO PAY

ON ALL RID

E-ON

N LEQAUIPW M EN T

8 from 13/8/1 . Offer valid 0. te ra ce n va ad t $75 variable cash hase amoun #Rever ts to 79.00. Minimum purc $ Annual fee

- 31/3/19.

45

FR OM

PER # WEEK

ZTrak™ L A I T N E D I S RE ERS W O M N R U ZERO-T M . Z335E 42 IN

$

36

DECK FRO

P ER # W EEK

eere ork. John D w rd a h e b ke it ain, and ma sn’t need to t e in o a d m y d jo n n a e to use e, and lawn to t y US A mad d to be easy A beautiful li e a n u ig q s e e ’r d y e re ers a pride lts. Th a ke o n e t h e ride-on mow ssional resu e m f to ro r p t ie s e a g e sy to e a Deere™ , it’s even ik e L im s t n d u quick and ea e R it g m othin . And for a li payments. N On ly k e e built to last w w lo er t y with wnsToLive p a L ro / p u r .a u o m y o f .c o eere re at JohnD s apply. . #Condition 5,519, Find out mo ce ti o n t u o with RRP $

ge – y ost $5,756 ject to chan ility are sub $3,499, X 350: Total C ese are determined b b la ai av d th an t P , s R n en es R o g m ti – ar ay 6 ca ly rep $3,73 ealer ch specifi . Products, 3/ 19 - E 110: Total Cost freight, assembly or d nts the highest month e applicable. rs le ea d l al se b y, may repre d from eliver gh 31/0 is paid clude pre-d es or charges rest dollar. It ealers throu all regions an available in only at par ticipating d term. RRP does not in rounded up to the nea additional interest, fe e promotional balance ances e b t o n ay er th ), ee m al it f B fr ar th n o es . o u d st ri ye d e o t 3% io re g an rs as ss er te min nth e in acce ed p for fi T of b t due per mo chments or r the specifi dar year, assu al fee over th g annual fee RP) incl. GS ns, fees, options, at ta mended Retail Price (R uals RRP plus $79 annu 5E - $115.00 (includin t equal minimum paymen on 52 weeks in a calen otional transactions fo ia, terms and conditio s, ct u d ro p 33 om prom st eq based S ome do no g criter and Z based on Rec 99. Total Co plied only to . Calculated 0 - $124.00 repayments time. Lendin Repayments Cost $4,636 – RRP $4,3 is E 110 - $108.00, X 35 purchase only. Above 20, whichever is higher terest free finance is ap nce rate current at the dit Licence 232595. t $ al l In re Z 335E: Tota inimum first repaymen used for the promotion utstanding balance or 20% deposit required. terest at the cash adva 434 162. Australian C o M d 06 is e in your dealer. e event the credit card calculated at 3% of the purchase $750.00 an alances and will accru ralia Limited ABN 4 8 0 d m tb required in th ments are required an for 30 months. Minimu t of the normal accoun ded by HSBC Bank Aust ay vi . ar p .a ro p re p p % rm it ly d 0 te of Month ls. Cre d will fo an interest raf the promotional perio n. See in-store for detai monthly at at the end o on applicatio outstanding ply and are available ap es g and char TRACTA61029_TurfSpring_AU_ABCG


ON T

SHELF E H

PLANTS

This month’s pick of the bunch at garden centres, online and in bookshops Two new colours have recently joined the Australian-bred Armeria Dreameria Collection. The fuss-free plants produce globe-shaped blooms on short stems, flowering mostly from winter to late spring but sometimes throughout the year. Armeria ‘Dream Weaver’ (left) has mulberry-purple flowers, while ‘Dream Clouds’ (below) is a pure white form. These and the others in the series are dry-tolerant plants that suit rockeries and coastal areas. Their compact form (50cm tall and 20–30cm wide) makes them good for containers, and the rigid stems provide long-lasting cut flowers. Grow in semi-shade or full sun and remove spent flower heads to encourage further displays. Fertilise in late winter for optimum results. pma.com.au

ost popular indoor plants worldwide over the past few years has been the ney plant (Pilea peperomioides), which is so sought after by enthusiasts specimens available in Australia have been selling for $50 or more. It is d by gardeners because it is so easy to grow, and has cute, moon-shaped aves and a compact form to about 30cm tall and wide. All the Pilea species strike readily from cuttings, but this one also produces little ‘plantlets’ with roots, which can be removed and re-potted. Over the years, it has made its way from China around the world, often shared by friends and family, rather than being sold in nurseries. With a resurgence in the popularity of indoor ants, Australian wholesalers have been trying to source enough material to w these plants commercially, and they’re now available at Bunnings Warehouse. nings.com.au


MARKETPLACE

Double flowers with primrose-yellow petals and a scattering of maroon spots in winter and spring make Hellebore ‘Princess Buttercup’ stand out. Known as winter roses, hellebores grow 30–45cm high and wide, and suit dappled light. They are often grown beneath deciduous trees. tesselaar.net.au

This evening primrose, Oenothera speciosa ‘Twilight’, has long-lasting pale pink spring flowers, with the added attraction of new, plum-coloured, foliage. As the season progresses, leaves turn to a mid-green and are followed by a prolific display of big, bowl-shaped flowers with pale yellow centres. The compact plants, growing to 30cm tall and 1m wide, flower through the warmer months and are tolerant to cold and drought. Plants suit well-drained soil and are ideal for sunny banks and slopes. lambley.com.au

TEXT DERYN THORPE

With vibrant and colourful flowers up to 10cm across, Argyranthemum ‘Grandessa Sunset’ has the biggest flowers of any marguerite daisy. This heat-tolerant daisy has an attractive contrasting eye, and an abundance of flowers that range in colour from bright red to light orange as they age, which gives the appearance of multicoloured flowers growing on the same plant. Bred in Australia, it suits pots and garden beds in a sunny spot, and grows 45–60cm tall and 30–60cm wide. oasishorticulture.com.au

Crystal white Alstroemeria ‘Lauren’ is a recent addition to the Alstroemeria Princess Lilies range. With their neat, compact, rounded habit, and about nine months of flower production per year, plants in this range are a popular choice for pots and low border plantings. Pretty, lily-like flowers cover the entire plant from top to bottom, which grows 30cm high and 40cm wide. It does best in a sunny spot, but protect potted plants from hot afternoon sun and keep well-watered during warm months. Trim lightly to remove spent flowers. ramm.com.au G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 11


PRODUCTS

T

ON EDITOR Jenny Baldwin HORTICULTURAL EDITOR Phil Dudman ART DIRECTOR Rachel Henderson CHIEF SUBEDITOR Kate Barber SUBEDITOR Gina Hetherington EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Carole Gridley HORTICULTURAL CONSULTANT Deryn Thorpe ABC TV HOST Costa Georgiadis PRESENTERS Josh Byrne, Tino Carnevale, Jerry Coleby-Williams, Jane Edmanson, Millie Ross, Sophie Thomson CONTRIBUTORS Steve Ball, Noel Burdette, Leonard Cronin, Virginia Cummins, Jackie French, Judy Horton, Michael McCoy, Cheryl Orsini, Martyn Robinson, Jennifer Stackhouse, Erica Steppat, Angus Stewart NATIONAL ADVERTISING MANAGER Anabel Tweedale, atweedale@nextmedia.com.au Phone (02) 9901 6371 DIRECTORIES ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Alora Edwards, aedwards@nextmedia.com.au Phone (02) 9901 6101 ACCOUNT MANAGER Annya Azzopardi, aazzopardi@nextmedia.com.au Phone (02) 9901 6320 PRODUCTION MANAGER Peter Ryman PRODUCTION AND DIGITAL SERVICES MANAGER Jonathan Bishop

SHELF E H

Encourage native bees and other beneficial insects into your garden by providing them with a home, and growing the flowers and herbs that they feed on. The Bee & Insect House from Mr Fothergill’s is a timber container filled with hollow reeds and crevices in which insects can make their home. The house comes with flower seeds that, when grown, will attract beneficial insects, including bees, hoverflies and butterflies, to the garden. mrfothergills.com.au

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER ABC TV Gill Lomas SERIES PRODUCER ABC TV Chris Paterson MANAGER PUBLISHING AND LICENSING, ABC COMMERCIAL Lisa Hunter BRAND MANAGER ABC MAGAZINES Jenni Powell SUBSCRIPTIONS 1300 361 146, gardeningaustralia.com.au EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES yoursay@gardeningaustralia.com.au Phone (02) 9901 6325 NEXT MEDIA PTY LTD Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590 Phone (02) 9901 6100 EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN David Gardiner MANAGING DIRECTOR Hamish Bayliss PUBLISHER Carole Jones ISSN: 1325-1465 ABC Gardening Australia magazine is published by nextmedia Pty Ltd (ACN 128 805 970) under licence from the publisher, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), and is subject to copyright in its entirety. ‘ABC’ and the ‘Wave’ and ‘Gardening Australia’ trademarks are used under licence from the ABC. The contents may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or part, without written permission from the publisher. All rights reserved in material accepted for publication unless specified otherwise. All letters and other material forwarded to the magazine will be assumed intended for publication unless clearly labelled not for publication. nextmedia and the publisher do not accept responsibility for damage to, or loss of, submitted material. Opinions expressed in ABC Gardening Australia magazine are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of nextmedia or the publisher. No responsibility is accepted for unsolicited material. No liability is accepted by nextmedia, the publisher, nor the authors for any information contained herein. All endeavours are made to ensure accuracy and veracity of all content and advice herein, but neither ABC Gardening Australia magazine nor its publisher or contributors is responsible for damage or harm, of whatever description, resulting from persons undertaking any advice or using any product mentioned or advertised in ABC Gardening Australia magazine or its website. PRIVACY POLICY We value the integrity of your personal information. If you provide personal information through your participation in any competitions, surveys or offers featured in this issue of ABC Gardening Australia magazine, this will be used to provide the products or services that you have requested and to improve the content of our magazines. Your details may be provided to third parties who assist us in this purpose. In the event of organisations providing prizes or offers to our readers, we may pass your details on to them. From time to time, we may use the information you provide us to inform you of other products, services and events our company has to offer. We may also give your information to other organisations, which may use it to inform you about their products, services and events, unless you tell us not to do so. You are welcome to access the information we hold about you by getting in touch with our privacy officer, who can be contacted at nextmedia, Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards, NSW 1590.

The UrbiPod is an indoor micro-garden appliance that makes it easy to grow herbs and microgreens all year. A built-in wicking irrigation system delivers optimum quantities of water and nutrients to the soil. Its energy-efficient LED lighting, which operates automatically, replicates sunshine and helps plants grow at a faster rate. The starter kit includes an assembled UrbiPod, coir potting medium, seeds and liquid nutrients. urbotanica.com

New from the makers of Seasol, The Seaweed Solution for Buffalo Lawns contains a balanced lawn fertiliser, soil wetter and liquid compost soil improver in a 2L hose-on container. Easy to apply, the fast-acting liquid goes to w to promote lush and healthy gre lawn. The containers, which are available in a twin pack, each treat up to 100m2 of buffalo lawn. For best results, apply the solution fortnightly or monthly during the growing season. seasol.com.au


DIY Glass Pool Fencing Solutions The Choice is Simple Safe, stylish and affordable. Bring your outdoor areas to life with clean lines and clear views you only get with glass. Choice of post systems, gate hardware and finishes. Getting started is easy, use our online calculator to estimate and plan your project. For further details visit thearchitectschoice.com.au

Proud Partners Protector Premium is an ISO9001 Certified Company


ON

T

MARKETPLACE HE

SHEL

F

BOOKS ROOT TO BLOOM

Mat Pember & Jocelyn Cross Hardie Grant Books This modern guide to whole plant use could be considered the plant version of nose-to-tail eating. It includes comprehensive summaries of 35 edible plants, including flowers, roots and weeds, their ideal growing conditions, nutritional values of plant parts and advice on how to prepare or preserve them for eating. There are also food and drink recipes, and advice on using plants to make skincare products, pesticides, plant tonics and medicinal potions.

INCREDIBLE EDIBLES

Matthew Biggs Penguin Random House Australia Keen to grow a few lesser-known food crops with exciting flavours and high health benefits? This book provides inspiration for the newbie through to experienced growers. Photographs and simple instructions, with differing levels of experience recommended, will generate confidence to grow some delicious and unusual food plants. The book also offers guidance on how to store, keep fresh and preserve crops to reduce wastage.

THE ALLURE OF FUNGI

14 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

LOW TOX LIFE

Alexx Stuart Murdoch Books For those concerned about adverse effects from ingredients in food, cleaning, skincare and fragrance products, this handbook offers a non-judgemental approach to minimising the toxic chemical load. Mindful of busy working lives, the author includes updates on the latest science and advice from experts, combined with great tips on how to reduce waste, make healthier food choices and easily create safer household and personal care products. GA

TEXT CAROLE GRIDLEY

Alison Pouliot CSIRO Publishing Love them or hate them, fungi are essential organisms for supporting our planet’s ecological functioning. Combining text with photo essays, this book presents fungi through the different perspectives of scientists, farmers, foragers, artistes and traditional owners. Beautiful photos and interesting stories make this a must-read for those keen to know more about some of the most fascinating organisms on Earth.


nourishing naturals for mature skin

comfort and protection for mature skin age 60+ Moisturising flower and plant nutrients to help restore skin’s elasticity, firmness and vitality. Use the ‘try me’ free testers on all Natio display stands to experience the exceptional quality and value. Priced from rrp $18.95 to $26.95. www.natio.com.au Available at Myer, David Jones and selected Pharmacies.


W H AT

’S

ON IN

OCTOBER

Your guide to garden shows and events around the country this month

NATIONAL 7 T H –13 T H National Gardening Week This week-long event organised by Garden Clubs of Australia encourages clubs, businesses, individuals and councils to ‘Dig in & Celebrate’.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA 21 S T Pinjarra Garden Day 10am–4pm. Edenvale Homestead, Pinjarra. 0409 686 015. Free. Deryn Thorpe as guest speaker, stalls with garden-related products, children’s activities and entertainment. 27 T H –28 T H Open Garden in Perth 10am–4.30pm. Amanda’s Garden, cnr Margaret & Matison Sts, Southern River. (08) 9398 7275. $5. Opening to coincide with annual fete. Garden has natural setting of paperbarks and mass display of ‘Amanda’ roses.


CALENDAR

VICTORIA 5 T H –7 T H Gippsland Orchid Spring Show Fri 8am–9pm, Sat 8am–5pm, Sun 9.30am –4pm. Mid Valley Shopping Centre, cnr Princes Dr and Centre Valley Rd, Morwell. 0422 676 001. Free. Huge display of orchids to view and plants for sale.

14 TH Grannes Open Garden 11am–4pm. 207 Pomonal Rd, Stawell. 0409 423 827. $15 incl. morning or afternoon tea. Native gardens located in a challenging environment, guided tours and a raptor demonstration.

6 TH –7 T H Charity Open Garden at Birchwood Near Benalla 10am–5pm. Birchwood Near Benalla, 653 ODea Rd, Molyullah. (03) 5766 6275. $6. Garden with spring bulbs and salvia. Botanic art, sculpture, crafts, plants and mosaics for sale. Proceeds to Wangaratta and Benalla Hospitals and Cancer Council Vic. Visit birchwoodnearbenalla.com.au

20 TH –21 ST Bacchus Marsh Flower & Garden Show Sat noon–5pm, Sun 9am–4pm. Bacchus Marsh Public Hall, Main St, Bacchus Marsh. 0402 024 055. $5. Enter competitions for flowers and produce, photography and decorated cakes. Plants for sale and light refreshments. bmflowershow.org

6 –7 Garden Lovers’ Fair 10am–4pm. Bolobek, 370 Mt Macedon Rd, Mt Macedon. 0418 126 086. $12 per day, $20 for both days. Access to the Bolobek gardens, guest speakers, including Penny Woodward, Stephen Ryan and Attilla Kapitany, and gardening stalls. TH

TH

6 TH –7 T H Pomonal Native Flower Show Sat 9am–5pm, Sun 9am–4pm. Pomonal Hall, Ararat/Halls Gap Rd, Pomonal. 0407 700 843. $5. Hundreds of specimens on display, plants for sale and open gardens. 12 T H –13 T H Wandin Silvan Field Day Fri 8.30am–5pm, Sat 8.30am–4pm. 0429 428 537. $15. Stalls for gardeners, primary producers and hobby farmers. Fundraising groups selling food and drink.

PHOTO LUKE SIMON

13 T H –14 T H Bonsai Society of Victoria 54th Annual Show 9am–4pm. Box Hill Town Hall, 1022 Whitehorse Rd, Box Hill. 0490 233 706. $5. Premier bonsai displays, wiring and trimming demonstrations, sales of bonsai plants and accessories. 13 T H –14 T H Gippsland Garden and Home Expo 9am–4pm. Lardner Park, via Warragul. (03) 5625 4589. $10. Demonstrations by experts, 150 displays and sales stands, and 40 specialist and generalist nurseries. 14 T H Charlton Open Gardens 11am–4.30pm. Registration at 1 High St, Charlton. 0407 140 336. $15, includes six open gardens and afternoon tea.

20 TH –21 ST Horsham Spring Garden Festival 9am–5pm. Horsham Botanical Gardens, Firebrace St, Horsham. 0425 761 410. $6. Local guest speakers, plant stalls and children’s activities. 21 ST Wedderburn Community House Annual Garden Expo 9.30am–3.30pm. Register and pick up maps at Wedderburn Community Centre, 24 Wilson St, Wedderburn. (03) 5494 3489. $15. Nine gardens that have not been shown before. Museum entry and Devonshire tea included. 21 ST Ivanhoe Garden Club Festa & Bellfield Community Garden Open Day Noon–4pm. Bellfield Community Centre, cnr Banksia St & Oriel Rd, Ivanhoe. 0401 161 461. Free. Stalls with plants, organic honey, homemade jams and preserves; workshops including hot composting and bonsai; tool sharpening; and Devonshire tea and sausage sizzle. 26 TH –27 TH Annual Flower Show Fri 11am–4pm, Sat 9.30am–3pm. St Andrews Uniting Church, Browning St, Orbost. Opened by former ABC Radio announcer Deb Bye. Plant stall both days, cake stall on Friday. Food, tea and coffee. 27 TH Annual Flower Show 9.30am–3pm. St Thomas Anglican Church, 16 A’Beckett Rd, Bunyip. 0419 156 844. $5. Floral displays, plants, craft stalls, photo competition, Devonshire tea and sausage sizzle.

27 TH –28 TH Alexandra & District Open Gardens Weekend 10am–4pm. Tickets at Alexandra Visitor Information Centre, 36 Grant St, Alexandra, or at gardens. 0467 162 857. $5 each, $35 for all gardens. Ten open gardens, sculpture exhibition, handmade tools, plants and paintings for sale. alexandraopengardens.com.au

ACT 22 ND SEPT–10 TH FEB Beauty Rich and Rare 10am–5pm. National Library of Australia, Parkes Place, Canberra. (02) 6262 1111. Free. Immersive sound and light experience illuminating the natural beauty of Australia through the eyes of Sir Joseph Banks. 20 TH –21 ST Open Gardens Canberra 10am–4pm. 3 Ramage Pl, Flynn and 17 Gilmore Cresc, Garran. 0411 055 938. $8 each. Two gardens to explore through Open Gardens Canberra. For details, visit opengardenscanberra.org.au

SOUTH AUSTRALIA 6 TH –7 TH Australian Plants Society’s Native Flower Display & Plant Sale Sat 10am–5pm, Sun 10am–4pm. Adelaide Showgrounds, Wayville. (08) 8296 1849. $3. Display of native flowers, with more than 800 species of Australian native plants for sale. Free soil pH testing, advice from horticulturists, workshops, bush food tasting, ikebana and children’s activities. 19 TH –28 TH Renmark Rose Festival Various times and locations. 1300 661 704. Fees for some events. Rose Festival Fair, open gardens, art trail, floral display, gala dinner, garden lunches, live music, markets, ‘Chefs in the Garden’ event. 20 TH –21 ST Burra Districts Spring Expo & Open Gardens Expo: Sat 9am–5pm, Sun 9am–4pm. Town Hall, Market St, Burra. 0429 845 703. $5. Open Gardens: 10am–4pm. $10 for all gardens. Gardening Australia presenter Sophie Thomson will talk at the Expo. Workshops, children’s activities, market stalls, bus tour, plants for sale. G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 17


CALENDAR

NEW SOUTH WALES 5 T H –7 T H Southern Orchid Spectacular Fri & Sat 9am–4pm, Sun 9am–2pm. Caringbah High School, 85 Willarong Rd, Caringbah. 0417 406 374. $5. Displays of exotic orchids, vendor orchid sales, free growing advice and light refreshments. 6 TH –7 T H 58th Bilpin Flower Show & Spring Fair Sat 11am–4pm, Sun 10am–3pm. Bilpin Hall, 2596 Bells Line of Rd, Bilpin. (02) 4567 0642. $5. Display of local flowers and vegies, expert advice, stalls, open gardens and entertainment. 6 TH –7 T H Rivendell Flower Show 10am–3pm. Thomas Walker Estate Rivendell, Hospital Rd, Concord. (02) 9767 8488. $15. Guest speaker Helen Young, floral and garden exhibits, and interactive workshops. 7 T H Huge Plant Sale 10am–3pm. 45 Parklands Ave, Lane Cove North. (02) 9427 3550. Free. Great variety of plants, open garden and advice. Proceeds to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. 7 TH –20 T H Griffith Spring Fest Various times, locations and prices. (02) 6962 8100. Open gardens, workshops, a multicultural festival, and more than 70 large sculptures built from oranges lining the main street. griffithspringfest.com.au 13 T H Orchid Potting Demonstration Day 11am & 1.30pm. Hunter Region Botanic Gardens, 2100 Pacific Hwy, Heatherbane. (02) 4987 1655. $2 (garden entry). Expert advice, demonstrations, orchid house tour, prizes, cafe onsite. huntergardens.org.au

13 TH –14 TH Robertson Open Gardens & Spring Plant Fair 10am–4pm. Tickets available at Community Technology Centre, 58 Hoddle St, Robertson. 0477 213 141. $5 each, $20 for all gardens. Seven Southern Highlands gardens open to the public. 13 TH –14 TH Dig Gloucester Garden Expo Sat 9am–4pm, Sun 9am–3pm. Billabong Park, Denison St. (02) 6558 4107. Open gardens $2 each. Six rural open gardens and an organic community garden, Expo with workshops, exhibitors, speakers, art and craft exhibitions. diggloucester.com. 13 TH –14 TH Mudgee Garden Spectacular 10am–3pm. Tickets at mudgeegarden spectacular.org.au or cash payment at each garden. 0411 205 633. $5 each, $20 for all gardens. Inaugural event with six gardens open, catering by local CWA.

TASMANIA 14 T H Plan a Native Garden 1.30–4pm. Inverawe Native Gardens, 1565 Channel Hwy, Margate. (03) 6267 2020. $30 incl. afternoon tea and printed notes. Must book. Tour of garden with head gardener, landscaping tips, plant selection, simple soil analysis and pruning. 27 T H –28 T H Two Open Gardens in Southern Tasmania 10am–4pm. Eggs and Bacon Bay Cottage, 10 Craypoint Pde, Eggs and Bacon Bay ($5); Crawleighwood Garden, Underwoods Rd, Nichols Rivulet ($7). 0438 395 071. The gardens are about 20 minutes apart. Plants for sale, including trees, shrubs, bulbs and rare perennials. Lions Club sausage sizzle and refreshments available.

18 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

19 TH –21 ST Galston Open Gardens 9.30am–4.30pm. Tickets at Galston Club, 21 Arcadia Rd or at gardens. (02) 9653 2394. $5 each, $20 for all gardens. Nine open gardens in the semi-rural suburbs of Galston, Arcadia, Glenorie and Dural. 20 TH Wentworthville Community Garden Open Day 9.30am–2pm. Fullagar Rd (behind the tennis courts), Wentworthville. 0413 021 577. Free. Open garden, vegetables and plants for sale, morning tea and barbecue lunch available. 20 TH –21 ST Open Garden Weekend 10am–4pm. 2 Pildra Ave, St Ives. 0419 688 583. $10. Visit the garden of the 2011 Gardener of Year winner for NSW. Plants, gifts, cakes, refreshments. Proceeds to The Hunger Project. 27 TH –28 TH Bundanoon Garden Ramble 9.30am–4.30pm. Tickets at Bundanoon Memorial Hall, Railway Ave, Bundanoon. 0414 617 974. $20 for all gardens. Eight gardens open in the Southern Highlands, with garden stalls and gifts. 27 TH –28 TH Lake Macquarie Garden Club Open Gardens & Art Trail 10am–4pm. Tickets at Lee Rowan’s Gardenworld, 381 Hillsborough Rd, Warners Bay and Poppy’s Home & Garden Centre, 83 Oakdale Rd, Gateshead. 0418 832 522. $5 each, $35 for all gardens. Ten open gardens, art, entertainment. Proceeds to the Hunter Medical Research Institute.


27 T H –28 T H Bathurst Annual Spring Spectacular 9.30am–5pm. Tickets and map at Bathurst Information Centre, Kendall Ave, Bathurst (entry Great Western Hwy) and at gardens. 0427 470 135. $5 each, $20 for all gardens. Ten gardens to explore plus Miss Traill’s House garden in the Bathurst area. 27 T H –28 T H Illawarra Regional Rose Society 2018 Spring Rose Show Sat Noon–5pm, Sun 9am–3pm. Jamberoo Municipal Hall, Allowrie St, Jamberoo. 0411 863 464. $5. Rose displays, stalls, food including homemade scones, light refreshments. 28 TH Narrandera Town & Country Open Garden Day 9am–5.30pm (tickets available until 2.30). Tickets at Narrandera Information Centre, Newell Hwy. 0428 597 655. $15 incl. Devonshire tea. Six open gardens and a plant stall. Proceeds to local Can Assist.

QUEENSLAND 13 TH –14 T H Queensland Orchid Society Spring Show Sat 8.30am–3.30pm, Sun 8.30am–3pm. International Shooting Complex, 1485 Old Cleveland Rd, Belmont. (07) 3824 5931. $4. Orchids on display, sales of orchids, floral art, orchid accessories, potting demonstrations and light refreshments. 20 T H –21 S T Brisbane Tomato Festival Sat 8am–5pm, Sun 8am–4pm. Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mt Coot-tha, Mt Coot-tha Rd, Toowong. Free. Talks from Phil Dudman, Clive Blazey, Linda Brennan, Arno King and Kevin Redd. Tomato tastings, cooking demonstrations, plant and produce sales, food and refreshments available. 20 T H –21 S T Orchid Species Show Sat 8.30am–4pm, Sun 9am–3.30pm. Auditorium, Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mt Coot-tha, Mt Coot-tha Rd, Toowong. 0403 957 225. $4. Display of orchid species, some rare and near extinction, orchids for sale and experts on hand for advice. 27 T H –28 T H North Moreton Qld Orchid Council Inc Summer Orchid Show Sat 8.30am–3.30pm, Sun 8.30am–3pm. Auditorium, Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mt Coot-tha, Mt Coot-tha Rd, Toowong. (07) 3865 5615. $4. Wide range of orchids and foliage for sale, re-potting demonstrations, information from experts and light refreshments. GA

The January calendar deadline is October 1, 2018. Send event details (date, event name, opening times, address, phone number, entry fee and description) to Shows, Gardening Australia, nextmedia, Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590 or email the details to shows@gardeningaustralia.com.au

Available NOW at all leading Garden Centres Visit our website for the entire range of Anthony Tesselaar Plants

www.tesselaar.com

ATP-1205-18

PHOTO ISTOCK

tell us about your event


IN FLOWER NOW

PAWS to consider Plant breeder ANGUS STEWART has the lowdown on how to grow our native kangaroo paws to perfection

20 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


PLANTS

at a glance common name kangaroo paw botanic name Anigozanthos spp. and cultivars plant type evergreen soft-wooded perennial 30cm–2.5m (in flower)

30cm–1m full to lightly filtered sun year round spring, summer (peak); some flower year-round protect from frost

suitable

PHOTOS ANGUS STEWART

K

angaroo paws are one of our most distinctive native plants, with their vibrantly coloured, furry, tubular flowers. They range from 30cm tall to a towering 2.5m, when in bloom, and are quick to mature, giving the gardener a long-lasting flower display soon after planting. While a number of wild species have proved difficult to tame, there are plenty of colourful cultivars that have been specially bred for home gardens. They look spectacular massed together in beds, but are just as eye-catching in a large

container. Kangaroo paws are also one of the best native plants for attracting nectar-feeding birds such as honeyeaters, spinebills and wattlebirds. Grow a clump near outdoor decking areas or where you can observe them through a window, to watch the birds’ antics over many months. Kangaroo paws belong to one of our more remarkable plant families called Haemodoraceae, so named from the ancient Greek word for blood (haima). A close relative of the kangaroo paw is a group of plants known as bloodroots (Haemodorum spp.), which have been

CLOCKWISE FROM MAIN Angus surrounded by masses of Anigozanthos ‘Landscape Scarlet’ and ‘Landscape Lime’; the lowers of ‘Bush Diamond’ are tinged with soft pink; Conostylis aculeata makes a beautiful groundcover; an eastern spinebill feeding on ‘Landscape Orange’.

used by the Noongar Aboriginal people of south-west Western Australia as food, dye and for medicinal purposes. Another important group in this family is the cottonheads (Conostylis spp.), which share the furry flower texture of kangaroo paws. Grey cottonheads (C. candicans) is the G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 21


CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT A mix of Anigozanthos ‘Landscape Lime’ and ‘Landscape Lilac’; the striking red lowers of ‘Landscape Scarlet’; ‘Landscape Lilac’ is a tough, tall variety with purple and mauve lowers; bloodroot (Haemodorum spp.) is used as a bush food; ‘Rampaging Roy Slaven’, named after comedian John Doyle, is helping raise funds to support children with autism. It lowers all year in frost-free climates.

one to grow in the garden, and is widely planted as a garden and landscape flower throughout Perth. It adapts well to garden conditions across southern Australia but is best in pots in humid climates. Both the cottonheads and bloodroots can be found for sale at specialist native plant nurseries.

WHICH PAW FOR YOU? I would like a dollar for every time I have heard the words: “I don’t have much luck with kangaroo paws…” After 40 years of breeding and growing, I can assure you that anyone in Australia can have these plants flowering year after year with minimal maintenance and effort. The trick is to select the best type for your 22 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

climate, soil and purpose. To keep it very simple, kangaroo paws can be categorised into two types: tall and short. Tall varieties are more than 1m high when in flower. They are tough, long-lived perennials that thrive over a wide variety of climatic and soil conditions. They come in a range of vibrant colours, including red, yellow, orange, green, pink and lilac, and bloom from mid spring to mid summer. With a bit of tender loving care, they will thrive (see problem solver box, right). Top performers include ‘Big Red’, ‘Yellow Gem’ and the recently released ‘Landscape’ series. Unfortunately, retail outlets tend to stock only a limited range of these very tough, useful varieties for

logistical reasons – when they are in full flower, the tall flower stems make them difficult to handle and transport, and they blow over easily. Ask for varieties by name so your favourite garden centre can get them in, or search online for suppliers. The second group is the short varieties. When in flower, these are under 1m high, and are short-lived perennials in all but Mediterranean climates (areas with long, hot summers and cool, moist winters such as South Australia, Tasmania’s east coast and the south of Western Australia). To be blunt, these short varieties often disappoint, especially when gardeners plant them into the average garden soil on the Australian east coast, particularly

PHOTOS ANGUS STEWART

OVERPAGE ‘Bush Diamond’ has a dwarf habit and produces lowers with soft white, pink and green tones year-round.


PLANTS

YOUR PAW PROBLEMS solved WHY DO THEIR LEAVES GO BLACK?

Blackened leaves are the biggest problem encountered with kangaroo paws. Basically, anything that kills leaf tissue causes unsightly dark black marks to appear on the leaves. Irregular black marks are a reaction to environmental stress and caused by damage from snails or slugs, frost (right), too much or too little water, or nutritional stress. Fungal leaf spot diseases, such as rust and ink spot, show as circular lesions. Manage leaf problems by protecting plants from slugs, snail and frost. Ensure they don’t come under stress by growing them in full sun with well-drained soils and adequate low-phosphorus fertiliser. In heavy soil, grow paws in raised beds or large containers. Many modern cultivars are resistant to rust and ink spot disease.

MY PLANTS KEEP DYING… Fungal rots in the below-ground parts of kangaroo paws account for most plant deaths in Australian gardens, in my experience. These rots are worst in heavy soils and humid climates. Keep them at bay with good drainage – plant in a raised bed, rockery or pot. Alternatively, grow tall varieties that are much more resistant to these problems and grow well in virtually all soil types and Australian climates.

DO THEY NEED FERTILISER? with heavy clay soils or humid climates. However, the shorter varieties often flower year-round and come in a wide range of colours, and make outstanding pot and rockery specimens. These dwarf varieties tend to be the ones most frequently on offer in retail outlets as they are easy to grow, flower and transport in pots, and their flower displays are an appealing impulse buy. Cultivars that perform include ‘Bush Pearl’, ‘Bush Diamond’, ‘Bush Elegance’, ‘Bush Blitz’ and ‘Midas Touch’. My advice is to use them as bedding plants to create bold seasonal features, particularly for smaller gardens. See ‘where to buy’ overpage for a list of stockists.

Good nutrition maximises flower displays and keeps the foliage green and healthy, thereby avoiding leaf

blackening. While kangaroo paws are not as sensitive to added phosphorus as banksias, grevilleas and waratahs, it’s still wise to use a low-phosphorus fertiliser for native plants. Give plants a generous handful after pruning at the end of their flowering season.

DO THEY NEED WATERING? Kangaroo paws need an adequate supply of moisture while their flowers are forming. Drooping flower buds are a sign that extra watering is required. A bumper flower display can rapidly wilt if the garden dries out during late winter and spring.

THEY’RE LOOKING A BIT STRAGGLY… Like many perennials, kangaroo paws need pruning after flowering. I cut most of mine back hard. Wear long sleeves and trousers, protective goggles and a dust mask to prevent hairs on the spent flowers causing irritation. Tall cultivars can be chopped back to ground level each year in late summer or autumn as flowering finishes. This tough love cleans up any dead or blackened foliage. Be bold. I use a whipper snipper or hand hedging shears for a small job, and mechanical shears, a motor mower or tractor slasher for the big jobs. Smaller cultivars require more work to maximise their relatively short lives. Each flower stem arises from a leaf fan that is comprised usually of six leaves that gradually die and turn black as flowers finish. Rather than cutting the whole plant back to ground level, it’s best to remove the spent flower stems one at a time, as a savage cut back all at once will often kill the plant. As you remove the stems, make sure you take out the old leaves that are associated with them. G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 23


1

3

TOP TIP

When a plant is difficult to remove from its pot, thoroughly wetting the root ball can help. Inspect the pot’s drainage holes and, if blocked by roots, cut them off. Finally, try turning the pot on its side and give it a few sharp blows to loosen the plant.

STEP-BY-STEP

HOW TO DIVIDE KANGAROO PAW

4

where toBUY Kuranga Nursery 118 York Rd, Mount Evelyn, Vic. (03) 9760 8100, kuranga.com.au Nielsen’s Native Nursery 49–51 Beenleigh-Redland Bay Rd, Loganholme, Qld. (07) 3806 1414, nielsensnative nursery.com.au 24 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

Ask for varieties by name at your local garden centre or specialist native nursery Sydney Wildflower Nursery 9 Veno St, Heathcote, NSW. (02) 9548 2818, sydneywildflower nursery.com.au The Wildflower Place 453 The Entrance Rd, Erina NSW. (02) 4365 5510

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

Zanthorrea Nursery 155 Watsonia Rd, Maida Vale, WA. (08) 9454 6260, zanthorrea.com Many websites have a selection of kangaroo paws for sale online, including gardening withangus.com.au

1 SELECT a clump with lots of new growth. Use secateurs to remove any spent flower stems and dead leaves. Leave fresh new growth. 2 LIFT the prepared clump from the soil using a sharp spade, or take the plant out of its pot. Look for strong, healthy rhizomes (fleshy, swollen structures just below the surface). 3 REMOVE several sections from the clump, using a serrated knife and secateurs, making sure each section has a rhizome and new growth. Cut between shoots to avoid damaging the growth points. 4 CLEAN UP the division. Remove all the old growth and leave several new shoots, then replant or re-pot your new plant quickly so it doesn’t dry out. Water in well with liquid seaweed to encourage new roots. Replant the old clump in the garden or a pot, if you wish. GA

PHOTOS ANGUS STEWART

2

ANGUS STEWART shows how to turn an established clump of kangaroo paw into several new plants. Autumn is a good time to divide kangaroo paws


Great For All Plants, All Seasons! SPRING: Enhances flowering & fruiting.

SUMMER: Helps protect against heat & drought.

AUTUMN: Great for planting & strong root growth.

WINTER: Helps plants cope with the cold weather including frost.

www.seasol.com.au


PLANTS

ag

tumble

26 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

PHOTO KIM WOODS RABBIDGE

GREAT FEATURE


Each spring, DERYN THORPE looks forward to the spectacular racemes of violet flowers on her petrea vine

N

ative to Mexico and tropical South America, petrea (Petrea volubilis) is a woody-stemmed evergreen creeper that’s often thought of as the tropical wisteria. It offers a similar cascade of pendulous spring flowers, but grows in areas that are too humid to suit wisteria. In the warm-temperate climate in Perth, I’m able to grow both wisteria and petrea. Here, the wisteria flowers in late winter and early spring before petrea continues the show, blooming from mid-spring to early summer. In tropical and subtropical areas, petrea flowers in early spring, with further (though less showy) flowers right through until early autumn. When not in flower, petrea is easy to recognise from its sandpaper-like foliage and grey-barked trunk, which gives it its other common names, purple wreath and sandpaper vine. There are 30 woody climbers and shrubs in the Petrea genus, which is named after Lord Petre, who was an exotic plant collector during the 18th century. P. volubilis (‘volubilis’ means twining) is the most popular species among gardeners, and is part of the verbena family (Verbenaceae). The two-toned, dainty flower sprays can have up to 30 flowers. As well as the commonly seen lilac-blue of the species, there’s a white-flowered form known as ‘Albifora’. The flower racemes are up to 30cm long and appear from the axils of the leaves. In the centre of each individual flower is a simple five-lobed, velvet-like violet corolla, which is surrounded by

five narrow, star-like lilac calyces. The calyces remain on the plant long after the flowers drop, and age gently to an ashen lilac colour. Eventually, they also drop, forming wings that assist in seed dispersal as they fall to the ground, rotating like miniature helicopter blades.

growing & pruning Petrea is a vigorous vine that grows to 6–12m or even higher. Provide a position in full sun with ample summer water, free-draining soil and a cool root run. It is usually grown on a pergola or fence, but it can be allowed to create a scrambling, mounding shrub, and it makes a good groundcover over a bank. It doesn’t tolerate frost. In climates with cool winters, it needs protection in the early years and may lose leaves in a cold winter. Once established, petrea is very robust, with multiple stems that need a very strong support and yearly pruning to keep the vine in check. If left unpruned, it is likely to scramble into trees or grow into a tangled mess. Prune annually after flowering using a pole pruner. The best time to prune is after the whippy summer growth appears. To ensure ample flowering, look for stems where there is a short distance between the growth internodes. Do not prune these stems as they will be laden with flowers next year.

Another simple way to propagate new plants is by stem layering. Select a stem that can be pulled down to ground level, but don’t cut it off. Use secateurs to lightly scrape the underside of the stem, then peg the scraped side onto the soil, using a piece of bent wire to hold it in place. Leave the stem attached to the main plant until it forms its own roots, then detach it from the mother plant and transplant or pot it up. Alternatively, take stem cuttings in summer. Provide warm, humid conditions until they form roots. GA

at a glance common names petrea, sandpaper vine, purple wreath botanic name Petrea volubilis plant type scrambling vine

6–12m+ full sun

anytime spring to early autumn

how to propagate Growing your own petrea can be as easy as transplanting small self-seeded plants that appear beneath established vines. These can be successfully potted up when they are young.

suitable

3–6m


PLANTS

GREAT INDOOR PLANT

beautiful

BLOOMER

C

ape primrose is not the same primrose you would find in the English countryside in spring. This robust flowering plant is from the genus Streptocarpus, and is a close relative of African violet (Saintpaulia ionantha), gloxinia (Sinningia speciosa) and nodding violet (Streptocarpus caulescens), which are all popular indoor plants. Although they enjoy the same growing conditions, Cape primrose is distinct from its close relatives. Best known are hybrids, developed for their large, attractive, veined leaves that form a rosette for the crowning glory of the plant, which are its stems of large, nodding, trumpet-shaped blooms. Flowers can appear anytime in warm climates, and are usually seen in spring and autumn in temperate zones. They mostly come in shades of violet but there are also pink, red, white, yellow, near-black, multicoloured and striped forms, and some varieties have frilled or double flowers. Be warned, it will be hard to choose a favourite! Look for Cape primrose in flower at garden centres (search the indoor plant section), but for the broadest selection of varieties and colours, visit specialist African violet society shows and growers. You can use leaf cuttings to propagate more plants (see overpage).

28 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

GROWING TIPS Cape primrose plants enjoy a protected spot away from direct sunlight, yet require bright, indirect light for constant growth. They are usually grown as indoor or patio plants. A brightly lit, east-facing windowsill is ideal. They can be grown in all areas, but do best in mild temperatures.

Choose a potting mix suited for African violets. Getting watering right is critical. Ensure they are watered sparingly but just enough to keep the mix slightly moist. They don’t mind drying out a little, as they can then fully utilise the moisture around their fine root systems. Apply any liquid fertiliser that’s high in potash (such as African violet fertiliser) about once a month and you will be rewarded with flowers. Lots of them! In optimum growing conditions, these are long-lived indoor plants. To keep them looking good, remove dead leaves and spent flower stems. Re-pot in spring into a slightly larger pot if the plant outgrows its container. Keep away from heating or air conditioning, and move away from windows if temperatures become cold (especially below 5°C) or extremely hot.

COLLECTOR’S PLANTS

LEFT TO RIGHT he giant single leaf of collectable Streptocarpus grandis; a regular Cape primrose with delicate mauve lowers.

If you venture onto the websites of online nurseries that specialise in African violets or visit enthusiasts’ special displays at a collectors’ plant fair, you may find some extra special streptocarpus plants. My favourite is the giant Cape primrose (S. grandis) – it is high on the must-have list for anyone with an appetite for the truly unusual. Africa has always been rich in incredible flora that appeals to collectors and, true to form, Zimbabwe is the home

PHOTOS TOSHIJIRO OKUTO (COURTESY OF THE GESNERIAD REFERENCE), GAP PHOTOS/CLIVE NICHOLS

Cape primrose is a lovely flowering plant that can be grown in all climates under the right conditions, and includes an unusual variety that is very appealing to collectors, writes NOEL BURDETTE


at a glance common names Cape primrose, streptocarpus

botanic name Streptocarpus Hybrid Cultivars family name Gesneriaceae plant type perennial

30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;50cm 30â&#x20AC;&#x201C;50cm bright light indoors anytime mainly from spring to autumn

suitable


PLANTS

of this amazing giant species. It has successfully colonised spaces where many other plants simply couldn’t thrive. Plants cling to life on moss-covered logs, rocks and cliff faces nestled within the understorey of temperate shady forests. Unlike many Streptocarpus species, the giant Cape primrose is unifoliate – that is, it produces just one large leaf, up to 70cm long. Unifoliate plants are usually monocarpic, meaning they die after flowering, and this is no exception. It takes about two years to mature, then develops a tall, multi-stemmed flower stem with several nodding bell-shaped blooms in a delicate shade of mauve. After flowering, tiny seeds are dispersed over surrounding moist surfaces, where they eagerly germinate into new plants, and the parent plant dies. This is the best way to propagate this plant. Growing this species at home requires special techniques. Place the young plant towards the side of the pot or hanging basket where the large, handsome leaf can be encouraged to hang gracefullly over the side, so it won’t stop moisture reaching the roots. The roots resent being both too wet and too hot, so a cool, shady corner is needed to ensure a perfect start for a young plant. Although these plants are shade lovers and thrive indoors, they appreciate filtered morning or afternoon sun for a little warmth, but not too much, as they are best grown when temperatures are a mild 21°C. Choose a mix that is suitable for African violets (they are cousins, after all) but add about 50 per cent perlite so the root system has good drainage and air circulation, and doesn’t become waterlogged. Avoid the temptation of standing them in a water-filled saucer as this quickly causes the roots to rot. Although short-lived, the giant Cape primrose is truly worth all the effort of growing it, so you can enjoy a beautiful and rare species at home. GA 30 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

2

3

4

STEP-BY-STEP

PROPAGATE CAPE PRIMROSE You can propagate ordinary Cape primrose by taking leaf cuttings in spring, producing new plants that will flower in about 12 months 1 REMOVE a healthy leaf from your plant and place it on a cutting board, then use a sharp knife to cut it into several segments about 5cm wide, cutting across the midrib. 2 INSERT the cuttings vertically into moist propagation mix in a tray or punnet. Put the base of each cutting (the end closest to the original leaf base) firmly into the mix to a depth of 2.5cm. Water in well.

3 COVER your propagation tray with a plastic bag, or place it in a foam box covered with glass or plastic. Keep in a brightly lit spot. Water as the mix dries, but don’t allow the cuttings to get too wet. New plants will form at the base of the leaf cutting in 4–6 weeks. 4 LIFT the new plants carefully from the propagation tray once the leaf cuttings have formed a cluster of tiny leaves and roots. Re-pot these plants into 10cm individual pots. As the plants grow, pot them on into larger pots.

PHOTOS GAP PHOTOS/JONATHAN BUCKLEY, GAP PHOTOS/MARTIN HUGHES-JONES

1


GRANDESSA 50% larger than a standard daisy

Beautiful Bred in Australia for Australian conditions, GrandessaÂŽ produces big, bold and beautiful flowers up to an eye popping 9cm, and will be available in Garden Centres where all good plants are sold. www.oasishorticulture.com.au


GARDENS

best of

BOTH WORLDS W

words and photography VIRGINIA CUMMINS

A passionate gardener is ruled by her heart when working in her Melbourne garden, a space filled with a harmonious mix of native and exotic plants

andering through Carol Ride’s spacious urban garden on a spring morning, it’s the flowering perennials that shine. Cherry pie (Heliotropium arborescens) with its dark contrasting foliage and divine vanilla perfume, along with salvias, purple bougainvillea and a thriving rose section stand out against the soft backdrop of a bush palette. As the sun rises through the fog, the 35 years of love that Carol has put into her garden sings as loud as the morning birdsong. With her broad taste in plants, Carol trials anything she loves. She’s created a seamless blend of natives, exotics, striking foliage plants and flowering varieties, both bold and delicate. It is a masterful melange with everything working in harmony, an effect that is difficult to achieve.

REALISING A DREAM Carol and her husband John had dreamt of having a large garden. When they found their property, about a 20-minute drive from Melbourne’s CBD, they loved the old Arts and Crafts-style house, but it was the surrounding bush and wonderful potential for a garden that really drew them in. Covering about 2000m2, the block in a leafy suburb by the Yarra River gave them the space they longed for. There weren’t many plants in the garden, so Carol did a short landscape design course to prepare for the massive task ahead. The now abundant and established garden invites you to explore, with its different levels, stone steps, paved areas, meandering grass paths, and plantings FROM LEFT Clumps of tall dietes mingle with the rambling native guinea lower (Hibbertia scandens); cottage plants, including roses and sweet peas, work in a bushland setting. 32 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


GARDENS

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE Statice, with its large purple lower heads, is a feature at the entrance; Leucadendron ‘Superstar’; David Austin rose ‘John Clare’; romneya thrives in Mediterranean climates; Carol grows roses for cut lowers; foliage of diferent shapes and textures are anchored by a rock.

34 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

anchored by large basalt rocks. There are peaceful places to stop and take in the rich vista along the way, including quiet garden rooms and seating areas. Giant lemon-scented gums (Corymbia citriodora) form a big canopy in the back garden, and snowgums (Eucalyptus pauciflora), with their gnarled branches, add character. Many trees have been carefully positioned to provide shelter. As a campaigner for a greener planet and founder of Psychology for a Safe Climate, a non-profit organisation that aims to foster emotional engagement with climate change, Carol’s philosophy is seen in the garden. Ornamental grapevines and a strategically placed Manchurian pear shade and protect the house, reducing the need for cooling during summer.


LEFT he striking purple of the smoke bush in foreground tones with mauve lowers and provides a contrast to a range of greens.

HAPPY BEDFELLOWS

Carol is also passionate about seed saving, and grows her own vegetables in wicking beds, using environmentally friendly gardening techniques.

SHARED PHILOSOPHY In 1996, while working on her Masters in Psychoanalytic Studies, Carol needed help with her garden, so she put a notice up at Burnley Horticultural College. Jela Ivankovic-Waters (then a student, now a landscape architect) answered her call and the pair began a 10-year gardening relationship, fostering a great friendship. Jela encouraged Carol to plant what she loves and step back to see the whole effect.

Keen to take this concept to a wider audience, Jela recently co-authored Native: Art and Design with Australian Plants with fellow designer Kate Herd. The book celebrates the use of native plants in gardens, reflecting lessons from Carol’s garden. It also aims to break down the idea that gardens need to be exclusively Australian native plants or exotics, and encourages gardeners to mix the two. Carol’s garden exemplifies this, showcasing a harmonious mix of many types of plants, each with their own charm and purpose. “It’s how a plant will respond to your environment that should determine its use,” explains Jela. “The native/non-native

Here are some Australian natives that add variety of foliage, flowers and form to an exotic planting. Cutleaf daisy (Brachyscome multifida) Low ground-covering perennial with dainty leaves and mauve daisy flowers during spring and summer. Drought tolerant. Easy to grow from a cutting. 20–40cm 30cm–1m Cushion bush (Leucophyta brownii) Low-growing silver mound of a shrub with yellow flowers in spring. Easy to grow from a cutting. 1m 1m Geraldton wax (Chamelaucium uncinatum) A fast-growing airy shrub or small tree with pink or purple flowers (above) for months. Great cut flower. Needs good drainage. Prune by a third after flowering. 2.4m 2.4m Snowgum (Eucalyptus paucifolia) Small tree with twisted branches. The foliage and flowers are at eye level. Cut oversized or woody trees almost to the ground and they will shoot. 18m 6m Thryptomene (Thryptomene saxicola) A small shrub with scented foliage and white flowers from winter to spring. Plant on the edge of a path where you brush past it. Good cut flower. Drought tolerant. 1–1.5m 1.5m

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 35


GARDENS

CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW A small sculpture in a sea of perennials; chooks free-ranging in the garden; cutleaf daisy (Brachyscome multiida); a daisy grown from a cutting taken on one of Carol’s walks; blue-grey leaves of mingo grass beside the variegated foliage of a plectranthus.

delineation is an Australian cultural mindset that’s fixed. If we mix these plants we have much more to play with, rather than being hemmed in by what we’re told we should and shouldn’t plant. When you introduce Australian natives, you have continuity of flowering and foliage interest, and attract birds and insects year-round.”

NATIVE GEMS Carol has planted a number of wattles (Acacia spp.). She says these natives are often overlooked, as they are classified as short lived, but she regards them as valuable and versatile garden plants. There are wattle varieties that cascade, spill over and run along the ground as a cover, and others that can be shaped as a small shrub (see box, opposite). Jela also believes wattles are some of the best-performing plants available. “The value wattles can offer is completely underestimated,” she says. “People seem put off because they may only live 15 years, but that’s a long time considering how tastes change. Most grow incredibly fast, 36 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

and there are so many varieties. Their plasticity and hardiness are unparalleled.” Other natives featured in Carol’s garden are Thryptomene saxicola, croweas and a Geraldton wax (Chamelaucium uncinatum), all with mid-winter flowers. See page 35 for more natives to mix with exotics. “All plants should be considered equal and judged on the merit of how they

perform and work together, and what they can do for you and the environment,” enthuses Jela. “I often think a really good garden is one where you don’t feel you have to look at anything in particular, but where it just feels great to be in it, and you can feel the love,” she adds, beautifully summing up the effect Carol’s garden has on people fortunate enough to visit. GA


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Masses of lowers on a Snowy River wattle; the fringed wattle has pale yellow balls; gold dust wattle is a lovely shape; blue bush is a very tough plant.

CAROL’S FAVOURITE WATTLES Blue bush (A. covenyi) Can be a multi-branched shrub or a single-branched tree. Blue-grey foliage with lemon-coloured flowers in early autumn, finishing with decorative black seed pods. 6–7m 2–3m Clay or flat wattle (A. glaucoptera) Frost tolerant, yellow-flowering shrub with dense, striking, blue-green foliage with leaves resembling wings. New growth has a reddish tinge. 0.5–1.5m 2–3m Fringed wattle (A. fimbriata) Glorious pale yellow flowers and feathery foliage. 1–2m 1–2m Gold dust wattle (A. acinacea) Small to medium shrub with a beautiful shape and gorgeous flowers in a string along the stems. 1–3m 1–2m Hairy wattle (A. vestita) Very bushy medium to tall shrub with beautiful drooping foliage. 3–6m 3–5m Leafless rock wattle (A. aphylla) Unusual leafless blue-grey stems sport ball-shaped flowers from late winter to mid spring. 1–2.5m 2m Queensland silver wattle (A. podalyriifolia) Lovely grey-green foliage and an abundance of fluffy yellow flowers. 5m 5m Snowy River wattle (Acacia boormanii) Rounded frost-hardy shrub with bright yellow ball-shaped blooms in late winter and early spring. Smooth grey bark and silvery seed pods after flowering. 4.5m 2–3m

Measured and mindful Perfect irrigation is a balancing act. Let the clever GARDENA Water Smart Flow Meter help you water your garden in a controlled way. GARDENA Water Smart Flow Meter Just connect it to your tap, sprayer, sprinkler, micro irrigation system or pump and it will record your water consumption per day, season or watering session as well DV\RXUÁRZUDWH Backed by a 5-year warranty!

Passion for Life


PASS ON THE

gardening

BUG

One of the greatest gifts we can give our kids is a love of gardening. COSTA GEORGIADIS has 10 great ways to get them involved illustrations CHERYL ORSINI

F

inding ways to connect children with gardens and nature is more or less what gets me out of bed each day. Apart from all the data about children needing more green time instead of screen time, I suspect the idea that we can share the awe of nature with younger generations is something most people in history have felt at some stage. Sharing the magic and beauty of plants and gardens cuts across cultures and borders. I have visited or looked over the fence at private and community gardens here and around the world, and spoken the language of gardens with adults and children – all without uttering a word. This is why I love getting children into the garden. It’s a passport to the world on every level imaginable: the world of nature and ecology and biology and geography; the importance of health and nutrition and harvest and seasonality; the joy of sharing and cooking and sitting and talking; and the physical and emotional therapy that the beauty of nature can bring us. Walking in a garden, forest or bushland immerses us in nature, a form of meditation or therapy the Japanese call ‘forest bathing’. Offering this to our children sets them up for a lifetime

38 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

of health and understanding that cannot be downloaded and applied through an app. So, how do we get these connections established between our children and the natural world around them? What tips and tricks can we use to get their energy and enthusiasm focused on the outside world – the plants, gardens, flowers, bees, birds,

frogs, trees, fruit, vegetables, creeks, lakes, streams, rivers, ocean and beaches? Here are 10 simple ways to get started. It is not about imposing a rigid framework or giving instructions. The easiest way to get kids interested is to model a genuine love for plants and gardens through your own habits and spontaneous gestures.


KIDS IN THE GARDEN

1

MODEL WHAT YOU WANT THEM TO DO

This is the simplest approach I know. Children love to do what you are doing, particularly if you build some tension and create an air of excitement around the process. When you know kids will be around, plan to be outside in the garden at the time. It lures them away from the lounge or the TV or computer, and you are then seen to be doing what you believe in, without having to talk about it. Reveals are also a nice way to get attention: “Do you want to come and search for strawberries?” Or: “I’m going to lift the compost lid and see what is happening.” Or: “I think there are some tomatoes ready to be picked – maybe we can eat some fresh off the vine…”

2

BUILD HABITS AND ROUTINES

Being outside in the garden when kids are at your place is one thing, but it’s best to create habits and routines. If you have a regular family dinner once a week or month when everyone gets together, then make the habit of saying let’s get together a half hour earlier to do some treasure hunts or harvesting in the garden. Set up a seasonal routine where you take the children in your world for a visit to the botanic garden. Call it a bus trip, call it a picnic, call it exploration... whatever you call it, do it regularly, and build that sense in your family of ‘this is what we do’. Over time, it becomes like visiting old friends – a wonderful routine. bganz.org.au

3

GROW SOMETHING FROM SEED

Introduce a young person to the sheer awe and joy of watching a seed germinate and grow into a seedling. Keep it interesting by selecting plants with different

sized seeds, such as pumpkins and broad beans, with their larger seeds, through to the tiny seeds of lettuce and carrot. Growing wheat seeds or sprouts on moist paper towel in a container on the windowsill is another easy project where you can share the awe together. seedsavers.net

4

START A CONTAINER GARDEN TOGETHER

Start small and build it up step by step. By growing the project slowly, you can grow enthusiasm and interest, and build excitement and gain traction as you go. Start by growing something like herbs, which are not only easy to grow but can also be turned into a topping for pizza or a pesto or something that kids love to eat. Cherry tomatoes are an easy option and the returns are there for the picking. Lettuce and silverbeet can be harvested and turned into salad or spinach triangles or spinach pie that the children can help you make. You can grow that connection between seed, soil, harvest and plate.

5

GO TO A TALK OR WORKSHOP

Make it random and keep it different. It could be your local council and its sustainability team, or it could be a flower or garden show. It could be a talk or workshop at the local garden centre or nursery or art gallery or museum, or even the local library. There is so much going on, so pull the odd random event and take the kids on an adventure. I’m excited at the thought of it!

Junior Landcare for younger children or Intrepid Landcare for teens and young adults. Maybe it could be Take 3 For The Sea, where they can connect to the importance of keeping land waste from entering our oceans and waterways, or you could clean up litter on a beach with Responsible Runners, or even help out at your local community garden. The bottom line is that getting children involved with volunteering opens up a whole world of community connections and potential career pathways for them, which can change and enrich their lives. landcareaustralia.org.au; intrepidlandcare.org; take3.org; responsiblerunners.org

6

JOIN A GROUP AS A JOINT PROJECT

Give them some options around a local group that you could volunteer with together. It could be G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 39


KIDS IN THE GARDEN

garden journal

7

VIST YOUR LOCAL FARMERS’ MARKET

Introduce children to markets, and meet the people who grow food. Make it once a month or whenever you can, with a view again to building a habit. Introduce the kids to the growers, and build communication. The growers often give samples of their produce, and they will remember the children, so the more you take them there, the more they will feel like part of the growing tribe. farmersmarkets. org.au

8

PUT GARDENS ON THE HOLIDAY MAP

Before going on a school holiday trip or even a weekend away, sit down and see where any botanic or community gardens may be along the way. Pick and plan a course that can include some brief stops. Rather than a highway rest stop, why not take an exit and have a cuppa and a sandwich at a local community garden. Even let the locals know you are coming, and I’m sure someone will be there to welcome you and show you around. Connect with gardens through the Australian City Farms & Community Gardens Network. community garden.org.au

40 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

Take photos of all the activities you do together and make a little garden journal. That way your budding horticulturist or gardener or landscaper or botanist or landcarer or florist or nursery grower or farmer or bonsai artist or horticultural therapist or market gardener or botanic artist or landscape architect or chef or librarian or entomologist or... will be reminded of where they were infected with the nature virus.

9

COLLECT CACTI AND SUCCULENTS

There are so many fascinating cacti and succulents to choose from, to spark the creative growing imagination of children. From echerveria succulents to the massive array of cacti, there is something for every imagination. You could go to a nursery or garden centre together and pick your way through the options. How about starting a small basket of succulents? Or potting up some gifts? There are heaps of great ideas for gardening with succulents on the Gardening Australia website. Create some little gardens, give them as gifts, and help the kids build up an inspiring track record of growing successes. abc.net.au/gardening

10

GIVE THE GIFT OF GARDENING Birthdays, Christmas, first day of school, graduation from kindy or Year 1. There is always an opportunity to give a gift, so make it connected to nature: a hand trowel or rake, a packet of seeds, a ticket to a workshop, a carnivorous plant… the possibilities really are endless. GA


Water Efficient Irrigation

Neta provides the most efficient watering solutions: Pot Plants, Garden Borders, Garden Beds & Lawns.

Available at

www.netagarden.com.au


AVAILABLE IN:

ZINC

CREAM

GREY

GREEN


S

Bolt-down kit with sleeved anchors

S

Mid-wall frame & corner brackets for extra strength

S

Corner & door bracing for added strength & style


I love my

SHED Every garden needs a shed, says JENNIFER STACKHOUSE


STORAGE

PHOTOS GAP PHOTOS/J S SIRA, GEORGIE McKIE, TINO CARNEVALE

A

garden of any size usually has a shed. It may be holding up a climber or sitting neat as a pin down the back behind the clothesline and beside the compost heap. We have four sheds in our large, old rambling garden in Tasmania, and I love them all. There’s a wood shed and a lean-to, where the push mower, wheelbarrow and a ladder sit. My husband Jim also uses it as the spot to smoke the trout he catches regularly in nearby Lake Barrington. Next to the lean-to is a building that’s almost too cute to call a shed. Dubbed the ‘Old School House’ by our property’s previous owners, it was their kids’ playhouse. They added a small verandah, which is a top spot to sit to admire the garden. Digging further back into the property’s history we’ve discovered that this little building was a small dairy, where the milk from the house cow was turned into fresh butter. It now stores most of our garden tools. There are shelves and hooks to keep it tidy, so it’s easy to find what’s needed. Our final shed is adjacent to the chook yard and vegie garden. It was the obvious space to store the chook food and a few extra tools, stakes, twine and netting, so we have them handy when working in the vegie patch. Once a bland metal building with a skillion roof, a coat of cream and green paint means it now blends in with the house. It’s also in a sunny spot, so I am training climbing roses over it for further concealment. His Orangeness (Leo, the cat) enjoys it as a place to perch in the sun and watch over the garden and his flock of chooks. I am not alone in loving my garden sheds. Gardening Australia presenter Tino Carnevale loves the shed in his Tasmanian garden so much he’s written a haiku-inspired poem in its honour.

CLOCKWISE FROM MAIN A place to store tools and relax; Dora on the verandah of the ‘Old School House’ in Jennifer Stackhouse’s garden; Tino Carnvale loves his rustic shed.

“My shed, my shed a place to rest my head that ’s not my bed” - Tino Carnevale G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 45


STORAGE

RENOVATE, DEMOLISH OR REPURPOSE?

FROM TOP he plastic kit shed in our editor’s garden is raised on recycled treated timber logs, with waterproof timber looring; the shed of Peter and Chelly Gray, makers of beautiful things for the garden, including this shed sign.

Our sheds add character as well as functionality to our garden. It’s worth doing the minor repairs needed to keep them waterproof and functional. Often sheds appear very run-down, but before making the decision to demolish your shed, consider whether it might be able to be repaired as a quirky garden feature. If demolition of an old shed is on the agenda, or if you’re planning to repair it, it’s important to have it checked out by an expert to see if it contains any asbestos before starting the work. Just about any structure in the garden can be repurposed as a shed, from the kids’ disused cubby to the old outhouse. If you can stand up in it, then you can turn it into a garden shed. Not far from us is a garden that has a gypsy caravan as a shed. With its pot belly stove, it’s a very cosy shed that’s more for comfort than storage. Even grander is Gardening Australia presenter and regular contributor Sophie Thomson’s old railway carriage, which she has repurposed as a shed and workshop in her garden at Mount Barker in South Australia.

CHOOSING A NEW SHED We inherited our sheds, but in a new or renovated garden the shed is likely to be a new build. Choosing what to build won’t be easy, as there’s a shed-load of sizes and designs available. Where budget is not an issue but aesthetics are, employ n architect or builder to esign a bespoke shed match the look of your ouse or garage. For simpler and cheaper ersion, select one of he many off-the-shelf options available. Off-the-shelf sheds range from simple Zincalume or steel sheds, which are 46 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


PHOTOS JENNY BALDWIN, SIMON GRIFFITHS, SOPHIE THOMSON, GAP PHOTOS/ANDREA JONES, ISTOCK, GAP PHOTOS/HEATHER EDWARDS

ABOVE We can’t all have a train carriage like this one in Sophie homson’s garden, but it shows where imagination and lateral thinking (and a crane) can take you! LEFT A quick lick of paint is a simple way to pretty up any shed.

roof garden

The space on top of your flat or skillion-roofed shed is an opportunity to extend your garden, as in these two examples. Plant with succulents and other drought-hardy plants.

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 47


STORAGE

RIGHT A big garden will amost certainly need a big shed to house a wide range of tools. Metal is afordable and durable, and available in a range of colours. BELOW here’s a lot packed into this small garden, including a shed and attached greenhouse.

new shed checklist O Check with your local council

O Do you need a window? As well

or planning body, as your garden shed may need a planning permit, depending on its size and location on the property. O In tropical or cyclone areas, select sheds and construction methods rated for cyclones. O Select a dry, level site with access for construction. O Look above the spot where you plan to locate your shed. Building under trees may provide shade, but falling branches could damage the shed. Also, building over the top of a tree’s root system can be detrimental to the tree. O Consider whether you need access to water inside your shed, and if you would like power for lights, or to operate tools. O What sort of flooring is best? A concrete slab provides a solid weight-bearing surface and will keep the interior dry. O If you would like doors that open outwards, make sure there’s plenty of room for them to open. Sliding doors provide wide, easy access and take up little space.

as letting in more light, a window increases ventilation and keeps the shed cooler in summer. Some sheds have skylights for natural illumination. O Orient the shed for easy access into the shed for wheelbarrows and other large or wheeled items. O Which type of roof would you like on your shed – flat, skillion (sloping) or pitched (gable) roof? Is the shed high enough to stand in? Basic DIY sheds start at 1.8m high but, for ease of access, look for a height of 2.1m. O Do you want to catch rainwater from the roof? If so, select a pitched roof with guttering that you can connect to a tank or water butt. O What colour would you like? Metal and plastic sheds come in a range of colours, while timber sheds can be left to weather or painted to match the house. O Storage solutions inside the shed, including wall-mounted storage or shelves, are extra, so factor the cost of these into your overall purchase decision. OTools can be stolen, so make sure you can lock the shed door.

48 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

available as flat-pack kits in a range of sizes, to fancy timber constructions made from treated pine, western red cedar or other timbers. There are also heavy-duty plastic sheds. Sheds are available from specialist manufacturers or hardware stores. Delivery may be extra, depending on how much you’re spending and how far you are from the nearest distributor. A basic metal garden locker or small shed with a flat or skillion (sloping) roof that’s high enough to stand in starts at around $300 to $400. For a shed that has space for a workbench and plenty of equipment, such as ride-on mowers, prices range from about $600 for a modest 3m x 3m x 2.1m shed to $1200 or more for a 4.5m x 3m x 2.1m shed. Generally timber sheds cost more than metal sheds. Small cedar shed flat-pack kits cost about $700 to $1000, and larger sheds about 4.8m x 2.5m x 1.8m sell for more than $4000. Timber sheds usually include a window, either in the door or wall, and have skillion or pitched roofs.


AUSTRALIA’S NUMBER ONE WHEELBARROW BRAND ABOVE Plastic sheds, which are made from A plastic shed polypropylene resin or polycarbonate, designed to look are lightweight and easy to manage. like a timber one They are reinforced with a metal frame blends in easily with natural (either steel or aluminium) and have an materials such in-built floor and provision for shelving as stone, wood systems. Prices start at about $500 to and clay. $700 for a small shed, and rise to more than $1000 for a shed that measures about 2.4m x 2.2m x 2.1m. When you are deciding what to build, consider how handy you are. Sheds require two people to erect them safely, and demand prior building experience or experience with tools. Most shed suppliers offer help with construction or can recommend a builder. It’s probably about a day’s work for NEXT MONTH a builder to put a simple flat-pack shed together, especially if you need a concrete or paved base, or require piers or foundations for a wooden shed. GA

WHEELBARROWS

FROM

99

$

S hed s & sto ra g e fo r a sm a ll s pa ce

CARTS

FROM

89

$

Tell us about PHOTOS ISTOCK, GAP PHOTOS/HOWARD RICE

YOUR SHED…

Do you have a special shed? Rose-covered, rustic or ramshackle... or perhaps you have a Shed of Good Intentions that has turned into a Shed of Shame? Whether your shed is humble or high-end, we’d love to see it. Send us a high-resolution photo and tell us, in 100 words or less, what makes your shed special. We’ll publish our favourite submissions in future issues of the magazine. Email yoursay@gardeningaustralia.com.au with ‘My Shed’ in the subject line, or post to My Shed, Gardening Australia, nextmedia, Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590. Include your name, street address, email and daytime phone number.

SHERLOCKLASTSLONGER.COM.AU


AUSTRALIAN MADE & OWNED AUSTRALIAN QUALITY GUARANTEE

Same low prices every day ONLY

$1799 200 CAPSULES

ONLY

ONLY

$1899

$2499

180 TABLETS

100 TABLETS

ONLY

$1999 100 TABLETS

Odourless Fish Oil 2000mg 200’s

Glucosamine 1500mg 180’s

Helps support heart, joint, brain and eye health. *Odour is vanilla

For mild osteoarthritis. Helps relief joint pain, repair and rebuild joint cartilage, improve joint function

SAVE EVERY DAY in your local pharmacy

Turmeric 3100mg extract 100’s (extract equiv. to 3.1g dry rhizome) Traditionally used in Ayurvedic herbal medicine to help relieve pain & inlammation associated with mild osteoarthritis

QUALITY HEALTH A U S T R A L I A

CHC2037-1216

RRP for competitor brands, Always read the label. Use only as directed. Vitamin supplements can only be of assistance if the dietary vitamin intake is inadequate.

For more information visit: www.qualityhealthaustralia.com


PRACTICAL

PHOTO ISTOCK TEXT JENNIFER STACKHOUSE

See more on spring pruning on Friday, Sept 28 at 7.30pm on ABC TV

M

SPRING tidy up Keep your garden looking good right through spring with these easy tips

id spring in the garden is all about flowers, fragrance and growth, but look a little closer. Among all the beauty are flowers that are past their best. There are also overgrown hedges, daggy bulbs and bits of frost-damaged growth that want to reshoot. Regular pruning and clipping takes little time but makes a world of difference to how long and how well plants grow. Make these clever cuts to keep things in full bloom at your place. For more spring jobs, turn to page 66.

deadhead for more lowers Deadheading is a type of pruning that’s done while plants are in flower. Regularly cutting off the dead flowers has several benefits: it keeps plants looking good, stops the plant forming seeds, and acts as tip-pruning, encouraging new growth and more flowers. Cut the flower stem below the old flower and just above a spot where new growth will appear. For shrubs or small flowering plants that mass themselves in blooms, shear over the plant when most of the flowers are spent.

Take the secateurs to roses, daisies, japonica camellia, viburnum (Viburnum tinus), spring-lowering natives, bulbs and annuals. Don’t deadhead lowers that you want to form fruit or seeds (such as fruiting plants). G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 51


PRACTICAL

trim hedges Hedges may be looking a bit scruffy after a rush of new growth. Once the growth hardens off, it’s safe to prune. If the hedge is a flowering hedge such as an azalea, wait until flowering is over before pruning. Use a hedge pruner, shears or secateurs to shape hedges. Before starting, however, there’s a very important check to be done. Have a good look into the hedge to make sure there are no nesting birds in residence. If there are birds nesting, wait until the young have fledged and flown away before pruning.

Hedge plants to prune in mid to late spring include pittosporum, bottlebrush, box (Japanese and European), viburnum, conifers, photinia, azalea, Italian lavender, camellia and westringia.

Throughout winter and early spring, gardeners in cold climates are warned not to prune off frost damage – growth that’s been burnt by frosts or cold. This is because the damaged growth protects the shoots further down the stem. At this time of year, when the frosty nights are over in all but the coldest areas, it’s safe to go ahead. Here, we’re pruning a Ceratostigma griffithii. Use secateurs or a hedge pruner to clip over the plant, cutting it back to the living part of the stem. Water and feed the plant, then stand back. New growth will erupt from dormant shoots. If the fickle spring weather suddenly takes a cold turn, cover the plant overnight to protect the new, vulnerable growth. If your garden may experience frost in late spring, leave frost damage where it is for a little longer.

52 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

Take pruners to frost-damaged plants, including subtropical plants growing in cold winter climates, such as frangipani, iochroma, sweet viburnum, elaeagnus and hibiscus.

PHOTOS JENNIFER SOO, ISTOCK, BRUCE HUTCHISON, GAP PHOTOS/RICE/BUCKLAND

prune away frost damage


Cut of spent dafodil and other narcissus lowers, along with those on tulip, hyacinth, bluebell, freesia, anemone and ranunculus. Once lanky bulb foliage has gone brown, cut or twist it of (without pulling up the bulbs!).

care for spent bulbs The early spring bulbs have finished flowering in all but the coldest climates. Looking after them now needs a two-pronged approach. Spend a satisfying time in the garden cutting off the pent flowers near the base of e stem (a type of deadheading) ut don’t touch the foliage. Follow his with a feed of fertiliser, to eed the growth that is still green nd ensure plump, healthy bulbs orm beneath the soil. Allow the bulb’s leaves to die back for as ong as you can tolerate their ntidiness. Gardeners sometimes plait up lanky bulb leaves to tidy the garden. While this makes everything look neat, it limits the photosynthesis process. GA


WILDLIFE

he secret life of Despite having tiny brains, bees have demonstrated a surprising ability to learn new skills, solve problems and even count, writes LEONARD CRONIN

I

t’s a warm, sunny day and bees are buzzing around the garden, visiting flower after flower, collecting pollen and nectar to sustain their community. This timeless scenario has become so much a part of our natural world that we take these humble insects at face value. Bees are just bees, right? Mindless automatons, they slave away for the benefit of the hive, following an in-built program that has evolved over millions of years. But is this really all there is to these little creatures? With a brain the size of a mustard seed, we have long assumed that bees, like other insects, do not have enough grey matter to indulge in reasoned thought or the nuanced behaviour we associate with birds, mammals and other animals with much larger and more complex brains. This basic assumption has, however, recently been shaken up by a number of imaginative scientists, who are revealing aspects of bee behaviour that point to the startling conclusion that bees are, in fact, capable of learning new tasks, and can use tools, solve problems, improvise, and make individual decisions. There

54 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

E

is even evidence to show that bees react in ways that seem suspiciously similar to human emotions.

how smart are they? We’ve known for at least 300 years that bees are smart and live in an elaborate society, with guards, food collectors, temperature controllers, honeycomb builders, egg-laying queens and her consort drones. But when Austrian ethologist Karl von Frisch made his famous observations of dancing bees

in the early 20th century, many scientists and philosophers were outraged by his suggestion that mere insects are able to communicate using a form of language. The ‘waggle dance’ described by von Frisch is performed by a successful forager bee on returning to the hive, and communicates to other bees the distance and direction of a food source. The number of circuits in the figure-of-eight dance indicates the distance, while the orientation of the dance shows the direction. Not only are bees using

DOES BRAIN SIZE MATTER? We humans have always regarded ourselves as the smartest of all animals. After all, we have an unusually large brain containing about 86 billion neurons, and we are very clever, so the two characteristics are assumed to be linked. Yet bumblebee brains contain less than a million neurons and they are still capable of a high level of behavioural flexibility. Like many insects, bees need the cognitive capacity to navigate and survive in a complex world, and it is becoming increasingly clear that multifaceted skills do not necessarily require a large brain. Even for the cleverest bumblebees, however, rapid climate change, habitat loss and the use of pesticides are unfortunately proving too much for them. Are we, with our big brains, doing any better?


PHOTO ISTOCK

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 55


WILDLIFE

56 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

HOW TO TRAIN A BEE Using a plastic model bee, researchers showed bumblebees that they could get a sugary reward by pushing a small yellow plastic ball into the centre of a test arena. Once they had learnt how to do this, they were given three balls, although the two closest to the centre were glued down. The bees soon learnt to move the farthest ball to get a reward. Next, an untrained bee was introduced to the arena. This new bee watched the trained bee push the farthest ball to the centre, where it received a reward. Remarkably, when they were offered a similar set-up, with three unglued balls, untrained bees not only succeeded in the task, but tended to select the closest ball to the centre, improving on the behaviour of the trained bees. Most of the bees solved the task on their very first test trial, and some even pulled the ball backwards. While the bumblebees learnt from other bees, they were also able to improvise their behaviour to improve their performance.

To see if bees could use other objects as tools, they trained them to move a small plastic ball into a hole, to be rewarded with a drop of syrup. The bees proved to be good at this, and also improved rapidly, devising new ways of getting a reward and learning the technique from other bees.

do bees have feelings? These revelations have astounded biologists, and further tests have raised the intriguing possibility that bumblebees may experience feelings that resemble our mental state of happiness. We experience a sense of wellbeing when our brains produce a chemical called dopamine. This neurotransmitter makes us feel more optimistic, and we are more likely to be adventurous. To determine whether bumblebees experience similar emotional states,

the researchers gave one group of bees sugary water and another group plain water before setting them free to forage. The result was that the bees given the sugar were more likely to look for sources of food in new and ambiguous situations than their sugarless peers. The sugar reward was also shown to give the bees a hit of dopamine. This chemical makes humans feel good, and maybe it affects bees in the same way, making them feel more optimistic and adventurous. As you can imagine, this is a very controversial idea. Without asking bees to fill out a questionnaire, we can’t know whether they feel positive emotions, but we do know that even an insect with such a tiny brain is far more capable of learning, innovating and communicating than we ever thought possible. Now that’s worth making a buzz about! GA

PHOTOS IIDA LOUKOLA

symbolic language to share information about the location of food sources, this dance also raises the tantalising possibility that bees may be able to count. It seems that they can. In an experiment carried out in Germany in the 1990s, honey bees trained to expect food along a route after passing a certain number of identical landmarks were shown to be able to estimate the distance of the food by counting the number of landmarks. It is also clear that bees are expert navigators able to remember the locations of a large number of flower patches. By using miniature tracking devices, scientists have recently discovered that, as they make repeated journeys, bees work out the shortest and straightest paths between food sources. Rather than mechanically repeating their actions, bees are constantly learning from their environment and innovating new solutions. Such brain power has never been seen in an insect before, and although these experiments show that bees are capable of remarkable mental feats, most of the tasks involved could be considered fundamental to a bee’s natural foraging routines. To determine the extent of a bee’s deductive powers, Dr Olli Loukola and his colleagues at the Queen Mary University of London decided to take bumblebees out of their comfort zone, and devised a series of tests to see if they could be taught to use tools. The use of tools shows that an animal is able to envision how a particular object can be used to achieve a goal. Tool use has always been held up as a sign of higher-order intelligence, and for a long time was ascribed to humans alone. But then it was seen in primates, followed by marine mammals, and later in birds. In 2016, Dr Loukola’s team demonstrated that bumblebees could learn to pull strings to access a reward of sugary syrup. Not only was this quite extraordinary, but the technique soon spread around the colony.


g

the bucket list

LONGWOOD

in Pennsylvania, US words and photography MICHAEL McCOY

Indulgent, outrageous, prodigal and disarming... Longwood Gardens is all this and more, with serious horticultural research and gardening excellence underpinning the spectacle 58 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


TRAVEL

CLOCKWISE FROM MAIN Entire gardens with real lawn are grown under glass; the Topiary Garden is clipped to perfection; masses of tulips and snapdragons; a striking display of Echium wildprettii.

h to live in an era when the very rich loved gardens, and they spent personal time, energy and dollars on developing and nurturing them! Longwood Gardens, just outside of Philadelphia, emerged in such a time. It was the very expensive, very indulgent playground of Pierre S du Pont. And whatever you might think about such extravagance, the world of horticulture is now the beneficiary of his spending. The garden is more than 436 hectares, and has an annual running budget of more than US$50 million, much of which comes from an endowment left by its creator. But what goes on there is not just about

O

titillating and wowing the visiting public, though it certainly does that. There’s serious research underway, and a great team of horticulturists practising gardening at its most demanding level. The garden is appealingly idiosyncratic, as all personal gardens should be. There’s some truly (and wonderfully) crazy stuff going on, such as the immense, digitally controlled pipe organ, consisting of more than 10,000 pipes, in a ballroom attached to a 1.8ha group of glasshouses. A single Italianate fountain covers more than 2ha of land, and responds to piped music that’s played several times a day. Perhaps most individual of all, there’s a fantastically nerdy timepiece, obsessed

over by du Pont himself, in which a daily movable upright rod provides a perfect sundial every day of the year. But it’s the plants and the planting that make a visit to Longwood so memorable. Springtime reveals sheets of tulips in fabulous and surprising combinations. Heights, colours and flowering times are meticulously studied and recorded to ensure that planned combinations flower at exactly the same time, and at perfect relative heights for maximum impact. Elsewhere, garden rooms are filled with annuals and biennials that are so perfectly grown and staked as to totally reset your expectations of personal horticultural achievement. Altogether less intense, G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 59


FROM TOP A toilet block has never been so inviting; sheets of gorgeous pastel-coloured tulips and foxgloves; the Italian Water Garden.

WHILE YOU ARE THERE

Chanticleer

but no less lovely, are the large areas of woodland, in which the ground that surrounds local native dogwoods and redbud trees is carpeted with native phlox, trilliums and foamflower. In sync with current thinking around conservation and sustainability, there are large areas of carefully managed wildflower meadow, while the public toilets are semi-underground and lined with green walls, which make a visit to the loo an absolute must! Longwood is a mind-blowing spectacle and horticultural wonderland in equal measure, guaranteed to equally please the serious garden lover and their bored partner or teenage travelling companions, at any time of the year. GA

At a mere 14ha, Chanticleer is on an altogether more personal scale than Longwood, but it is also a private garden thriving under the benefit of a generous endowment and a team of very inspired and empowered gardeners. It exudes an overwhelming sense that someone there is having a lot of fun! chanticleergarden.org

Winterthur As with all woodland gardens, Winterthur is best visited in mid to late spring, when the carpet of azaleas and wildflowers is at its best, or when the trees overhead colour in very late autumn. This is another du Pont estate, founded by Henry F du Pont in the late 1800s, but has a different character to Longwood. It’s just over 400ha, with meadows, streams and forests. winterthur.org

Brandywine Valley Visiting Longwood or Winterthur from Philadelphia will take you through Brandywine Valley, which is exceptionally beautiful in its own right, and provides unforgettable picnic spots. There are also many wineries in the area, if any further inducement to visit is required! bvwinetrail.com

NEED TO KNOW The gardens are open every day of the year. Entrance is timed, and booking is recommended. Ticket prices rise slightly over the Christmas period, when there’s a spectacular Christmas display in the glasshouses, and this draws enormous crowds. Guided tours are available. For more details, visit longwoodgardens.org 60 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


AT HOME WITH JACKIE

suddenly YOU CANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T GARDEN FOR A YEAR (or more)

HOW TO COPE WHEN

62 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


It can happen to any of us – an injury or illness that puts gardening out of reach for a time. How did JACKIE FRENCH manage when it happened to her?

T

PHOTO GAP PHOTOS/ROBERT MABIC

he withdrawal symptoms began after three weeks without planting or picking anything in the garden, or even having a gentle mooch. An accident had led to surgery, the surgery went wrong… and it has been a year now since I have planted even a tomato bush. It wasn’t easy. I planted my first vegie garden at 18. Gardening has been part of the heart of my life ever since. We eat mostly from the garden, both veg and fruit. Our vases are filled with the flowers and leaves of the season. Ever since they were the only presents I could afford to give, I’ve loved taking baskets of produce to friends, though admittedly they are not quite as thrilled after the 10th basket of limes, chokos or zucchini. But not this year. How did I survive? FRIENDS Gardening friends are the only possible way for a bone-deep gardener to survive. Friends will bring you baskets of home-grown produce in season. You won’t need to depend on pallid supermarket tomatoes. Once the word gets out, there’ll be home-grown, green-skinned-but-luscious-inside peaches, bunches of silverbeet, salads made from home-grown rocket. I was brought flowers too – not the glorious bouquets brought to hospital, but tiny bunches of floppy-stemmed roses or buckets filled with stunning waratahs. With every bunch I felt connected to the seasons again. HELP: PAID OR VOLUNTARY Our garden doesn’t need much work but it does need some, and I live with a man who has not learnt when and how to pick asparagus in our 30 years of marriage, or which is parsley and which is coriander. I had to accept that not only was I not gardening, but I wasn’t going to garden for

at least a few months – enough time for fruit fly to invade the tomatoes, or for weeds to overcome the onions. Actually, a big achievement over the last year has been that, finally, I’ve learnt to ask for help, and understand that others like helping, too. I no longer feel embarrassed being the helped, not the helper. ACCEPTING THIS MAY LINGER Things have improved, hopefully permanently, but maybe not. I will never be as agile as I was before the surgery. So I have to accept that when (not if) I go mooching in the bush or into the rougher parts of our mountainside orchard again, I will do so with crutches, even if I no longer need them all the time. It is too easy to trip on rough ground, especially with wombat holes, bettong nests in the tussocks, and tree roots that have grown massive since I passed that way. With a bit of help, there will be some vegies planted this spring but they will be climbing ones. I have even bought spiral frames for the tomatoes and zucchini to train them upwards, so I don’t need to bend or squat to pick them. I’ve bought long-handled tools to help me plant and weed, and the veg will be planted with paths between them, instead of the crammed wilderness of previous years, so that crutches won’t squash the squash. I’m even planning something that I hope will never be needed: level paths that suit wheelchairs, as well as above-ground garden beds. But today, for the first time in a year, I put the hose on some ultra-dry avocado trees, then picked a basketful of lemons. Yesterday, I picked parsley, and I am ordering a glorious abundance of seeds. Not gardening is okay for a year. But long-term? I may need to plot to get my plots, but I am determined I will always have a garden. GA G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 63


SUBSCRIPTION OFFER

BONUS GIFT

Your choice of a DIARY

or CALENDAR

when you su

2019 Diary • his is the perfect diary to use as a gardening journal, or as a daily or weekly planner • See your week at a glance, with the double-page format • Excellent readability, with clear, generous-sized type

Valued at $17.95

2019 Calendar • his user-friendly calendar features good, clear type, and attractive plant and garden images • Useful dates such as school terms, moon phases and public holidays are clearly marked • Full colour, and easy to mount on the wall

Valued at $17.95

Subs b Clu Join our Subs Club to WIN prizes every month! Subscribe to ABC Gardening Australia magazine and you’ll go in the draw to win great prizes every month. All of our current subscribers have a chance to WIN! This month, our Subs Club prize pack includes two beautiful gardening books. Total prize pack is valued at over $100!

visit mymagazines.com.au to subscribe 64 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

!


Subscribe to ABC Gardening Australia magazine this month and you’ll not only get 12 issues for just $59, but you’ll also receive a BONUS calendar or diary! Offer is open to new, renewing or extending customers who subscribe for one year or more. Calendar and diary are valued at $17.95 each.

PLUS SAVE up to

$63

MAGAZINE

HURRY! OFFER ENDS OCTOBER 7, 2018 HOW TO SUBSCRIBE

PAYMENT DETAILS

I would like to subscribe for (tick one only) Me Gift 1 year (12 issues) Australia $59 – SAVE $27.40 2 years (24 issues) Australia $109 – SAVE $63.80 1 year (12 issues) New Zealand A$65.95 1 year (12 issues) Overseas A$139.95

Cheque/money order for $

Please select 1 item from the following choices: [ ] Diary [ ] Calendar [ ] I prefer not to receive the gift I already subscribe. Please extend my subscription with this offer. PLEASE PHOTOCOPY THIS ORDER FORM FOR ADDITIONAL SUBSCRIPTIONS.

MY DETAILS

Visa

Mastercard

Amex

Card number

■■■■ ■■■■ ■■■■ ■■■■ Cardholder’s name (please print) Cardholder’s signature Expiry date

■■ / ■■ CVV ■■■

SUBSCRIBING IS EASY

Mrs/Ms/Miss/Mr/Other Address Postcode

or charge my

is enclosed payable to nextmedia Pty Ltd

Telephone (

)

1300 361 146 Overseas callers dial +61 (0)2 9901 6111

Email Please provide phone or email in case of delivery issues

GIFT RECIPIENT DETAILS Mrs/Ms/Miss/Mr/Other Address Postcode

Telephone (

)

Send the original or a copy of this coupon to: ABC Gardening Australia Subscriptions Locked Bag 3355 St Leonards NSW 1590

Email Price offer available to Australian residents only, and ends 7/10/18. All rates include GST. Savings based on total cover price. New Zealand: 1yr/12 issues A$65.95. Overseas: 1yr/12 issues A$139.95. Subscriptions commence with the next issue to be mailed. Please allow 6–8 weeks for delivery of your first magazine and separate delivery of your BONUS diary or calendar. This form may be used as a tax invoice; nextmedia P/L (ABN 84 128 805 970). BONUS diary and calendar offer available to Australian and New Zealand residents only. Offer open to new, renewing or extending subscribers who subscribe to ABC Gardening Australia magazine in print for one year or more between 00:01 AEST 10/9/18 and 23:59 AEDT 7/10/18 (may be extended) and you will receive either a BONUS diary or calendar, valued at $17.95; select your option when subscribing. Only while stocks last; an alternative will be supplied if your first choice is no longer available. ABC Gardening Australia magazine Subs Club is open to Australian and New Zealand residents only, and ends 7/10/18. Prize pack valued at $109.99. One winner will be drawn from the ABC Gardening Australia magazine Australian and New Zealand subscription base on 9/10/18. The promoter is nextmedia Pty Ltd. NSW Permit No. LTPM/18/02824; ACT Permit No. TP 18/00337. Please tick if you do not wish to receive special offers or information from nextmedia or its partners via [ ] mail [ ] email or [ ] phone. Our Privacy Notice can be found at nextmedia.com.au. If you prefer to receive communication electronically, please ensure we have your current email address. MA/GDN810

or phone 1300 361 146 for the cost of a local call G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 65


OC

a monh in he

TO

BER

GARDEN

More than 50 jobs to do in your action planner


YOUR PLANNER

Take action

Fungus on camellias and azaleas Check new growth on sasanqua camellias and azaleas for distorted, thickened leaves caused by a fungus. Prune off before they can develop the white spores that spread the disease, disinfecting secateurs in methylated spirits between each cut.

TEXT JUDY HORTON PHOTOS LUKE SIMON, ALAMY, BRENT WILSON, PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATSKY, ISTOCK

TOP JOB

PRUNE SPRING BLOOMERS

Cut back or trim winter- and spring-blooming shrubs as soon as their flowering has finished. Lightly clip native plants such as boronia, mint bush, chorizema, thryptomene, waratah, bottlebrush and banksia (above) just below their spent flowers. Thin out established cane-growing shrubs, such as mock orange (Philadelphus spp.), May bush (Spiraea cantonensis), weigela, forsythia, mahonia and kerria, by removing one-third of the canes, including the oldest shoots – cut these off completely at the base, then trim any unwieldy stems that are getting too long. Remove finished flower stems from ornamental blossom trees, such as peaches and plums, so they can’t develop pest-attracting fruit. Use shears to trim spring-blooming hedge plants, such as viburnum, westringia and Indian hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis spp.).

I t’s time to...

Dig out and divide crowded bearded iris after their flowering has finished Take leaf cuttings from kalanchoes and other succulents (above), and pot them into a sandy mix Lay new lawns so they establish before the hot weather arrives Fertilise newly planted roses Train root systems of flowering plants by watering deeply and letting them dry out between waterings Feed container plants with a slow-release plant food Prune wisteria after flowering – shorten their long shoots and thin overcrowded sections to let more sun reach the inner parts of the plant Visit open gardens to gain some inspiration for your own garden Split clumps of daisies and other daisy-like plants such as marguerites, asters, gerberas and gazanias, and spread them around the garden Plant cold-sensitive ornamentals such as jacaranda (below) and tibouchina

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 67


Do it now

Clean timber decks and furniture, and trea or repaint, to make sure they are in top shape in time for the summer entertaining season Continue picking late-blooming sweet pea to keep the plants producing more blooms Turn or dig the compost heap, and sprinkle with water if the contents are dry Stake tall perennial plants such as dahlias and delphiniums, to keep them standing uprig Apply soil wetter around shrubs in establis garden beds to help them access water Help children sow nasturtium (right) and sunflower seeds for cheery summer colour Split up crowded clumps of cymbidium or and replant them in garden beds or container Cut back regal (azalea-flowered) pelargon and feed with rose fertiliser – they mostly flow spring, but this might encourage some later b Feed garden beds with blood and bone – t goodness will release slowly over the coming Deadhead rhododendrons after flowering, feeding and renewing mulch around the base

MAKE A SCARECROW

A scarecrow helps to protect or, at the very least, decorate your summer crops. The first thing to decide when making a scarecrow is whether to dress it in pants or a skirt. There are definite advantages to choosing a skirt or dress: it’s easier to fit in place, and you only need one pole going into the ground. Also, a skirt moves in the breeze, so it does a much better job of frightening the birds. The central pole has to be nice and sturdy, though, because it carries the entire weight of your scarecrow. Before installing the pole in the ground, attach a crosspiece if you want your scarecrow to have horizontal arms. Next, decide what material will give the body its shape. Straw is a traditional stuffing, but you might prefer a modern option, such as old pillows – one or two for the torso and another (with some stuffing removed) to make the head. Paint, glue or stick eyes and a nose onto the face, and tie the body parts into place. Dress your scarecrow in an old shirt and a skirt or dress, then add a hat, hair, glasses or an apron. Some blingy old necklaces and bracelets will also flash and reflect the sun. Have fun making your scarecrow. Your creativity is only limited by your imagination and that of any willing helpers you can find.

68 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


YOUR PLANNER

TOP JOB

PREVENT FRUIT FLY

More areas than ever before are being affected by fruit fly. Last summer, fruit flies found their way into parts of South Australia, Victoria and across Bass Strait to northern Tasmania. Even if you live in a normally fruit fly-free zone, keep a look out for these pests. Hanging up a trap and checking it regularly is a good way to do this. As the weather warms up, fruit flies emerge from their winter hiding places and start to breed. Summer fruits, especially nectarines and peaches, and the soft fruiting vegies such as tomatoes and capsicums, are their favourites. Now is the time to protect vulnerable fruit. Make fruit fly traps out of plastic bottles, with holes drilled near the top and a fly-killing attractant in the base. Recipes abound, but usually combine sugary or yeasty ingredients mixed with an insecticide. Commercially available pheromone traps (such as Dak.pot Lure and Insecticide and Fruit Fly Trap) that

attract and kill male Queensland fruit fly are effective over a much bigger area and can be useful to indicate fruit fly activity. It’s the egg-laying females, however, that damage fruit, so for overall control it is necessary to control females. Cera Trap lures both male and female Mediterranean fruit flies (found in WA). The insects can’t escape once they’re inside, eventually drowning in the fluid attractant. Other control measures use baits based on the female fruit fly’s need to feed on protein before she lays eggs. Most of these are ‘splash baits’ such as Eco-Naturalure, which are applied near, but not on, fruit. The fly feeds on the protein and, at the same time, ingests the fatal insecticide. Splash baits must be reapplied after rain or after they have dried out. Insecticides used in baits include biologically friendly products such as spinosad. Once the pollinated fruit begins to grow and ripen it can be protected by

Pest alert Earwigs

PHOTOS PHIL DUDMAN, ISTOCK

Warmer weather encourages earwigs, which start chewing holes in all sorts of plants. Earwigs mostly eat at night, so a nocturnal trap is the best way to catch them. Make a trap from an empty tuna tin with a little bit of oil left in the bottom, or leave upturned pots stuffed with crumpled paper near susceptible plants, and check for hidden earwigs in the morning. If you can let your chooks loose in the orchard, earwig numbers will soon dwindle.

covering it with fruit fly exclusion bags. These are available commercially, or make your own using paper bags or use an airy fabric such as gauze.

sow & plant…

IN OCTOBER Asian greens beans beetroot cabbage capsicum/chilli carrot celery/celeriac ceylon spinach cucumber eggplant fennel ginger lettuce melon okra potato silverbeet spring onion sweetcorn tomato

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O  O O O O O O O O   O O O  O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

KEY tropical

O

subtropical

O

arid/semi-arid

O

warm temperate O cold temperate

O

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 69


YOUR PLANNER TOP JOB

CHECK WATERING SYSTEMS

With summer just around the corner, it’s time to make sure all your watering systems are working well. Start by disconnecting and cleaning out any filters. After these are back in place, turn the system on. Walk around the irrigated area, checking for and repairing any leaks. Replace broken sprinkler heads and look for blocked sprinklers. Ants and dirt may be clogging them, so give them a clean. Disconnect sprinklers and wash them out – use a safety pin to clean mini sprinklers. Carefully clear away garden plants that are interfering with the irrigation system, and make sure that all the sprinklers or dippers are watering the plants they are meant to water. Move them if necessary.

Edible garden

70 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

START AN ESPALIER

Espalier is the ancient art of training and confining plant growth to a flat, single plane. Choose a compact fruiting plant or one grafted onto a dwarfing rootstock to restrict growth and make maintenance easier. Fruit trees need some sun but make sure your tree won’t get too hot in summer. In hot climates, an east-facing wall or fence is best. Before planting, install a sturdy frame such as lattice or metal reinforcing mesh or a series of horizontal wires to which the branches can be loosely tied. Once your plant is in the ground, tie chosen branches in a horizontal or fan pattern, and remove the rest. Keep the tree well watered and fertilised. Cut out or rub off unwanted growth as soon as it appears. Regular maintenance is the secret to success.

PHOTOS ISTOCK, ROB FRITH/ACORN PHOTO, CRAIG WALL

Rub off excess blossoms or tiny fruit from summer fruit trees to reduce overcrowded crops Plant basil, mint and chives (above) in the herb garden, and try some different herbs such as Asian basils, lemon balm and wasabi Replace early losses of tomatoes and chillies in cold climates Sow two sweetcorn seeds together then remove the weaker plant Remove emerging flowers from rhubarb plants to prevent them from weakening the plant Watch out for citrus scab, which causes rough, warty lesions on the outside of lemons and other citrus – prune to open up the tree and keep leaves dry, and use a copper fungicide if the problem persists Plant out sweet potato shoots Wear old clothes when picking ripe mulberries; rub stains with green fruit Remove leaf curl-twisted leaves on peaches and nectarines, and make a note to spray just before blossom time next winter or spring Tie up and tidy long canes on boysenberries, raspberries (right) and the like, then mulch with straw or airy compost


Grow a climber for summer shade

Spring is the season to plant climbers to eventually provide shade in your garden. For maximum coverage, plant in the ground, rather than pots, as pots limit their growth potential. Most climbers need a sunny spot, and they provide better coverage with more blooms when the side-shoots are trained to grow horizontally. Feed and water them well to encourage growth. Some of the best-behaved ďŹ&#x201A;owering climbers are star jasmine (Trachelospermum jasminoides), bower-of-beauty (Pandorea jasminoides) and, in warmer areas, bougainvillea. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like summer shade and winter sun, plant a deciduous vine such as wisteria, ornamental grape (below) or, in cool districts, a vigorous clematis such as Clematis montana.


YOUR PLANNER

Plant colour for Christmas Get moving now if you want colour in your Christmas garden. Plant seedlings of marigold, torenia, zinnia and nasturtium. In cooler areas, you can also put in petunia and delphinium. Pot up portable containers you can move around for best effect. Calibrachoas, such as Superbells ‘Holy Moly!’ (above), are hard to beat for sustained flowering. They’re like small petunias but come in a wider range of colours, including yellow and orange. Some have a trailing habit, making them ideal for underplanting larger specimens in established containers. (There’s more on growing calibrachoa in next month’s issue.) Many old-fashioned, slightly maligned plants are now available in modern versions that make a great summer show. Look for early-blooming dwarf dahlias, mini sunflowers and vibrant cannas. Even the humble sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is now available in ornamental versions with colourful leaves that look great trailing down the sides of a large pot.

Watch out Spring weeds

Tiny weeds seem to appear out of nowhere in spring. They look soft and harmless when they first emerge, but it’s critical to get them out or they will spread and take over the summer garden. Small seedlings are easily killed by hot water, hoeing or using an organic weedkiller, but weeds become much more resilient as they mature. Try to do a morning ‘weed walk’ and pull out all the baby weeds you see. It saves a lot of time and effort in the long run. 72 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

In he tropics Remove and replant excess suckers 40–70cm tall from established banana clumps Pick up fallen fruit and put it in the compost, but bag up any affected by pests or disease and place in the rubbish bin Clean out gutters and drains to cope with anticipated heavy rain Sow seeds of custard apple, and pot on or plant out within a few weeks after germination Group foliage plants such as heliconias (above) to create an instant lush effect Grow kangkong (water spinach) in damp spots, but harvest regularly so it doesn’t take over Identify the ants in your garden and report any that could be invaders to outbreak.gov.au Tidy tatty cycads and feed with an organic plant food Harvest mangosteen when the skin turns a purplish-red colour (below), then do a taste test to check if the fruit is ripe Plant a Panama Red or Panama Yellow passionfruit vine


Top tip

Chop up old banana skins and put in the base of tomato planting holes, where they will add extra nutrients.

TOP JOB

PHOTOS PROVEN WINNERS, ISTOCK, PHIL DUDMAN

GROW COMPANION PLANTS

October is a popular month for planting summer vegies but they can be surprisingly fussy about their garden bedmates. For example, it’s said that beans don’t grow well with onions but, because they add nitrogen, beans are good near leafy crops such as lettuce. Corn is also a friend of beans, and Native American gardeners have traditionally grown corn with climbing beans because the cornstalk becomes a support for beans. Chillies and capsicums appreciate the company of carrots and onions, and members of the pumpkin family are happy near eggplants, radishes, corn and cabbages. Most importantly, aim for diversity in your plantings. It also helps to mix flowers among your crops, to encourage pollinators and provide natural insect control.


YOUR PLANNER

STEP-BY-STEP

1

REJUVENATE YOUR LAWN JOSH BYRNE demonstrates how to aerate, feed and water a patch of lawn to encourage happier, healthier turf over the coming months

3

4

5

6

PHOTOS ROB FRITH/ACORN PHOTO

2

1 MOW the grass a little shorter at this time of year. This helps to remove the thatch (dead material), making way for healthy, green regrowth. 2 SOAK the lawn with water to soften the soil the day before aerating it. If it is particularly dry, apply a soil wetter, as this helps water penetrate the surface more readily. Soil wetters come in various forms, including dry powders, liquid concentrates that you mix in a watering can, or ready-to-use products that simply click onto the hose. 3 MAKE vertical holes 5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;10cm deep all over the lawn, using a garden fork. You can also strap on lawn aerator sandals, which are available at garden centres and online, and walk over the surface. For large lawns, consider hiring a coring machine, which aerates the lawn by removing small plugs of soil. 4 SPREAD organic fertiliser evenly over the entire surface of the lawn. 5 WATER the fertiliser in thoroughly. 6 FOLLOW UP with another soaking in a week or so, in dry conditions, to encourage fresh, healthy spring growth.

74 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


Attaches to a standard rill cordless d


20 YeArs YEARS

Waters a LARGE area up to 15 metre diameter. Average flow rate of 10 LPM. 5HPRYDEOH ͤOWHU IRU GDP RU ULYHU ZDWHU XVH Able to run multiple sprinklers from the same tap. UV stablished plastics for a long life in the sun.

Waters a SMALL area up to 8 metre diameter. Average flow rate of 4 LPM. Purpose shaped base for roof cooling. 5HPRYDEOH ͤOWHU IRU GDP RU ULYHUZDWHUXVH Able to run multiple sprinklers from the same tap.

PRESSURE P.S.I

5

10

15

20

25

30

40

SIZE OF DISC USED

1.25MM DISC

1.5MM DISC

1.75MM DISC

2.0MM DISC

WITHOUT DISC

APPROX DIAMETER IN METRES

6.2

12

13.8

14.5

14.8

15

16

WATERING DIAMETER

1.5M TO 3.0M

2.5M TO 4.0M

3.5M TO 5.0M

4.5M TO 6.0M

EFFECTIVE UP TO 8M

USAGE L.P.M

4.1

6

7.3

9.1

10

10.7

13

APPROX. LITRES/MIN

2.5

3.0

3.5

4.5

6.5


PHOTOS GAP PHOTOS/ROBERT MABIC, PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATSKY

IN THE

PATCH

Horticultural editor and devoted food grower PHIL DUDMAN shows you what to plant, pick and tend in the edible garden this month

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 77


IN THE PATCH

PLANT it NOW TOMATOES For gardeners in cooler areas, it’s time to think about getting your tomatoes in the ground. If you get late frosts, you might want to wait until the risk has passed, or plant but be prepared to cover your plants on nights when frost is predicted. Choose a sunny spot protected from strong winds, preferably where you haven’t grown tomatoes or their relatives, such as eggplant, chilli and capsicum, for the past three years. This decreases the risk of pests and diseases they have in common. Plan to space your tomato plants about 1m apart, then prepare a planting area about 60cm wide for each plant by digging in a bucketful of compost as well as two good handfuls of pelletised chicken manure. Tall-growing vine tomatoes need a trellis or long stakes to support them, so put these in now. When planting, bury the stem up to the first set of leaves, or even deeper. Extra roots will form, giving your plants greater access to moisture and nutrients. If you want to grow your tomatoes in containers, choose large pots, at least 50cm wide, and fill them with top quality potting mix. Compact bush tomato varieties are best suited to container growing.

Ginger does all of its growing in the warmer months, so planting it now guarantees the greatest return when you come to harvest in the following autumn and winter. All you need to get started is a healthy piece of root (rhizome) from your fruit shop or market. To increase the number of plants, cut the rhizomes into smaller pieces about 5cm long. When you do this, make sure that each piece has two or more eyes. These are the little bumps where the first shoots form. When planting, bury your pieces about 3cm below the surface, then keep the soil on the drier side of moist until the shoots appear, which may take a month or so. You can grow ginger in full sun, but it does just as well in semi-shade, which is good to know if sunny spots are at a premium in your garden. It loves organically rich soil, so add compost when planting. Tropical and subtropical areas are best for growing ginger, but it’s worth a go anywhere that’s warm and frost free. If you’re short on space in your garden, you can grow ginger in containers filled with a 50:50 combination of compost and potting mix. It makes a lovely pot plant for a balcony or courtyard. Place it in a warm, sheltered spot.

78 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

PHOTOS CRAIG WALL, PHIL DUDMAN, LUKE SIMON

GINGER


helping HAND Tips for tackling this month’s problems FIXING DRY SOILS It’s been a dry spring in many areas and soils are parched. It can also get very hot in October putting even more stress on plantings and drying out even well-watered soils. Vegies hate drying out, so daily soil moisture checks are vital in the patch. Mornings are the best time to sink a finger into the soil. If it comes out dry, don’t delay in giving the ground a good soaking. Try to get up a little earlier so you have time to give your plants some attention before you get on with your day. Heading outside early to water the garden is always a great way to start the day!

THIRSTY FRUIT It’s critical that fruiting plants are receiving adequate moisture right now, particularly those that are currently flowering and setting fruit. These include citrus, stone fruit and blueberries. When these plants suffer moisture stress, it leads to smaller crops and poorer fruit quality. The plant may drop its fruit altogether in order to survive. If there isn’t any decent rain, give your fruit trees and bushes a very deep soaking, using a sprinkler if local water restrictions allow, at least once every 10 days or so. Also, be sure to top up the mulch around these plants, if needed, to help retain moisture in the soil.


BEANS

Common climbing bean and bush bean varieties are all good candidates for pots. The climbers need something to clamber up, such as long poles or a tomato cage. When plants are full of foliage, tall frames can tip in the wind, so place them in a sheltered spot. Wide, shallow containers offer stability, or go for a large trough near a wall, with wires or trellis attached. Bush beans (such as these butter beans, above) don’t need support, and can be grown in containers upwards of 30cm wide.

80 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

Set up your potted beans in a spot that receives at least 3–4 hours of full sun per day, with protection from hot midday and afternoon sun. Use a premium potting mix (look for ticks on the bag) with added fertiliser and wetting agent. It’s easy to start bean crops from seed. Spring and summer are the times to sow in temperate areas. You can plant almost year-round in the tropics and subtropics, but it’s best to choose snake bean varieties if you’re planting in the humid months.

PHOTOS GAP PHOTOS/GRAHAM STRONG, PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATSKY

CROPS IN POTS

Space bush beans 5–7cm apart. For climbers, sow 2–3 seeds at the base of each pole, planting them 2–3cm deep, and keep them just moist until they germinate, which takes a week or so. Potted beans need more regular watering than in-ground beans, and it’s critical that you don’t let them dry out when flowering begins. Give them a drink whenever the top 5–7cm of mix feels dry. A light cover of surface mulch helps conserve moisture. Beans won’t tolerate wet feet, so don’t let them sit for long with their saucer full of water. Give your bean plants an application of liquid fertiliser every three weeks to keep them growing strongly. Check for tiny yellow spots on leaves, as this indicates the presence of two-spotted mite (red spider mite), which can damage plants. Use an organic soap spray to control outbreaks, spraying under the leaves. All going well, you should be harvesting your first bean pods in 50–60 days. The pods are ready to pick when they are long, smooth and tender.


IN THE PATCH

1

2

STEP-BY-STEP

GROW YOUR OWN SPRING ONIONS PHIL DUDMAN describes how to sow, plant, nurture and harvest delicious spring onions and shallots

3

4

5

6

1 FILL cell punnets with seed-raising mix or potting mix (shown). Firm in and moisten. Use a stick to make holes 10–15mm deep. 2 SOW about 8–10 seeds into each cell, then backfill and water. 3 PLACE punnets in a warm, sunny spot. Keep moist until seeds germinate in 2–3 weeks. Continue watering, and liquid feed once a week. Seedlings are ready to plant out when they’re 10cm tall. 4 PREPARE soil by adding compost and organic fertiliser. Use a dibbler to create planting holes 15–20cm apart. 5 SQUEEZE out seedlings, then place them in the holes and firm them in. 6 WATER your plants regularly. 7 HARVEST individual onions as they reach a useable size. A gentle twist and pull separates them from the bunch.

7

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 81


Go he

GREEN & GOLD! You’ve got to love a crop where one of the GETTING STARTED These plants grow and produce in most only downsides to growing it is the excess soil types, given adequate drainage, food and water, but they produce for the longest harvest, says TINO CARNEVALE period in deep soil that is rich in organic

E

very year I do it. I think back to the last season and somehow tell myself that there wasn’t quite enough, conveniently forgetting the jars, labour and neighbours needed to deal with such a glut. So off I go planting more zucchini than I need. Zucchinis are the slender relations of the pumpkin but, unlike their rambling cucurbit cousins that can smother your garden like the loving embrace of an Italian nonna, they contain themselves better and usually only spread over a metre or so. Cucurbits, including zucchini, are made for sun. Provided with enough water they

82 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

seem to visibly soak up the sunshine and convert it into carbohydrates, in turn creating seemingly endless amounts of fruit until the plants die off in late summer or autumn. They love the sun, but the wind not so much. Most years the wind causes a few damaged leaves but there are years in my cold, windy Hobart garden when entire plants are lost. I have had strong, vigorous plants filled with flowers, just days away from fruit, snapped off at the base and rolled, tumbleweed-like, into a quiet corner of the garden by a blustery wind. So in a cold, windy spot, make sure your zucchini have shelter.

matter. The best crops I have grown were in fine and crumbly compost made from the previous autumn’s leaves. In the tropics, zucchinis are a crop to grow over the dry season, but everywhere else spring is the time to sow seed. Start seed in small pots (coir pots are ideal) to plant out as the season warms, or sow directly in the ground in soils that are already warm. For gardeners who prefer to buy seedlings, there are plenty of punnets of seedlings available from late spring and into summer. I add lots of compost where I am growing zucchini, and use a fork to mix it into the soil before raking it up to form planting mounds. These provide the good


IN THE PATCH

at a glance

TOP VARIETIES Black Beauty Prolific with the classic dark green, glossy-skinned fruit. Cocozelle Italian heirloom with light and dark green striped fruit. Da Fiore Translates to ‘of flowers’. This is one for those who really value the blooms as a delicacy. Big flowers but small fruit. Gold Rush Bright golden yellow fruit. High yielding. Lebanese Smooth, squat fruit with soft, pale green skin. Perfect for stuffing. Romanesco Fluted and ribbed fruit, green speckled skin and a nutty flavour.

common names zucchini, courgette botanic name Cucurbita pepo plant type annual fruiting bush 50cm full sun spring summer, autumn

suitable

BIG BRO

PHOTOS ISTOCK, FIONA WALSH, GAP PHOTOS/JONATHAN BUCKLEY, GAP PHOTOS

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Zucchinis form rapidly in warm weather; the yellow Gold Rush; plump Lebanese zucchinis; Romanesco has ribbed skin.

drainage these plants need to avoid root or stem rots later. Deep soils also allow the roots to reach further down, which puts them in good stead as the season gets warm or windy. Compost usually provides enough nourishment in good soils but add blood and bone or well-rotted animal manure for additional nutrients in poor soils. Then all that’s needed is a couple of applications of fish emulsion through summer. This gives zucchinis a quick hit to make them feel

Troubleshoting LOTS OF GROWTH, NO FRUIT? Zucchinis produce separate male and female flowers. When flowering begins, flowers may be all male so there’s no fruit (although the male flowers can be picked to make a delicious pasta sauce). Usually, female flowers appear with warmer weather and fruit soon follows – even too much fruit!

1–3m

and look young again. If all’s well, they will keep growing and fruiting until it gets too cold, or the first frost hits.

Tromboncino (below) is a long, trombone-shaped cultivar of Cucurbita moschata, a close relative of true zucchini. This Italian heirloom has pale green skin and is tolerant of powdery mildew.

HARVESTING With zucchinis, the more you pick, the more you get. Check vines daily and cut fruit off with a small knife when it’s about 10cm long so you don’t end up with inedible woody zeppelins! Spines on their leaves and stems make harvesting perilous so approach the vines with caution. GA

FRUIT IS SHRIVELLING Early fruit may start to form, then yellow and rot from the tip. If the fruit is tiny, a lack of pollination may be the problem. When the fruit is a little larger but still immature, you’re dealing with blossom-end rot, which is caused by a calcium deficiency due to saline soil, inconsistent or overzealous watering or even excessive heat, as well as too little calcium in the soil. Water your plants regularly, and liquid-fertilise.

LEAVES SMOTHERED IN A WHITE POWDER? This is powdery mildew. It may occur if the plant is weakened while young by physical damage, lack of nutrients or too much or not enough water. If it arrives after a long, productive season, it’s a sign the plants are tired. Remove affected plants but, before you do, look for yellow and black spotted ladybirds, which feed on powdery mildew – if you see some, leave the plants a bit longer!

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 83


GAR

DE

N

GUESTS & PESTS The distinctive bandy-bandy lives underground but is sometimes seen when it surfaces to feed, move or mate, writes LEONARD CRONIN

H

aving lived on this property for many years, I was sure I’d come across all the larger creatures that share our garden, or come and go. So you can imagine my surprise when I almost tripped over a beautiful black and white banded snake moving slowly in the dark, just metres from our front door. There are few snakes with such distinctive markings, so no problem with identification. It was the cryptic and aptly named bandy-bandy: one of a small contingent of venomous burrowing snakes. While a number of snakes use the burrows of other animals for shelter or

84 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

to search for prey, few actually burrow into the soil, although many snakes can wriggle their way into loose topsoil or sand. Burrowing snakes have blunt noses protected by large, tough scales, and are among the least understood terrestrial vertebrates. Most look like overgrown earthworms, and are only noticed when they occasionally surface after rain to look for a mate or change shelters. Bandy-bandys feed almost exclusively on blind snakes, which means wherever they are seen there must be blind snakes, so there is a whole world of subterranean activity of which we are barely aware.

Owls, goannas and other hunters will take bandy-bandys if they get the chance. But while most snakes are well camouflaged to avoid being attacked by predators or noticed by their prey, bandy-bandys, with their prominent contrasting stripes, take a different approach. Like zebras, their black and white striped pattern has the effect of confusing predators. When threatened, the bandy-bandy loops its body up and down so that the bands, moving at a particular speed, dazzle the predator and detract from the snake’s outline, making it difficult to determine the

PHOTOS ISTOCK

bandy-bandy Vermicella annulata


BACKYARD VISITORS

creature comforts A garden shed can be a very appealing place for wildlife, says MARTYN ROBINSON

S

snake’s speed and direction. This effect is similar to the illusory effect created by a moving wagon wheel or barber’s pole that appears to rotate in the opposite direction. Although rarely seen, bandy-bandys are widespread throughout the eastern states of the country. They belong to the same family as Australia’s deadliest snakes, but produce very little venom and are unlikely to bite humans. As with all snakes, if you are lucky enough to see one, be cautious and give it a wide berth.

Len gardens in the Northern Rivers, New South Wales

heds are places where all sorts of things are stored, sometimes for a very long time. Little wonder that many creatures decide to call them home – they provide protection from the weather and there’s often food to be found inside or nearby. Some shed guests are harmless, but there are some you might not want to encourage! Visitors can range from insects and spiders to rodents and other small mammals, as well as snakes and lizards. While daddy-long-legs aren’t a worry, red-backed spiders might be, and they love making webs in plant pots, as do their stripe-less cousins, flowerpot spiders. Rodents will be looking for seeds you may have left out, or warm shelter, and insect-eating bats sometimes live in the rafters, as it’s dark up there. Snakes will be after rats and mice, and lizards are there for the insects. So what can you do? To deter spiders, stack the pots and place them upside down on the shelf or floor. This makes them far less appealing. Make sure the area under the bench is clear of stored items, and sweep away any cobwebs that don’t have daddy-long-legs in them. It’s good to leave the daddies if you’re not afraid of them, as they catch and eat red-backs and other spiders. Store seeds and anything rodents might eat in sealed containers. Find where they are getting in, and block off these entry points. I’d be inclined to leave the bats, as they feed on flying insects. If you don’t want them in your shed, wait until they fly out at night then close off the entry. Be careful not to harm bats, as they are a protected species and need all the help they can get. Taking care of these things should also remove any attractions and prevent entry for snakes and lizards, so you can reclaim your shed for yourself… unless you are happy to share it with some friendly garden guests? GA

Martyn gardens mainly on Sydney’s Northern Beaches

WHAT ON EARTH?

Have you found something interesting in your garden? Send us a photo and Martyn will ID it. Email yoursay@gardeningaustralia.com.au with ‘Creature’ in the subject line. G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 85


PETS

IT’S A OUT THERE A garden can be a lethal playground for pets. DR ERICA STEPPAT shares what plants your furry friends shouldn’t sample and the steps to take if they do

T

here are many plants in the average backyard or inside your house that may be poisonous or toxic to your pet. Luckily for pet owners, many pets seem to have good instincts and leave these plants alone. However, not all animals display the same logic and intuition. Most parts of all the plants listed in the table (right) are in some way dangerous to both cats and dogs. They are also likely to affect rabbits, guinea pigs and ferrets, although we rarely see these animals in the vet clinic. I have included many of the more common offenders, along with a few that you may not know about. However, there are many, many more, so always check a plant’s safety before purchasing it for your garden. If you do think that your pet has eaten something he or she should not have, contact your vet or emergency centre as soon as ingestion is suspected, even if they have no visible symptoms. Vets have ways to make animals vomit, and the sooner we induce this vomiting, the less chance the toxicity will affect your pet. When you go to the vet clinic, take along a leaf or flower from the likely culprit. While we are not botanists, we have many books with pictures to help us identify the plant.

86 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

It is a familiar scene at the vet clinic to see a healthy-looking dog walk in, seemingly proud of their achievement of ingesting a plant that they shouldn’t have. To treat them, we give an injection and

within 10 minutes, they are vomiting. We are able to reverse this with another injection, so by the time they go home, they just feel that they have had a very weird experience at the vet clinic. GA


KEY

low

plant Many bulbs, including daffodil, onion and snowdrop

mild

moderate

severe

how toxic? what happens? Vomiting, increased heart rate, diarrhoea, increased breathing and drooling, abdominal pain. Some bulbs of the onion family can cause haemolytic anaemia and destroy red blood cells.

For every kind of gardener TV show 7.30pm Friday

Top jobs fr your SPRING GARDEN

October 2018

JACKIE FRENCH

Delphinium

Vomiting, increased heart rate, diarrhoea, increased breathing and drooling, abdominal pain. Can be fatal in large doses.

Gardenia

Vomiting and diarrhoea.

Geranium (Pelargonium)

Vomiting and depression.

How to cope when you can’t garden for a year!

Growing suces • PETREA

• BEANS IN POTS • CAPE PRIMROSE • SPRING ONION • KANGAROO PAW TV show 7.30pm Friday

Top jobs fr your SPRING GARDEN

October 2018

PHOTO & ILLUSTRATIONS ISTOCK

JACKIE FRENCH

Hydrangea

Vomiting, increased heart rate, diarrhoea and lethargy.

Lantana

Vomiting, diarrhoea, weakness and liver damage.

Lilium

Kidney damage/failure.

Oleander

Breathlessness, muscle tremors, cardiac arrest and death.

Privet

Vomiting and diarrhoea. Can be dangerous only in large quantities.

Sago palm or cycad

Liver damage and clotting problems.

Bird of paradise (Strelitzia)

Contains hydrogen cyanide. Vomiting, drowsiness and difficulty breathing.

Sweet pea

Only seeds are toxic. Neurological signs – head pressing, tremors, seizures and possibly death.

Yesterday, today and tomorrow (Brunfelsia)

Berries are especially toxic. Salivation, seizures and death can occur.

Wisteria

Only seed pods are toxic. Vomiting, diarrhoea and depression.

How to cope when you can’t garden for a year!

Growing suces • PETREA

• BEANS IN POTS • CAPE PRIMROSE • SPRING ONION • KANGAROO PAW

sheds fr every garden INSPIRATION, IDEAS & PRACTICAL ADVICE

Tino Carnevale Few plants give as generously as good old zucchini

Costa Georgiadis 10 fun ways to get kids hooked on gardening

c

NO T , ZINIO & GOOGLE PLAY

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram ABCGardening Australiamagazine

@gardeningaustraliamag

Apple, the Apple logo and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc, registered in the US and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.


MAILBOX

Sharon King, Pascoe Vale South, Vic

DERYN THORPE SAYS Bamboo has a reputation as the bullying bad boy of the plant world, but if you choose the right one it can transform a garden into an oriental paradise. It makes a great privacy screen, evokes a feeling of peace and tranquillity, and most people enjoy the restful sound of the wind moving through the stems. A mature grove of bamboo is miraculous, sending up new shoots that can reach full size in just a couple months, and it comes in a range of different forms, textures and colours. Basically there are two types of bamboo: running or clumping. The running types are invasive, as they grow from a rhizome that travels underground, much like kikuyu grass, ignoring boundaries. Clumping types are better behaved and grow in a tussock, much like fescue grass, and are best for urban gardens. These grow with a circular footprint and have fine, fibrous roots. For a continuous screen, place plants about 70cm apart. If the space is narrow, plant them even closer. Bamboo generally grows in sun or shade but is best with something in between. It grows in a wide range of soil types, but does best in sandy loams. It dislikes waterlogging and saline conditions. For rapid growth, keep it well fertilised. Mulch well and water during summer. If they dry out, they can defoliate. Bamboos can be infested with mealy bug in warm areas, but this is unlikely in cooler zones such as Melbourne.

MAIN PHOTO RED CLOUD BAMBOO

I’D LIKE TO USE SOME BAMBOO TO GREEN UP AN UGLY FENCE, BUT I’M NERVOUS ABOUT THE WAY IT SPREADS. WHAT CAN I DO TO STOP IT INVADING MY GARDEN AND THAT OF MY NEIGHBOURS?


snakes alive! Thought I would share some photos I took of these two red-bellied black snakes (Pseudechis porphyriacus) in September last year. This is male combat, determining fitness and reproductive potential with females residing in the location. This is a shy, reclusive species, but these two were so preoccupied they allowed me in close proximity to take these images. I perform snake removal tasks locally, but I persuaded the landowners in this instance to leave these fellows alone. Lyall Naylor, Stroud, NSW

Remove older culms (bamboo canes) every couple of years to maintain the health, vigour and appearance of the grove. Lower leaves can be removed to show off the canes. This is very effective with colourful stems. For a formal hedge, select a bamboo variety that’s amenable to pruning, such as Bambusa multiplex ‘Alphonse Karr’. Here are some of the top varieties of clumping bamboo: Blue bamboo (Drepanostachyum falcatum) grows to 3.5m tall with narrow leaves on arching 1cm-diameter culms, which have a blueish bloom in their first year. Needs shade for most of the day. Hedge bamboo (Bambusa multiplex) has several good garden varieties. Here are two to consider for your garden: ‘Alphonse Karr’ has pinkish shoots that become green-striped yellow culms. Grows to 4–5m tall with culms 2.5cm diameter but can be pruned to 2–4m tall. Handles high winds and sea air. ‘Stripe-stem Fernleaf’ features lovely yellow-striped green culms, 3–4m high and 1.5cm diameter. Erect shape with fern-like foliage. Slender weaver’s bamboo (Bambusa textilis var. gracilis, left) is a very popular bamboo with an upright, tidy form that reaches 6–7m tall. Smooth culms have a 2.5–3cm diameter. This fast grower is recommended for screening between houses, or in other narrow spaces (no less than 35cm wide). Edible shoots.

write and win!

Got something to say? Share your thoughts, ask a question, slip us a tip and show us your best shots. The pick of the crop each month wins a six-month subscription to ABC Gardening Australia magazine (current subscriptions will be extended).

yoursay@gardeningaustralia.com.au (letters) experts@gardeningaustralia.com.au (questions) Your Say, Gardening Australia, nextmedia, Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590 FACEBOOK facebook.com/ABCGardeningAustraliamagazine INSTAGRAM @gardeningaustraliamag #gardeningaustraliamag

giant yield

Lyall Naylor from Stroud, NSW, has won a six-month subscription for his spectacular photos (above left) of two red-bellied black snakes. hey were so busy they didn’t mind Lyall getting up close!

Our four standard calamondin trees have yielded 13.6kg of perfect fruit, which our friend Teresa has made into more than 50 jars of marmalade! Joe & Judith Hlubucek, O’Malley, ACT

Can you please tell me what’s wrong with my previously healthy young grevillea? A few weeks ago, I noticed the tips of the branches going brown, then all the sap started oozing out along the stems. It seems to be working its way from top to bottom. I have other grevilleas that are ine. Can it be saved? Bev Wilson, Atherton, Qld

ANGUS STEWART SAYS This is often a sign of plant stress. Plants respond to borer attack by weeping sap into the wound to drown the pest. Look for signs of attack along the stems where sap concentration is highest, then treat the borer infestation. Also, too much moisture in the soil can cause extra sap flow, particularly during high-growth conditions (in spring, for instance). If your grevillea is in a permanent wet spot, transplant it if it’s not too big, or improve the drainage in that part of the garden.

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 89


I have a love for geraniums and I am slowly building up a collection. hey are growing and lowering but they get a little leggy. hey don’t appear to get really bushy. In winter, they only receive a couple of hours of mid-afternoon sun. Could they be not getting enough? My intention, in planting them slightly sheltered, is to protect them from the severe heat in summer. Should they be grown in semi-shade with protection from hot afternoon sun? Is it a good idea to prune them back hard during winter? Are they picky regarding soil type? Maureen Latta, Leichhardt, Qld

Your Insta posts

Clockwise from below left beyondbroome, who has a tropical garden in north-west Australia, posted this fabulous photo of little mangoes forming among flowers. After trying to grow spring bulbs in a neglected spot, we_love_gardening threw sunflower seeds into the bed and walked away. Now, each year, it’s a cheerful and low-maintenance spot. Melbourne gardener greglorenzutti shows us how he’s eating from the land, with this delicious-looking brekkie. ca.lewis, who gardens in Kariong, NSW, has shared a picture of the last cauliflower of the season. In one season, his 1.2m2 garden bed produced six caulis, two cabbages and a bunch of beetroot! After harvesting $35 worth of produce from his tiny bed, he says he’s become a square-foot gardening convert. Well done, Chris!

DERYN THORPE SAYS Most of the plants we call geraniums are in the genus Pelargonium and are undemanding, waterwise plants that flower year-round in warm climates. Where I live, in Perth, they are known as pelargoniums or zonal geraniums. You’re right that they do best if they get light shade during summer. I grow those with coloured leaves in dappled shade, and the rest in positions with morning sun and afternoon shade. Pots are great for geraniums and you can move them around, depending on the season. In the height of summer, wholesale nurseries have shadecloth blinds that automatically cover the greenhouse roof between 11am and 3pm to stop the flowers from ‘burning’ in the heat. My adaptation for big feature pots that get too much sun is to cover them with pieces of old sheet on hot days. Zonal geraniums need cutting back at least yearly, preferably in autumn (in warm areas) or, where it’s colder, in early spring. This makes them bushier and stops them getting leggy. Use the cuttings to create new plants. Zonal geraniums need well-drained soil, prefer a neutral pH and detest wet roots. Provide small amounts of a complete fertiliser regularly. Controlled-release prills (small balls of fertiliser) are best for pots.

native beauty Our pincushion hakea flowered for the first time this year. My husband and I are in awe at how magnificent the flowers are! Rosalie Behiels, Geraldton, WA 90 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


win

A WATERING PACK

worth

$95

MAILBOX

ONE OF MY AFRICAN VIOLETS THAT I HAVE PROPAGATED FROM LEAF LOOKS VERY STRANGE. TWO OF THE PETIOLES HAVE PRODUCED THREE LEAVES EACH! IS THIS COMMON? IS THERE AN EXPLANATION OR TERM FOR THIS PHENOMENON? Marjorie Ting, West Pennant Hills, NSW

PHOTO ISTOCK COMPETITION OPEN TO AUSTRALIAN RESIDENTS ONLY. STARTS 10/9/18 AT 00:01 (AEST) AND CLOSES 7/10/18 AT 23:59 (AEDT). ENTRIES JUDGED ON 8/10/18 AT 2PM AT NEXTMEDIA LEVEL 6, 207 PACIFIC HWY, ST LEONARDS NSW 2065. TOTAL PRIZE POOL VALUE $575.82 (INC GST). THE JUDGES’ DECISION IS FINAL AND NO CORRESPONDENCE WILL BE ENTERED INTO. FULL TERMS & CONDITIONS AT GARDENINGAUSTRALIA.COM.AU. PRIZES SENT TO THE POSTAL ADDRESS PROVIDED ON THE ENTRY FORM.

JANE FLOOD FROM JANE’S AFRICAN VIOLETS SAYS This is sometimes seen as

GO WITH THE FLOW

Perfect irrigation is a balancing act, but Gardena’s Water Smart Flow Meter can give you more control over watering your garden. Just connect it to your tap, sprayer, sprinkler, micro-irrigation system or pump and it records your water consumption per day, season or watering session, as well as your low rate. Made in Germany, it comes with a 5-year warranty. For more information, visit gardena.com

a ‘twin leaf’, where the leaf grows a Siamese twin, but this is a triplet – a freak of nature, which can just happen with no cause. It could also be a flower stem that has never developed the flowers. It appears to be originating under the leaf stem where a flower stem would grow from. Best to just remove it. They aren’t suitable to use for propagation. All your plants are nicely groomed and symmetrical in shape, except for the lopsided one with the problem leaves. I suggest taking some of the leaves off the side so the plant can sit flat in the pot. It may need to be re-potted to cover the stem and achieve a flat, symmetrical growth pattern.

We have six Gardena watering packs to be won, each worth $95 and containing a Water Smart Flow Meter, an Aquazoom Sprinkler and a Tap Nut Adaptor. To enter, tell us in 25 words or less about a creative way you save water. Write your name, address, daytime contact number and entry on the back of an envelope, and send to Gardena Watering Pack, Gardening Australia, nextmedia, Locked Bag 5555, St Leonards NSW 1590, or email comp@gardeningaustralia.com.au with ‘Gardena Watering Pack’ in the subject line, by October 7. For full terms and conditions, visit gardeningaustralia.com.au

community spirit I would like to skite about my daughter-in-law Emma who lives in Exmouth, WA, where the desert meets the ocean. It is a magnificent part of our land and sea but hostile in terms of gardening. Emma and my son Lucas are teachers at the local school. Emma has been so very enthusiastic and diligent in re-establishing the community garden. She has applied for and received grants to re-energise the community’s interest in the garden. They set up wicking beds, compost bins, shaded areas and introduced chooks! I’m so proud of her and wanted to share their success. Lyn Plummer, Sunbury, Vic

While walking in the Queensland rainforest I came across this very unusual looking bug. What is it? Damian Burke, via email

MARYTN ROBINSON SAYS It’s a beetle rather than a bug, despite what looks like a ‘beak’ in front. This is one of the weevils. There are a lot of similar species, which require microscopic examination to differentiate, but this appears to be from the genus Leptopius. These weevils are commonly called wattle pigs, due to their pig-like snout and favoured food plant. It is harmless.

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 91


CROSSWORD

take a break!

Put the kettle on – it’s time to relax! Solve our puzzle for a chance to win a pack of watering guns and hose fittings

20 across A

WIN a Neta hose ittings pack

26 across B

105 SOLUTION NEXT MONTH

SEE OPPOSITE

5 down C 1. Wife of a sultan (7) 5. Origanum dictamnus, or … (7) 10. Queensland mining city, Mount … (3) 11. A modified and often coloured leaf, with a flower in its axil (5) 12. Breathed out (7) 13. Steed, mount (5) 14. 24-across, for example (3) 15. Implements, utensils (5) 17. Bristly, rough (6) 18. Leafless flower stems (6) 20. This flower (6) (Picture A) 22. The New Zealand tree-fern, Cyathea medullaris (6) 24. Grape variety (6) 26. Genus of the myrtles (6) (Picture B) 29. Northern Australian timber-producing tree of the genus Xanthostemon (5) 92 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

30. Bristly growth on grasses, for example (3) 31. Spicy Mexican sauce (5) 33. Removing skin from (7) 34. Hot drink containing whiskey, … coffee (5) 35. Plant used in brewing (3) 36. Another name for taro (7) 37. Herb fatal to swine (7)

down 1. Rind or peel, for example (4) 2. Drains away from soil or similar (7) 3. Eggplant (9) 4. Decrease, subside (5) 5. Thorn apple, for example (6) (Picture C)

6. Forested (5) 7. Able to grow without light (7) 8. Lathyrus aphaca or … (6,3) 9. Gardens (abbrev.) (4) 16. Plant related to onion, used as a seasoning (6) 19. Edible gourd (6) 21. White-flowered lawn pest (5,4) 23. In no particular order (3,3,3) 25. Wattles (7) 27. Windpipe (7) 28. Prickly pear or … fig (6) 29. Fleshy fruit with hard skin and lots of seeds (4) 30. Poisonous growth in stagnant water, blue-green … (5) 31. Dirties, stains (5) 32. Duelling sword (4)

CROSSWORD COMPILED BY STEVE BALL PHOTOS ISTOCK

across


N I W Neta hose fittings packs each worth

$102

a perfect it Netaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plastic hose-end ittings are designed and made in Australia. he one-piece design keeps the connection watertight and suits all watering applications. he ittings and guns come with a ive-year â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;no breakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; guarantee. To celebrate its 71st birthday, Neta is giving ive readers the chance to win watering guns and hose ittings, worth $102. he pack consists of two quality metal watering guns, a watering nozzle and an assortment of essential 12mm tap adaptors, connectors and joiners.

how to enter

We have ďŹ ve Neta packs to give away, worth $102 each. To enter, unscramble the highlighted letters in the crossword (opposite) and email your answer to comp@gardeningaustralia.com.au by September 30. Put â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Neta packâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the subject line. Include your name, street address, email and daytime phone number.

WINNERS Flemingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nurseries tree voucher (Jul 18) C Peters, Tumut, NSW; S Peters, Mindaribba, NSW. Fruit salad tree (Jul 18) R Haig, Chinchilla, Qld; R Knight, Northam, WA; J McCabe, Reservoir, Vic; H Mears, Avondale Heights, Vic; F Rooney, Sale, Vic. Gardena pruning kit (Jul 18) V Cooper, Victoria Point, Qld; J Cosh, Kurri Kurri, NSW; J Flanders, Mansield, Vic; M Joli, Manton, NSW; D Wilson, Lane Cove, NSW.

solution       

                  

  

September 2018 crossword

       

       





 

                   

          

             

                    

  



   

             

     

Septemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unscrambled word: foliage G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 93

104

CROSSWORD COMPETITION TERMS AND CONDITIONS: OPEN TO AUSTRALIAN RESIDENTS ONLY. COMPETITION OPENS 10/9/2018 AT 00:01 (AEST) AND CLOSES 30/9/2018 AT 23:59 (AEST). FIVE LUCKY WINNERS WILL EACH RECEIVE A NETA HOSE PACK, WORTH $102 EACH. TOTAL PRIZE VALUE IS $510. WINNERS DRAWN ON 1/10/2018 AT 14:00 (AEST) AT 207 PACIFIC HIGHWAY, ST LEONARDS NSW 2065. WINNERS NOTIFIED BY TELEPHONE AND IN WRITING. PERMIT NUMBERS NSW LTPM/17/010349, ACT TP 16/02544. FULL TERMS AND CONDITIONS AVAILABLE AT GARDENINGAUSTRALIA.COM.AU. PRIVACY POLICY AVAILABLE AT NEXTMEDIA.COM.AU. PROMOTER IS NEXTMEDIA PTY LTD; ABN 84 128 805 970; 207 PACIFIC HIGHWAY, ST LEONARDS NSW 2065.

1 of 5


ADVERTISING PROMOTION

INSTORE

Information from some of our advertisers about their products

outdoor style

tonic for plants

fruit tree guide

no more weeds

easy driveway

health support

The beautiful Vincent Sheppard Dovile setting is a comfortable classic outdoor range in Lloyd Loom weave. It’s available in a variety of colours from Cotswold InOut Furniture. Visit one of the showrooms to view the collection. cotswoldfurniture.com.au

The Fiskars Xact Weed Puller enables you to remove weeds effortlessly. With its ergonomically designed handle and four-pronged stainless steel claw, you can quickly rid your garden of weeds while standing, saving your back and knees, and without using chemicals. fiskars.com.au 94 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

With regular applications, Seasol helps protect your garden from the stresses of summer. A natural plant tonic, it is safe for all plants, including natives, all year round. It promotes healthy growth, helping with heat and drought tolerance. seasol.com.au

EconoGrid40 is a reinforced paver that offers an economical option for vehicle traffic. Suitable for grassed and gravel areas, the pavers are pervious, enabling you to comply with council regulations that require more than 15 per cent soft landscaping on commercial property. allstakesupply.com.au

Growing fruit is on trend, but with so many fruits to choose from, it can be confusing. To help you choose the best fruit trees for your garden, Fleming’s Nurseries has created ‘Pick of the Crop’, an online guide to fruit for the garden. flemings.com.au

Search the Dietitians Association of Australia website for an Accredited Practising Dietitian (APD), who can offer support on nutrition and diet. An APD considers the whole person, including medical history, goals, lifestyle and needs, to provide individualised advice. daa.asn.au/find-an-apd


directory To advertise please phone 02 9901 6101 Email: aedwards@nextmedia.com.au

GIFT GUIDE

Too busy Gardening to worry about sunscreen? Too hot in long sleeves? Made from a special cool-tech fabric. Fully tested and certified to be 50+ UV Protection. ONE SIZE FITS ALL

$32.95 Per pair

BETTER THAN SUNSCREEN…COOLER THAN LONG SLEEVES Try new IceRays UV protective and cooling armsleeves, now being worn by professional gardeners and landscapers. Made from a hi-tech moisture activated cooling fabric. Comfortable, with no tight bands and no seams, they cool you off as you warm up, they come in many great colours and are the only sleeves on the market that have been tested by the Australian government UV testing body ARANSA to be 50+. Get yours now at

www.icerays.com.au Call 1300 025 939

enquiries@icerays.com.au

GROW UP TO 6 Clever self watering systems Indoor and Balcony Ř Ideal for potted plants Ř Perfect watering 24/7 Ř No timer/power required Ř Better plant growth

Outdoor and Greenhouse DRIP SYSTEM

FRUIT SALAD TREES GROUND OR POTS All Climates

3 Tree Types Ř Ideal for outdoor & greenhouse Ř Perfect watering 24/7 Ř No timer/power required Ř Better plant growth

Ph: 1300 137 881

Different Fruits on One Tree!

www.blumat.com.au

Ř STONE FRUITS Ř CITRUS FRUITS Ř MULTI APPLES

ORDER ONLINE FruitSaladTrees.com

Dispatch ALL YEAR

sales@fruitsaladtrees.com (02)65858115 or1800FRUITS

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 95


GIFT GUIDE

ZKHHOLHZUDSV Ő

ǁ

in C imes us ra ia

©

ĞƐůĞLJ ŐƌŽǀĞǁ ŶĂƌƚ

ĚĞƐŝŐ

High Quality & Hand Crafted Wind chimes Shop Online. Great gifts. FREE Delivery on orders over $100 Ph Carol on (03) 5523 3410

www.windchimesaustralia.com.au

Toll Free No: 1800 336 153 info@clementinedesign.com.au www.clementinedesign.com.au

3528'/< 0$'( ,1:$

ZZZJURYHZHVOH\FRP

Genuine French Enamel House Numbers

DECKING

STONE

GRASS

PAVING

OUR RANGE

Made in Germany - Patented

Incredible on both even and uneven surfaces

is calling” www.frenchhousenumber.com

CONCRETE

Phone: 0413 886 720 3

Dee Jackson

3

3

Fast, effortless and efficient sweeping, thanks to its uniquely shaped bristles.

Australian artist, Dee Jackson, creates beautiful watercolour portraits. Commisions welcome.

Composter

Dee Jackson Tel: 02 9416 2265 / +612 9416 2265 Mob: 0439 986 452 / +61 439 986 452 Email: deejackson@deejackson.com.au www.deejackson.com.au

A revolution in glass cleaning Ř 4XLFN DQG (DV\ Ř 6WUHDN IUHH Ř 1R PHVV\ GULSV

ALL METAL NO PLASTIC! Ample r oom for a wheelb arrow !

3DWHQWHG  0DGH LQ *HUPDQ\

Ph: 1300 137 881 96 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

www.aquablade.com.au

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

฀ ฀ ฀฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀ ฀ ฀ ฀ ฀

฀฀

www.easycomposter.com.au

฀ ฀ ฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀

Ph: 1300 308 336


GARDEN MARKET

MAKE DIGGING EASIER WITH PRONGS

THE WORLD’S EASIEST LOADING TRIMMER HEAD

LADY PRONG AND WEEDER PRONG

ALSO SEE LONG PRONG & SON OF PRONG ONLINE Get $10 cash back during October on Lo g and So Models

Buy online Combo Offer for Gardening Australia Buyers!

SPECIAL OFFER FOR GARDENING AUSTRALIA READERS SAVE $15.00 when you get the two $124.70 Inc GST Postage to your door or PO BOX.

ALSO E BL AVAILA ITE IN WH

PRONGS ARE MADE OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY STEEL!

LADY PRONG: $89.75

WEEDER PRONG: $49.50

Inc GST & Postage to your door or PO BOX

Inc GST and Postage to your door or PO Box

Go online to www.prong.com.au Credit card phone sales welcome. Call Anytime 0417 627 097

FRUSTRATION-FREE FRU TRAT O FREE TRIMMING TRI MI G * Reloads in seconds * Fits all petrol machines * All itting parts included * Quick and easy to assemble * Simply insert line - No winding

Ph: 1300 137 881

www.sureload.com.au

Pruning Poles Various pole lengths available - 3m, 5m, 5.5m & 6m

SEAVIEW ORTHOTICS 5 Higgins Street Bunbury WA 6230 M: 0418 947 522

ZZZŴLSVWLFNDXVWUDOLDFRPDX

KILL WEEDS ORGANICALLY with a

SHEEN FLAMEGUN For all clearing problems Firebrakes Sterilising. Ideal on paths, fences, along edges, and rockeries ESTROY WEEDS the modern way WITHOUT he use of poisons

Bon Trading Co Box 82, Woollahra 2025 Phone: (02) 9331 2007 Name:....................................... Address: ..................................

www.flameguns.com.au

Heavy duty and general purpose Web: cutabovetools.com.au Mobile: 0403 128 500 E: sales@cutabovetools.com.au

FREE PREMIUM CUTTING LINE. USE CODE “ ABC GARDEN” TO RECEIVE EXTRA $10.00 WORTH OF LINE.

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 97


GARDEN MARKET Professional Gardening Tools Australia-wide delivery!

Felco Pruners & Loppers

Felco 4-$74, Felco 2/8/9/11-$90 Felco 6-$83, Felco 7/10-$108 Felco 12-$104, Felco 100-$108 Felco 220-$240, Felco 231-$240 Full Felco range + spares in stock

Grass & Edging Shears

Telescopic handles Grass - $65; Edging - $65

TOOWOOMBA WATERSAVER GARDENS  Use 80% less water  Water once a month  Kits: ive sizes/24 colours  Herb $210/Jumbo $430  Simple assembly  Free freight: code 1660  Nets/canopies to suit Find out more: e: alan@watersavergardens.com.au w: watersavergardens.com.au

Give me a call: Alan on 04 2499 6540

> NEW PRODUCTS COMING SOON - Check the website! <

98 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

High Limb Chain Saw Hand operated high limb chain saw. 1.2m blade on 6m ropes with throw weight. Made in USA. $80

Dramm Watering Products

Professional US made watering products including wands, valves, nozzles and guns. 61cm classic Over 150 tree & gardening books wand + 400PL head pictured $38

Barnel Telescopic Pole Saws Ideal for high branches and palm fronds. 460mm Samurai steel blades. 3 sizes: 1.8-5m $300; 2.3-6.3m $360; 2.3-7.5m $500

Large selection of hedge shears, loppers and saws! Tel: 02 9417 7751 Fax: 02 9417 7426

Over 1800 products at

www.forestrytools.com.au or call for our 2018 catalogue

PO Box 870 Willoughby NSW 2068


FINEST NURSERIES MAPLE SPRINGS NURSERY AND JAPANESE GARDENS Specialist growers of Japanese Maples. 250 grafted varieties. Cool Climate Trees & Shrubs, Conifers, Ornamentals & Bonsai (Open 7 days) (Gory’u Japanese Gardens Open by appt only)

:H DUH GHOLJKWHG WR DQQRXQFH WKDW RXU QHZ PDLO RUGHU ZHEVLWH KDV DUULYHG 7KLVPHDQVD ZRUOG RI SODQWV DQG H[SHUW JURZLQJLQIRUPDWLRQ DZDLWV \RX

GUIDED GARDEN TOURS OPEN BY APPT

ǁǁǁ͘ĚŝƐĚĞůŝŐŚƞƵůƉůĂŶƚƐ͘ĐŽŵ͘ĂƵ 85 Baaners Lane Little Hartley, 2790 Blue Mts NSW Ph: 02 6355 2140 | Mob: 0414 879 082 Email: maplesone@bigpond.com

:HDUHDFFUHGLWHG WRVKLSWR DOO VWDWHV WALLIS CREEK WATERGARDEN

For more tips and tricks from ABC Gardening Australia magazine, sign up to our e-newsletter

Retail nursery & Online Shop Find us at www.walliscreekwatergarden.com.au and follow us on facebook

DAFFODIL GARDEN Y R T N E E E FR & FLOWER SHOW

Visit:

to help you create your Romantic Spring Garden.

gardeningaustralia. com.au

Visit HANCOCK’S DAFFODIL FARM in the picturesque Dandenongs, Belgrave-Gembrook Rd., Menzies Creek, Victoria. (Melways 124 E11) Daily 11am - 4pm, Friday 24th Aug. to Sunday 30th September. Display garden of over 200 daffodil types, indoor display plus fresh cut flowers & potted bulbs.

I can’t make it but I’d love to have a garden filled with daffodils & Spring flowering bulbs. Please send me the FREE Hancock’s 2019 Daffodil and Bulb Catalogues. Name:

.....................................................................................................

Address:

..................................................................................................

................................................................................... P/code: ................ J.N. Hancock & Co. 2 Jackson’s Hill Road, Menzies Creek VIC 3159 Phone: (03) 9754 3328 Fax: (03) 9752 5877 ga1018 :HEZZZGDႇRGLOEXOEVFRPDX

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 99


GARDEN & BEYOND

CLEVER COMPOSTER

Joy and Bliss...

Want an easy way to dispose of ALL your kitchen waste - even doggie doo?

The Gifted Garden GARDEN DELIGHT MICROBIAL ROCK MINERAL FERTILISER 100% Natural minerals and humates No chemicals or animal products Ideal for indoor and outdoor use

Vegan ly Friend FREE CALL 1800 819 003 www.earthlife.com.au

Bring the joy of nature into your home with beautiful botanical art prints Museum quality limited edition prints, cards and gift boxed stationery. Private botanical art tuition Contact Helena on 0498 055 617 or hkw8@bigpond.com 20% of print profits will be donated to the Motor Neurone Disease Research centre and Clinic at Maquarie University

54 ANNUAL SHOW TH

THEN TRY A COMPOT OR TWO!

13 and 14 October 2018 o8ff'7j8ff*'5

)25#&&5)1(5&&65gfhh5"#."),-5) )25#&&65#.),#555555555fjof5hii5mfl

$5 entry Children free R5,'#,5)(-#5#-*&3R5#,#(!5(5.,#''#(!5 ')(-.,.#)(R5&-5) 5)(-#5*&(.(5--),#An excellent event for bonsai novices and experts alike

ALL WELCOME!

JUST FILL FORGET, REFILL WHEN READY www.compot.com.au 07 3358 3716

To advertise please contact (02) 9901 6101

ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON AGAIN the Renmark Rose Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201C; October 19 to 28, 2018 Come and smell the Roses Renmark is the home of the National Rose Collection of Australia at Rustonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roses. Check out the full program at www.renmarkroses.com

HOME STUDY s s s s s s s

Horticulture Turf Management Pets Writing Agriculture Wildlife Self Sufficiency

700 ONLINE COURSES HORTICULTURE s Landscaping s Hydroponics s Permaculture s Plant Varieties s Natives s Nursery PH: 07 5562 1088

NEW s Turf Grasses s Biophilic Landscaping s Sports Coaching s Building Renovation s Mechanics s Root Vegetables

Australian made Weathervanes & Artwork

www.acs.edu.au

M I L LT H O R P E

3-4 NOV 2018

View the entire Glenview range online at

glenviewproducts.com.au For more information call Bob on 02 9449 9892 100 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


GARDEN & BEYOND

Spring cleaning... your furniture needs it! Nourish you r furniture now , before the summer hea t arrives.

ORDER ONLINE OR FIND A STOCKIST NEAR YOU

www.howardproducts.com.au

alaIIa

1800 672 646

@U_ aqlm

@_KmI@iMm—@lKM_m Î q]pqlM 24 Days with Kim Woods Rabbidge 24 April-14 May 2019

6/7

5˒˟ˎ˗ˍˎ˕˕

FL OW ER SH OW

OCT

+එඏඐඔඑඏඐගඛ

ĞůĞďƌŝƚLJ ƉƌĞƐĞŶƚĂƟŽŶƐ /ŶƚĞƌĂĐƟǀĞ ǁŽƌŬƐŚŽƉƐ ^ĞŶƐĂƟŽŶĂů ŐĂƌĚĞŶ ĂŶĚ ŇŽƌĂů ĞdžŚŝďŝƚƐ • džĐŝƟŶŐ ŵĂƌŬĞƚƉůĂĐĞ • sŝŶƚĂŐĞ ĐĂƌ ƐŚŽǁ • <ŝĚƐ ƐƉĂĐĞ • ,ŝŐŚ ƚĞĂ • ,ŝŐŚͲĞŶĚ ŐĂůĂ ĚŝŶŶĞƌ

• • •

ZZZULYHQGHOOÀRZHUVKRZFRPDX 9767 8488

-RXUQH\ ZLWK .LP D SKRWRMRXUQDOLVW H[SORULQJ EHDXWLIXO JDUGHQV JDOOHULHVVRXNVDQGPDJQLILFHQW DUFKLWHFWXUH LQ HLWKHU 0RURFFR RU 6SDLQ±RULQERWKFDSWLYDWLQJFRXQWULHV  VWDU DFFRPPRGDWLRQ IDEXORXVORFDOFXLVLQHHQWUDQFH IHHV WUDYHO FRPIRUWDEO\ EHWZHHQ GHVWLQDWLRQV ,QFOXGHV&yUGRED 3DWLR )HVWLYDO )XOOWRXUSULFHWZLQVKDUH  VLQJOH VXSSOHPHQW 2SXOHQW -RXUQH\V    (PDLOHQTXLULHV#RSXOHQWMRXUQH\VFRPDX :HERSXOHQWMRXUQH\VFRPDX

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 101


GARDEN & BEYOND

KILL TERMITES

90 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE

THE EASY WAY! â&#x20AC;&#x153;DIYâ&#x20AC;? Termite Baiting System and White Ant Termite Bait Finally, a complete â&#x20AC;&#x153;D.I.Y treatment. No more pest needed. As easy as 1-2-3 1

Install Superway Termite Ba around your property & inspe every 2-3 weeks.

2

As soon as the Baiting Statio active. Apply the Termite trea the station. (Superway owned & AP

3

Termite colony destroyed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; r Baiting Station

FOR A FREE INFORMATION PACK, SEE CONTACT DETAILS BELOW:

ULTRASONIC POSSUM DETERRENT 24/7 POSSUM REPELLER FOR THE ULTIMATE POSSUM CONTROL The ultrasonic Possum Deterrent has a maximum range of 14 metres. This weatherproof Possum Repeller randomly and intermittently emits quiet ultrasonics with a maximum arc of 170 degrees in front of the device. The device also has a motion sensor that activates the possum repeller when possums move into its infra red coverage zone. The light sensor automatically turns the device on at dusk and off at dawn or runs 24 hours when used in a roof space. The Possum Repeller is easy to use, set up and maintain. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always at the end of a phone or email to help you with any setup and best practice questions you may have.

(07) 5443 6344 birdgard@birdgard.com.au

www.birdgard.com.au AU S OW TRA NE LIA D N

N LIA A R N ST OW AU GR

STOP ALGAE IN PONDS THE NATURAL WAY STEPHEN BROS BARLEY STRAW

6 Prevent new algae growth in ponds, dams and lakes 6 Simply place the bag in your pond 6 One application is effective for up to 6 months 6 Fish and Animal Friendly )RU PRUH VSHFLÂżF LQIRUPDWLRQ VHQG  [  VWDPSV SOHDVH PHQWLRQ \RXU SUREOHP WR

6 Saves water Available at selected garden and hardware centres or order online Available in bags of 100g, 1kg and 20kg For further information contact Stephen Bros T: (07) 4663 9152 M: 0419 727 435 E: mpstephen@bigpond.com W: www.stephenbros.com.au

102 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A


CLASSIFIEDS African Violets

Clivias

SUNSHINE IRIS NURSERY

Possaway

AFRICAN VIOLETS – If you would

SPECIALTY CLIVIAS

Over 600 varieties of bearded

Possum deterrent. All natural,

iris and daylilies, including rare

made in Richmond

like more information contact: The Secretary, The African Violet

Excellent range

vintage iris.

Association of Aust Inc.

Imported varieties; new strains

8 Wangalla Road,

Seeds, seedlings, mature plants

www.sunshineiris.com.au

Ph Peter Haeusler 0447360524

Call Mandy 0429857085

specialtyclivias@gmail.com

Margie 0422672112

Riverview NSW 2066 Ph: (02) 9427 5407

Bulbs

Possums smell there is a

Posts to all states in Australia.

killer predator Perfect for trees, fences, eaves, roofs, etc Ph Laundrymutt 03 9421 495

Burwood, VIC 3125

Van Diemen Quality Bulbs

NARROMINE IRIS FARM

Specialty bulb growers.

Over 1500 different tall bearded,

Roses

Time to think about bulbs.

Dahlias

Spuria and Louisianna (water) iris.

Ladybird Roses

Order your tulips, iris,

Dahlia Colour!

Some Canna Lilies, and Daylilies.

www.ladybirdroses.com.au

liliums etc here.

For catalogue please send SASE to

Geranium cuttings 20 for

Mail order roses and rare plants

$30 (our choice)

Ph: 03 5904 3332

Send for your free catalogue to: 363 Table Cape Road,

Club Creek Bulb Farm

Plus Postage.

Wynyard, TAS 7325

PO Box 114 Emerald, VIC 3782

Ph: (03) 6442 2012

Ph 03 5968 4316

Postage is $12.50 NSW and

www.clubcreekbulbfarm.com.au

$15 interstate.

Fax: (03) 6442 2582 Email: manager@vdqbulbs.com.au

Ph: 02 6889 1885 or

www.vdqbulbs.com.au

Frangipanis & Brugs TULIPS WITH A DIFFERENCE Free Colour Bulb Catalogue. Quality

Plus Dessert Roses, Angel’s

e: sales@ladybirdroses.com.au

Free colour iris catalogue.

M: 0408 350 384

Salvias/Geraniums Large variety of colourful and water-wise salvias.

or E: melroberts@bigpond.com

Scented geraniums

W: www.narromineirisfarm.com

also offered. Not tubestock.

Autumn/Spring/Summer

trumpets and rare Sanseveria’s.

Or post ‘Villa Nova’ 471 Tomingley

Can provide growing and

Flowering Bulbs -

Australia’s biggest and

Road, Narromine NSW 2821.

care advice.

best selection. We mail order

Payment by

Mail order. Sorry no Tas. or W.A.

Credit card/cheque/money order/

Email kbasiaco@iprimus.com.au

Tulips, Dutch Iris, Daffodils, Alstromeria, Hyacinths, Liliums, Hippeastrums, Daylilies, Gladiolus,

Australia Wide!

Rhubarb, Asparagus…

Ph: (07) 4097 0065

294 Chambers Road, Boyup Brook

www.sacredgardenfrangipanis.com.au

WA 6244 Ph/Fax: (08) 9767 3069

Perennials

for catalogue. Mobile 0404 369848

Including Climbing Hydrangea’s,

Email: lyn@wabulbs.com www.wabulbs.com

direct deposit

Geraniums Geraniums. 200 Varieties

Seeds

Clematis, Polygonatums. Epimediums, Podophyllums,

Australian Wildflower Seeds

Iris, Asarum, Campanula, Gentiana,

Nindethana Seed Service P/L -

Geraniums, Asters,

PO Box 2121, Albany WA 6331.

Post free to all states

Dianthus, Echinacea,

Ph: (08) 9844 3533

labelled for only $45.

Ph: Roger (08) 9470 2345

Lathyrus, Oriental Poppies,

Fax: (08) 9844 3573

Post Free. Quality plants, good

See pics on net

Penstemon, Phlox,

www.nindethana.net.au

Veronicastrum, Viola

Largest selection of native seed.

Cacti & Succulents

30 = $65, 60 = $115.

Excellent collection. 40 named varieties, separately

varieties, wide range of types and colours,

www.geraniumcottage.net

Shop Online at

including some echeverias. Sorry mail order only.

Irises

Prompt delivery. 18 page list

Ferndale Iris and Daylily Nursery

available on request.

Small packets to bulk quantities

www.lynnsrareplants.com.au Ph. (02) 4784 3101

Violets Ladybird Roses

85 Caloola Road,

Perennialle Plants Nursery

Newbridge, NSW 2795

Specialising in frost and dry

SCENTED SWEET VIOLETS

Catalogue Available. No WA or TAS

tolerant perennials by mail order

www.ladybirdroses.com.au

PO Box 756, Mildura VIC 3502

PH: (02) 6368 1058

www.perennialle.com.au

Single & Double Parma Violets

Ph: 03 5024 6653

Email: kellycr@activ8.net.au

0427 077 798

Ph: 03 5904 3332

Direct Debit now available. Order and payment to: Mildura Succulent Supplies

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 103


FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN THE

Ultimate AV Experience! GREAT GIFT IDEA !

PRIZE VALUED AT

$9,944!

Enjoy state-of-the-art big screen 4K Ultra projection images and reference-quality surround sound, taking sports, movies and concert home entertainment to a new level

THIS FANTASTIC PRIZE COMPRISES: • BenQ’s latest TK800 projector • Denon AVR-X1400H 7.2-channel AV Surround Receiver

• Klipsch surround sound package • Total prize value of $9,944!

SUBSCRIBE ONLINE ANYTIME AT OR PHONE 1300 361 146 FOR THE COST OF A LOCAL CALL See www.mymagazines.com.au for full terms. Open to Australian and NZ residents over the age of 18. One entry per Eligible Product Purchase, defined in full terms. Competition opens 2/8/18 at 12:01 AM and closes 24/10/18 at 11:59 PM. Winner drawn 30/10/18 at 11:00 AM at 207 Pacific Hwy, St Leonards, NSW 2065.The total prize pool valued at up to $9,944 (incl.GST). Winner notified by email and published online at www.mymagazines.com.au from 05/11/18 for 28 days. The Promoter is Nextmedia Pty Ltd (ABN 84 128 805 970) of 207 Pacific Hwy, St Leonards, NSW 2065. Authorised Under: NSW Permit No. LTPS/18/25430. ACT Permit No. TP 18/01165. SA Licence No. T18/1071.


GARDENING ON YOUR

TV

radio

For details of programs on your local ABC station, call 139 994 or visit abc.net.au/local

ACT

SA

ABC Radio Canberra

ABC Radio Sydney

ABC Radio Adelaide; 639 ABC North & West; 1485 ABC Eyre Peninsula & West Coast; ABC South East SA

Saturday 9am

Saturday 8.30am

ABC Radio Central Coast Saturday 9am

1062 ABC Riverland; 999 ABC Broken Hill

ABC Central West

Saturday 9am

Saturday 8.30am

1233 ABC Newcastle

Statewide; ABC Radio Adelaide; 639 ABC North & West; 1485 ABC Eyre Peninsula & West Coast; ABC South East SA; 1062 ABC Riverland; 999 ABC Broken Hill

Saturday 9am

Sunday 10.30am

Saturday 8.30am

NSW Gardening Australia is on ABC TV every Friday at 7.30pm and repeated on Sunday at 1.30pm and on iView.

THIS INFORMATION IS CORRECT AT THE TIME OF PRINTING BUT IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE. PHOTO ROBERT FRITH/ACORN PHOTO

September 14

97.3 ABC Illawarra Saturday 8.30am

In this episode, we share our favourite past stories about native plants. Josh Byrne (above) shows us some amazing gum trees, Tino Carnevale plants a bed of edibles, Costa Georgiadis meets the team saving a coolibah swamp, Jerry Coleby-Williams visits an award-winning garden, Sophie Thomson learns how a saltbush is saving a lettuce crop, Clarence Slockee shares his favourite bush herbs and Jane Edmanson discovers bonsai native trees.

ABC Mid North Coast; ABC Cofs Coast

September 21

ABC Riverina

This episode is a collection of our top food stories. Tino Carnevale has tips for perfect vegie-growing soil, Jerry Coleby-Williams tastes tropical fruits, Josh Byrne plants tomatoes, Jane Edmanson meets an aquaponics expert, Sophie Thomson plants pizza herbs, Millie Ross checks her pantry for seeds, and we meet Bruce Pascoe, who says native plants should be part of our farming future.

Saturday 9.30am, Thursday 9.30am

ABC New England North West Saturday 8.30am, Thursday 9.30am

ABC North Coast

TAS

ABC Radio Hobart; ABC Northern Tasmania

Saturday 8.30am

Saturday 9am, Peter Cundall and Chris Wisbey

Wednesday 10.30am, Saturday 8.30am

ABC South East Wednesday 10am, Saturday 9am

ABC Western Plains Thursday 9.35am fortnightly, Saturday 8.30am

VIC

ABC Radio Melbourne; ABC Victoria Saturday 9.30am

91.1 ABC Central Victoria Thursday 7.35am

NT

100.7 ABC Gippsland

ABC Radio Darwin

Monday 10am

Saturday 9am

594 AM ABC Western Victoria

Costa Georgiadis celebrates spring in Canberra at Floriade, Sophie Thomson tackles some spring pruning, Jerry Coleby-Williams gets great tips from a passionfruit farmer, Tino Carnevale visits a Gondwana-themed garden on Bruny Island, Jane Edmanson has a list of spring jobs to do, Millie Ross visits garden designer Fiona Brockhoff, and we meet a man who gardens with goats.

783 AM ABC Alice Springs; 106.1 ABC Tennant Creek

Tuesday 9.10am

Saturday 8.30am

Wednesday 6.40am monthly

ABC Southern Queensland

ABC Southwest Victoria; 1602 AM Warrnambool; 94.1 FM Hamilton; 96.9 FM Horsham

Oc tober 5

Saturday 9am

Thursday 7.35am

Sophie Thomson explains the beneďŹ ts of stinging nettles, Costa Georgiadis meets a designer who celebrates imperfections, Jane Edmanson meets gardening chef Annie Smithers, Josh Byrne is in Kalgoorlie to meet a conservationist, Millie Ross builds a no-dig garden, Jerry Coleby-Williams looks at growing roses in the subtropics and Tino Carnevale helps relocate an orchard.

Friday 10am

September 28

Visit iview.abc.net.au to watch previous episodes of Gardening Australia

107.9 ABC Ballarat ABC Goulburn Murray

QLD

Tuesday 9.40am

ABC Radio Brisbane Saturday 6am

630 ABC North Queensland ABC Tropical North; ABC Capricornia; ABC Wide Bay; ABC North West Qld; ABC Western Qld

WA

ABC Far North

ABC Radio Perth; ABC Great Southern; ABC South West; ABC Goldields Esperance; ABC Kimberley; ABC North West; ABC Midwest and Wheatbelt

Friday 10am, Saturday 8.30am

Wednesday 3.30pm, Saturday 9.05am

Friday 10am

Download the ABC listen app and listen to live radio streams of gardening programs across Australia.

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8 105


he big picture O

ne of Australia’s grand old dames of gardening used to take visitors around her truly lovely garden by exactly the same route each time. At a predetermined point, she’d make sure that everyone’s attention was drawn in a specific direction, and then, at just the right moment, swing through 180 degrees to reveal an entirely new and unexpected vista, to gasps of delight and surprise from her guests. It worked every time. Not that we need any further evidence that gardens are among the greatest players of the game of conceal and reveal. At best, they’re a living sculpture that very deliberately opens and closes around us, inviting exploration. One minute we can be looking down a long, shaded tunnel of trees to a splash of light at the end, with no idea what we’ll see when we get there, and the next we can be approaching a door or gate in a wall that can’t help but suggest almost Narnia-like possibilities on the other side. It’s for this reason that I’ll do anything to not be shown around a garden the first time I see it. There’s nothing more instructive than to walk a garden with its owner or custodian, but it should be your second walk around. The first should be a journey of discovery. The garden of Ninfa, south of Rome in Italy, is widely considered to be the most romantic garden in the world. Its odd collection of ancient crumbling buildings, bridges and streets makes a setting like no other for rhythmic revelations of scenes of stupendous, drooling beauty. I’d anticipated

106 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 8

G A R D E N I N G AU S T R A L I A

hunting among those medieval ruins, with the much-photographed wisteria-draped roman bridge as my goal, and discovering endless joys along the way. But it wasn’t to be. Due to the fragility of the garden, you’re not allowed to wander at will. You must be with a group, and you must be guided. I’m okay about that now that I’ve visited a few times. But the first time, it nearly killed me. The garden genius of concealing and revealing isn’t just about views. It can allow you to tell what can only be described as spatial jokes. There’s a moment in the garden at Hidcote, in the UK, when you’re walking along a double flower border of a scale you’d expect from a large, private garden. You then climb a set of appropriately wide steps, which are flanked by matching summerhouses big enough for three or four people to sit in. Your headspace is firmly in a language of largish gardens, when suddenly, without warning, you find yourself looking through one of the summerhouses to a lawn walk of such enormously disproportionate width and length that you’re thrown off balance. The drama and surprise of that moment is about equal to finding a portal in your own backyard which steps into Versailles. And, as long as you discover it for yourself, you stand there and laugh. Even the smallest gardens can play this game. It can be as simple as making sure you can’t see everything at once. But please, if I come to visit, let me walk through your garden, the first time at least, on my own. GA Michael blogs at thegardenist.com.au

PHOTOS ISTOCK

He asks to be left alone to explore a garden by himself, at least on the first outing. The fun is in the discovery, says MICHAEL McCOY


Save the date! Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a year of inspiring gardening in the 2019 ABC Gardening Australia and ABC Organic Gardener diaries and calendars.

2019R

THE PERFECT GIFT FOR ANY GARDENER!

CALENDA

Ä? 

R

9 PLANNE  1 0 2I  D   Ä?  

Annual/monthly planners Public holidays, school terms & moon phases Handy tips and planting suggestions

calendar

2019 Monthly planting gu ide featuring

diary 2 019

Your organi c gard en pl anner

On sale

NOW

Available from newsagents or online at www.gardeningaustralia.com.au and www.organicgardener.com.au

Profile for desoz9967

Bznnsnnsnnsnsn  

Bznnsnnsnnsnsn  

Profile for desoz9967
Advertisement