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Teddy, the youngest son of Sarah Coffey and John O’Brien was born on June 5th 1910 and grew up in Patrick’s Hill in Bandon. He was only five years of age when his father died, attended school locally (probably with support from some of his older siblings who now worked in London) and went on to train as a national teacher in Drumcondra in Dublin, following in the footsteps of his older brother Paddy Joe. His early teaching years were spent in Clondrohid, Upton, and Aherla, none too far from Bandon. Summers were spent at local beaches and Teddy had a particular fondness for Courtmacsherry where he enjoyed pitch and putt and sing songs in the evening as he had a fine tenor voice. While studying by night for a B.A. in UCC, Teddy met Lily Lynch who was in the same class. Apparently they used to pass notes to each other in class, became close, and married in the Honan chapel in UCC on 14th August 1942.  Teddy’s older brother Jack was best man and Lily’s sister Molly was bridesmaid. The honeymoon was spent in Bray after which they set up home in Cork in the Blackrock area of Cork. By this stage Teddy was teaching in Christ the King national school in Turner’s Cross, Cork where he was to spend the rest of his teaching life.  Lily taught for some time in Cloghduv and Ballincollig before eventually moving to Our Lady of Lourdes national school near her home in Blackrock, Cork. Their first child Valerie sadly died of infection in the first week of her life. Kenneth was born on 16 January 1946 and Dorothy on 25th December that same year. Two further children, Catherine and David, did not survive because of problems caused by interaction between Rhesus positive and negative blood. Unfortunately In the late 1940’s there was little or no treatment for this complication of pregnancy. The long summer holidays from teaching gave plenty of opportunities for visiting Nana and cousins in Bandon, often sleeping upstairs in one of the small bedrooms . Ken and Dor both have memories of Nana sitting at her sewing machine, her box of snuff nearby and the newspaper propped up so that she could study the form before taking her black Bandon cloak from a hook behind the door and running out to place her bet on the horses!! Another abiding memory is of being sent down the hill for messages and passing a bakery with the most delicious smell of bread and cakes wafting out into the street. Free visits to the cinema controlled by uncle Jack, and accompanied by some of the cousins, was another highlight. Ken remembers the excitement when Teddy’s sisters - Kitty, Lucy and Lolly - visited Bandon each summer and the lavish meals prepared in their honour. Dor remembers them visiting Teddy and Lily in Cork- the three of them linking arms as they came up the driveway (There never seemed to be any men with them!) Ken also recalls a drive to Bandon before

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Profile for DesignTactics

O'Briens of Bandon - 1875 to 2013  

This is the story of the family of John and Sarah O’Brien of Bandon, Co. Cork, Ireland, and their descendants. They had eleven children and...

O'Briens of Bandon - 1875 to 2013  

This is the story of the family of John and Sarah O’Brien of Bandon, Co. Cork, Ireland, and their descendants. They had eleven children and...