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Eight people died in the Carmody’s hotel collapse and the site has never been built on. A ninth person, a journalist, was killed when the aeroplane he was piloting crashed shortly after take-off from Shannon airport. He had come to Ennis to take photos of the scene of the tragedy, and was rushing back to Dublin to file them with the newspapers for the following day’s edition when the crash occurred. There is a plaque in Ennis where the hotel used to be and it is now an entrance to a car park. Shortly before his own death in 2005, Tomás’s father, Tom Donlon, talked about the accident to his daughter Áine. He was school inspector in Ennis at the time of the accident, and had, apparently, been inspecting the Church of Ireland National School on Harmony Row, just around the corner from Bindon St. and very close to Carmody’s Hotel, when the accident happened. He and the teacher and pupils could hear all the commotion outside – the ambulance and Garda car sirens etc. but as was the practice in those days, nothing would interfere with an inspection, and the inspection continued until the end of the school day. It was not until then, when Tom was on his way home that he heard about the accident in the hotel, and realised that his own son had been one of the victims. He was very emotional and distressed as he told the story – more than fifty years after the accident had occurred. It was a devastating tragedy for the family and when an opportunity came the following year for Tom to leave Ennis and transfer to Dublin, Peggy was happy to move. This was the final move for the family and they bought a house at 21 Lavarna Road, Terenure, Dublin 6 where they lived until Tom’s death in 2005. In 1960, Peggy’s mother, Sarah O’Brien, left Bandon and came to live with Peggy and family in their house in Terenure. She was 85 years of age at that time and while she was still mobile and mentally clear, she was no longer able to live alone. By the end of 1962, her health had deteriorated and she needed nursing care. She spent the last few months of her life in Our Lady’s Hospice, Harold’s Cross, where she died on 11th October 1963. In 1963, Tom became a Divisional Inspector in Dublin and became involved in a major Irish language research project in the Department of Education, Buntús Gaeilge, which influenced the development of a new approach to teaching the Irish language in schools. At the same time, he developed an Irish language radio and television series for adults, Buntús Cainte, which was a major success. The series was accompanied by a three volume booklet with audio tapes and later CDs. By the time Tom died in 2005, Buntús Cainte has been re-printed more than twenty times and hundreds of thousands of copies had been sold. However, as Tom was a civil servant, the

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Profile for DesignTactics

O'Briens of Bandon - 1875 to 2013  

This is the story of the family of John and Sarah O’Brien of Bandon, Co. Cork, Ireland, and their descendants. They had eleven children and...

O'Briens of Bandon - 1875 to 2013  

This is the story of the family of John and Sarah O’Brien of Bandon, Co. Cork, Ireland, and their descendants. They had eleven children and...