Page 1

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


DFD 01


O r i g i ns

De sig n F u t u r e D al l a s

In late 2014, we were longing for the creative, collaborative energy of the “Studio” environment

that is so common in design school, and we weren’t finding that same spirit in our day jobs. We knew that clients, billable hours, and building permits were all important parts of the design profession, but we needed to flex our creative muscles, and feel excited about our city. At the time, Dallas didn’t offer any creative outlets like charrettes, competitions, or even creative conversations to attend. We were craving active, inspirational, and impactful things to work on, and we wanted to do it together. We wanted the “Studio” spirit here in Dallas. So we started Design Future Dallas with nothing more than a half-baked idea, and a hunch that other Dallas designers felt the same as us. Our goal was to build a community of creative people who actively wanted to collaborate, and then create opportunities for us to work together on projects that inspired and provoked the people of Dallas. DFD 01

Design Future Dallas is not an organization, or a non-profit or a club… We are just designers. We meet when we are inspired, and have ideas. We design when we find a great project (without clients or budgets or permission). And we believe that collaboration is the key to the success of a better-designed Dallas. For the first Charrette, we borrowed an empty storefront in Deep Ellum, bought party supplies, and printed huge maps of downtown. The night started with broad discussions about “places we love in Dallas, and why.” Everyone had a voice, and by the end of the night we had a chance to share our visions for first DFD project, which we called Billboard Urbanism. The charrette was amazing, and brought back the passion and collaboration of the Studio. You could feel the energy from a group of people all working together toward an imaginative future, building upon each other’s ideas, and challenging us to do better. We wanted that. We needed that. And we’re working to make design an integral part of the future of Dallas.


Gray Garmon

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Bi l l b oa r d U rb a n i s m De sig n F u t u r e : S a n Ja ci nto

DFD hosted a two-day charrette to answer the question, “How might we reimagine the seemingly abandoned Hawkins/San Jacinto intersection as a destination in the downtown Dallas area?� 25 architects, designers, urbanists, and creative Dallasites devoted their Friday evening to sharing big visionary ideas of the city. They first discussed larger urban issues in the Dallas Metroplex and then refocused on Hawkins and San Jacinto. The group developed dozens of potential projects like DFD 01

hammock stations, urban markets, and a mountain that covered up I-345. This collaborative community action of creative people hopes to give Dallas a vision for the future. This project is not intended to be built, but rather encourage people to question current urban conditions and future plans for our city.


Design Future Dallas

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Every weekday, more than 380,000 eyes pass by an unseen piece of land near the intersection of Routh Street and San Jacinto. Some may be going to see an opera in the Dallas Arts District, some to enjoy a drink in Deep Ellum, others to conduct business in one of Dallas’s corporate office towers. Surprisingly, this visibility and intersection of identities create a valuable condition to explore and exploit for the City of Dallas. The site lies at the intersection of three distinct districts: • The Dallas Arts District, which is a master planned and institutional cultural district, houses high art in relatively contemporary architectural facades. • Deep Ellum, which is a historically cultural district, cultivates local culture through street art, murals, concert venues, taverns, restaurants, and galleries. • Downtown Dallas, which is one of the city’s commercial centers, generates tremendous economic activity while delivering minimal cultural capital. DFD 01


We propose using the site as a collision of each of these districts, appropriating the iconic commercial medium of the billboard to create works of art. The billboard forest that emerges will both engage and undermine the individual motivations and ideologies of each of these three districts and create an array of experiences for users.

Whether viewing the site from the highway, from different vantages on the undulating ground plane of the site, or from inside and on the billboards platforms, this billboard forest engages a diverse audience. Seasonal programs, which include artist residency within the billboard buildings, attract out-of-town guests as well as residents in the surrounding three communities.

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Routh Park looking south toward 345

DFD 01


Routh Park looking north toward the Arts District

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Cr ow dus S t re e t

In the spring of 2015, a g r oup of urban activists, with the blessing and collabor ation of the Deep Ellum neighborhood, planned and implemented a 3 day pop-up par k on Cr owdus Str eet. T he par k was a hit. So, in the winter of 2015, Design Futur e Dallas launched a competition to r edesign Cr owdus Str eet as a per manent pedestrian space. We r eceived 27 cr eative and unique submissions fr om ar ound the wor ld as well as many fr om right her e in Dallas. DFD 01


Design Future Dallas

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Neo -Na tiv e

F i rst P lac e C ro wdus S t ree t D e s i g n C o m p e t i tio n

Crowdus Site Plan

Sunlight glances off the sleek chrome of the enormous ring suspended above the intersection before me. As I press the crosswalk button, the cars slow to a halt, and I pass a sculpture of weathered wood posts crafted with rusted steel to support the hoop floating above. I remember the first time I visited Crowdus Park ten years earlier. In response to the revival gaining in Deep Ellum, the park was a powerful intervention that transformed the chaotic mess of traffic and insufficient pedestrian space into the local pride it is today. Originally three blocks long, it’s grown organically over time, and the fused wood and steel sculptures are now faded with wear. The series of chrome rings above every intersection have maintained their sleek purity, and continue to reflect flashes of downtown, surrounding buildings, and curious crowds back at pedestrians; in contrast, the supporting beasts embody the handcrafted charm of the park’s industrial character.

DFD 01

Layers of graffiti tell the rich history of the cultures and creatives that have grown roots in the neighborhood, and the strains of a local band performing nearby infuse the air. As I walk beneath the dappled shade of trees lining the street and pass by the group of street musicians, I become an essential part of the fabric of this city and the lives present here. We propose using the site as a collision of each of these districts, appropriating the iconic commercial medium of the billboard to create works of art. The billboard forest that emerges will both engage and undermine the individual motivations and ideologies of each of these three districts and create an array of experiences for users. Whether viewing the site from the highway, from different vantages on the undulating ground plane of the site, or from inside and on the billboards platforms, this billboard forest engages a diverse audience. Seasonal programs, which include artist residency within the billboard buildings, attract out-of-town guests as well as residents in the surrounding three communities.


Gensler

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Br ea k i ng G ro u n d

Seco nd P lac e C ro wdus S t ree t D e s i g n C o m p e t i tio n

View showing Crowdus Street with Central Flex Space

We are “Breaking Ground� on a new vision for Deep Ellum - one that brings together the community in a walkable, vibrant environment. The intent is to create a linear park that is well integrated in the historic industrial framework, respecting Deep Ellum’s past while providing an exciting new destination and greater connectivity to the broader city. People are now the priority. The Ground that was once focused on cars can now be used for a variety of pedestrian activities and community events. Adjacent businesses can spill out to energize the space. Underutilized areas such as alleys and parking lots are activated and incorporated to firmly root our design into the Deep Ellum neighborhood. Native vegetation and innovative storm water solutions improve the urban ecosystem and offer a much needed reprieve from the harsh urban environment. This transformed street will serve as a catalyst for the rest of Deep Ellum, encouraging more ground to be broken where the community can take root and grow.

DFD 01

Crowdus Section


Studio Outside

Crowdus Site Plan + Concept Diagrams

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


A month-long “test” will take place in September 2016 on Crowdus from Commerce Street to Reel FX. Spearheaded by the Deep Ellum Foundation, this month-long event will allow the Deep Ellum neighborhood and city of Dallas as a whole to experience what it would be like to have a permanent communal space on Crowdus. First and Second place entrants from the competition are working together to plan and implement the September event. With trees, seating, numerous events and celebrations, live music, artists, and great vibes, you won’t want to miss this.

DFD 01


Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Rem ov e d

DFD 01


Andrew Barnes

When highways are removed, we can appreciate the vast amount of space they occupy, the separation they create, and how instrumental they are in shaping our neighborhoods.

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Syn a ps e

“My life experiences are punctuated by geography” Lindsey’s father and childhood are in Alaska, her teenage and college years in Texas. During her mid 20’s Lindsey resided in Morocco. Now Lindsey is about to embark on what she describes as her “real” adult life, beginning as a professor in Missouri.

“When I look back, location was always a key factor in understanding who I am. This is why my work explores identity as it relates to place.” The painting Synapse depicts several locations that are significant to Lindsey. “Similar to memory, certain areas are clear while others hazy; Moments and people from the past are either prominent or fade away. Aerial views of important neighborhoods and other locations are preserved, while images deep in the watercolor are less easy to decipher.” Her process illustrates how events from long ago, though hard to remember, still live in the subconscious and contribute to identity. Lindsey is an Assistant Professor of Art in Painting at Truman State University. Her work is represented in Dallas at Carneal Simmons Contemporary Art located in the Dallas Design District. Co ver Im age

DFD 01

-

Tem pest Ci t y 24” x 24” Wat er c o l o r, i n k , s a l t a n d a c r y l i c o n a c r y l i c p a n e l


Lindsey Dunnagan

S y n a p s e 2 4 ” x 2 4 ” Wa te r co l o r, i n k, sa l t a n d a cr yl i c o n a cr yl i c p a n e l

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


E xp anding Com pas s 24” x 24” Wat er c olor, ink , s a l t a n d a c r y l i c o n a c r y l i c p a n e l

DFD 01


I n n e r L i g h t 2 4 ” x 2 4 ” Wa te r co l o r, i n k, sa l t a n d a cr yl i c o n a cr yl i c p a n e l

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


O ak Cl i ff S t re e t c ar

D A RT + D es ign P hilant hr o p y

In July 2016, we were approached to design a “temporary” pavilion for the new Bishop Arts destination on the Dallas Streetcar. We only had a matter of weeks to design and build the pavilion before the opening of streetcar on August 27th. One of our goals was to maximize the use of digital software and CNC fabrication to build the pavilion, and other was to offer a cultural signifier for travelers using the Bishop Arts stop. Although the project was very well received, it quickly became apparent that there were numerous (and ultimately) an insurmountable amount of hurdles to clear. To save time we’ve just made a bullet list of requirements to design a stop for the DART streetcar…

DFD 01


Gray Garmon + Rickey Crum

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


DART station in its current condition.

Variables From City Hall requirements RFQ Contracts Budgets For Permitting Office Site Plan Floor Plan Sections/Elevations Pertinent Details Fire Proofing/UL/Specs Lighting plan and UL Signed Engineered Foundation Signed Structural Engineering of Frame Landscape Plan

All employees working on DART have to attend a DART safety meeting that lasts about 4 hours, here in Dallas on Tuesday’s and Thursday’s After these are completed each employee gets a badge allowing them to be on site (This is given out at the end of the DART safety meeting) Someone from your company will need to attend the DART track allocation meeting to obtain track allocation (Basically you will out a form and email it into DART, then attend the Track allocation meeting downtown Dallas. At this meeting DART operations will be the ones that allow you to work near their tracks.

From DART/Contractor Requirements Bond A+ or better (this can be worked around if you are not able to bond)

All work will need to be done during the night after revenue service hours (between midnight and 8:00 am)

Insurance requirements: Automobile $2 million, workers comp, and there is one more. (I’ll get that info to you when corporate sends me the full insurance requirements.)

Project Goals

All employees working on site have to undergo a background and drug test at FC Background here in Dallas

Provide an temporary and iconic arrival point for the grand opening of the new Oak Cliff trolley line

DFD 01

Utilize/Showoff CNC capabilities due to short timeline


DART station showing the proposed structure.

Obstacles City work requires an open bidding/vetting process. We were propositioned to do the project last minute without going through a public bidding process, which ultimately led to us working as a subcontractor under the DART line contractor. Although we got around the bidding/vetting process, we opened ourselves up to having to jump through the hoops of DART’s contractor. Our proposed structure needed to meet the city requirements for an occupied structure, which meant meeting ADA, fire ratings, building codes, building permits, inspections and certificates of occupancy. In fact, we were required to have structural engineered drawings for the structure and foundation. We were shocked to realize that there weren’t reduced requirements for temporary structures or open-air structures of this small size.

Working with DART is a gauntlet of hoops to jump through, and to some extent, rightfully so due to safety risks of working on or near the rail lines and overhead power lines. The issue we ran into is that DART management is broken into mutiple sectors, each with their own requirements and review/approval processes. Because of this, there was a severe lack of transparency in what the requirements were and who was responsible for reviewing and approving various aspects of the design/construction. Despite asking repeatedly, we never received a comprehensive list of DART requirements for transit stop structure. This was arguably our biggest hurdle...

City funding for projects like this can come from multiple city entities, each with their respective additional requirements on how the money can be spent. In this case, the city was paying for the temporary trolley stop through DART funds. We didn’t find out until the end of the process that these were federal funds (TIGER) with requirements and stipulations in addition to the DART and city imposed requirements.

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Fan ta s y a n d t h e City

DFD 01


Andrew Barnes

Industry Infrastructure Technology Progress In Constructivism, pieces and parts make up a unit. The combination of disparate components into a fluid and evocative composition is the hallmark of the most effective Constructivist work. It is the creation of a whole with greater meaning than its individual parts. In the formative years of the Soviet Union, as this optimistic new movement took shape, the subject matter, while sometimes abstract, was largely focused on themes of technology, industry, and infrastructure. In short: progress. The core ideals of this movement were well suited to the young Soviet state, as they emphasized one new whole out of many; a perfect metaphor for one’s place in the new society. One could imagine oneself as a piston in an automobile engine, perfectly tuned to the job - strange, even awkward by oneself, but part of a functioning and cohesive whole. With the mentality towards the future and the construction of the new communal state, it is natural that the Constructivists turned towards technology, industry, and infrastructure as their subject matter. Iakov Chernikhov, one of the

leading Constructivist thinkers, created countless schemes for new power plants, manufacturing facilities, elevated roadways, etc. It was through these studies, “fantasies” as he called them, that he conveyed a sense of pride and optimism; the promise that through the creation of this new infrastructure that the society would be brought into modernity. In Dallas, we have undertaken two high-profile and high-cost bridge projects. The Margaret Hunt Hill and soon to be completed Margaret McDermott Bridges are eye-catching, employ bold geometry, and add an element of glamour to otherwise utilitarian automobile infrastructure. Either of these projects would make fitting subjects as one of Cherikhov's fantasies. They scream progress, prosperity, and audacity. They are on postcards. They convey to the world that Dallas is a place where “big things happen.” These are but the most eye-catching examples of our obsession not only with transportation and highway infrastructure but with monumental architecture.

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Meyerson: A Concert Hall

City Hall: Constructive assemblage of a strong triangular volume and various intersecting elements.

Chernikhov Exerpts

The highways which surround our city are in a constant state of “improvement;” new widening projects bring much anticipated capacity and congestion “relief.” This infrastructure however, in an American contrast to the ideals of Constructivism, is primarily focused on the individual. Transportation engineers attempt to move the greatest number of people in private automobiles, sealed off from one another in high-speed anonymity. Yet as we build more and wider roads, we decrease the collective well-being by inducing traffic and making these very roads intolerable. The construct becomes less effective for its sole purpose. These pieces of infrastructure are a heavy presence in the physical composition of our city. They cannot be ignored. They divide and define neighborhoods. Every object we place in our city has an impact. When we build our cities, we are constructively adding to the totality, to the overall amalgamation of what our city is and will become. While at one scale a bridge, road, or stadium is a constructive

DFD 01


W Hotel: Vertical Composition Residences

collection of individual pieces, when one steps back they become the pieces of the larger construction of the city. This construction can be either a unified, progressive whole or can be a gathering of unrelated parts with no distinguishable result. Chernikhov created hundreds of constructive fantasies as he explored the endless possible combinations of form and shape. While many had a stated purpose, such as a power plant, factory, hospital, etc., many were abstract without function. It was here that he explored and nurtured his own creativity. The fantasies informed his more reality-based work, and went on to inspire other constructivist architects such as Konstantin Melnikhov, Vladimir Tatlin, El Lissitsky, and the Vesinin brothers. Italian Futurism, the Bauhaus, Brutalism, and even Zaha Hadid can claim influence from Cherniknov. At the core is the fantasy, of which he created thousands. The fantasy is exploration, the combination of disparate components into an as-yet unknown composition.

What place does the Fantasy have in our society? Why should one strive to create simply for the sake of creating? The answer lies in the way our city and our region is unfolding around us. The physical layout of our City is a framework for its citizens, dictating many aspects of their lives. For all the progress made in the past decade, Dallas remains an auto-dependent segregated City. I believe the Fantasy can and will be the genesis for the radical reconceptualization of our City its development. When something such as development and transportation planning has been done in such a similar manner for so long, the status quo begs to be challenged. What can change? What can be reconceived? What new construct can be created from the pieces? We need exceptional creativity in the City. We need Fantasy.

Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Mob i l e C u l t u ra l H u b 20 1 5 Dal l a s C u l t ura l C i ty

The Dallas of today is a far cry from its founding days. Over six million call Dallas Fort Worth home and, perhaps more recently, the city is composed of a wide variety of transplants that all bring something different to the table from various points of the country and beyond. Growth in population has led to the change in the selfdependent dynamic but only to a neighborhood level in most areas of the city. No better piece depicts this than the “Neighborhoods of Dallas” map often found from the walls of coffee shops to stores in Oak Cliff. Each piece of the city developing yet hanging on to its own turf. Our culture in a sense has backtracked slightly. Though our cultural district have a long standing history of being concentrated to a degree over the course of the city’s history, the concentration occurred in various locales. The consolidation of all high and far reaching forms of cultural activity to the Arts District is a wonder to those who visit but lacks a permeation to the communities that truly could benefit from their existence. Though efforts have been made to at least provide a means of outreach, the Nasher being the greatest example of this, performance and art from an international scale predominantly remains within one portion of the region. Cultural exposure can be the catalyst for linking communities within the fabric of our city. This was a DFD 01

point clearly recognized by the Cultural City group during the 2015 Dallas Festival of Ideas. Using our highway culture and inland port legacy as the founding base, could we use these elements to create an exchange of the cultural experience throughout the city? When approached by the Cultural City group to take on the design of the project there were two caveats. One was the need for the cultural platform to be flexible, able to move from neighborhood to neighborhood during the course of the year. Second was a desire for flexibility and choice. The system would in turn have a built in catalyst for dialogue. The team would be able to engage in the discussion from the outset and observe the outcome all the way through. In essence, an incubator for a future cultural hub. The concept is rooted in the reverence of the port. Using shipping containers as the base groundwork for the cultural piece is flexible. A series of typologies in the manipulation of the container allow each neighborhood or user group to configure the container as desired. One image shows the container simply and purely as a performance house. Nimble in concept, the container could be placed anywhere for an impromptu show or activity. Another image shows the container as a portable


Michael Friebele

classroom. The container can unhinge to create a series of pseudo classroom spaces with larger sections acting as pieces for demonstration. Sides can be used to mount murals or be painted directly onto like the graffiti found on rail cars as they pass.

The Mobile Cultural Hub project was done in conjunction with the Cultural City group during the 2015 Dallas Festival of Ideas and Big Bang! A special thank you to Jin-ya Huang for the connection and opportunity.

The project was presented and became a finalist in the Fast Pitch. Though not chosen to receive the initial funding provided through the Dallas Center of Humanities the Mobile Culture Center still remains a viable idea for future consideration. Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Portable Classroom Concept

DFD 01


Dallas Fantasy Discourse


Dallas Fantasy Discourse


DFD 01

Profile for DesignFutureDallas

DFD Issue 01: Dallas Fantasy Discourse  

First issue of DFD - A zine produced by Design Future Dallas

DFD Issue 01: Dallas Fantasy Discourse  

First issue of DFD - A zine produced by Design Future Dallas

Advertisement