Page 1

Complimentary April 2011

Living the Good Life

WHEN YOU’RE READY TO MOW LIKE A PRO, GET A TORO® Toro® TimeCutter® & TITAN® Zero Turn Mowers TIME CUTTER® ZERO TURN MOWER Starting at

$

OR

2,399

Exceptional Products for Exceptional Results

128 Sha

Price...$149.95

0% APR 24 MONTHS 3.9% APR 60 MONTHS 125B Handheld Blower

“Third Generation Now Serving The Unifour!” The Killians Team is committed to working together for our community to provide the best products and service support...for generations to come!

www.toro.com

Pr

RZ3016 Price.

“Better Servi 3790 Springs R Mon.-Fri. 7: www.killiansin

Continuing To Build A Legacy HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

1


2

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

3


LIVI NG

from the publisher

Hickory

LIVING Living the Good Life

Publisher

Welcome to the April issue. Spring is definitely in the air. While I don’t pretend to have a green thumb, I appreciate and enjoy the beautiful array of colors this season brings. There is something about the smell of freshly mowed grass and the sweet smell of flowers in the air. After the cold winter, spring is the welcome season of renewal and hope. This is a colorful and exciting issue that I know you will enjoy. There is a spring planting article and a list of fun things to do in April. Please read our cover story on Killian’s Hardware. This is a great story about a local hardware store that is owned by two ladies who are a third generation of owners. April is also Stress Awareness Month. Do you have any stress in your life? This month's article about stress gives some suggestions on how to eliminate stress and some possible causes. Thank you for reading the April issue of Hickory Living Magazine.

Myron Gough

Publisher, Hickory Living

April 2011

Myron T. Gough 2359 US Hwy 70 SE, Suite #310 Hickory, NC 28602 828-464-4060

Art Direction/Graphic Design - Kathy Wheeler 828-238-3224 Advertising Consultants - 828-464-4060 Beth Propst - 828-446-9816 Kathy Wheeler - 828-238-3224 Contributing Writers - Kristie Darling Cheryl Grant Kathy Wheeler G. Daniel Hearn Nick Messe Cheryl Wilms Cover Photography - Shane Greene Photography Killians, Inc. E-mail submissions and ads: HickoryLiving@gmail.com Web site: www.HickoryLivingMagazine.com

Find Hickory Living Magazine on Facebook. http://twitter.com/HickoryLiving

Hickory Living reserves the right to deny any advertisement or listing. Submissions are welcome, but unsolicited materials are not guaranteed to be returned. Hickory Living assumes no responsibility for information, products, services or statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher is prohibited.

4

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

5


LIVI NG

content

April 2011 8 • Fun Things To Do In April 12 • Killians–Continuing To Build A Legacy 16 • Getting To The Core Of Stress 19 • Family Businesses Have The DNA To Survive 20 • Defining Career Goals 23 • Food! Perfect For Entertaining 24 • Oh, My Aching Back! Treatment Options For Herniated Disks 29 • Inside The Chamber... The Silent Tsunami 30 • Hickory Resources

6

Our online version of Hickory Living gives you a glimpse of this month's issue featuring our cover story and advertisers.We invite you to pick up your FREE copy today! . HICKORY HICKORY LIVING LIVING •• APRIL APRIL 2011 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

7


8

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

9


10

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

11


TIME CUTTER ZERO TURN MOWER Starting at ®

2,399 cover story $

LIVI NG

OR

for Exceptional Results

0% APR 24 MONTHS 3.9% APR 60 MONTHS

“Third Generation Now Serving The Unifour!” The Killians Team is committed to working together for our community to provide the best products and service support...for generations to come!

RZ3016 Price..

“Better Servic 3790 Springs Ro Mon.-Fri. 7:3 www.killiansin

www.toro.com

Continuing To Build A Legacy By Kristie Darling

Photos On the cover: Left to right–Susan Killian Kirby and Sharon Killian Radke, third generation owners of Killians, Inc. Pictured: Sitting, Rhett Isenhour, parts manager. Standing from left to right, Bruce Hartsell, hardware manager; David Schere, service manager and Mike Adcock, wholesale manager. Opposite page: Top–Owner Susan Killian Kirby is always busy working with customers and running the daily operation of the store. Below–Killians' managers are long time employees who enjoy their role in taking care of customers. HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

128 Sha

Price...$149.95

125B Handheld Blower

12

Pri

Shane Greene Photography © 2011


I

t’s all about relationships at Killians. In this unique hardware store, the value of building relationships is experienced in each transaction. Enter Killians and you will find years of special friendships established around providing exceptional customer care and the very best in hardware, power lawn and garden equipment, parts and service. This ongoing commitment of standing behind their products and services goes back three generations. In fact, the mission statement that Killians is built upon is, “…commitment to working together for our community to provide the best products and service support…for generations to come!” The Killians' story is remarkable. When you meet the people carrying on this business today, you will understand their dedication to keeping their family’s legacy alive. Susan Killian Kirby and Sharon Killian Radke, sisters in heart, soul and business, run Killians in the same enthusiastic way their father and grandfather before them did—by listening to each customer who walks through their door and providing solutions to their needs. “I do just about anything around here, from greeting customers and running the front of the store, to doing bookkeeping and more,” Susan shared. “We stay very busy, in springtime especially, but we love it. This is our passion.” Business on a first name basis is common at Killians. Many families have been purchasing their tools, supplies and hardware at Killians for generations. The expansive store includes a spacious showroom, antique car museum, repair and maintenance buildings topped by a signature Cessna airplane mounted on the roof. It’s a Springs Road landmark on the north side of Hickory. The business was founded as a feed mill owned by the sisters’ grandfather, Emory Killian. Their

Shane Greene Photography © 2011

father, Elmer, expanded it into Killians Hardware in 1953. Killians has grown to meet the community’s needs over the years and now offers residential and commercial lawn equipment from manufacturers like Toro—a global leader in the industry for 97 years—Husqvarna, Peco, Troy-Bilt and Stihl, gardening equipment and supplies, seed, feed, mulch and fertilizers, a full line of hardware, plumbing, electrical supplies and an amazing selection of household necessities. Specialty items like Case knives, White Mountain ice cream freezers and North Carolina-made Wilmington grills are on display. HISTORY IN A HARDWARE STORE To say the store has changed over the years is an understatement, and yet the past makes its presence known in many ways. “When we were kids, and the showroom was downstairs, we’d play on the mowers,” Susan said with a smile. “We carried lots of toys then, and continue to carry specialty toys by Radio Flyer for children.”

Shane Greene Photography © 2011

Shane Greene Photography © 2011 HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011 HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

1313


Killians is a major retailer for Toro. Sharon Killian Radke is one of only six dealers in the country chosen by Toro to serve on the Toro Dealer Council team–an honor that was also bestowed to her father. In February, many old friends stopped in during Customer Appreciation Day to share stories from the past, attend seminars, and peruse the newest lawn and garden equipment. Terry Fox, curator of Killians’ museum, reminisced about sitting on Santa’s knee and getting his first bicycle and bb gun from Killians. Hickory Sand Company owner, Wayne Propst, has been coming to Killians for 63 years. “I remember coming by the old feed store with my grandfather,” he recalls. “I bought a lawn mower from Sharon’s dad in 1972, and it’s still running. Elmer charged me $450, and I told him he was robbing me! Elmer let me pay so much each month.” I heard similar stories from many customers. Likewise, Toro representatives spoke highly of their business relationship with Elmer and now with Sharon and Susan. Past competitors told of Elmer taking them 14

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

under his wing to show them the ropes. Elmer was an avid collector whose extensive treasures portray a history of family involvement and business success. In 1990, Elmer began working with Terry Fox to restore his antique cars to their original beauty and eventually create the museum. The museum, open on Customer Appreciation Days, displays cherished relics of the past. From Model T’s to cars representing each year Elmer’s daughters were born, customers can show their children and grandchildren what they drove in the old days. Shoppers don’t see Elmer Killian’s office, preserved just as he left it when he passed away unexpectedly in 1997. However, they will recognize the massive brick fireplace that stands just beyond the store’s entrance. That fireplace is a reminder

Shane Greene Photography © 2011

of Emory and Elmer’s early years as brick masons. From the Killian family’s values and their customers’ fond memories, to Elmer’s memorabilia and legacy, the past remains in the future of Killians Hardware. ALL YOUR LAWN AND GARDEN EQUIPMENT Sharon Killian Radke invited me into the showroom. Rows of shiny zero-turn mowers, lawn tractors, tillers, aerators, generators and pressure washers fill the space. From the wall displays you can choose chainsaws, clippers, edgers, pruners, sprayers and blowers. “The biggest part of our business is power equipment, parts and service,” Sharon explained. “We stand behind everything we sell and provide service, parts and repairs on site. Richard Powell has been with us in the parts department for 38 years. He’s now working part


EXPERTISE IN SERVICE AND LAWN CARE Killians was the 2009 Master Service Dealer of the Year award winner at the Toro Company. Chip Dellinger, Toro regional manager, has worked with the Killians for ten years. “When it came time for Sharon and Susan to take the helm, they didn’t miss a step,” Chip shared. “From working with their dad, they had become a part of Killians Hardware at a level I don’t think even they realized.” Hardware manager Bruce Hartsell is the man to see if you have questions or concerns about hardware or your lawn. He’s known as “the lawn guy.” “I get questions about lawns and grass, and my best advice to everyone is to develop proper soil conditions, use quality seed and plant at the right time,” Bruce says. “It’s rewarding for someone to invite me to see their lawn after I’ve helped them solve their lawn problem.” Bruce has been helping folks at Killians for 20 years.

Shane Greene Photography © 2011

Shane Greene Photography © 2011

time, but his influence with our team remains full time. Reliable customer service is key when you sell this kind of equipment.”

Service Manager David Schere keeps his department on task. With three full-time mechanics, repairs, tune-ups and parts are always available. For the many landscapers and lawn care businesses that depend on Killians, repairs can be provided for old or new equipment within 24 business hours. With the largest parts inventory in the Southeast, finding what you need is easier at Killians. THE TRADITION CONTINUES That old-time customer care is served at Killians to this day. “It is refreshing to see a business like Killians,” said Jack Hensley, Toro’s director of customer care. “Susan and Sharon have a heart for serving their community and building relationships with their customers. It’s not something they feel like they have to do, but a result of them wanting to.” Susan and Sharon give back to the community in many ways. Killians partners with nonprofit organizations like Sipes Orchard Home and local churches, helping them maintain their properties. “We treat everyone the same way,” Sharon told me. “We are who we are, and we do what we say we’ll do. In this way we honor our father and grandfather and the honest way they did business. An old fashioned, full ser-

vice approach is what we’re all about.” Killians brings a unique nostalgia to the shopping experience. At the same time, up-to-date equipment, products and advice will be found there. If you haven’t yet been, put Killians on your list of places to shop. Killians goes way beyond what the big box stores offer, in service, competitive pricing and personal attention. The smiles, knowledge and integrity you experience first hand will convert you into a loyal Killians' customer. Killians, Inc. 3790 Springs Road, NE • Hickory 828-256-2147 www.killiansinc.com Shop our eBay store at Killians Online

Photos Above: Left–Toro representatives were on hand during Killians' Customer Appreciation Day. From left to right– Dan Stewart, territory manager; Chip Dellinger, regional manager; Terri Berg, inside sales representative; Killians' owner Sharon Killian Radke; and Jack Hensley, director of customer care. Right–Customers attended seminars at Killians during Customer Appreciation Day. HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011 HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

1515


16

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

17


Oh, My Aching Back! Treatment Options for Herniated Disks From the Spine Center at Frye Regional Medical Center

C

all it what you want -- ruptured disk, herniated disk, bulging disk, compressed disk, prolapsed disk or slipped disk – it all means one thing, pain. Pain when you sit down. Pain when you bend over. Sharp pain in your back or down one of your legs. Fortunately, there is a wide range of treatment options for this condition, both non-surgical and surgical. People in their 30s through 50s are at the greatest risk of suffering from a herniated disk, as it is most commonly called. This condition occurs when disks, which act as soft cushions between the bones of the spine, begin to flatten and become less flexible as people grow older. If the outer part of the disk tears, or ruptures, the inner part pushes through to press on nearby nerves. “Diagnosing a herniated disk usually involves reviewing the patient’s medical history and a physical exam. An 18

HICKORY HICKORY LIVING LIVING •• APRIL APRIL 2011 2011

X-ray may be taken to show potential causes of pain or rule out other conditions, such as a tumor,” stated Greg Rosenfeld, MD, neurosurgeon at Frye. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans can be performed for a more detailed look at the spine. A myelogram, which involves injecting a contrast dye into the spinal canal, may be used to detect pressure on the spinal cord. An electrical nerve conduction test can be done to identify signs of nerve damage. Non-surgical treatment of herniated disks is effective in treating more than 90 percent of patients. One or two days of bed rest may help alleviate pain, but any more than that may slow down recovery. Pain medications, such as acetaminophen, may help relieve discomfort. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, including aspirin and ibuprofen, can lessen pain and reduce inflammation. Muscle relaxants may be prescribed for constant back spasms.

Up to three corticosteroid injections in the affected area may be given to relieve pain. Physical therapy, in conjunction with prescribed medications, also may help lessen discomfort. Most people feel better after about a month; but you should talk with your doctor if your symptoms persist after four to six weeks. You may be a candidate for surgery. “The most common surgery to treat a herniated disk of the lumbar (lower) spine is open diskectomy. This procedure involves removal or partial removal of a disk to relieve pressure on a nerve,” said Dr. Rosenfeld. A diskectomy may be performed in conjunction with a laminotomy, which involves making an opening in the lamina (the back part of the bone over the spinal canal) to reach the herniated disk. A laminectomy could be done to remove most of the lamina. Surgery is performed under general anesthesia. Patients can expect to stay in the hospital


one night and return to work in two to six weeks. You are not alone if you have ever suffered from back pain. As many as eight or nine in 10 people are affected by back pain at some point during their lives. Herniated disks are not always the reason, so it is important to talk to your doctor to find out what is causing your back problems.

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

19


20

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

21


22

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


R

emember Hurricane's Hugo and Katrina, the earthquake in Haiti, the Tsunami’s in Asia, or any catastrophe for that matter. The world and in particular American citizens, in cooperation with our government, shine in the spotlight to lend our total resources of people, money and equipment, whatever it takes, to help with restoring these communities back to some kind of normalcy with food, water, shelter and clothing as quickly as possible. The impact of these events is sudden, powerful and a sense of urgency exists like no other, and we rally to the rescue.

Inside The Chamber

The Silent Tsunami

By G. Daniel Hearn, CCE President/CEO Catawba County Chamber of Commerce

We have another Tsunami that has hit this country and Catawba County, but it was not sudden, powerful, and has not created a sense of community urgency and a rally cry for support like the catastrophes I mentioned. The reason why is because it has taken over 50 years to get here and the gradual effects are not causing us to react in the same way. Our Tsunami is trying to stop one-third of our high school students from dropping out of school every year. Thank goodness our local rates are much better than that, but the storyline does not change. If you think dropping out of school is mainly about an individual choice and that those who left school are paying a personal price for a bad decision, think about the consequences for our community and country, no matter what the number is. The children of drop-outs are more likely to drop out and to live in poverty. A one percent reduction in drop-out rates would reduce the number of crimes by 100,000 annu-

ally. Increasing graduation rates by 10% would prevent 3,000 murders per year. The lower wages of drop-outs mean $36 billion in state and local funding is lost each year. Nearly 80% of drop-outs depend on the government for health care assistance. Lower annual earnings cost the federal government an estimated $158 billion or more in lost revenue each year. Each youth who drops out and enters a life of drugs and crime costs the nation between $1.7 and $2.3 million dollars in crime control and health expenditures. The average high school drop-out makes 27% less income per year than the average high school graduate. Over a lifetime, this adds up to over a quarter-million dollars in reduced personal income. High school drop-outs live a decade less than graduates and are disproportionately affected by heart disease, diabetes and obesity. High school drop-outs are 3.5 times more likely than graduates to be arrested and 8 times more likely to be incarcerated. There is no single drop-out prevention strategy that provides a one-size fits all formula for success. This Tsunami is a national disgrace; a call to action, and we should in our own individual communities treat this like our own national disaster. This is unacceptable and there is much we can do about it. I believe in Catawba County that it is an underrecognized and under-reported crisis with devastating consequences for those individuals and for our community. Only two-thirds of all students who enter 9th grade graduate with a regular diploma four years later. Someone please call the Red Cross Emergency Hot Line! HICKORY HICKORY LIVING LIVING •• APRIL APRIL 2011 2011

23


24

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011


HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

25


26

HICKORY LIVING • APRIL 2011

Hickory Living April 11 Issue  

Welcome to the online version of Hickory Living Magazine. We invite you to read April’s cover story and visit our advertisers. For recipes a...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you