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southern gentleman | MAKING A TOAST

A Toast to Remember By Jason Frye | Photography courtesy of Getty Images

As the best man, you’ll be expected to make a toast at your best friend’s wedding. Make it memorable for all the right reasons. Every June I say a prayer of thanks that just about every friend, cousin, and professional acquaintance who thinks we’re close friends – even though we only see each other at three conferences a year – are married. And that none of them are working on round two. Yet. It’s not that I dislike weddings or that I hate getting dressed up. Quite the contrary. My mother-in-law once told me “you clean up pretty good” (note: it was not on my wedding day when I had what retrospect tells me was a regrettable haircut). I also get sentimental at weddings, and I may even get on the dance floor. So what’s the problem? Toasts and speeches, they’ll ruin a good wedding every time. Simply put, there are too many of each. Especially 76 DeSoto

here in the South where I’ve seen wedding parties so big they could field two baseball teams and have players on the bench. When you get a wedding party that big, everyone gets to make a speech. Or toast. Or a speech with a toast at the end. It’s too much. The toasts are too long (or they rhyme, ugh), or the stories are wildly inappropriate (this isn’t the time to embarrass your best friend, do that later) or just plain dull. So, Southern Gentlemen, I’m here to help you out this wedding season. Whether you’re getting married and need to have a talk with your best man about the toast or whether you’re the best man and you’ve been asked to deliver a speech, here are six rules and they’re easy to follow:

Profile for DeSoto Magazine | Exploring the South

DeSoto Magazine June 2019  

DeSoto's 2019 "I Do" Issue! … All about weddings. A go-to guide for every bride and groom.

DeSoto Magazine June 2019  

DeSoto's 2019 "I Do" Issue! … All about weddings. A go-to guide for every bride and groom.