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Then, as now, engineering was a demanding course, and relative to other faculties in UCD left little time for the enjoyment of college life and its various extra-curricular activities. The UCD school of engineering was located away from the main Belfield and Earlsfort campuses Terrace in the old College of Science on Merrion Street (now the Taoiseach’s office), further restricting the opportunities to mix with students of other faculties and participate in the many various college societies and clubs. Following in the footsteps of his older brother Liam, Uinseann joined the UCD Rowing Club. Soon finding out that his physique was more suited to coxing than rowing, he enjoyed some successes in his two years in the club. After his first year in College, Uinseann spent the summer working in Boston, USA, where his eldest brother Seán was the Consul General of Ireland. Shortly after starting college, Uinseann was introduced by mutual friends to Marian Connor, the couple became great friends and Marian was to prove a valuable ally providing great support to Uinseann during some difficult times as he progressed through college. On graduating from UCD in 1974 with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering, Uinseann accepted an offer to join a graduate training programme with the US company General Electric – a decision that was to lead to a career involving extensive travel for much of the next forty years of his life. He specialized in gas turbine engines and their control systems, spending the first two years of his career in the US (Schenectady NY and Phoenix Arizona) and the Middle East (UAE and Saudi Arabia) training and gaining site experience in the construction and commissioning of power stations. In 1976 Uinseann and Marian married, and shortly afterwards accepted an assignment in the village of Soussa on the Mediterranean coast of Libya, where he was to commission a new gas turbine power generation station. While this was an interesting and challenging work assignment for the young engineer, it proved a very challenging assignment for the young couple because of the very limited facilities and amenities in the village and surrounding area. Even basic food supplies were difficult to obtain; the accommodation was very basic; power cuts were frequent and sometimes prolonged; there was no telephone or TV, or entertainment of any description; only one or two people in the areas spoke English – and for Marian there was the added restriction that it was not feasible for her to go outside of the house alone during the day, while Uinseann was at work. The interesting Greek and Roman ruins and amphitheatres in the village and surrounding area were poor consolation – merely reminders of better times in this part of the world! The Libyan assignment successfully completed nine months later (1977), Marian and Uinseann moved on to what was intended to be a short assignment in the North of England – but which

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Profile for DesignTactics

O'Briens of Bandon - 1875 to 2013  

This is the story of the family of John and Sarah O’Brien of Bandon, Co. Cork, Ireland, and their descendants. They had eleven children and...

O'Briens of Bandon - 1875 to 2013  

This is the story of the family of John and Sarah O’Brien of Bandon, Co. Cork, Ireland, and their descendants. They had eleven children and...