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GUSTAVE DORE.


<Affemuf&' GiLifion.

THE

DORfi

BIBLE GALLERY CONTAINING

ONE HUNDRED SUPERB ILLUSTRATIONS AND

A PAGE OF EXPLANATORY LETTER-PRESS FACING EACH

'

ILLUSTRATED BY

3

GUSTAVE DORE

PHILADELPHIA

HENRY ALTEMUS 507, 509, 511

and 513 Cherry Street


P* 7^

â&#x20AC;&#x17E;o

Entered according to Act of Congress,

By

in the year 1890,

HENRY ALTEMUS,

in the Office of the Librarian of

Congress

at

Washington, D. C.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

PREFACE. This volume, as the designs being

in

is

a collection of engravings illustrative of the Bible

from the pencil of the greatest of modern delineators, Gustave Dore.

The

warm

recog-

this collection

has been made, met with an immediate and

and acceptance among those whose means admitted of

no wise diminished since

enjoy

indicates,

title

from which

original work, nition

all

its

it

its

first

for the larger

and ever-widening

expressed want of

this class,

circle

and

That work, however,

to provide a

relating to the

readers people.

;

The aim has been

in its entirety,

is

to introduce subjects of general interest

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; those most

known

form,

is,

those

familiar to all

taste of the

prefixed a page of letter-press, in narrative

generally a brief analysis of the design.

and often-

felt

work was projected and has been

most prominent events and personages of Scripture

each cut

far too costly

volume of choice and valuable designs upon

the plates being chosen with special reference to the

To

popularity has

was

of M. Dore's admirers, and to meet the

sacred subjects for art-loving Biblical students generally, this carried forward.

its

extended to those who could only

publication, but has even

casually or in fragmentary parts.

purchase, and

its

American

and containing

Aside from the labors of the editor and publishers, the

work, while in progress, was under the painstaking and careful scrutiny* of artists and scholars not directly interested in the undertaking, but It

is

hoped, therefore, that

the appreciative

and

its

still

having a generous solicitude for

general plan and execution

friendly patrons of the great artist,

will

and

render to

those

it

its

success.

acceptable both to

who would wish

possess such a work solely as a choice collection of illustrations upon sacred themes.

to


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

GUSTAVE DORR The

subject of this sketch

and are

3.

still

perhaps, the most original

At an age when most men have

the world has ever known. art,

is,

under the direction and

discipline of their

He

has laid

fields hitherto lying waste,

To

into clearer view

and opened new and shining paths and

and warming them

His delineations of character,

to fuller in

be found by

critics,

and

facile

human

heart.

life.

the different phases of

from the horrible

life,

tendency of

wood and

seems endless

To

laid

treasure-house

that his

one, however, of his

stirs,

and stem satisfied

genius

;

above

his mind.

;

yet dormant,

those

is

ness, perhaps, of

His vistas

a beauty

He

constantly augmenting traits

we

will

there,

(vi)

refer

mayhap, imbibed that deep

has caught the very spell of the wilderness

lie

;

So bold and

all its

his

;

she has

truthful

and

so delicate the tracery of branch

slumbering with repose either

some

is

at once

shadowy glade or

in

rejoicing stream

:

and

own, he spreads a canopy of peerless sky, or a wilder-

angry storm, or peaceful stretches of

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; another kingdom to

fair

the

who would know

so patriarchal the giant boles of his woodland monarch, that the gazer

in

in

mountain-pass and rich ravine, whose variety of form and detail

his countless representations of forest scenery

supreme

may

and romantic passes of the Vosges doubtless developed

There he wandered, and

enchanted eye.

and entranced.

all,

lies

most prominent

ravine, either with glint of lake or the glad, long course of

fell

or

her hand upon him and he has gone forth with her blessing.

minute are

the

powers of Nature.

in the wild

[valley,

to the

the

in

of wealth.

His early wanderings

delight of

to

and, whatever faults

;

useless to attempt a sketch of his various beauties

his wonderful rendering of the

this inherent

and embellished

lustre of his genius, bringing their beauties

rendering of almost every thought that

It is

gems

for the pencil

the public will heartily render their quota of admiration to his magic touch,

them best must seek them with fresh

ever-

where none before had

vistas

grotesque, the grand to the comic, attest the versatility of his powers

his rich

work with

has raised illustrative

subjects tribute to his genius, explored

all

works of the great he has added the

the

He

gifts.

his

and importance before unknown, and has developed capacities

before unsuspected.

won

masters and the schools, he had

increasing wonder and delight at his fine fancy and multifarious

trod.

gifted designer

scarcely .passed their novitiate in

and readers and scholars everywhere were gazing on

brilliant reputation,

art to a dignity

and variously

soft, fleecy

cloud, or

teeming art after the earth has rendered

all

heavens serene and

her

gifts,


a

Paul Gustave Dor6 was born in the city of Strasburg, January

we have no very artistic creations

him

in Paris,

when

1848,

At eleven years

particular account.

— a set

of lithographs, published

native

in his

The

city.

His

actual

first

first

following year found

Labors of Hercules," was given

"

boyhood

his

of age, however, he essayed his

entered as a student at the Charlemagne Lyceum. his fine series of sketches, the

Of

10, 1833.

work began to

in

the public,

through the medium of an illustrated journal with which he was for a long time connected as designer. for

In 1856

were published the

"The Wandering Jew"

—the

showing a perfect abandonment

humorous and grotesque

first

to fancy

cident or suggestion that could possibly

make

With

more

reputation, which

love for nature and his

was a dreamer, and many of he was at home Pilgrimage " and

many is

still

power

more enhanced by

These

also, as

of the scenes of

"

Don

Every

to the horror of

gave the

at once

her varying moods, Dore

the realm of the imagination.

in

in-

subsequent works.

his

for interpreting her in

achievements were

the actual world

in

account

his finest

was

add

effective or

was seized upon and portrayed with wonderful power.

all his

When

the story

— indeed,

fierce battles,

her most forbidding and terrible aspects.

in

young designer a great

highest degree

in the

and supernatural, with

the other weird

;

shipwrecks, turbulent mobs, and nature

the scenes

Contes Drolatiques" and those

illustrations for Balzac's "

witness his designs for "Atala,"

"

But

London

Quixote."

taken of the variety of his designs and the

fact

considered that

in

almost

every task he attempted none had ventured before him, the amount of work he accomplished fairly incredible.

To enumerate

the

containing hundreds of illustrations

immense

will

tasks he undertook

give

some

— some single

faint idea of his industry.

already mentioned are Montaigne, Dante, the Bible, Milton, Rabelais, Tennyson's

King,"

"The Ancient Mariner," Shakespeare,

Fables," and others

Take one pictures.

of the

of these works

is

— the Dante, La Fontaine, or

labor involved in their production

"

Don Quixote "

is

surprising

" Idyls

of the

;

—and glance at the

but when the quality

properly estimated, what he accomplished seems prodigious.

No

particular

for his reputation rests solely

upon

his

as an illustrator.

Dore's nature was exhuberent and buoyant, and he was youthful as a violinist, and

passion for music, and possessed rare

skill

succeed with his pencil, he could have

won a

He was it,

Besides those

Legende de Croquemitaine," "La Fontaine's

mention need be made of him as a painter or a sculptor,

work

volumes alone

still.

The mere hand

work

"

is

to her

and

He

appearance.

assumed

that,

had he

had a

failed to

brilliant reputation as a musician.

a bachelor, and lived a quiet, retired his art.

it is

in

life

with his mother

His death occurred on January

— married, as he expressed

23, 188,3.

(vii)


LIST

GlISTAVE DORE,

.

.

OF ILLUSTRATIONS,

e

Creation of Eve,

e

.

.

.

The Expulsion from the Garden,

The Murder of Abel,

.... .... 8

Noah Cursing Ham, The Tower of

Babel,

I

2

â&#x20AC;&#x17E;

The Deluge,

Frontispiece

3

4 5

6

Abraham Entertains Three Strangers,

7

The Destruction of Sodom,

8

The Expulsion

9

Hagar

in

of Hagar,

the Wilderness,

io

Trial of the Faith of Abraham,

ii

The Burial of Sarah,

12

.... .... ....

Eliezer and Rebekah, Isaac Blessing Jacob,

Jacob Tending the Flocks of Laban,

.

13

14 15

Joseph Sold into Egypt,

16

Joseph Interpreting Pharaoh's Dream,

17

Joseph Making Himself

Moses

in

Known

to His Brethren.

the Bulrushes,

The War Against

19

....

Gibeon,

Sisera Slain by Jael,

Deborah's Song of Triumph,

Jephthah

Met ( viii

")

18

by His Daughter,

20 21

22 23


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Jephthah's Daughter and

Her

Companions,

IX

24

Samson Slaying the Lion,

25

Samson and Delilah,

26

Death of Samson,

27

Naomi and Her Daughters-in-Law,

28

Ruth and

29

Boaz,

.

The Return of the Ark,

30

Saul and David,

3i

.

David Spares Saul,

32

Death of

33

Saul,

The Death

of Absalom,

34

David Mourning over Absalom,

35

Solomon,

36

....

The Judgment of Solomon,

37

The Cedars Destined for the Temple,

38

The Prophet Slain

39

by a Lion,

Elijah Destroying the Messengers of Ahaziah,

40

Elijah's Ascent in a Chariot of Fire,

4i

The Death of

42

Jezebel,

.

Esther Confounding Haman,

43

Isaiah,

44

The Destruction of Sennacherib's

Host,

45

Baruch,

46

Ezekiel Prophesying,

47

The

Vision of Ezekiel,

.

48

Daniel,

49

The Fiery Furnace,

50

Belshazzar's Feast,

51

Daniel

in

the

Lions' Den,

52

The Prophet Amos,

53

Jonah Calling Nineveh to Repentance,

54


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

X

Daniel Confounding the Priests of Bel,

55

Heliodorus Punished

56

The

....

Nativity,

The Star

in

The Flight

the Temple,

in

the East,

The Massacre

58

.

into Egypt,

57

5*9

.

of the Innocents,

60

Jesus Questioning the Doctors,

61

Jesus Healing the Sick,

62

Sermon on the Mount,

63

Christ Stilling the Tempest,

64

The Dumb Man

65

Christ

The

in

Possessed,

the Synagogue,

66

Disciples Plucking Corn on the Sabbath

Jesus

Walking on the Water,

68

.

Christ's Entry into Jerusalem, Jesus and the Tribute Money,

67

69 70

.

The Widow's Mite,

7i

Raising the Daughter of Jairus,

72

The Good Samaritan,

73

Arrival of the Samaritan at the

The Prodigal

Inn,

Son,

74 75

Lazarus and the Rich Man,

76

The Pharisee and the

77

Jesus and the Jesus,

and the

Woman

Publican,

of Samaria,

Woman Taken

The Resurrection of

in

Adultery,

Lazarus,

78

79 80

Mary Magdalene,

81

The Last

82

Supper,

The Agony

in

the Garden,

Prayer of Jesus

The Betrayal,

the Garden of Olives,

....

in

83

84 85


LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

XI

Christ Fainting Under the Cross,

86

The Flagellation,

87

The

Crucifixion,

The Close of the The Burial of

.

88

Crucifixion,

89

Jesus,

90

The Angel at the Sepulchre,

91

The Journey to Emmaus,

The

92

Ascension, •

Martyrdom of

St. Stephen,

93

94

Saul's Conversion, 95

Deliverance of St. Peter, ,

96

Paul at Ephesus, 97

.

Paul Menaced by the Jews, «

98

e

«

99

TOO

Paul's Shipwreck,

Death on the Pale Horse,


CREATION OF EVE. See

HE

Lord God caused a deep sleep

one of

his ribs,

God had

Adam

said,

This

and closed up the

taken from man,

now bone

is

of

my

because she was taken out of man.

and

shall cleave

appropriateness.

in

The

and brings us face

figures

and

The

fall

upon Adam, and he

bones, and flesh of

Therefore

shall

a

my flesh She man leave his :

shall

artist

shows

conceived, and

figure of

in

majestic form, faintly outlined

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

and luxuriant

in

still

the

noble conception of him i

be called

father

and

his

mother,

is

told with entire

and glowing beauty of the Garden

profound repose,

him with wonder, while

And Woman,

the man.

and the utmost delicacy of thought,

executed with delicate white

Adam, though

upon

the varied

and he took

flesh."

fine poetic sensibility

Amid

;

which the Lord

rib

made he a woman, and brought her unto

to face with all the freshness, simplicity

debonair, gazes

and. the

flesh instead thereof;

slept

Paradise here depicted, the story of Eve's creation

by the hand of God.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;beautifully

ground.

to

ii.

unto his wife: and they shall be one

In the scene

just finished

Genesis

in

foliage are three

luminous

touches upon a pale backpalpitates with

dazzling

light

life.

Eve, coy

beyond stands a

whose image man was

created.


"

THE EXPULSION FROM THE GARDEN. Genesis

See

JHE

happiness of

Adam

and Eve

in

the

iii.

Garden of Eden did not long continue.

Serpent appeared and tempted Eve, by offering her the forbidden

"

When

Adam.

turn beguiled

commandment

they had thus broken the

they heard the voice

sought to

of

God

hide themselves from

judgment upon

described by Milton in

and banished them from the garden.

Paradise Lost

all

Some

happy

expulsion

is

thus

faces thronged,

and

the gate

;

fiery

natural tears they dropp'd, but

arms

:

wiped them soon:

The world was

all

Their place of

rest,

They, hand

hand, with wandering steps and slow,

in

The

seat,

over by that flaming brand

With dreadful

they

the eastern side beheld

Paradise, so late their

Waved

and when

:

" They, looking back,

Of

;

in fear

But God summoned them before him, pronounced

his face.

their transgression, "

them and

the garden, their consciences smote

in

of God, their

eyes were opened," and they no longer appeared to each other innocent as before in

The

and she

fruit,

before them, where to choose

Through Eden took

and Providence

their solitary

their guide

:

way."

Adam and Eve are fleeing from the threatening figure that guards the way Adam seems stunned with amazement and fear at the new scene which life."

In the picture

of

"

the tree of

opens before him, while Eve clings sightly shrubs

to him,

with head

bowed

sorrow and remorse.

in

and broken rocks cumber the ground around them

across their hard, dry path

threatening growl.

;

and from

The beauty and

strikingly contrasted with the

his

cragged

luxuriance

rugged and

sterile

2

lair

a

;

Un-

thick brambles stretch

crouching wild beast sends forth a

of the foliage

scene which

that

lies

bounds the garden are

beyond.


:

THE MURDER OF See

Adam and Eve

[[FTER

a

tiller

of the

iv.

had been driven from the garden of Eden,

The record

and Abel were born.

became

Genesis

ABEL.

of their lives

are told that Cain

and Abel a keeper of sheep, and then follows the account

soil

of the awful tragedy with which their names

will

be forever linked

and obedience, the other as the embodiment of envy,

tleness

We

brief.

is

Cain

their children

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;one

as the type of gen-

rebellion

We

and revenge.

read thus "

And

in

process of time

it

And

offering unto the Lord.

came

to pass that Cain

and the Lord had respect unto Abel, and

offering,

he had not respect

well, shalt

thee

be

brother,

and

;

his

it

the

keeper

me

opened her mouth

when they were

countenance

And

If

?

door;

well, sin lieth at the

to his

And

fell.

thy countenance fallen

over him.

the

thou do

And

unto

Cain talked with Abel

his

Cain rose up against Abel

in the field, that

?

And

he

What And now

said,

to receive thy brother's

And

hast thou done

his

and

I

shall

me

me

said,

I

know

not:

voice of thy brother's

When

:

A

fugitive

punishment

thou

and a vagabond

is

the

tillest

greater than

I

ground

shalt thou

can bear.

be Be-

out this day from the face of the earth, and from thy face shall

be a fugitive and a vagabond

every one that findeth

shall slay

me.

slayeth Cain, vengeance shall be taken on Cain, lest

My

The

?

he

thou art cursed from the earth, which hath

blood from thy hand.

Cain said unto the Lord,

And

Abel thy brother?

is

not henceforth yield unto thee her strength

the earth.

hid,

shalt rule

from the ground.

hold, thou hast driven

be

to pass

is

thou doest not

Lord said unto Cain, Where

I

blood crieth to

in

and thou

if

And why

?

his

fat

and slew him.

"And

shall

wroth

art thou

desire,

came

Am my brother's

it

Why

of the ground an

But unto Cain, and

to his offering.

and Cain was very wroth, and

:

thou not be accepted? and

shall

brother

Cain,

fruit

Abel, he also brought of the firstlings of his flock, and of the

thereof:

Lord said unto

brought of the

any finding him, should

kill

And

in

the

the earth

Lord

him seven

him." 3

:

and

it

shall

come

said unto him, Therefore

fold.

And

the

Lord

set a

.1

to pass that

whosoever

mark upon


!

THE DELUGE. See Genesis

HAT

a

thrilling

last place of

and

terrifying scene

is

vii.

here placed before us

— showing perhaps

the

refuge from the rising waters of the Flood which, as the Bible records,

overwhelmed the world, because of the wickedness of the people, and ingulfed and destroyed

all

living,

mothers, grandsires birds

breathing things

all

— the

tender

again replenish the earth.

blooming youth,

they withdrew slowly from the valleys and pleasant

wondering how much would be spared of

to swell

fields,

around

their

homes, doubtless

regretfully gazing behind,

and perhaps

their habitations, of their crops of grain

and

their

but the flood followed them on, rapidly driving them from slope to slope, and what

terror

and anguish must have seized upon them

to be

swept away or swallowed up, and they came to see that the

under

their feet.

How

as, in its swift pursuit,

numbers of them began were surely sinking

hills

they must have, watched with straining eyes from lofty peaks the waters

raging beneath, or listened to their roar and fury, with hearts subdued by of the night.

And when

finally,

giddy crags of the mountains, wailings must have

were torn from

their little

We

the darkness

looking higher and higher for safety, they are driven to the

who can

left their lip's!

fear, in

picture their despair?

What

and groans and

cries

what piercing shrieks have rent the

air,

bitter

as fathers or mothers

ones

In the picture before us the artist has strikingly depicted the wildness

scene.

fathers,

Noah in. the Ark, and the beasts and he was commanded by God to save by sevens and by pairs to The people had gone on in their wickedness, and as the torrents

descended ceaselessly and the gathering waters began

;

the

save the righteous family of

all

and creeping things

vineyards

infant,

see the waters surging

in

hollow waves,

till

and horror of the

their foreboding blackness mingles

—the remorseless powers of nature unrestrained.

with a sky heavy and dark and pitiless as they In the foreground a single rock

still

meets the tempest's shock, and around

or have been swept the few survivors of the perishing host.

A

babes of the hapless pair who are perishing

her,

in the flood

below, their last feeble strength being given to place their

reach of the breakers.

The

at her feet cluster the

infant stretches out his

she has sunk unconscious upon the father's breast.

4

have gathered,

tigress has gathered her

young about

and almost

it

little

ones beyond the

hand imploringly towards

its

mother, but


NOAH CURSING HAM. See Genesis

HE

scene in which

Noah

is

ix.

represented as cursing his second son

representing the pastoral simplicity of the time effectively in the

spirit

ably conceived,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the prominent

foreground, of the principal characters in the history, conforming

Noah, with arm

of the incident.

while on either side,

in

ward look of pain regarding her culprit,

uplifted, hurls the

attitudes of wonder, grief

Japheth, with their wives, look on.

form of the

is

The

lost

grouping,

itself to

dread malediction upon

his

the son,

and acquiescent condemnation, Shem and

flying family of

Ham,

his stricken partner, with back-

companions, the wondering children and the shrinking

are an admirable culmination of the description of the 5

tale.


THE TOWER OF See Genesis

HERE

much

has been

According

BABEL.

xi.

inquiry concerning the

to tradition, its site

was the same as

near Babylon, which Nebuchadnezzar found ruins are called Birs character,

among which

the spot about 450 B. in

Nimrod the

name

C, and described

Of

it

older but purely fanciful pictures.

in

"And

the whole earth

And

And

No

description of

We

read as follows

city is

upon the

Go

to, let

us

in

and they have

face of the

whole

one language; and

all

earth.

is

this

And

it

came

brick,

Therefore

language of all

all

is

the

name

the earth

;

of

upon the it

spiral

And let

they said

us

make

called

all

Go

to,

the earth

Babel, because the

and from thence did the Lord

the earth."

6

:

Go

to, let

us

us a name, lest

:

they begin to do; and

face of

to pass as

and burn them thoroughly.

let

now nothing

scatter

;

will

be

us go down, and there

confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech.

City.

and the

given,

that

And the Lord came down to see the And the Lord said Behold, the people

restrained from them, which they have imagined to do.

scattered them abroad from thence,

number

the land of Shinar, and they dwelt

make

and the tower, which the children of men builded.

one,

that, to the

.

:

and a tower, whose top may" reach unto heaven, and

scattered abroad

visited

simply a reproduction by the artist of the form given to

they had brick for stone, and slime had they for mortar.

we be

form

its

was of one language, and of one speech.

they said one to another:

build us a city

Herodotus

we have no knowledge except

this site

they journeyed from the East, that they found a plain there.

The present

inscriptions in the cuneiform

and another upon

raised,

is

upon

the original structure

is

of Belus,

the temple then existing as "a solid tower a stadium

derived from the brief account in Genesis. stairway presented in the engraving

Temple

and restored.

ruins

in

of N?buchadnezzar frequently appears.

depth and width, upon which another tower

of eight towers."

remarkable tower.

this

that of the great

They bear

of Nimrod).

(citadel

of

location

and they

So the Lord

left off to

build the

Lord did there confound the them abroad upon the

face of


ABRAHAM ENTERTAINS THREE STRANGERS. See Genesis

HEN for

Abraham was commanded to leave his kindred in Ur of the Chaldees, and make himself a new home in Canaan, it was with the assurance that this goodly land, and flowing with milk and honey, should be given him and become

rich in pastures

This promise was renewed again and again

the inheritance of his children.

Abraham and Sarah had become to

man, and were yet childless

become the

xviii.

of

father

old

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;when

Canaan

heirs forever, should possess

they had far exceeded the usual age allotted

promise was

a great nation ;

that his

;

and

still

attended with

many

in the

held forth to

children,

that the care

thus

far

all

their

these promises

his

life

Honor and power had been bestowed upon

blessings.

and

children

believed that

acquired vast possessions, and was regarded as a mighty prince

came a

that he should

and favor and blessing of God should

of God, and

favor

Abraham

children's

his

Abraham

be manifested towards them in a peculiar manner.

would be made good, for he walked

and even when

;

the

in

had been

him, he

had

land to which he

stranger.

One

day, sitting in

door of

the

his

tent during the heat of the day, he beheld three

They were messengers sent to Abraham, and bore tidings to make glad his heart. He went out before them and bowed himself to the earth, for thus were strangers welcomed in those days. And he said " My lord, if now I have found favor in

men

standing near.

:

thy sight, pass not away, -fetched,

and wash your

pray thee, from thy servant

I

feet

and

rest yourselves

of bread, and comfort ye your hearts

come

your servant.

to

And

;

:

let

a

under the tree

after that

you

water,

little ;

shall pass

and on

they said, So do, as thou hast said.

:

I

I

will

pray you, be

fetch a morsel

for therefore are

And Abraham

you

hastened

Make ready quickly three measures of fine meal, knead and make cakes upon the hearth. And Abraham ran unto the herd and fetched a calf tender and good, and gave it unto a young man and he hastened to dress it. And he into the tent unto

Sarah, and

said,

it,

;

took butter and milk, and the calf which he had dressed, and set stood by them under the thy wife

?

And

he

said,

in

this special

and they did

life

;

and

lo,

And

spirit

beautiful,

before them

they said unto him, said,

shall

I

;

Where

will certainly return

and he is

their features

The

is

have a son."

The

quite simple in detail, reflecting, therefore,

figures of the three spiritual visitants

bear the impress of serenity and peace. 7

Sarah

unto thee

manner was again announced God's purpose towards Abraham.

of the narrative.

and

he

Sarah thy wife

picture which represents the scene here described

the

And

eat.

Behold, in the tent.

according to the time of

Thus

tree,

it

are

impressive and


THE DESTRUCTION OF SODOM. See Genesis,

HE "

rose up from thence and looked toward

destroy the

to

But

fifty,

ten's sake

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he

God

wickedness.

great

the wicked ?"

with

righteous

pleaded, and

the city

in

said he

two angels came

for forty's sake, for

thirty's,

were not under

was

visit

his

Sodom and found Lot

to

in

life

Behold now, (is

not a

it

his wife,

and

"

for thy

and

;

I

this city is little

one

?)

thee,

The sun was

rained upon

my

my

escape city

and

thither,

was

a

And

for

some

and

which grew upon the ground.

But

of the warning,

me

Oh,

one.

this

city,

cannot do anything

I

evil

take me, and

let

me

for till

the

I

in

die.

escape thither

have accepted

I

which

thou

thou be come

hast

thither.

called Zoar.

the plain,

all

and

warn such as

to

he said unto him, See,

upon the earth when Lot entered

risen

cities,

lest

little

not overthrow

will

I

is

it

soul shall live.

that

and

city,

thy mercy, which thou hast showed unto

flee

and

tarry for the night.

Behold now, thy servant hath found

Lord.

near to

unto,

family,

They

gateway.

sitting at the

thou be consumed.

Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and

he overthrew those

a

for

look not behind thee, neither stay thou

life,

cannot

Therefore the name of the "

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even

two daughters departed, urged on by* the

escape to the mountain,

thing,

this

their

lest

said unto them, Oh, not so,

Haste

spoken.

Escape

escape to the mountain,

;

concerning

thee

for twenty's

sons-in-law were unmindful

his

thy sight, and thou hast magnified

my

saving

But

roof to flee also.

morning Lot,

the

And Lot

grace

for

there were five

if

it

warn Lot of the impending destruction of the

to

messenger who charged them, "

be spared

should

it

accompany him home, and partake of refreshment, and

of their

in all the plain

to

would withhold destruction.

to

in

repast*

Abraham interceded, Then the promise was

would spare

they urged him to gather together as speedily as possible his

and early

their

then informed of God's purpose to utterly

of their

promised that

finally

In the evening

The purpose

Abraham

still

finished

Sodom, and Abraham went with them

righteous people were found

fifty

if

and

less than

were invited

also destroy the

thou

him that

their sakes.

He was

way."

their

of the plain, because

cities

saying, " Wilt

when they had

strangers entertained by Abraham,

three

bring them on

made

xix.

xviii,

his wife

and

all

fire

Then

into Zoar.

Lord

the

from the Lord out of heaven

the inhabitants of

the

cities,

;

and

and that

looked back from behind him, and she became

pillar of salt."

The scene deur.

The

is

whole

here represented quite horizon

is

ablaze

;

literally,

the

walls

and

Through

this

filling all

Lot and

his

mindful of the injunction not to look backward. look,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

rigid,

gloom over the

daughters hasten, urged

The

artist

has

unbreathing and almost transshaped figure.

in

on

given Lot a

and has quite successfully indicated the hapless

stands high above the fire-swept plain, her drapery clinging

limbs

gran-

terrific

doomed city appear fairly torn stifling smoke rolls upward in tumul-

the upper sky with blackness, and spreading

gathering darkness

and appealing

invested with almost

of the

asunder by the furious sweep of the flames, while the tuous volumes,

is

fate of

by

earth.

terror,

and

most' anxious his

wife,

who

hard folds to her motionless


THE EXPULSION OF HAGAR. See Genesis xxi.

HE

incident of which the engraving before us

Hagar and Ishmael from

the tent of

Abraham

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

is

the illustration

is

thus described in the twenty-first

dismissal of

chapter of Genesis:

"Abraham made a great feast the same day that Isaac was weaned. And Sarah saw the son of Hagar the Egyptian, which she had borne unto Abraham, mocking. Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not

be heir with

my

son,

even with

And

Isaac.

the thing

was very grievous

in

Abraham's

sight because of his son.

"And God

said unto

Abraham, Let

because of thy bondwoman; in Isaac shall

because he

is

thy seed.

bottle of 'water,

and gave

And

story of

in

familiar.

it

on her shoulder), and the

Hagar and Ishmael appears always

M. Dore has again

to

much

told the story in

portrayal of their expulsion being artistic in conception faithful to

will

I

make a

nation,

child,

and sent her

the wilderness of Beersheba."

treatment, and the pencil of the artist has helped

them

bondwoman

rose up early in the morning, and took bread, and a

unto Hagar (putting

away: and she departed and wandered

The

also of the son of the

And Abraham it

not be grievous in thy sight because of the lad, and

Sarah hath said unto thee, hearken unto her voice; for

in all that

thy seed be called.

it

the spirit of the East. 9

have been a favorite subject for

pictorial

make the chief incidents relating to his own original and effective way, his to

and execution, tender

in

sentiment and


HAGAR

THE WILDERNESS.

IN

See Genesis xxi.

HIS

-

thrilling

was spent

scene in

is

intended

the bottle, and

she went and sat her shot

;

and

lift

for she said,

me

up her voice and

adhering ally

Let

;

the

wept."

extremity

of

the

the child

against him, a

M. Dore has given

empty water-flask child

destitute

The lamentation now cast aside

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

are also, in

Hagar,

vivifying well of water, wherewith to

fill

ere

the

water

under one of the shrubs.

And bow

good way

And

the spirit of this

of the stricken as

a useless

it

were a

incident

mother thing

is

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and

without pathetic-

the

commentaries on

God had opened

her bottle and restore the

10

as

off,

she sat over against him.

themselves, eloquent yet

"And

the following verses:

not see the death of the child.

stretched figure of the dying utter

she cast

down over

strictly to the literal details.

portrayed

to illustrate

lad.

her

eyes

out-

the

to see the


1

:

TRIAL OF THE FAITH OF ABRAHAM. See Genesis

HIS engraving

represents one of the most striking

sacred history. old age.

Isaac

Around him

associated the prophecy

xxii.

was

clustered

examples of

Abraham and Sarah

the only son of

the sweetest incidents of

all

of future greatness for their descendants;

faith

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

recorded

in

child of their

home; with him was promise had been

for the

Abraham that through Isaac he should become the father of many nations. But the command came to Abraham to take this beloved son and offer him up as a burnt offering unto the Lord, great as was the sacrifice, he bowed in meek submission; unaccountable made when

to

must have seemed such a command, his faith in the promises of God was still unshaken. We see the aged patriarch toiling up the mountain, and before him Isaac, bearing the wood for In these verses from the altar, the boy obedient unto his father, the father obedient unto God. as

the Bible

"And

it

Abraham. Isaac,

the story related

is

whom

came

And

God did tempt Abraham, and And he said, Take now thy son,

to pass after these things, that

he said, Behold, here

I

am.

said unto him, thine only son

thou lovest, and get thee into the land of Moriah; and offer him there for a burnt

upon one of the Mountains which I will tell thee of.^ "And Abraham rose up early in the morning, and saddled his ass, and took two of his young men with him, and Isaac his son, and clave the wood for the burnt offering, and rose up, and went to the place of which God had told him. Then on the third day Abraham lifted up And Abraham said unto his young men, Abide you here his eyes, and saw the place afar off. And with the ass, and I and the lad will go yonder and worship, and come again to you. offering, and laid it upon Isaac burnt his son and he of the took the Abraham took the wood And Isaac spake unto fire in his hand, and a knife; and they went both of them together. and he said, said, My father: Here am I, my father, and son. And he said, Abraham his Behold the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for a burnt offering ? And Abraham said, My son, God will provide himself a lamb for a burnt offering: so they went both of them And they came to the place which God had told him of, and Abraham built an Altar together. there, and laid the wood in order, and bound Isaac his son, and laid him on the Altar upon the wood. And Abraham stretched forth his hand, and took the knife to slay his son. And the Angel of the Lord called unto him out of heaven, and said, Abraham, Abraham. And he said, Here am I. And he said, Lay not thine hand upon the lad, neither do thou anything unto him for now I know that thou fearest God, seeing thou hast not withheld thy son, thine only son from me. And Abraham lifted up his eyes, and looked, and behold, behind him a Ram, caught in a thicket by his horns and Abraham went and took the Ram, and offered him up for offering

;

:

:

a burnt offering, jireh, as

said,

it is

in the

stead of his son.

said to this day, In the

And Abraham

Mount

of the Lord

called the it

shall

name

of that place Jehovah-

be seen.

"And the Angel of the Lord called unto Abraham out of heaven the second time, and By myself have I sworn, saith the Lord, for because thou hast done this thing, and hast

not withheld thy son, thine only son, That

in

blessing

I

will bless thee,

multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which thy seed shall possess the gate of his enemies.

earth be blessed, because thou hast obeyed

my

And

voice." 1

in

is

and in multiplying, I will upon the sea shore, and

thy seed shall

all

the nations of the


II


THE BURIAL OF SARAH. See Genesis

xxiii.

[HILE Abraham has come down to us as the noblest type of the patriarchal chief in all history, Sarah may be regarded as the type of conjugal love and obedience. The Bible speaks of her as lovely in person and affectionate in disposition. She was married to Abraham before his departure from Chaldea, and was with him through all his wanderings in Palestine. The grief manifested by Abraham at her death and his anxiety about her burial place show the depth of his affection for her. The sons of Heth had given him choice of

the

their sepulchres

all

which was therein, and

but

And

and Abraham came

I

am

that

Sarah died to

And Abraham

"

mourn

may bury my dead

my

us,

Canaan

for her.

my

me a possession And the children

of a burying place with you

give

:

sight.

Heth answered Abraham,

of

none of us

:

of

withhold from thee his sepulchre, but that

shall

And Abraham

in the choice

stood up and

bowed himself

to the people

of

end of

give

field

my

I

thee,

the

the people of the

of the

land, saying,

take

But

it

ham,'saying unto him,

what

is

as

much money

the

at

in

I

it

thee

land. if

My

:

And

that

I

therein,

is

will

I

me and

give

thee?

dead

me;

my

lord,

presence of the himself

the audience of the people

is

;

worth four hundred shekels of

Bury therefore thy dead.

And Abraham

hear-

************

kened unto Ephron, and Abraham weighed

Ephron

to

audience of the sons of Heth, four hundred shekels of

the silver which he had

silver,

current

"And after this Abraham buried Sarah his wife in the cave And before Mamre the same is Hebron, in the land of Canaan. :

therein,

were made sure unto Abraham,

for a possession of a

Heth." I

2

:

me I will give thee money And Ephron answered Abra-

there.

the land

me

hear

And Abraham bowed down in

me,

it

audience of the children of

thee, in the

it

shall give

dwelt amongst the children

pray thee, hear

my

bury

worth he

saying, Nay,

he spake unto Ephron

Lord, hearken unto

that betwixt

I

the

in

city,

bury thy dead.

it,

is

it

And Ephron

of his

gates

thou wilt give

of me, and

as

answered Abraham

and the cave

people give

;

for

:

Hittite

went

before

for the field

field

burying place amongst you.

that

all

his

Heth.

of

children

And Ephron

Heth, even of

is

:

the

of Heth.

silver;

the land of

in

in

is

of

Hebron,

is

son

for a possession of a

sons

these were the years of the

;

the

the

to

your mind that

the

at the close of the burial

And he communed with them, saying, if it be I should bury my dead out of my sight, hear me, and entreat for me to of Zohar: That he may give me the cave of Machpelah, which he hath,

even

land,

which

he desired for a

these

Lord, thou art a mighty Prince amongst us:

mayest bury thy dead.

Ephron

same

Sarah and to weep

for

out of

our sepulchres bury thy dead thou

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and

away

led tenderly

Kirjath-arba, the

in

a stranger and a sojourner with you I

"

of Machpelah, with the cave

stood up from before his dead, and spake unto the sons of Heth, saying,

saying unto him, Hear

the

Abraham

the field

in

Sarah was a hundred and seven and twenty years old

of Sarah.

life

see

were

that

" field

turning back with eager and sorrowful gaze towards the sepulchre.

still

And

"

trees

we

In the illustration

possession. rites,

the

all

but he chose only the

;

money

of the the

in

the

with the merchant.

field

field,

named

of Machpelah,

and the cave that

burying place, by the sons of


ELIEZER AND REBEKAH. See

HIS

Genesis xxiv.

which relates to the touching and familiar story of Isaac and Rebekah,

picture,

shows the

meeting between Abraham's servant and the beautiful maiden who

first

afterwards became Isaac's wife and the mother of the cave at Machpelah,

and Abraham, now stricken with age, wished

whom

so Eliezer, his chief steward, in called

Sarah had been buried

among

all

his goods,

Abraham was

"there

seek for a bride

"And

the servant took ten camels, of the camels of his master, and departed

goods of

master were

his

And

of Nahor.

called,

the daughters of his kindred. (for. all

hand) and he arose, and went to Mesopotamia, unto the

in his

was

swear that he would not choose from among the

to

Canaanites a wife for Isaac, but bade him journey to Mesopotomia, whence

and

in

to provide a wife for Isaac;

he trusted, and who had charge of

and Abraham caused Eliezer

:

Israel.

he made his camels to kneel

down without

the

city,

the city

by a well of water, at the

women go out to draw water. And he said, O Lord, thee send me good speed this day, and shew kindness

time of the evening, even the time that

my

God

of

unto

my

the

men

master Abraham,

master Abraham. of the City

I

shall say,

I

will

Behold,

come out

Let down thy

pray

I

and thereby

Isaac;

And

it

shall

pitcher,

I

let

that thou hast

When the stranger asked will draw "Drink, my lord, and

for

whether he could

find

the gates and told

come

may

to pass that the

and she

drink,

damsel to

shall say,

whom

Drink, and

that thou hast appointed for thy servant

my

shewed kindness unto

master."

look upon," came out of the city to draw water at the

water from her pitcher, she answered him kindly, saying

water for thy camels

I

Eliezer, after he

I

it

prayer was ended, Rebekah, the grand-daughter of

his

fair to

let

same be she

the

happened that ere yet

well.

Then

pray thee, that

I

know

Abraham's brother, "a damsel

stand here by the well of water; and the daughters of

draw water: And

to

give thy camels drink also,

I

also,"

and she drew

for all .the camels.

had given her ornaments of gold, asked whose daughter she was, and

lodging for the night

all

that

her father's house

in

;

and Rebekah hastened within

had happened, and her brother Laban went out and sought the

stranger and conducted him to the house of Bethuel, his father, where he was welcomed and

provided

known

for.

But before partaking of the food that had been prepared

his errand, related all that

given to Isaac,

who was

rich in

is

and asked

before thee; take her and go, and

Lord hath spoken."

unto her, Wilt thou go with

at the well,

that

this

man?

*

And

*

*

she said, 13

* I

"And

will go."

let

made

Rebekah might be

camels and gold, and could provide for her abundantly.

they replied: "Behold, Rebekah son's wife, as the

had transpired

for him, Eliezer

Then

her be thy master's

they called Rebekah, and said


ISAAC BLESSING JACOB. See Genesis xxviii.

VERY beautiful Isaac, seated

patriarchal scene

on one side of

his

is

conveyed

to us

by

this picture.

couch, blesses his beloved Jacob.

The venerable The primitive

of household, yet overflowing with the rude wealth of a desert chief, the lovely view as if too touched the reposing camels through the open door, the half-averted form of Rebekah, life thought of the coming departure to steadily endure it, all form an idyl of pastoral

at

powerfully rendered by a master's touch. 14


JACOB TENDING THE FLOCKS OF LABAN. See Genesis xxviii,

HIS engraving Jacob

xxix.

a representation of quiet pastoral

is

in the

life

time of the patriarchs.

seen tending the flocks of Laban, which are gathered near a

is

which Rachel

returning with her pitcher.

is

well,

from

Jacob was the younger son of Isaac

Abraham and Isaac, a herdsman, Esau had grieved his parents by taking two wives from among the Canaanites, and Rebekah wished Jacob to marry from among his own people, as his father had done. Hence, when Esau threatened to slay Jacob, who had not only selfishly obtained his birthright, but had also defrauded him of his father's and Rebekah, and became,

blessing,

like

Rebekah urged him

Jacob, and blessed him,

and

to

safety to her

for

flee

charged him,

"

brother Laban.

and said unto him, Thou

And

Isaac called

shalt not take a wife of

************

the daughters of Canaan.

Then Jacob went on

"

by

Padan-aram,

to the

house of Bethuel, thy mother's

And

mouth.

thither

were

the

in

and

field,

people of the East.

land of the

the

into

there were three flocks of sheep lying

lo,

watered the flocks

for out of that well they

;

and came

his journey,

he looked, and behold, a well

it

to

and take thee a wife from thence, of the daughters of Laban, thy mother's brother."

father,

And

go

Arise,

and a great stone was upon the

:

the flocks gathered, and they rolled the stone from the well's

all

mouth, and watered the sheep, and put the stone again upon the well's mouth

And

Jacob said unto them,

Know

he said unto them,

he said unto them,

Is

My

And

until all the flocks

mouth

then

:

we water

them.

:

and they

?

he said, Lo,

is

it

is

well

said,

and behold, Rachel

:

yet high day, neither

be gathered together, and

is

till

they

his

Rachel, and lifted

and

father's brother,

came him, all

to pass,

And

they said,

pass,

when Jacob saw Rachel,

.that

up

his

for she

:

the daughter of Laban, his mother's

And

and wept.

he was Rebekah's son

And Laban

kept

mother's brother, that Jacob went near, and rolled the

his voice,

when Laban heard

things.

We

the stone from the well's

roll

spake with them, Rachel came with her father's sheep

And

and she

;

Jacob

Jacob told Rachel that he was her

and

ran,

her father.

told

the tidings of Jacob, his sister's son, that he

and embraced him, and kissed him, and brought him

these

daughter

time that the cattle

it

stone from the well's mouth, and watered the flock of Laban, his mother's brother. kissed

And And

Of Haran are we. And they said, We know him.

and they

?

water ye the sheep, and go and feed them.

and the sheep of Laban,

brother,

He

said,

in his place.

the sheep.

And while he yet And it came to

"

whence be ye

ye Laban the son of Nahor?

should be gathered together

cannot

brethren,

he well

cometh with the sheep.

well's

to

said to him, Surely thou art

his

my

house

ran to

and he

:

bone and

And

my

told

flesh:

it

meet

Laban and he

abode with him the space of a month. "

me

And Laban

for

nought

said unto Jacob,

tell

?

Because thou

me, what shall thy wages be

of the elder was Leah, and the

And

seven years for Rachel thy younger daughter. than that

I

?

my brother, shouldest thou therefore serve And Laban had two daughters the name

name of the younger was Rachel.

Rachel was beautiful and well favored.

thee

art

should give her to another

:

Leah was tender-eyed, but

Jacob loved Rachel, and

And Laban said, It man abide with me. :

is

said,

I

will

better that

And

I

serve thee give her to

Jacob served seven

years for Rachel: and they seemed unto him but a few days, for the love he had to her." '5


JOSEPH SOLD INTO EGYPT. Genesis xxxvii. 5-28.

ND

Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told it his brethren, and they hated him yet the more. And he said unto them, Hear, I pray you, this dream which I have dreamed. For behold, we were binding sheaves in the field, and lo, my sheaf arose, and also stood upright and behold your sheaves stood round about, and made obeisance to my sheaf. And his brethren said to him, Shalt thou indeed reign over us, or shalt thou indeed have dominion over us? and they hated him yet the more, for his dreams and for his words. ;

"And he dreamed

yet another dream, and told

it

his brethren,

and

Behold,

said,

have

I

the sun and the moon and the eleven stars made obeisance And he told it to his father, and to his brethren and his father rebuked him, and said Shall and thy mother, and thy unto him, What is this dream that thou hast dreamed? And his brethren envied brethren, indeed come to bow down ourselves to thee, to the earth?

dreamed a dream more; and behold, to me.

;

I,

him

;

but his father observed the saying.

"And Joseph,

and he

Do

brethren went to feed their father's flock in Shechem.

his

not thy brethren feed the flock

said unto him,

Here am

1.

And

in

Shechem?

came

me

Israel

said unto

Come, and

I will send thee unto them; pray thee, see whether it be well word again so he sent him out of the

he said to him, Go,

with thy brethren, and well with the flocks, and bring vale of Hebron, and he

And

I

:

Shechem. found him, and behold, he was wandering in the field, and the man certain man "And a asked him, saying, What seekest thou? And he said, I seek my brethren tell me, I pray thee, where they feed their flocks. And the man said, They are departed hence for I heard them And Joseph went after his brethren, and found them in Dothan. say, Let us go to Dothan. him afar off, even before he came near unto them, they conspired against when they saw And And they said one to another, Behold, this dreamer cometh. Come now, him, to slay him. therefore, and let us slay him, and cast him into some pit, and we will say, Some evil beast hath devoured him and we shall see what will become of his dreams. And Reuben heard it, and he delivered him out of their hands, and said Let us not kill him. And Reuben said unto them, Shed no blood, but cast him into this pit that is in the wilderness, and lay no hand upon him that he might rid him out of their hands, to deliver him to his father again. "And it came to pass when Joseph was come unto his brethren, that they stript Joseph out And they took him and cast him into a of his coat, his coat of many colors that was on him. pit and the pit was empty, there was no water in it. And they sat down to eat bread and they lifted up their eyes and looked, and behold, a company of Ishmaelites came from Gilead, with their camels, bearing spicery, and balm, and myrrh, going to carry it down to Egypt. And it if we slay our brother, profit is and brethren, What conceal his blood? Judah said unto his Come, let us sell him to the Ishmaelites, and let not our hand be upon him for he is our Then there passed by Midianites, brother, and our flesh, and his brethren were content. merchant men, and they drew and lifted up Joseph out of the pit, and sold Joseph to the Ishmaelites for twenty pieces of silver; and they brought Joseph into Egypt." to

:

;

;

:

;

;

;

;

16


I

Us


JOSEPH INTERPRETING PHARAOHS DREAM. See Genesis

HARAOH

xli.

dreamed: and behold, he stood by the

river.

And

behold there came up in a meadow.

out of the river seven well-favored kine, and fat-fleshed, and they fed

And

behold, seven other kine came up after them out of the river, ill-favored and and stood by the other kine, upon the brink of the river. And the ill-favored and lean-fleshed kine did eat up the seven well-favored and fat kine so Pharaoh awoke. And he slept and dreamed the second time and behold, seven ears of corn came upon one stalk, rank and good. And behold, seven thin ears and blasted with the east wind, sprang up after them. And the seven thin ears devoured the seven rank and full ears and Pharaoh awoke, and behold, it was a dream. And it came to pass in the morning that his spirit was troubled, and he sent and called for all the Magicians of Egypt, and all the wise men thereof: and Pharaoh told them his dreams but there was none that could interpret them unto Pharaoh." Then the chief butler of Pharaoh make known unto him the skill of Joseph in the interpretation of dreams, and Joseph was brought out of the prison into which he had been cast by Potiphar, his master, and Pharaoh related unto him the dream which had perplexed him. "And Joseph said unto Pharaoh, The dream of Pharaoh is one; God hath shewed Pharaoh what he is about to do. The seven good kine are seven years, and the seven good ears are And the seven thin and ill-favored kine that came up after seven years the dream is one. years; and the seven empty ears blasted with the east wind shall be seven years them are seven of famine. This is the thing which I have spoken unto Pharaoh:, what God is about to do, he sheweth unto Pharaoh. Behold, there come seven years of great plenty throughout all the land of Egypt. And there shall arise after them seven years of famine, and all the plenty shall be And the plenty shall forgotten in the land of Egypt, and the famine shall consume the land. not be known in the land, by reason of that famine following, for it shall be very grievous. And for that the dream was doubled unto Pharaoh twice, it is because the thing is established by God: and God will shortly bring it to pass. Now therefore let Pharaoh look out a man discreet and wise, and set him over the land of Egypt. Let Pharaoh do this, and let him appoint officers over the land, and take up the fifth part of the land of Egypt in the seven plenteous years. And let them gather all the food of those good years that come, and lay up corn under the hand And that food shall be for store to the land, of Pharaoh, and let them keep food in the cities. lean-fleshed,

:

;

:

:

:

against the seven years of famine, which shall be in the land of Egypt, that the land perish not

through the famine.

"And

the thing

was good

in the

eyes of Pharaoh and

in the

eyes of

all

his servants.

And

Pharaoh said unto his servants, Can we find such a one as this is, a man in whom the spirit of is ? And Pharaoh said unto Joseph, Forasmuch as God hath shewed thee all this, there is none so discreet and wise as thou art Thou shalt be over my house, and according unto thy word shall all my people be ruled: only in the throne will I be greater than thou. And Pharaoh And Pharaoh took off his said unto Joseph, See, I have set thee over all the land of Egypt. ring from his hand, and put it upon Joseph's hand, and arrayed him in vestures of fine linen, and And he made him to ride in the second chariot which he had put a gold chain about his neck. And they cried before him, Bow the knee and he made him ruler over all the land of Egypt."

God

:

:

:

â&#x20AC;˘

17


i7


;

KNOWN TO

JOSEPH MAKING HIMSELF Genesis

I

HEN

HIS BRETHREN.

1-24.

xlv.

Joseph could not refrain himself before

all

them

made

known unto

himself

and the house of Pharaoh heard. father yet live

And he

?

And

am

I

near unto me,

a posterity that sent

shall neither

me

hither;

hither,

but

to save

God

;

house, and a ruler throughout

your

And

God

And God

And

there will

thy household, and

eyes of

my

my

all

down my

bring

a,ll

my

all

God

;

thou shalt dwell

and

Joseph

me

me

made me

five years' in

the

before you, to preserve you

So now

to Pharaoh,

lord of

all

was not you

it

and lord of

Haste you, and go up

hath

my

to

Egypt

all

father,

his

and

come down

;

the land of Goshen, and thou shalt be near unto

in

flocks,

and thy herds, and

all

that

nourish thee (for yet there are five years of famine), lest thou and

that thou hast, it is

come

to poverty.

my mouth

glory in Egypt, and of

And

his neck.

he

fell

And

behold, your eyes see, and the

that speaketh unto you.

that

all

upon

And you

you have seen, and ye

his brother Benjamin's neck,

Moreover, he kissed

And

the fame thereof

was heard

in

all

his brethren,

shall

shall tell

haste,

and wept

;

and and

and wept upon them

Pharaoh's house, saying, Joseph's brethren are come

And Pharaoh

pleased Pharaoh well, and his servants.

it

father,

and your households, and come unto

of Egypt, and ye shall eat the fat of the land.

your wagons out of the land of Egypt father,

And

my

before you to preserve

said unto Joseph,

Say unto thy

brethren, This do ye, lade your beasts and go, get you unto the land of Canaan.

your

doth

;

after that his brethren talked with him. "

and

I

father hither.

Benjamin wept upon

am

therefore be not grieved,

by a great deliverance.

the land of Egypt.

brother Benjamin, that

father of

and the Egyptians,

and yet there are

sent

me, thou and thy children, and thy children's children, and thy thou hast.

Now

did send

and he hath made me a father

say unto him, Thus saith thy son Joseph

unto me, tarry not.

lives

for

in the land,

be earing nor harvest.

and

in the earth,

me

I

;

pray you, and they came near; and

I

Joseph, your brother, whom, ye sold into Egypt.

For these two years hath the famine been

which there

his brethren,

cried,

with him, while Joseph

he wept aloud

Joseph said unto

Come

his brethren,

nor angry with yourselves, that ye sold life.

man

and he

:

his brethren could not answer him, for they were troubled at his presence.

Joseph said unto

said,

And

his brethren.

And

by him

that stood

Cause every man to go out from me; and there stood no

and come.

for

Also regard not your

the children of Israel did so;

your

stuff;

me and ;

Now little

for the

I

will

for the

thou art commanded,

And

to his father

he sent after

this

this

do ye

Take

:

ones, and for your wives, and bring your

good of

all

the land of

way.

To

all

of

Egypt

to the

is

yours.

command-

them he gave each man

changes of raiment; but to Benjamin he gave three hundred pieces of of raiment.

silver

and

five

changes

manner: ten asses laden with the good things

of Egypt, and ten she asses laden with corn, and bread and meat for his father by the way.

he sent

his

brethren away, and they departed; and he said unto them, See that ye

by the way."

take

give you the good of the land

and Joseph gave them wagons, according

ment of Pharaoh, and gave them provision

And

fall

So

not out


:

MOSES

THE BULRUSHES.

IN

See Exodus

HxA-RAOH, king

of

Egypt

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

ii.

new monarch "which knew

increase of the children of Israel, had given orders that

Hebrews should be slain however, was evaded, "and the people

as soon as they were born. multiplied

the birth of Moses, the account of which

is

not Joseph"

when she saw him

the male children of the

all

This blood-thirsty command,

and waxed very mighty."

At length comes

"And there went a man of the house And the woman conceived, and bare a son and she hid him three months. And when she could :

that he was a goodly child, no longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed

with pitch, and put the child therein, and she laid

came down

wash herself

to

at the

river,

and when she saw the ark among the had opened

daughter, Shall for

I

is

go,

one of the

and

And

thee?

called the child's mother.

nurse

it

for

me, and

The moment

call

I

will

to

And

to him.

And

And

Go:

And

Pharaoh's daughter said unto her,

Take

And

give thee thy wages. is

said

when

to

the

her,

woman

it.

river's side

And when

sister

to

that she

Pharaoh's

may nurse

the maid went and this child

away, and

took the child and nursed

the ark of bulrushes

is

she

she had compassion on

Then said his Hebrew-women,

children.

daughter

And

the daughter of Pharaoh

she sent her maid to fetch

flags,

thee a nurse of the

selected by the artist

with slime, and

and her maidens walked along by the

Hebrews'

Pharaoh's

it

the flags by the river's brink.

in

she saw the child: and behold, the babe wept.

it,

him, and said, This

the child

it

what would be done

to wit

off,

fearful of the

as follows:

of Levi, and took to wife a daughter of Levi.

his sister stood afar

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

it."

being drawn to shore by

one of the attendants of the Egyptian princess, who stands under the downy plumes of her two fan-bearers giving directions

The

in

regard to the

child,

whose beauty has won her

heart.

flowing stream, the waving reeds, the regal costume and state of the Princess and her

retinue,

are

wondrous a

lovely surroundings

of

the

slumbering

destiny.

19

child,

before

whom

lies

so

great and


19


THE WAR AGAINST See Joshua

HEN

it

was learned

that the inhabitants of

GIBEON.

x.

Gibeon had made peace with

kings of the Amorites gathered their people

The Gibeonites

them.

So Joshua ascended from

"

them.

mighty men of

valor.

them

hand

into thine

;

And

Lord

the

he and

Gilgal,

there shall not a

war with him, and

Fear them not

of them stand before thee.

unto them suddenly, and went up from Gilgal Israel,

come up quickly and save

to

the people of

all

said unto Joshua,

man

together and declared war against

upon Joshua

at once called

all

and slew them with a great slaughter

And

night.

;

for

Lord discomfited them before

the

And

down

as they fled from before Israel, and were

in

down great

them, unto Azekah, and they died

from heaven upon

whom

which died with hailstones, than they

spake Joshua to the Lord children of Israel,

Moon

in

in

and he said

in

Sun stood

still

in the

of a

man

Lord fought

of his

direct

one of the grandest themes consonance with multitudes of the

in

tempest upon the

upon Gibeon, and thou

Sun stood

still,

and the Moon

stayed, until the people

not this written

Is

in

the

it,

or after

it,

that the

Sun

to stand

interposition

behalf of his

in

whole compass of

in the

The wide

sweeps on terrified

commanding eminence, still in

book of Jasher?

So

Lord hearkened unto the voice

Biblical

of battle

field

— furnishes lore — a

people

this astonishing

the

artist

to swell the destruction

and

flying

troops

with

the heavens and the

arm

Moon

uplifted,

to

20

is

pause

with

subject, too, quite

is

in

rough with the swarming

To

from the Lord, which pours

of the confederated kings.

foreground are seen the hurrying legions of the Hebrew horse, while a Joshua, on a

Then

whose masses are relieved against the sun-illuminated mountains.

the right the host of Israel

down

they were more

still

condescending favor and consideration

his peculiar genius. foe,

cast

for Israel."

This striking proof of God's manifestation

Lord

midst of heaven, and hasted not to go down, about a whole day.

there was no day like that, before for the

;

to pass

Lord delivered up the Amorites before the

the

their enemies.

And

:

came

the children of Israel slew with the sword.

when

the

it

to Bethhoron, that the

the sight of Israel, Sun, stand thou

And

the valley of Ajalon.

had avenged themselves upon the

the day

have delivered

I

Joshua therefore came

goeth up to Bethhoron, and smote them to Azekah and unto Makkedah.

stones

the

all

and chased them along the way that

at Gibeon,

the going

Israel, the five

little

In

the

towards the

left

commanding with undaunted in the valley of Ajalon.

faith

the


20


SISERA SLAIN BY JAEL. See Judges

T

was a gloomy period

iv.

when Deborah became judge

the history of her people

in

The national spirit had become feeble and idolatry and wickedness had The people chafed under the discipline and stern morality which the increased. statutes of Moses enjoined, and many of them renounced their allegiance to God, neglected his service, and worshipped with those who served Baal and Ashtaroth. Then " the Lord Israel.

in

sold

them

hand of

into the

whose host was

Sisera, which

cried unto the Lord

Israel

dwelt

mightily oppressed the children of

she judged

Ramah and

Bethel, in

And Deborah,

children

of

and twenty years he

palm tree of Deborah, between

and the children of

;

;

the

of

a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth,

she dwelt under the

Mount Ephraim

And

Harosheth of the Gentiles.

in

Israel.

And

Israel at that time.

Hazor, the captain

in

he had nine hundred chariots of iron

for

;

Canaan, that reigned

Jabin, king of

came up

Israel

her for

to

judgment."

When

the people prayed

Barak, the leader

called

thousand

men

will

armies

of the

of the

And

not go.

his

Sisera

she

said,

I

will

I

will

:

met Barak, with nine hundred

and took refuge

"

crept

softly to

So God subdued on

Here we see the

agony of

in

his

Lord

chariots till

fallen

Jael

is

enabled

are

remarkably

most

vividly portrayed.

Sisera, clad

her

features, but lights in the

to

seen approaching, lithe

perform

thou wilt not go with me, then

in

mail,

shall sell

and

Heber

Sisera into the hand of a his

all

were

all

Inside

armed men

slain.

his

temples

and so

may

look

in

tent cloth, so

upon the

graceful, yet her countenance

unwomanly a deed.

the earth.

There

fallen

no

into

fine contrast to the

21

subdued

the

ground.

the

Israel."

indicating

stands gazing

Jael that

him

nail of

a posture

Barak and

chieftain.

The

his

figure ot

will

cruelty expressed

they seem equally devoid of any trace of pity or compunction.

evening sky produce a

from

Jael covered

shows the strength of is

but they

;

Sisera escaped

the Kenite.

the tent, in

pinned to the

I

notwithstanding the journey that

;

through

nail

ten

Mount Tabor, where.it was "And Barak said

day Jabin, the king of Canaan, before the children of

that

his death, lies

who

proceed, with

through weariness, she took a

asleep

upon him from the door, and she has drawn aside followers,

to

into his hand.

if

thee

Israel,

and drove the

side,

the story

but

;

the tent of Jael, wife 6f

when he had

with a mantle, and tent,

go

for the

melted away before the victorious hosts of the field

and directed him

of Israel,

surely go with

thou takest shall not be for thine honor

woman."

oppression of Jabin, Deborah

bitter

army should be delivered

thou wilt go with me, then

If

from the

tribes of Naphtali and Zebulun, toward

promised that Sisera and unto her,

for deliverance

which in

the

The broken

twilight of the interior.


21


DEBORAH'S SONG OF TRIUMPH. See Judges

HE is

Song of Deborah (though been penned.

and the leader had been

triumphant song was

in

group

is

Holy Writ

to

both Deborah and Barak) fire

Barak, incited by Deborah, had overcome the army of

slain

by the hand of

Jael,

and

this

glorious

outburst of

celebration of that victory, which resulted in the deliverance of Israel

from the oppression of Jabin. intensity

accredited in

considered one of the most magnificent outpourings of patriotic poetry and

that has ever Sisera,

v.

In this fine

engraving the regal

and vigor of movement, show her exalted mood attested by their earnestness

and deep

attention.

22

;

figure,

glowing countenance and

and her power over the

listening


22


!

JEPHTHAH MET BY HIS DAUGHTER. See Judges

EPHTHAH,

xi.

an unnatural son of Gilead, having been cast out and deprived of

inheritance by the other sons of his

ward towards

the deserts,

"vain men," and "was a mighty

went

father,

land of Tob, lying east-

and there gathered about him a band of outlaws, or

man

of valor"

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so

that

Accordingly when the Ammonites rose against

land.

to the

fame went back

his

to his native

Elders of Gilead besought

Israel, the

Jephthah to become their captain, which he consented to do on condition that

Ammonites, he should remain

victorious over the

Then Jephthah went with

words.

them

captain over

And

Jephthah vowed a vow unto the Lord, and

Ammon

children of

my

doors of

house

mine hands, Then

into to

meet me, when

surely be the Lord's, and

Ammon

unto the children of

And

hands. cities,

of

up

them

;

till

came

to

thou

hast

opened

were subdued before the children of

and she was

;

pass,

when he saw

brought

my mouth

father, if thou hast

daughter came

his only child

me

;

thou shalt without

If

unto

whatsoever cometh forth of the

thine enemies, even of the children of

meet the

rent

thou

art

I

come

thou

we

victor chief,

And

Israel.

out

to

shall

to

Minnith, even

Thus

his

the children

Jephthah came

clothes,

and

said,

to

to

me

And

she

my me

Mizpeh

said

:

And

it

daughter

Alas,

one of them that trouble

the

twenty

meet him with timbrels and with

cannot go back.

forasmuch as

;

Ammon,

So Jephthah passed over Lord delivered them into his

and the

opened thy mouth unto the Lord, do

proceeded out of thy mouth

In the picture

he

Lord, and

the

*

*

deliver the

fail

beside her he had neither son nor daughter.

her, that

very low, and

Mizpeh. *

for a burnt offering.

from Aroer, even

behold, his

in

return in peace from the children of

to fiorht against

he smote them

house, and

his

dances

filial

it

thy

and the people made him head and

be, that

shall

he were

not so according to

and unto the plain of the vineyards, with a very great slaughter.

Ammon

unto

offer

will

I

I

it

said,

if

the Elders of Gilead

words before the Lord

his

all

we do

us, if

the Elders of Gilead,

and Jephthah uttered

;

"And

Head.

their

unto Jephthah, The Lord be witness between

said

his

for

I

have

unto him,

My

according to that which hath

Lord hath taken vengeance

for thee of

Ammon."

see the lovely maiden tripping joyously forth with her companions to

proud of

pride and love she

is

to

his success,

and

little

become the unhappy 23

dreaming that by

this

touching act of

victim of her father's rash vow.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

;

;!

JEPHTHAH'S DAUGHTER AND HER COMPANIONS. See Judges

N

maiden received her

patriotic

submission

moment

which

with

her

for

pride and blossom

"

And

two months,

that

may be

me

alone

months

And

me

let

it

my :

virginity,

delayed.

I

and

mindful

is

truth

she

that

my

came

father,

of the

"Hebrew

to

only that

and cheerful her.

It

is

a

Lord had

the

But tenderer feelings be

yielded

up, in

the

Let

this

thing

be done for

may go up and down upon the mountains, and And he said, Go. And he sent her away for two

I

fellows.

And

vow which he had vowed.

virginity

upon the mountains.

she

father,

knew no man.

And

who it

did

was a

daughters of Israel went yearly to lament the daughter of Jephthah .

This tenderly sweet and mournful picture by M. Dore

ful

the ready

but even then she pleads only that

;

she said unto her

the Gileadite four days in a year."

the incident, as will

now

which the

with

end of two months, that she returned unto her

to pass at the

in Israel that the

spirit

imposed upon

thus

is

and she went with her companions, and bewailed her

with her according to his

custom

sacrifice

of her youth, forces itself upon her

her sacrifice

bewail

the

upon the enemies of her people.

father

find place in her heart, as the sorrowful

:

sad greeting, and

father's

accepted

she

and undaunted

lofty

of national triumph and rejoicing, and she

vengeance

taken

was shown the

the preceding sketch

xi.

is

"Song

Melodies," entitled by the author the

O my

Since our country, our God,

Strike the

bosom

that's

by thy vow,

the voice of

my

mourning

hand

of

me

this,

O my

the

in

father,

low,

blow

is

As

flow,

And

have

won

And my

When When And

it

as pure

me

below.

the virgins of Salem lament,

Be the judge and

Let

ere

the last thought that soothes

Though

I

beg

!

be sure

That the blood of thy child the blessing I

o'er,

is

me no more

that I love lay

There cannot be pain

And

bared for thee now.

the mountains behold

If the

sire

that thy daughter expire

Since thy triumph was bought

And And

keeping with

the

spirit

of

the following poem, one of the most chaste and beauti-

also be found

Demand

in

!

the great battle for thee,

father

this

the hero unbent

and country are

free

!

blood of thy giving hath gushed,

the voice that thou lovest

my memory

still

is

hushed,

be thy pride,

forget not I smiled

24

when

I died.

of Jephthah's Daughter;"


14


SAMSON SLAYING THE See Judges

HE

Samson abounds

story of

in

incident

career

his

in

deals

in

xiv.

xiii,

occurrences of the most remarkable nature.

character rough, daring and heroic rises into the hero, the

LION.

mold of

cast in a

avenger and the judge of violence,

and

passion

Of a

iron rather than bronze

his people,

bloodshed,

and from the

though

—he

earliest

directed,

under

Divine control, into channels of Justice, where actions, otherwise inexcusable, become legitimate

and

just.

His birth was miraculously foretold to razor should

come on

his head, for

to deliver Israel out of the

his

mother by an angel, and

it

was directed

that

no

he was to be ever a Nazarite unto God, and should "begin

hand of the

Philistines."

Samson was yet young when he sought him a

wife " in Timnath, of the daughters of the

who would much rather have had him choose a helpmeet from among their own people but Samson was of a different mind, and said unto his father, "Get her for me, for she pleaseth me well." "Then went Samson Philistines."

It

was evidently a thing

distasteful to his parents, ;

down, and behold, a him,

his father

young

and

lion

his mother, to

Timnath, and came to the vineyards of Timnath: and

roared against him.

And

and he rent him as he would have rent a

the Spirit of

kid,

the

Lord came mightily upon

and he had nothing

in his

engraving the strength and beauty of the young athlete are splendidly shown.

hand."

The

In the incident,

moreover, was the occasion of that famous riddle that led to such sanguine and direful results for the thing

was "of the Lord." 25


^r


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

SAMSON AND DELILAH. See Judges xiv, xv.

AMSON,

the Judge of Israel for twenty years,

was the son of Manoah, "a

He

of Zorah, of the family of the Danites."

loved Delilah, "a

certain

woman

man

in the valley

The tempting beauty or personal fascination of this woman seems to have completely unmanned him; and his varied and wonderful history is a striking example of a man of splendid power prostrated and destroyed by her whose "feet go down to death," whose "steps take hold on hell." The particular of So.rek,"

who wrought

his ultimate destruction.

incident which this striking picture represents

"And his soul

not

it

came

to pass,

was vexed unto death,

If

I

my

be shaven, then

any other man.

thus rendered:

when she pressed him that he told her

come a razor upon mine head;

womb.

is

And when

for

I

daily with her words, all

his heart,

Delilah saw that he had told her

for the lords of the Philistines, saying,

and said unto

have been a Nazarite unto

strength will go from me, and

Come up

I

all

this once, for

and urged him, so that

shall

her,

There hath

God from my

mother's

become weak, and be

his heart, she sent

he hath shewed

me

like

and* called

all his

heart.

Then the lords of the Philistines came up unto her, and brought money in their hand. And she made him sleep upon her knees, and she called for a man, and she caused him to shave off the

And I

will

seven locks of his head, and she began to

she said,

The

go out as

Philistines

be upon thee, Samson.

at other times before,

afflict

And

and shake myself.

departed from him." 26

him, and. his strength

went from him.

he awoke out of his sleep, and

And

said,

he wist not that the Lord was


DEATH OF SAMSON. See Judges xvi.

HIS superb

illustration of the

the very spirit

revenge

and tumult of destruction and wrath.

for all his bitter sufferings

among

his foes.

flying idolaters, the horror of the falling columns, the bent

whom

it

says,

in his life,"

"So

Dagon is pregnant with Here Samson wreaks his

pulling-down of the temple of

and straining

the dead which he slew at his death were

are powerfully and splendidly portrayed. 27

The- hurry, the terror of the figure of

Samson, of

more than they which he slew


27


NAOMI AND HER DAUGHTERS-IN-LAW. See Ruth

HE

nobler,

thee

:

the

Bible, are

said,

Intreat

goest,

people, and thy

I

among

me go

will

parting steps of to

lot,

is

finely

Orpah

lay,

thou diest,

:

yet leads her

be the pathway of her future

and where thou lodgest,

:

life,

also,

artist.

home

if

will

I

I

will

die,

lodge

:

and there

thy will

aught but death part thee and me."

The

to kith

and she turns

wide, lonely land, over which

and kin

to

;

the

but for Ruth, Love alone

Naomi, content with her to

afterwards so beautifully rewarded by years of prosperity and peace. 28

to leave her.

leave thee, or to return from following

God my God Where

portrayed by the

and refuses

most pathetic annals of devotion and

the

not to

be buried: the Lord do so to me, and more

The scene is

in

for whither thou

my

clings to her mother-in-law,

faithful nature,

"And Ruth

:

people shall be I

more

;

as recorded

domestic love after

Naomi with her daughters-in-law forms the subject of the present Orpah has just said farewell and departed weeping but Ruth, of a

parting of

engraving.

Her words,

i.

fix

her


28


——

:

:

;

RUTH AND BOAZ. See Ruth

HE

story of

Ruth and Boaz

is

ii,

iv.

iii,

one of the sweetest

as true in

its

and

tale,

fill

the

showing the heart that beat thousands of years ago

throbs as

her

filial

is

maiden

the heart of the

—with the congratulations

the foreigner

Obed

:

he

is

in

tenderness and devotion are

of the noble Boaz, the kinsman of Naomi. Christ

ever spoke or sung.

wisdom of Naomi,

character of Ruth, tender and sweet, guided by the delight,

idyls

'

her father's

fitly

Wedded

rewarded

of the people and the elders

To them was born

was peculiarly blessed.

this

fields to-day, and, to

in the protection city of

Judea

round

and love

David and of

union of the Israelite and

a son, "and they called his

In the engraving

the father of Jesse, the father of David."

an unceasing

in the corn-lands of

Bethlehem,

in

is

The

Ruth

is

seen

name in the

foreground gathering the scattered wheat, the busy harvesters around her, while Boaz, standing near,

is

directing the

reproach her that she

may

not.

young men respecting

And

her:

some of

let fall also

"Let her glean even among the sheaves, and

the handfuls of purpose for her;

glean them, and rebuke her not."

A

companion picture

Thomas Hood

furnished in these exquisite lines by

She stood breast-high amid the corn, Clasped by the golden light of morn,

Like the sweetheart of the sun,

Who many On

a glowing kiss had won.

her cheek an autumn flush,

Deeply ripened

;

In the midst of

—such a

blush

brown was born,

Like red poppies grown with corn.

Round

her eyes her tresses

Which were

But long lashes veiled a

That had

And

fell,

blackest none could

been

else

all

tell

light

too bright.

her hat, with shady rim,

Made

her tressy forehead dim

Thus she stood among

God

Praising

Sure,

I

said,

Where I Lay thy Share

;

the stooks,

with sweetest looks.

God

did not

mean

reap, thou shouldst but glean

sheaf

my

adown and come

harvest and

29

my

home.

to

and leave them

the engraving

is


29


THE RETURN OF THE See

HE

the news

;

Ark of

pleasure has people.

the priest,

Eli,

land of

and the

them

endure the wrath of the

to It

is

this

extreme and

Such a mark of the Almighty's high

and

terrified fallen at

hasten

of a subtle

dis-

who had judged Israel for forty years, had bitterness to young and old. For seven months

stricken

his

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

to

God

bear

beauty.

Ark

the

months of mourning, of death and of

back, for

it

it

proves too heavy a burden

to

of Israel.

return that the artist has illustrated. full

doom on

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;he

captors, but they are

its

disease,

Philistines

vi.

a dreadful foreboding

like

and the day was one of in the

Samuel

the Lord has been taken. fallen

had remained

I

ARK.

"And

the

The

narrative itself

kine took the straight

is

pastoral

way

to the

in

way

the of

Bethshemesh, and went along the highway, lowing as they went, and turned not aside to the

right

hand, or to the

And

border of Bethshemesh. valley is

;

and they

lifted

up

the artist's translation!

High lofty,

left:

and the lords of the

went

their eyes,

What

and saw the Ark, and rejoiced

a glowing redundance

its

lowing kine, slowly coming on in the

light,

:

is

in

it."

How

Well may the

as emblematic of him

who dwelleth

30

artist

lovely

the charming scene!

seen the

with

cart,

its

the middle distance the

foreground the people amid their sheaves,

enraptured at the glorious vision.

scene in intensest

to see

of light floods

in the background, against a vast fan of spreading radiance,

white-winged cherubim,

after them, unto the

they of Bethshemesh were reaping their wheat harvest in the

shadowy forms of the reapers, and joyful,

Philistines

all

alert,

have wrapped the whole

in light

unapproachable.


:

W^^^S^^^'S^^&S-

mw Ji*

; .:

â&#x20AC;¢JiwEBiMMM

ipr,

w 30

.

.

,

.

.,:,

v

,.,.!

:V

' ,

-':


SAUL AND DAVID. See

AUL

to

pass as they came,

Philistine, that the

meet king

when David was returned from

women came

Saul, with tabrets, with joy,

out of

his ten thousands.

And

Saul,

other

he

said,

twice."

the wall

me

ascribed unto David ten thousands, and to

And

it

times I

Saul hath slain

came

to

will

The to

nance, and

;

in

And

?

and there was a javelin

in

Saul's

smite David even to the wall with beautiful figure of the minstrel

avoid the the

fatal

his thousands,

the

women

and David

it;

lad,

evil

And

hand.

God came upon

who, with harp

"

in in

hand, his

with the evil spirit

combine

to

his

hand, as

Saul cast the javelin, for

and David avoided out of

passionate rage of the king, troubled all

from

spirit

and David played with

;

said,

they have ascribed but thousands,

thrust of the king's javelin, the terror

fading background, and palatial architecture,

dramatic scene.

And

Saul eyed David from that day, and

pass on the morrow, that the the midst of the house

it

and dancing,

Saul was very wroth, and the saying displeased him, and he

and he prophesied

at

the cities of Israel, singing

all

said,

and what can he have more, but the kingdom forward.

"And

the slaughter of the

and with instruments of music.

answered one another as they played, and

They have

xviii.

had become jealous of David because of the praises of the people.

came to

Samuel

i

is

his

presence

shrinking to

youthful counte-

from God," the

form a simple but thoroughly


3i


DAVID SPARES SAUL. See

|

AVID

in the

is

seeks him,

in

xxiv.

wilderness of En-gedi."

still

very cave

Samuel

I

determined on

which David

his

and

Arrived

life.

band have taken

his

" the

garment.

anointed

of the

Lord," and

only, while

After leaving the cave, the king

Saul

"

Saul

enemies.

David and

is

men

his

In this bold

David's

refuge.

asleep, cuts

off the skirt

life,

melted to contrition, and returns home;

but, evidently

suspicious.

still

gat them up unto the hold."

and picturesque engraving

circumstance of war, occupies the precipitous

the components conform to the one purpose

all

who have been hunted

the rocks of the wild goats," has

of Saul.

in

I

David, with only a

strongholds

know

;

open valley below,

for in that

thou and see that there

have not sinned against thee

;

pomp and

is

I

cut off

few

devoted

wood " and upon

of the

Holding up the fragment of the king's garment he says

killed thee not,

hand, and

"

the

into the

my hand

the

all

Saul,

with his followers, a band winding along

the light.

caves, in

come out

see, yea, see the skirt of thy robe in

and

cliffs,

the mountain side, with spears gleaming in

army

who

notwithstanding the words of

representing the power and prerogative of the nation, and surrounded by

adherents,

of his

presently arrested by the voice of David,

is

the

followers

of exhibiting, in the strongest possible manner, the disparity between the two groups.

all

in

but he refuses to lay his hand

;

is

declares to him his innocency of his intention towards his his

Saul sleeps

in the valley,

advise him to seize the opportunity, and put Saul to death

on

host of three thousand men,

Saul, with a

in

to

full

him

view of the

:

"

My

the skirt of thy robe

neither evil nor transgression in

yet thou huntest

my

father,

soul to take

it."

mine


:

DEATH OF

SAUL.

See I Samuel xxxi.

TUMULTUOUS

battle-scene

closes

and turbulent

rebellious, uncontrolled

distempered career, every

gift that

stormy

the in

spirit,

of Israel's

life

fallen in the battle

;

and now

armor-bearer to thrust him through with

was sore his

afraid.

his

A

Providence had bestowed upon him.

Saul, fearing death "

sword.

Therefore Saul took a sword, and

and

insult

But

his

example, and thus perished the haughty Saul by

;

Jonathan and

from the

it."

brothers

Philistines,

begs his ;

he

for

His armor-bearer followed

own unblessed

his

restless

his

armor-bearer would not

upon

fell

Bold,

Saul cast away from him, in his

suspicion and jealousy has banished from his side the faithful David

have

king.

first

David, on

hand.

receiving the news of Saul's and Jonathan's death, slays the self-accusing messenger, and then

pours forth his grief

"The beauty

of Israel

not in Gath, publish lest the

in this

it

magnificent lamentation

upon thy high places; how are the mighty

slain

is

neither let there be rain

upon you, nor

slain,

from the

fat

in their

than Lions. delights,

of Gilboa,

let

Ye

daughters of

who put on ornaments

O

!

brother Jonathan

:

Tell

it

there be no dew,

for there the shield of the

;

Israel,

bow

:

weep over

of gold

From

is

the

of Jonathan turned not back, and the

Saul,

who

in their lives;

clothed you in scarlet, with other

upon your apparel. in thine

How

are the mighty fallen in the

high places.

very pleasant hast thou been unto

How

mighty

they were swifter than Eagles, they were stronger

Jonathan, thou wast slain

passing the love of women.

oil.

Saul and Jonathan were lovely and pleasant

death they were not divided

midst of the battle

my

of offerings

of the mighty, the

sword of Saul returned not empty.

and

fields

Ye mountains

away, the shield of Saul, as though he had not been anointed with

blood of the

!

not in the streets of Askelon, lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice,

daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.

vilely cast

fallen

me

;

I

am

thy love to

are the mighty fallen, and the weapons of

33

distressed for thee,

me was

wonderful,

war perished!"


;

THE DEATH OF ABSALOM. See II Samuel xv, xvi, xvii,

BSALOM

was the

third son

Talmai, king of Geshur. beauty.

"

From

of

King David,

He was

xviii.

his

mother being Maacah, daughter

greatly admired

among

the

Israelites

of

for his

the sole of his foot to the crown of his head, there was no blemish

was he distinguished for the beauty of his hair, which grew so luxuriantly that when at the end of each year he was shorn, its weight was equal to two hundred shekels of silver. But he was vain and deceitful of heart and his ambition, and perhaps envy of his brother Solomon, led him to plot against the king his father and to conspire with his enemies for his overthrow. He set himself diligently to work in various subtle ways to win over the people to himself, affectionately embracing all who approached to salute him, and saying to those who came to the king for judgment, " O that I were made judge in the land, that every man which hath any suit or cause might come unto me, and I would do him justice." Thereby he won their hearts and alienated them from King David. When he had thus gathered around him a sufficient number, he proceeded to Hebron first obtaining his father's permission, under the pretense that he wished to pay a vow unto the Lord and was there proclaimed king. When the news was brought to David by a messenger that the hearts of the men of Israel were with Absalom, he fled in haste from Jerusalem, attended by his servants and such men of the city as were still loyal, and passed over the Jordan, finding an asylum in the city of Mahanaim. Absalom took possession of Jerusalem, and was there solemnly anointed king. Afterwards he set out with a large army in pursuit of his father, following him across the Jordan. David gathered together his devoted people, and wished to lead them to battle himself; but they restrained him, saying, "Thou shalt not go forth: for if we flee away, they will not care for us in

him."

Especially

;

neither

if

half of us die, will they care for us;

now it is better that under the command of three

but

now

thou art worth ten thousand of us;

So David sent forth his army trusted leaders, after charging them to deal gently with Absalom, whom he still greatly loved. The king's people met the hosts of Absalom in the wood of Ephraim and overwhelmed them, slaying twenty thousand men. Absalom sought to escape on the back of a mule, but in passing under an immense oak, his hair caught in the boughs, and the mule fled from under him, leaving him suspended in the air. When a messenger who had therefore

thou succor us out of the

city.

informed Joab, the chief captain in David's army, he hastened to the spot, and, unmindful of the command of the king, " he took three darts in his hand and thrust them witnessed

this

through the heart of Absalom, while yet he was alive

men

in

the midst of the oak.

And

young Then he

ten

armor compassed about and smote Absalom, and slew him." and stones were thrown upon him in token of bitter hostility. From one of the gnarled In the engraving the fate of Absalom is strikingly portrayed. branches of the spreading oak we behold the wretched victim, held tightly by his strong locks perhaps conscious that death is speedily to overtake him for Joab and his followers, mounted on swift steeds, are seen galloping towards him, their stern features, wild shouts and angry gestures showing the spirit of vengeance that inflames their hearts.

was

that bore Joab's

cast into a pit in the forest,

;

34


34


DAVID MOURNING OVER ABSALOM. See II Samuel

FTER

great battle

the

wood

the

in

xviii.

of Ephraim, which

overthrow of the rebellious followers of Absalom, and

kingdom

Mahanaim

to

David, Cushi and Ahimaaz, the

watchman went up to the roof over the gate unto the and behold a man running alone. And the watchman he be alone, there

said,

If

And

the

said,

Behold another man

And

the

tidings

is

watchman saw another man running, and watchman

Methinketh the

said,

And

Ahimaaz, the son of Zadock.

And Ahimaaz

tidings.

And

running alone.

called

and and

cried,

And

man Absalom servant,

up

that lifted safe

their

the

king

And Ahimaaz

?

saw a great tumult, but

I

aside,

and stand here.

Cushi

said, Tidings,

And

my

is

knew

he turned :

not what

aside,.

for the

it

be as that young man

was.

and stood

Is

my lord the king, and And the king was much

over the gate, and wept: and as he went, thus he

Absalom

!

The mourned pathetic

would God

affection of for the

was

I

had died

David

young

for thee,

O

for his children

child of Bath-Sheba,

his lamentation

said,

said,

Absalom,

my

and

called unto the porter

He

well.

bringeth tidings.

also is

And

And

running of

the

like

he

down

fell

the

to

And

all

the king said unto him,

this

day of

thy

Turn

them

all

young man Absalom

safe

that rise against thee to

moved, and went up

to the

O my

my

son,

me

And, behold, Cushi came; and

still.

the

young

the king said, Is the

Lord hath avenged thee

the king said unto Cushi,

is.

the king

Joab sent the king's servant, and

Cushi answered, The enemies of hurt,

And

Lord thy God, which hath delivered

lord the king.

When

answered,

lord the king

And

rose up against thee.

I

my

and looked,

his eyes

a good man, and cometh with good

is.

and said unto the king, All

hand against

of the

he came apace, and drew near.

watchman

He

up

told the king.

the

earth upon his face before the king, and said, Blessed be the

up the men

lifted

running of the foremost

the king said,

restoration

between the two gates: and the

sat

wall,

mouth.

his

in

the

in

complete

the

in

son of Zadock, were dispatched to

"And David

bear the tidings to the king.

to

resulted

son Absalom,

my

son,

that

And

?

do thee

chamber

my

son

son!"

was often most touchingly manifested, as when he and

for

Amnon, whom Absalom

over the death of Absalom, which 35

is

slew.

Still

more

here so strikingly pictured.


35


SOLOMON. N

this patriarchal

gives him

all

and statuesque

that dignity

figure of Solomon,

and repose which

experience would legitimately

entail.

It

now

his years of

would seem as

in

old age,

M. Dore

command, knowledge and if

he were

in the

very act

sternest truth, the pages of that wonderfully profound collection of Proverbial

of composing,

in

lore, that tells

so much, in ripened thought, of collected observation on

and which closes

his

in

one of the noblest tributes ever offered 36

to the

human

life

and

worth of womanhood.

vanity,


3^


THE JUDGMENT OF SOLOMON. See I Kings

LL

the eyes of Judea

governed by an

and the other Bring

me

rival claims of the false

O my

mine nor in

The one

This

saith, is

is

the dead,

and give half

to the one,

no wise slay

her the living but divide

it:

own

and

true,

of his

skill,

my

son

criterion

future happiness or woe.

son, that liveth,

and half

living child was, unto the king (for her

thine,

my

mother and the

their estimation, a

and thy son

And

the living.

is

And they brought a sword before the king; and the king

a sword.

lord, give

in

a pregnant indication of their

Nay: but thy son

saith

living child in two,

whose the

and

character,

said the King,

she

is

it.

child,

Then

and

in

the

to the

it

:

but the other

King answered and

And

all

Israel

King

the

the

woman

and she

Let

said,

Divide the

said,

son),

said,

the dead:-

is

Then spake

bowels yearned upon her

no wise slay

the mother thereof.

other.

it

said,

be neither

said, Give her the living child, and

heard of the Judgment which the

king had judged, and they feared the King: for they saw that the wisdom of to

people,

irresponsible sovereign, their happiness lies mercilessly in his hands.

brought thus early before their king, would be,

"Then

To an Eastern

were on the young King Solomon.

This judgment, therefore, between the

wisdom and

iii.

God was

in him,

do judgment."

The sentiment

of the picture

is

well

shown

in

the appealing

agony of the one woman and

the indifference of the other, in the dramatic attitude of the executioner

judge, towards

whom

the surrounding spectators turn with tense

and

and of the youthful

eager gaze.

It is

a grand

representation of an oriental court in the ancient time, the regal splendor of the youthful king

being greatly heightened by relieving him against a background of choice decorative design. 37


THE CEDARS DESTINED FOR THE TEMPLE See I Kings

HERE

v.

has ever been attached something peculiarly sacred and noble to the Cedars

They have stood

of Lebanon.

as a figure for everything grand and

doubtless their use and high estimation in the building of the to

do

in

originating and continuing this impression.

M. Dore,

lofty,

the scene before us, has

in

presented a declivity of the mountain covered with groups of busy workmen, engaged occupation of felling and removing these magnificent trees to their floats by the sea-shore.

background

is

dim with umbrageous

hewing and trimming the scene of busiest

life.

fallen

foliage,

except

in

monarchs of the wood.

Two immense

boles

the

chief of

cumbrous wheels, are being conveyed down the mountain bustle

and anxiety incident

to their starting are fully

caparisoned horses are urged on or held are busy with directions, and the

progress of the work.

It is,

in

in the

The

open spaces where the laborers are

The foreground

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; evidently the

and

Temple has had much

side,

brought out

all

is

a splendidly wrought

their brethren

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on heavy,

and the straining labor and in

the engraving.

The

gaily

check by the excited men, the mounted overseers

woodmen themselves have paused

perhaps, the finest landscape 38

in

the book.

in

groups

to

watch the


THE PROPHET SLAIN BY A See

i

HIS scene

Kings

I

LION.

xiii.

represents a prophet of the Lord slain

for

his

Commis-

disobedience.

sioned from on high to denounce the idolatry of Jeroboam, he had in this his duty. all

He

had refused

obedience, by another path than

Bethel, he

words

:

"

am

I

house and drank water." he had drunk, that

brought back. carcass

was

*

*

he saddled

And when

"

the king,

is

and was returning,

Met by an at

length

old

it

him

of

persuaded by these

and an angel spake unto me by the word of

;

into thine house, that

he

may

eat

bread and

came the

to pass, after ass,

to

wit,

in his

he had eaten bread, and after

for

the

prophet

whom

he had

he was gone, a lion met him by the way and slew him, and

cast in the way,

in

prophet

So he went back with him, and did eat bread

And

for

refusing, he

first

him back with thee

but he lied unto him.

;

with

by which he came.

a prophet also, as thou art

the Lord, saying, Bring

drink water

that

After

invited to his board.

is

to eat or drink

fulfilled

and the ass stood by 39

it;

the lion also stood

his

by the carcass."


=3


THE MESSENGERS OF AHAZIAH.

ELIJAH DESTROYING

See II Kings

LIJAH

i.

and most romantic character

the prophet has been considered " the grandest

Of

ever produced."

that Israel

early

his

life

only

is

it

known

from a nomadic and unsettled people dwelling beyond the Jordan ployed either

came

hills,

in

the chase or in the quieter labors of pastoral

him the knowledge of Jehovah

to

Ahab and announced

chapter of

the seventeenth

in

the inhabitants of Gilead, said I

word of

Lord came unto him

the

of the brook, and

became

dry,

I

the

dwelt with a widow, and the

go

to

little

And

before Jordan.

is

were constantly increased and made

it

who was

of

whom And the

Israel liveth, before

my

word.

be that thou shalt drink

When

there."

her cruse and the handful of meal

During the

to supply their wants.

from the

by

thus abruptly

is

the brook

Here he

for

lack of rain,

fierce

she possessed

third

Elijah

before Ahab, and then occurred his triumph over the prophets of Baal upon to flee

in

the nation

the Tishbite,

shall

thee

to feed

famine which had prevailed throughout Samaria,

Again he was obliged

appeared

first

Zarephath, between Tyre and Sidon.

to

in

oil

faith

Get thee hence and turn thee Eastward, and hide

have commanded the ravens

commanded

he was

And Elijah Lord God of

:

rain these years, but according to

saying,

by the brook Cherith, that

thyself

Kings

As

unto Ahab,

dew nor

not be

stand, there shall

I

"

the lonely

sublime

in the

He

people em-

among

His appearance

introducing the worship of Baal.

Jezebel, in

zeal.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

God which had been brought upon

rebuke the dishonor against

to

was nurtured

such fearlessness and fiery

which he afterwards enforced with Israel

there he

;

There,

life.

he came

that

year of the

again appeared

Mount Carmel.

anger of Jezebel, taking refuge

desert

in the

down under a juniper tree, and "requested for himself that he might die." Going afterwards to Mount Horeb, he there communed with God, and was comforted, and it was announced to him that Elisha should become his successor. Still once more he confronted Ahab this time to denounce his crime against Naboth. After the death of Ahab his son Ahaziah became king, and perpetuated the idolatrous practices of his parents. Having been injured by falling through a lattice in his chamber, he sent to Ekron to ask of the god Baalzebub whether he should recover. The messengers were met by Elijah, who announced in the name of God that Ahaziah should never leave his bed, but of Beer-sheba, where he sat

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

should "surely

"Then

die.

the king sent

unto him a captain of

(and behold, he sat on the top of a

king hath a

man

there

said,

Come down. fire

of God,

unto them, thy

fifty.

Thus hath

If

I

And

be a

and he went up

to him,

and he spake unto him, Thou man of God, the

Elijah answered,

fifty,

with his

the king said,

man

the fire

The headlong

his fifty;

and said

to the captain of

fifty,

If

be

I

fire

unto him another captain of

man

with

come down from heaven and consume thee and thy fifty. And from heaven, and consumed him and his fifty. Again also he sent

of God, then let

came down

And

hill)

fifty,

fifty

;

And

Come down

he answered, and said unto him,

quickly.

And

Elijah answered,

come down from heaven, and consume of God came down from heaven, and consumed him, and of God, let fire

destruction of the messengers of Ahaziah

the engraving.

40

is

O

and said thee, his

and

fifty.

powerfully wrought out in


:

:

ASCENT IN A CHARIOT OF

ELIJAH'S

See II Kings

[HE

closing scene

in

the

ii.

great prophet was

of the

life

FIRE.

more marvellous and im-

pressive than any other presented, even in a career so associated with miracles, so

wrapped up

midst of

in the

fortitude

perils, his unfaltering trust

in

His undaunted courage and

God and

devotion to the Jehovistic

render him one of the most majestic characters

faith of his fathers,

Hebrew

and extraordinary events.

startling

in

prophets, and

among

the whole line of

have caused him to be associated even with Moses himself

the

in

reverence of his nation. It

was a

matter for the

difficult

artist

exceptional and extraordinary a

to represent so

scene with due impressiveness, and at the same time avoid exaggeration and preserve an

apparent naturalness, and

in

countenance of the prophet clouds

this

light the

achievement of M. Dore

quite notable.

The

benignant, his form majestic, and the sweeping action of the

is

represent the whirlwind which bore

to

is

him

aloft

finely

is

conceived and executed.

What follows is the account given in II Kings of the prophet's translation "And it came to pass when the Lord would take up Elijah into heaven by a whirlwind, that Elijah went with Elisha from Gilgal. And Elijah said unto Elisha, Tarry here, I pray thee for the Lord hath sent me to Bethel and Elisha said unto him, As the Lord liveth, and as thy soul liveth, I will not leave thee. So they went down to Bethel. And :

the

;

Knowest thou Yea,

said,

pray thee

know

I

were

at

I

will

take

Lord hath sent me

away thy master from thy head to-day ?

came

Elisha,

to

And

to Jericho

Elijah said :

So they came

not leave thee.

will

Jericho

take away thy

Lord

hold ye your peace.

it,

for the

:

the

that

thy soul liveth, that

Prophets that were at Bethel, came forth to Elisha, and said unto him.

sons of the

And

he

As

And

the

Lord

liveth,

I

and as

the sons of the Prophets

and said unto him, Knowest thou

and he answered, Yea,

master from thy head to-day?

he

unto him, Elisha, tarry here,

said,

to Jericho.

And

Lord

that the I

know

it,

will

hold ye

And Elijah said unto him, Tarry, I pray thee, here: for the Lord hath sent me to Jordan. And he said, As the Lord liveth, and as thy soul liveth, I will not leave thee. And they two went on. And fifty men of the sons of the Prophets went, and stood And Elijah took his mantle, and wrapped to view afar off; and they two stood by Jordan.

your peace.

it

together,

and smote the waters, and they were divided hither and

thither, so that they

two

went over on dry ground.

when they were gone over, that Elijah said unto Elisha, Ask what I shall do for thee, before I be taken away from thee. And Elisha said, I pray thee, And he said, Thou hast asked a hard thing let a double portion of thy spirit be upon me.

"And

it

nevertheless, not,

it

came

if

shall not

to

pass,

when I am taken from And it came to pass as they

thou see me,

be

so.

there

appeared a chariot of

Elijah

went up by a whirlwind

fire,

and horses of

into heaven."

4

l

fire,

thee, still

it

shall

be so unto thee: but

went on and

if

talked, that behold,

and parted them both asunder, and


4i


4


THE DEATH OF See

N

the

book of Kings

first

Kings

I

xxi,

xxii

II

;

JEZEBEL. Kings

ix.

recorded the story of Jezebel's wickedness

is

her persecution of the prophets and her crime against Naboth contains the account of her painful and tragic death.

palace of her husband, received to

his

King Ahab, which he greatly desired

chamber

great disquiet, and

in

brooded

foolishly

idolatry,

book

the second

There was a vineyard near the

to possess

as an inheritance from his fathers, refused to part with

it

;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;her

over

his

it,

;

but Naboth,

who had

and so the king retired

disappointment.

Jezebel,

perceiving the distress of her husband, bade him arise and eat and be merry of heart, and

promised that the vineyard of Naboth should be given him. against Naboth that he had blasphemed against fury of the people,

who took him

Ahab now thought thither to

enjoy

it;

from the

forth

himself secure

God and city

palace,

seen

his house,

at the wall of Jezreel.

all

who condemned

and prophesied that the

him,

guilty

Jehu was afterwards appointed to reign

in

may avenge

with his

armed

the blood of

my

servants the

hand of Jezebel."

followers, beneath the

windows of

Jezebel's

obedience to his command, are hurling her to the earth below.

There, at the base of the wall and her.

I

the servants of the Lord, at the

in the picture,

and her attendants,

and devour

all

house of Ahab thy master, that

Prophets, and the blood of is

to death.

and thus was he commissioned by the young prophet who anointed him: "Thou

shalt smite the

Jehu

and stoned him

be charged

to

This brought upon him the

but he was quickly sought by the prophet Elijah,

queen should be eaten by dogs Israel,

the king.

it

the possession of the coveted vineyard, and proceeded

in

gave warning of the impending destruction of over

Then she caused

among

The composition

is

the

armed host are

spirited,

almost to cause a shudder to the beholder. 42

the savage dogs, waiting to tear

carefully executed,

but withal so

realistic as


42


:

ESTHER CONFOUNDING HAMAN. See Esther

|STHER, and

his favorite courtier

On

Jews.

known her the King, sold,

I,

the beautiful Jewess,

my life be my people, to

adversary and enemy, the

And the and Haman

Queen.

garden

:

that there

was

evil

I

Then

he? and where

is

enemy

the

Persia,

banquets the king

of Mordecai, Esther's "cousin, and of the

have found favor

my

at

had held

the king

petition,

this

my

slain,

and and

in

my

people at

to perish

:

tongue, although, the

presume

my

but

King, and

if it

request.

For we are

we had been

if

enemy could not

in his heart to

king arising from the banquet of wine

make request

for his

life

determined against him by the King."

in his

to

And

do so?

Then Haman was

wicked Haman.

stood up to

O

thy sight,

makes please

sold for

countervail

Ahasuerus answered, and said unto Esther the Queen

he, that durst

is

is

me

I

be destroyed, to be

bondmen, and bondwomen,

Who

Haman,

words, "If

given

let

the king's damage.

queen of Ahasuerus, king of

the second day of the banquet, at the request of the King, Esther

petition, in these

and

vii.

Esther

afraid before the

said,

The

King and

wrath, went into the palace

Esther the

The queenly

Queen

:

for

he saw

dignity of Esther, the

piercing look of the king, indicating his kindling wrath and angry suspicion, and the guilty

consciousness of the

Haman,

exhibit in a high' degree

artist.

43

the graphic

skill

and dramatic force

of


;

ISAIAH.

SAIAH,

the

most magnificent of the Prophets

Lord the Saviour trays

with his Lord.

this

isolated

words burning with the

him kneeling on the mountain

cliff,

;

above, the bending skies.

and striking scene,

in

unison

44

foretold the

;

in hill

The

rapt

and

artist

God

coming of our

The scene porand awe-struck communion

inspiration of

bent

Before him a grand sweep of country

waters desolate and wide in

in

He who

!

valley,

!

mountain and ravine

has rarely been happier than

with the subject of his sketch.


44


;

:

THE DESTRUCTION OF SENNACHERIB'S HOST. See Isaiah xxxvi., xxxvii.

ENNACHERIB, his father

Sargon

when

at a time

the

power becoming greatly reduced. minion over the surrounding nations.

By

throne

of

glory of the kingdom was waning and

its

successive conquests

was sent from Lachish, under render pitulate,

battle

The

of Jerusalem.

taking the

command

was

to

occur,

The Angel

finest

so

of the

"

Judah

all

"

went

Then

dosub-

had gained by

Hezekiah the

of

sur-

but during the night before the

;

and smote

forth,

thousand

five

we

like a

place

the

wolf on the

fold, ;

when Summer

forest

is

sea

green,

host, with their banners, at sunset were seen,

Autumn

Like the leaves of the forest when

That host on the morrow

For the Angel of Death spread

his

hath blown,

and strown.

lay wither'd

wings on the

blast,

And And And

breathed in the face of the foe as he pass'd;

And

there lay the steed with his nostrils

the eyes of the sleepers wax'd deadly

But through

it

all

cold as the spray of the rock-beating

And

there lay the rider distorted

the foam of his gasping lay white

dew on

still

wide,

his

and

on the

pale,

the tents were

The

lances unlifted, the trumpet unblown.

And And And

the

all silent,

the banners alone,

widows of Ashur are loud

in their wail,

the idols are broken in the temple of Baal

the might of the Gentile, unsmote like

turf,

surf.

brow, and the rust on his mail

And

Hath melted

chill

there roll'd not the breath of his pride

And And

the

and

once heav'd, and forever grew

their hearts but

snow

;

.

by the sword,

in the glance of the Lord.

45

the

camp

!

of the in

the

subject of one of the

before the picture

it

And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold And the sheen of. their spears were like stars on the When the blue wave rolls lightly on deep Galilee. Like the leaves of the

in

and when they arose early

;

This event forms

of Byron, and

The Assyrian came down

With

that she

demand

:

That

his

a large portion of his army

cities,

to take the city

dead corpses."

all

Hebrew Melodies

admirably describes

extended

he

Euphrates, he carried his con-

of Rabshakeh, to

of the Lord

Assyrians a hundred and four score and

morning behold they were

the

king, following the advice of Isaiah the prophet, refused to ca-

and the invaders were preparing "

from

defended

the

all

and

Tigris

quering legions into Egypt and Palestine, wresting After

to

First he crushed a revolt in Babylonia.

duing one after another of the tribes along the

the valor of Hezekiah.

kings, succeeded

the mightiest of the Assyrian

which

it


45


BARUCH. See Jeremiah xxxii., xxxvi.

ARUCH

was of noble

lineage,

and gained

distinction for his superior acquirements,

as well as through his relation with the prophet Jeremiah, ion

and amanuensis he became, writing

his

terwards reading them to assemblages of the people the words of the

prophet were

miah, and

man know where ye

let

no

but they laid up the the ear of the king."

concealed

be.

said

fire,

in the

And

Temple.

Baruch,

to

they went

Go

"

the whole roll

The

"

princes

who heard

hide thee, thou and Jere-

Scribe,

and

told all

the words in

for the roll containing the prophecies,

was consumed.

them out with

added besides unto them many

but

his penknife

Baruch and Jeremiah had

and while thus secure against the wrath of the

whole of the prophecies, and

compan-

to the king into the court,

in

the sentences were read, he cut

till

friend,

prophecies from dictation, and after-

chamber of Elishama, the

the

that, as

into the

themselves,

and

Then King Jehoiakim sent

was so much displeased and threw them

in

roll

afraid,

whose

like

king,

words."

re-wrote the

Baruch was

afterwards imprisoned with Jeremiah, and was also carried with him to Egypt, where, according to one tradition, he died. artist

Another asserts

that his days

has represented him reclining upon the hard prison

about him,

in

rapt meditation.

rowful cast of countenance tion in the great

work

to

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;one

He that

has an

intense

would seem

which he was

called.

46

to

and

were ended

floor,

in

Babylon.

The

with his rolls of manuscript

introspective, but patient

and

sor-

convey the impression of entire absorp-


H m

".;'

|

i

v

""","'"'

1&$$

life MV

It

46

•.,'

;;':.

r'':"«|


EZEKIEL PROPHESYING. See Ezekiel

HE

second chapter of the book of Ezekiel begins with an account of the Prophet's

commission, "

And

these words

in

:

he said unto me, son of man, stand upon thy

thee.

And

that

heard him that spake unto

I

ii.

the spirit

entered into me, when

me

unto me, son of man,

said

me

the children of Israel, to a rebellious nation that hath rebelled against fathers have transgressed against me, even unto this very day.

dren and the

stiff-hearted.

Lord God.

And

briars

And

they,

whether they

know

hear or whether they

will

But

lious like that rebellious

The awaken

and thou dost dwell

thee,

thou, son of

house

among

forbear (for they

will

scorpions

and

zeal.

appeals and solemn

apparently

I

open thy mouth, and eat

From

— warnings —with

the

is

of

And

that

thou shalt

forbear, for they

Be not thou

commanding presence

parable,

the

brow may

proverbs,

— one

indeed

interest,

to approach him nearer.

47

his

to

own

well have sprung the noble

poems,

which his writings abound.

rebel-

give thee."

and infuse them with some portion of

that freighted

listen with thoughtful

will

say unto thee. I

though

be not afraid of their

:

hear or whether they

man, hear what

the sluggish hearts of his listeners

thought and glowing^ imagery few who

:

will

prophet, as represented in the picture,

sincerity, earnestness

chil-

been a prophet among them.

that there hath

words unto them, whether they

are most rebellious.

their

For they are impudent

thou, son of man, be not afraid of them, neither be afraid of their words,

and thorns be with

my

send thee to

They and

:

words, nor be dismayed at their looks, though they be a rebellious house.

speak

I

feet,

do send thee unto them, and thou shalt say unto them, Thus saith

I

are a rebellious house), yet shall "

speak unto

will

I

me upon my

he spake unto me, and set

And he

:

and

feet,

At

allegories, his feet are

the

pathetic

gathered a

while those beyond seem yet too timid


47


THE VISION OF

EZEKIEL.

See Ezekiel xxxvii.

URING

King Jehoiachin (about 590 b. c), Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, besieged Jerusalem, and carried away as captives the king and many of the the

Among

people.

Temple

in the

is

it

He

at Jerusalem.

who had

Buzi,

personal

recorded that he received the

and

history, gift

subsequent

esteem by

but

history,

his people,

it

is

The book

this

but

is

of prophecy in the

supposed that he died

fifth

the

In

first

year of Jehoiachin's Little

He was

held

known

is

of

the highest

in

His writings

important occasions.

all

prophecies

of his

meagre.

twenty years.

in exile.

and was consulted by them upon

formerly been a priest

near the Chebar, a river flowing

settled, with other exiles,

His prophecies cover a period of more than

captivity.

his

them was Ezekiel, the son of

only account of his

the

furnishes

chapter

of

Euphrates, and here his prophetic ministry began.

the

into

reign

are characterized by a lofty spirit of devotion and moral earnestness, and he exhibited the

most intense

zeal

and strength of purpose

accompanying engraving the Valley of

the

in

artist gives

his character

in

set

The hand me down

Dry Bones, which represented

of the

Lord was upon me, and

unhappy condition of

the

was

And

O

:

bones

I

will

sinews upon you, and

and ye

in you, "

So

I

the

cause breath

open valley; and

And

to

enter

Thus

saith the

and ye

into you,

shall

know was commanded

and ye

prophesied as

I

shall

that :

am

I

and as

the sinews and the flesh

came up upon them, and

was no breath

Then

them.

said he unto me,

man, and say unto the wind, Thus

and breathe upon these

me, and

the-

I

to pass

lo,

by

they were

O

answered,

Lord

Lord God unto these

And

live.

will

I

lay

the Lord. I

prophesied, there was a noise, and

And when

behold a shaking, and the bones came together, bone to his bone.

breath,

me

bring up flesh upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath

will

shall live,

in

and

the Spirit of the Lord,

in

Again he said unto me, Prophesy upon these bones, and say unto

ye dry bones, hear the word of the Lord.

Behold,

;

out

he said unto me, Son of man, can these bones live?

God, thou knowest.

them

in

but with

Israel,

of bones, and caused

full

them round about, and behold, there were very many very dry.

In the

life.

me

carried

the midst of the valley which

in

his high calling.

in

a thrilling and powerful presentation of the vision

promises of consolation and of a renewal of the national "

and

saith

slain, that

the

they

breath came into them, and they

the skin covered

beheld,

I

them above

;

lo,

but there

Prophesy unto the wind, prophesy, son of

Lord God

may

live.

lived,

;

Come

So

I

from the four winds,

commanded

prophesied as he

and stood up upon

O

their

feet,

an ex-

ceeding great army.

Then he said unto me, Son of man, these bones are the whole house of Israel behold they say Our bones are dried, and our hope is lost, we are cut off for our parts. Therefore prophesy and say unto them, Thus saith the Lord God, Behold, O my people, I will open your graves, and cause you to come up out of your graves, and bring you into the land of Israel. And ye shall know that I am the Lord, when I have opened your graves, O my "

:

:

up out of your graves, And

people, and brought you shall live,

spoken

it,

and

I

shall place

and performed

you

it,

in

your own land

saith the Lord."

48

:

shall

put

then shall ye

my

know

spirit in

that

I

you, and ye

the

Lord have


DANIEL.

ANIEL,

called

by Gabriel the

consistent figures to us in the

the Jewish

ment from

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; consistent

the king's table, desired

the fourth of

the great prophets

;"

"

as

He

story.

is

introduced"

being one of the four personages of

and water

eat,

and although nothing

into high favor

forms one of the most

Assyrian court, refusing the dainty nutri-

royal

pulse to

Old Testament

in

name

his

the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

probable that he was of noble or even of royal descent. ing drew to a close, he comes

of God,"

greatly beloved

in itself

book which bears

captivity (b.c. 604) who, at

"

"

is

As

to drink."

known

He

considered

is

of his lineage,

it

seems

his three years of court train-

on the occasion of Nebuchadnezzar's dream,

which he alone was found capable of translating.

A

second dream of the king's he also

afterwards interprets, and yet again the handwriting which appeared on the wall at Belshazzar's feast.

prosperity,

Under and

it

the reign of Darius,

was

in

"

the

on the banks of the Tigris." prophet, scroll

in

third

and

at the accession of Cyrus, he

year of Cyrus

The contemplative

hand, by the river-side,

is

" that

"

he saw his

figure given us

last

still

recorded vision

by M. Dore of the great

simple and grand, wedded withal

of the sadness of a captive's mien.

49

retained his

to

something


,

%-.

49 jK _-


THE FIERY FURNACE. See Daniel

EBUCHADNEZZAR,

the king,

made a

iii.

magnificent image of gold and set

the plain of Dura, in the province of Babylon."

kingdom were summoned

to

words: "At what time ye hear the sound of the cornet,

and

all

kinds of music, ye

King hath

set

up

fall

and whoso

;

falleth

not

down and

the great officers of his in

harp, sackbut, psaltery, dulcimer,

worshipeth, shall the

same hour be

captivity,

and, accused by their enemies, are

will

summoned

not

comply with

before

the

this

than

it

lives.

was wont

They to

cast

idolatrous

king, where, notwith-

standing his anger, they are yet given another opportunity of worshipping the image

saving their

these

But Shadrach, Meshach and Abed-nego, the three

companions of Daniel, men of the Jewish ;

flute,

up "in

down, and worship the golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the

into the midst of a burning fiery furnace."

command

all

and proclamation was made

dedication,

its

Then

it

refuse and are cast into the furnace heated

be heated." *

50

and

"one seven times more


SO


— —— : :

——

;

; ;

BELSHAZZARS FEAST. ELSHAZZAR was

the last of the Babylonian kings, and it is claimed, on good authority, by Sir Henry Rawlinson and others that he was the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar, and only shared with his father Nabonadius in the government of the kingdom but that on the invasion of the Persians Nabonadius advanced to meet Cyrus, leaving Belshazzar upon the throne in Babylon. This agrees with the Bible account that Daniel was the third ruler By diverting the river into another channel, Cyrus and his army were enabled in the kingdom. While the Persians were thus engaged, at dead of to march into the city through its dry bed. night, the court of Belshazzar were holding a grand feast in the palace. During their revelry the king ordered the sacred vessels belonging to the Temple of Jerusalem, which had been carried away by Nebuchadnezzar, to be brought forth, and from these they "drank wine, and praised the gods of gold and of silver, of brass, of iron, of wood, and of stone. In the same hour came forth fingers of a man's hand, and wrote over against the candlestick upon the plaster of the wall of the king's palace, and the king saw the part of the hand that wrote. Then the king's countenance was changed, and his thoughts troubled him, so that the joints of his loins were loosed, and his knees smote one against another." He hastily summoned the Then the wise men of Babylon but none of them could interpret the strange characters. queen remembered Daniel, as one in whom was "light and understanding anu excellent wisdom." He was called, and thus read and interpreted the handwriting: "Mene, mene, tekel This is the interpretation of the thing: Mene God hath numbered thy kingdom, upharsin. and finished it. Tekel thou art weighed in the balances and art found wanting. Peres thy kingdom is divided, and given to the Medes and Persians." The artist has portrayed this scene most impressively. Before the sumptuous court stands the prophet, pointing towards the fateful message he was called to decipher, while from the wall upon which the fear-smitten revellers gaze is poured down a flood of supernal light, dazzling the beholders, and illumining the richly sculptured walls and brilliant costumes. The massive architecture of the palace adds much to the effectiveness of the picture. Byron has ;

;

thus graphically described the scene

The king was on his throne, The Satraps throng'd the hall;

A

Chaldea's seers are good, But here they have no skill And the unknown letters stood

A

And

thousand bright lamps shone O'er that high festival. thousand cups of gold In Judah deem'd Divine Jehovah's vessels hold

The

Untold and awful

godless heathen's wine.

A

In that same hour and hall, The fingers of a hand

captive in the land, stranger and a youth He heard the king's command, He saw that writing's truth.

A

Came forth against the wall And wrote as if on sand The fingers of a man

The lamps around were bright, The prophecy in view;

;

A

solitary

Along

And

hand

He

the letters ran traced them like a wand.

saw, and shook, bade no more rejoice All bloodless wax'd his look,

tremulous his voice.

"Let the men of lore appear The wisest of the earth, the words of fear royal mirth."

Which mar our

it

on that night, it

true

'Belshazzar's grave is made, His kingdom pass'd away He in the balance weighed Is light and worthless clay.

And

And expound

read

The morrow proved

The monarch

And

still.

Babel's men of age Are wise and deep in lore But now they were not sage They saw but knew no more.

The shroud

his

robe of

state,

His canopy the stone; 51

The Mede is at his gate, The Persian on his throne."


5i


DANIEL IN THE LIONS' DEN. See Daniel

lARIUS

the

kingdom.

Mede had been

a decree

chief over

in these

and the princes against him.

his faithfulness to his

God.

words: "That whosoever

days, save of thee,

O

To

They

this

which, according to the law of the

Medes and

is

cast into the lions' den.

him

—held

in

God

and

"

or

The

is

his

to establish

man

for thirty

king, evidently

is

thereby cunningly ensnared, and, to the

God

preserves him

;

pit,

and

his enemies,

52

by

there to be instantly

subdued around

a successful and spirited delineation

miraculous scene.

only

signed the writing and the decree,"

figure of Daniel, with the ferocious beasts

check by an invisible power

them

to

end they persuade the king

order of the equally ensnared and angry monarch, are thrown into the

The resigned and noble

heart, excites

Persians, once signed, could not be altered.

Daniel, faithful in his daily supplications to God,

sincere grief of the king,

human is

King, he shall be cast into the den of lions." it,

rulers in his

the

therefore, unable to find

ask a petition of any

shall

flattered at this proposal, foolishly consented to

destroyed.

all

Daniel's government, resolved to attack him on what

flaw in

vulnerable point

pleased to set Daniel

This preference, acting as usual on the envy of the

the other presidents fault or

vi.

of this


52


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

THE PROPHET AMOS. See

MOS, one

Amos

was

of the minor prophets,

i.-ix.

called

from humble

herd at Tekoa, and also a dresser of sycamore about 800

is

king of also

Israel).

against

abound

the

His

directed. in

the things In the

intolerable

style

clear

is

oppression

of

the

earlier years.

him

familiar to

in his

There

and

figure solemn

objects; as well as

is

little

majestic,

variety in

It

is

wall,

towers and walls. scene suggests

is

and

The

at the

rest

is

one of utter

far horizon

line are

sins,

as

His writings

employments

supposed that he wrote at Tekoa.

into

lost

in

the solitude of his

strong relief against a

bril-

In the foreground a small cluster

stunted cactus struggles through the sand and rocks, the dull

by a projecting

to agricultural

his staff,

and brought

the landscape.

Jeroboam,

and against these

rising to a lofty strain.

engraving we see the prophet leaning upon

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

date of his prophecies

were the prophet's sternest rebukes

and vigorous, sometimes

most

having been a shep-

king of Judah, and

idolatry,

poor,

and

The

trees.

Uzziah,

was a period of luxury and gross

allusions to natural scenes

own thoughts liant sky.

It

(during the reigns of

B.C.

life,

level space

beyond

is

broken

dimly traced the outlines of the

but a vast expanse of earth and sky.

The

of

city's

feeling which the

loneliness.

53

N,

V-*5

"


JONAH CALLING NINEVEH TO REPENTANCE. See Jonah

ONAH,

i-iii.

the son of Amittai, one of the five minor

Hebrew

prophets, was born in

Gathhepher, a small town in Lower Galilee. But few details of his life are given, and these are found only in the book which bears his name, although allusion is made It is supposed that he lived during the reign of to him in other portions of the Scriptures. Jeroboam II., and some writers maintain that he 'was the first of the prophets. The book of Jonah begins with the statement that the word of the Lord came unto him, saying, "Arise, go to Nineveh, that great city, and cry against it for their wickedness is come up before me." Nineveh was the capital of the Assyrian empire, and one of the largest and wealthiest cities of antiquity "an exceeding great city of three days' journey," says the prophet surrounded by a wall twenty feet high, and so wide that three chariots could be driven side by side upon it. It abounded in gardens, in rare sculptured temples and in sumptuous palaces panelled with alabaster, one of them covering an area of nearly one hundred acres. It was this city, which in the plenitude of its splendor and power had given itself up to wickedness and debauchery, that Jonah was commanded to warn of approaching destruction. Fearing to execute this command, he " rose up to flee unto Tarshish, from the presence of the Lord," embarking at Joppa on a small vessel going thither. During the voyage a storm arose of such violence as to threaten the destruction of the vessel. The mariners were in great fear, and said to each other, "Come and let us cast lots, that we may know for whose cause this evil is upon us. So they cast lots, and the lot fell upon Jonah." He was thrown overboard, but was swallowed by a great fish, which did not devour him, but, at the end of three days and nights, cast him forth upon dry land, and he was again sent to Nineveh. Passing into the city a day's journey, he began to preach, announcing the destruction of the city within forty days and exhorting the people to repentance. They believed him, and did repent. A fast was proclaimed, and even the king put on sackcloth and sat in ashes. "And God saw their works, that they turned from their evil way, and God repented of the evil that he had said that he would do unto them, and ;

he did

it

The

not."

shown in the engraving, betrays itself both in the attitudes and countenances of his listeners. A group surrounds him, apparently made up of all classes. Some appear awed by the majesty of his presence and others overcome by the commanding force of his words; some gaze upon him curiously almost distrustfully, while others have bowed their heads or prostrated themselves in humble contrition before him. Even the more The picture also distant groups have been aroused by the solemn fervor of his exhortation. A palace helps to convey some idea of the architectural magnificence of "the great city." of its massiveness rising in the background, one vast colonnade above another, shows the structures, while the variety of their design and the richness of their ornamentation are seen There also is the winged bull with in the foreground, in pedestal, shaft and sculptured capital. human head, a form of symbolism common among the Assyrians, found on all their monumental remains, and still the admiration of the historian and the archaeologist. effect of Jonah's appeal, as

54


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;


DANIEL CONFOUNDING THE PRIESTS OF BEL. See Apocrypha

N

this story

Cyrus

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; "Bel

represented as King of Persia, and Daniel as standing high

is

the royal estimation.

It

this idol

totally

wonder

the king's

is

the idol that he himself adores.

though he holds

to please his royal master,

and the Dragon."

that

favorite does not worship

Daniel, faithful to his God, will not comply, even in his

Bel every day a large quantity of food

hands the power of

accustomed

is

to

life

and death.

Before

be placed, which, as

it

has

disappeared each morning, the king sincerely believes to have been consumed by the

from which he infers that Bel must be a god indeed.

idol,

his

in

the priests are

summoned, and

they, in order to

Daniel denies

this;

accordingly

prove that the viands are consumed by the

image, propose that the daily offering of food shall be brought as usual into the temple, and the doors sealed, so that

morning, Daniel shall

none can enter

die,

to disturb

it;

therefore the food has vanished in the

if

as having spoken blasphemy against Bel

they profess themselves ready to perish.

The food

;

but,

brought, the doors sealed, but Daniel

is

has taken the precaution to have the floor of the temple strewn with ashes of the king. night, of

The

priests,

entering with their families by a hidden way, are

consuming the provisions placed before the

themselves safe from

all

otherwise, then

if

statue,

in

the presence

the habit, every

in

and thus they evidently consider

detection, and, with the usual regardlessness of idolators for

bloodshed, would only rejoice at Daniel's destruction.

human

But the morning comes; the king and

Daniel enter.

"And the king said, And as soon as whole.

Daniel, are the seals whole?

mark and

and held the king

well

And

who showed him the table.

him and

art,

O

Bel,

and with thee

that he should not

whose footsteps are

children.

he

said,

Yea,

O

he had opened the door, the king looked upon the

with a loud voice, Great thou Daniel,

And

these.

And

go

in,

and

the king said,

is

no deceit at

said, I

all.

King, they be

table,

and cried

Then laughed

Behold now the pavement, and

see the footsteps of men,

women

then the king was angry, and took the priests with their wives and children,

the privy door,

where they came

in

and consumed such things as were upon

Therefore the king slew them, and delivered Bel into Daniel's power, who destroyed his

temple." 55


HELIODORUS PUNISHED See II Maccabees

NE

iii.

Simon, of the tribe of Benjamin, who was made governor of the temple,

out with

the

governor of Celosyria and Phenice, and

sums of money, so

account of the

sacrifices,

to

fell

And when

he could not

Apollonius, the son of Thraseas,

who then was

high priest about disorder in the

overcome Onias, he gat him

infinite

THE TEMPLE.

IN

city.

him that the treasury

told

in

Jerusalem was

full

of

that the multitude of their riches, which did not pertain to the

was innumerable, and that

was possible

it

bring

to

all

into the

king's hand."

Apollonius then comes to Seleucus, king of Asia, and informs him of

He comes

then commissions his treasurer, Heliodorus, to bring him the money.

and questions the high up

for

the relief of

property.

priest of the city,

widows and

in

some of

fatherless children," but that

command

in

The high

of his master.

*

*

horse with a terrible rider upon him, and adorned with a very

Heliodorus with his fore

complete harness of gold.

feet,

the ground, and

and put him

the

full all

the

laid

was private

and the whole

priest

city

Suddenly, "as he was there

seemed

covering, and he ran fiercely,

fair

that he that sat

upon

the horse

had

in

many

apparel,

who stood by him on

sore stripes.

And

Heliodorus that

either side,

fell

and

suddenly unto

were with him took him

into a litter."

salient

movement

horse and his avenging in those fleeing

it

"there appeared unto them an

was compassed with great darkness; but they

This engraving conveys,

apprehend the

and

and comely

scourged him continually, and gave him

to

money

Moreover, two other young men appeared before him, notable

in strength, excellent in beauty,

up,

Jerusalem

great distress; the priests and the multitude also sought aid through prayer.

present himself, with his guard, about the treasury,"

at

also

it

who

attempting to possess himself of

"Nevertheless, Heliodorus executed that which was decreed."

and smote

to

informs him "that there was such

Heliodorus, however, determined to persevere

the treasure, according to the

were now

who

this treasure,

in

a masterly way, the

and picturesque points of of which his theme

rider,

is

artist's

his subject,

This

capable.

with the attendant angels,

in

from the stately precincts of the temple. 56

sense of grandeur, his readiness

and is

his

power of representing

shown

in the

the fallen leader

to

splendid winged

and

his guard,

and


56


THE NATIVITY. See Luke

ii.

|0 the company of shepherds watching their flocks by night, the announcement

by the "Angel of the Lord" of the the flocks are fed by night

birth of Jesus.

itself

profoundly upon the character.

these sultry lands, where

In

and housed by day, the shepherds have the lonely

watches for undisturbed thought, and to devout and earnest It

men

was therefore appropriate

made

is

it

is

night-

a time that impresses

that the

"Shepherd of our

Souls" should thus have been announced to these simple and undoubtedly earnest-hearted men. Their "glorifying and praising

shepherds that the future

Lord of

all,

artist

the

God" shows

has depicted.

Redeemer

signification

all

power

in

utter

The

—lying on

unerringly to the deepest chords of the

the spirit of their mind,

his

it is

this visit

of the

infant Saviour,

lovely in his helplessness

mother's knees,

is

human

weakness

and

—and

heart, for

it

57

a representation that appeals

has also another and sweetest

endears the sacred character of

mother, as protectress of the infant Christ, as nothing else can.

— the

The

picture

is

woman and

very charming


57


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

THE STAR

IN

THE

See Matthew

HIS most

interesting incident in the

EAST.

ii.

of Christ

life

mentioned by

is

St.

Matthew

Tradition, in adding to the simple narrative of the Apostle, has adorned

ways,

among which

also the constituting in the Biblical

length,

The number, however,

them kings.

much owing

in

number of the Wise men, and the Magi is left totally undecided

of

increasing their retinue to an indefinite extent.

useless discussion has been to

expended upon

the enthusiasm roused

Christian times, in the search after sacred

are discovered somewhere in the East. in

Much

this subject.

by the Empress Helena, during the

earlier

bodies of the Magi

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;these

relics,

primitive pilgrims, considered by the church as "the

be placed

various

account, and the artist has, in his gorgeously oriental rendering of the incident,

learned and also

to

in

are the appointing of three as the

taken a perfectly allowable liberty

At

it

alone.

the supposed first

Gentile worshippers of the Christ"

They are conveyed

at

once to Constantinople, there

the great church of "St. Sophia;" afterwards they are transported to Milan,

and subsequently,

in the

times of Frederick Barbarossa, from there conveyed to the magnificent

cathedral at Cologne, where

now

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the most honored

they finally rest

This grand procession, peculiarly striking

from

the

of

all its

stately camels,

traditional relics.

with their showy

trappings and the majestic figures which surmount them, fades away into the midnight distance

with a sumptuous and half-spectral fact,

effect,

a caravan of superb suggestions,

remarkably provocative to the imagination

that, in

;

it is,

in

conjunction with the profound appropriateness

of the lustrous heavens, with their Herald Star dominant over beautiful picture.

58

all,

forms an exceptionally


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

THE FLIGHT INTO See Matthew

ITTER mourning and woe were to slay Jesus

of the

and

his

was

baffled;

Lord appeared

to

be

my

ii.

brought upon Bethlehem by Herod; but

when

Joseph

in

the wise

men had

night,

and departed

fulfilled

into

When

I

his

purpose

departed, "behold the angel

a dream, saying, Arise, and take the

mother, and flee into Egypt, and be thou there until

seek the young child to destroy him.

by

for

EGYPT.

bring thee word

:

young

child

Herod

for

he arose he took the young child and

his

Egypt, and was there until the death of Herod: that

which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Out of Egypt have

will

mother it

might

I

called

son."

The father,

artist

has

mother and

here child,

presented a very sweet and tender scene. with their plodding, patient beast

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;have

just

The little group mounted some rising

ground, from which Joseph throws a backward glance of troubled watchfulness, while Mary's countenance, raised to heaven, seems to rest alone unconscious, dreams in

its

in

the help she so divinely seeks

;

the child,

mother's arms a wakeful dream under the deep, calm skies. 59


THE MASSACRE OF THE INNOCENTS. See Matthew

EROD, who

and thus established

2,7,

Senate King- of Judea, conquered

his authority

over the whole country.

was signalized throughout by the most wanton deeds of

reign falling

Roman

had been appointed by the

Jerusalem B. C.

even

ii.

upon

his

kindred and the nobles of

court.

his

It

His

vengeance

cruelty, his

had been predicted by the

prophets that there would come a Prince of the house of David to restore and reign over the nation and purify the Church, and this prophecy

men came

the wise

in the East,

it

was

And

among

And

written by the prophet:

the Princes of Juda

;

what time the

young

which they saw

When

child was.

"And when mother, and

fell

they were

come

for

;

it

till

search

again, that

they had heard the king they departed, and

lo,

came and stood over where

gifts,

house, they

the

into

down and worshipped him

:

saw the young

and when they had opened

gold and frankincense and myrrh.

I

may

the star

the

young

And

child with

Mary

his

their treasures, they

being warned of

God

in

a

own country another

*

*

"Then Herod, when he saw and sent

Go and

said,

me word

dream, that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their *

demanded

land of Juda, art not the least

he sent them to Bethlehem, and

went before them,

and

troubled,"

they saw the star they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

presented unto him

way."

"

come a Governor that shall rule my people the Wise men, inquired of them diligently

privily called

When

also.

the East

in

in the

and when ye have found him, bring

child,

come and worship him

thou Bethlehem

And

star appeared.

diligently for the

whose Star they had seen

they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judea

for out of thee shall

Then Herod, when he had

Israel.

when

hence,

;

Calling together the Chief Priests and Scribes, "he

of them where Christ should be born. it is

the Jews,

keeping with the character of Herod that he should be

should seek to destroy him.

thus

King of

to Jerusalem, inquiring for the in

was cherished by the Jews

forth,

and slew

all

that he

was mocked of the Wise men, was exceeding wroth,

the children that

were

Bethlehem, and

in

in all the coasts thereof,

from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently inquired of the

Wise men.

Then was

fulfilled that

which was spoken by Jeremy the Prophet, saying, In

Ramah

was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping

for

her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not." It is

painful to dwell

and yet the

upon a scene of such wild and

picture, with all

monstrous deed.

The

its

literalness,

and hopeless frenzy

of the

mothers are

closely are sacrificed with them.

By

From all

is

here portrayed,

can scarcely exhibit adequately the horror of the

begun the work of blood, have abandoned

soldiers of Herod, having

themselves to the most reckless cruelty.

ruthless ferocity as

their

in vain

the stairway

;

is

vengeance there

and those who

is

no escape.

shield their

almost overtaken, she can go no farther, and, prone upon the ground, as a she covers them with her body as her only shield.

60

little

ones too

a mother with her three babes, awaiting,

with the calmness of despair, the destruction to which they are surely doomed.

fate,

The agony

Surrounded,

pitiful effort

against


6o


THE DOCTORS.

JESUS QUESTIONING See Luke

HIS scene

is

laid in the

Temple

ii.

at Jerusalem.

doctors and expounders of the law

An

earnest group of

—are gathered around

men

—learned They not

the child Jesus.

alone listen intently to his words, but their features show the unfeigned astonishment

and awe with which they regard him, as old doctrines first

and power of uttering new

public ministry of Christ

"Now

his

fulfilled

Joseph and

thus recorded in

is

his

old,

the days, as they returned, the child Jesus tarried behind in Jerusalem,

But they supposing him

it.

their kinsfolk

to

have been

that after three days they found

him

in

And when

And

all

my

father's business?

And he went down mother kept in favor with

all

And

that heard

company,

And when

came

it

to pass,

him were astonished

they saw him, they were amazed

unto him, Son, why hast thou thus dealt with us? he said unto them,

And

and

the Temple, sitting in the midst of the Doctors, both

hearing them, and asking them questions.

understanding and answers.

in the

and acquaintance.

they found him not, they turned back again to Jerusalem, seeking him.

about

And when And when

they went up to Jerusalem, after the custom of the feast.

mother knew not of

And

of this

Luke:

went a day's journey and they sought him among

sorrowing.

The account

unfolded before them.

truths, are

parents went to Jerusalem every year, at the feast of the Passover.

he was twelve years they had

marvellous knowledge and insight, his grasp of

his

How

is it

:

Behold, thy father and

that ye sought

me?

and I

his

at his

mother said

have sought thee

Wist ye not

that

I

must be

they understood not the saying which he spake unto them.

with them, and

came

these sayings in her heart.

to Nazareth,

And

and was subject unto them: But

Jesus increased

in

wisdom and

stature,

his

and

God and man."

The composition of the picture is admirable harmonious and well balanced throughout. There is much skill shown in the grouping, the attitudes are unconstrained and graceful, and the intense and varying emotions expressed in the countenances exhibit in a marked degree the artist's

power of expression. 61


OT


JESUS HEALING See Matthew

HAT a

gathering of

emaciated child idiocy,

hem

a sick

man

of his garment, and

certainly here

is

in

still

human

THE iv.

misery, helplessness

and disease

her arms, another bearing one

who has

The Saviour

— presses the forehead of the

child,

in

One

Divine

the midst

and

tells

the story with pathetic power.

62

;

— the

for

pitying friend

such alone could

fountain from which

while the rest await the power of his

miraculous touch to be delivered of their "diseases and torments." realistic,

with her

the hopeless look of

some

another, seemingly half dead, supported by

help in sorrows and extremities like these. all

The mother,

!

prostrate on the ground, a wretched cripple straining to touch the

wretchedness enough to demand the aid of

health shall flow to

SICK.

The

picture

is

sternly


SERMON ON THE MOUNT. See Matthew

ERE we

v,

vi,

vii.

behold the Saviour delivering the most sublime discourse that ever

We

mortal ears.

are told that his fame had already spread through

that great multitudes of people followed him. into a mountain,"

knowledge and were astonished Scribes."

good

will

dramatic,

It

and poured forth

"And

truth.

it

at his doctrine.

seemed

The

and well balanced

umbrageous

trees,

the

to pass

For he taught them as one having design

is

announcement of Enthroned on

followers the solemn

to the world, so

long

in

the

leader and

and sublime

darkness, those

authority,

his mission,

first

skill

mountain

comforter truths

is

and not as the

"Peace on

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; picturesque side,

new

and

beneath the

expounding

of the

earth,

to

his

dispensation,

rays of Divine benediction and

truth that henceforth shall widen into the full'and perfect day.

63

and

these sayings, the people

a superb specimen of Dore's

throughout.

Syria,

wonderful compendium of Divine

when Jesus had ended

Divinely commissioned

awakened and wondering and thus opening

came

all

on

Seeing the multitudes, he went up

to their rapt attention this

like the first great public

toward men."

"

fell


CHRIST STILLING THE TEMPEST. See Matthew

I

HE

viii.

scene here so vividly portrayed represents the incident, recorded in Matthew, of

Christ speaking to the troubled waters.

Seeing the multitudes gathered about them,

Christ and His Disciples entered into a ship

While

upon the shore of the Sea of

crossing, "there arose a great tempest in the Sea,

with the waves

:

but he was asleep.

Lord, save us:

we

Then he

and rebuked

arose,

marvelled, saying,

perish.

And

he

And saith

the winds

What manner

of

his Disciples

unto them,

insomuch that the ship was covered

came

Why

to him,

and awoke him, saying,

are ye fearful,

O

ye of

and the Sea, and there was a great calm.

man

is

this,

64

Galilee.

that even the winds

little

But the

faith?

men

and the Sea obey him."


THE DUMB MAN POSSESSED. See Matthew

HE

ix.

castellated steep with solitary palms against a clear, pale sky,

the action of this scene.

The miraculous

is

a charming

foil

to

deliverance of the unhappy demoniac,

sealed up in his silent misery, holds a wider and profounder beauty than any nature

can give.

The haunting of sorrow and

poignancy to wretchedness

itself;

ponents of nature and art around rejoice

and add

its

pain,

where

all

else

is

rich

and

fair,

seems

to

add a

yet this blighted soul, so jarring upon the beautiful comit,

is,

through the Master's Divine influence, set free to

jubilant quota to the general praise

of bird or lute, and in keeping with the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a song of gratitude

harmony of nature and '

65

meeter than music

the heart of man.


CHRIST IN THE SYNAGOGUE. See Matthew

ND

when he was come

into his

own

xiii.

country, he taught

insomuch that they were astonished, and

and these mighty works?

Mary? and not

all

his

Whence

Whence,

not this the Carpenter's son?

then, hath this

man

all

And

man

this

wisdom,

not his mother called his sisters, are they

these things?"

own country and amid his own people, pours out in their synagogue his instruction. The attentive hearers are at first astonished at " this wisdom

and these mighty works," and wonder whence they come.

when they remember

were among them. spiritually

An

Is

their synagogue,,

Lord, in his

gracious words of

him,

in

hath this

brethren James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas?

with us?

Our

Is

said,

them

and

that he

is

But envy quickly arises against

"the Carpenter's son," and that his brethren and sisters

and

So

"

they were

offended

physically,

"

he did not

many mighty works

in

him,"

admirable group, with the resplendent figure of Christ 66

to

there,

their own' bitter loss,

because of their

in their midst.

both

unbelief."'


:

THE

See

HE

whole

spirit

Mark

ii.

and teaching of Jesus was opposed

narrowness of the Pharisees.

was made up of force,

ON THE SABBATH.

DISCIPLES PLUCKING CORN

With them

set observances

and

to the cold formalism

was measured by

life

With Jesus

rites.

developing and exalting the moral nature, and prompting

and

was a

religion

to

it

rule,

and intense religion vitalizing

noblest deeds.

Hence

the Pharisees were ever ready with questionings and rebukes, and watchful for every apparent

This incident recorded

infraction of the law. for his

wandering from the beaten track

in

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the

Mark

presents them as openly rebuking him

laws and customs of their fathers.

detecting the narrow spirit of their creed, opens up before them, the strength, fullness

"And 'it came

and

why do

to pass, that

he went through the corn

they on the Sabbath day that which

Have ye never read what David were with him?

How

did,

them which were with him? for the

Sabbath

:

And

is

is

The whole scene

God

striking illustration,

is

fields

And

on the Sabbath day, and

his

the Pharisees said unto him,

not lawful

?

And

he said unto them,

and was a hungered,

he,

and they

that

in

the days of Abiathar the high Priest,

eat,

but for the Priests, and gave also to

he said unto them, The Sabbath was made for man, and not

man

is

the noble central figure,

other the transgressing Disciples.

is

need,

not lawful to

Therefore the Son of

In the picture Christ

teacher.

when he had

he went into the house of

and did eat the Shew-bread, which

man

this

liberty of his teachings

disciples began, as they went, to pluck the ears of corn.

Behold,

in

Christ,

The

Lord

also of the Sabbath."

on one side the eager Pharisees, on the

attitude of Christ

is

that of the calm

and benignant

suffused with the golden, mellow light of harvest time.

67


THE WATER.

JESUS WALKING ON

See

ESUS,

just

mountain

and cross

was

in

the

beholds them trouble,

"

the

to pray."

miracle

"toiling

in

sea,

and

five

thousand, had

the

lake.

and he alone on the

rowing;

for

the

his disciples to enter

the

a

a ship

And when even was come, the ship land." From the mountain height he

"

wind was contrary." "

" into

retired

Mindful of their

toil

and

Saviour comes to them, walking over

The affrighted disciples cry out, for they supposed it had been a spirit. " Be of good cheer The wind ceased and It is I be not afraid." terror are alike at rest. The dim "ship" against the dawning light, the

speaks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; their

the

Meanwhile he had constrained

about the fourth watch of the night

The Saviour

vi.

of feeding

to the other side of

midst of the

the swelling waves.

their toil

after

Mark

:

;

wind-swept figure of our Lord and the boisterous sea are miraculous scene. 68

all

beautiful

renderings of this


68


CHRIST'S

ENTRY INTO JERUSALEM. See

HRIST'S one hour that, after the

the final

xi.

of earthly triumph has come;

gloomy

scene.,

Mark

it

all,

The

the graceful

the burning burst of sunset

day, heralds, in the far horizon, the falling night.

Soon comes

But now, with rejoicing thousands, with branches of palm and

acclamations of joy and praise, he enters the city that he loves, dies to save.

is

among

the very foes

hoary walls, the thronging people, the lowly beast that bears the

palms and

fair

Judean sky, are the

striking scene.

69

rich

whom

he

Lord of

and appropriate adjuncts of

this


AND THE TRIBUTE MONEY.

JESUS

See

!

HE

Priests

chiei

Mark

xii.

and Scribes and Elders of Jerusalem came

the Temple,

and when they began

Jesus as he

to

was

him as

to his authority,

he delivered to them the parable of the "wicked husbandman."

Then they be-

walking

came greatly

in

incensed, and

"

to question

sought to lay hold on him, but feared the people

for

;

they

knew that he had spoken the parable against them and they left him, and went their way. "And they send unto him certain of the Pharisees and of the Herodians, to catch him And when they were come, they say unto him, Master, we know that thou art in his words. for thou regardest not the person of men, but teachest the true, and carest for no man ;

;

way of God in truth: Is it lawful to give tribute to Cesar, or not? Shall we give, or shall But he, knowing their hypocrisy, said unto them, Why tempt ye me ? bring we not give ?

me this

said

a penny, that

I

may

see

it.

image and superscription

?

And And

they brought

And

it.

they said unto

he saith unto them,

unto them, Render to Cesar the things that are Cesar's,

are God's.

And

And Jesus and to God the

him, Cesar's.

Whose

answering, things that

they marvelled at him."

This reply was not only a

fitting

rebuke

those

to

who were endeavoring

to

ensnare

him, but was a fine example of practical wisdom, showing the duty of conformity in sential

and proper ways

The calm

is

dignity

to the

customs and demands of society and of the

and nobleness expressed

distinction to the hardened, restless

and insidious 70

in

the countenance of

es-

state.

Jesus

faces of those gathered

all

is

in

marked

around him.


1

.

v Hi iiii

11,

I

1

iPffllHral

'Mfkm ,|

\\i

:

,i.

"i#

l

'.'^-^jV!'! !

Sii

»#

70

'

'''''•'V"

'si!

;

Sllif

I Bifl

,

Hi

ll'^llliiilll

liliilliiSi 5 If


:

THE WIDOW'S Mark

See

jHE episode

a most encouraging example of Christ's constant

and humble.

Their ways were wound around his heart, and

in this incident there shines forth a

of the offerings of the poor

is

xii.

is

of the widow's mite

notice of the poor

MITE.

double beauty; for not alone

his

encouragement

here to be noticed, but the deeper truth that the motive of the

giver was of higher value than the gift

itself,

the gift of the heart outweighing

the gift of

the purse

"And

many

treasury: and

she threw

how the people cast money into the And there came a certain poor widow, and

Jesus sat over against the treasury, and beheld

in

that

were

two mites, which made a

unto them, Verily

I

For

all

much.

farthing.

say unto you, that

have cast into the treasury. did cast in

rich, cast in

this

And

he called unto him his

poor widow hath cast more

they did cast in of their abundance

in :

disciples,

than

all

and

they which

but she of her want,

that she had, even all her living."

all

This conception of the

artist

is

quite in keeping with the spirit of the incident,

and

expressed with delicate grace and sentiment, the figure of the humble, shrinking and forgetful giver,

woman

who

is

saith

being strikingly opposed to that

evidently of those

who

"

of the ostentatious

cast in much." 7*

is

self-

and purse-proud public


THE DAUGHTER OF

RAISING OF

See Luke

N

this

Disciples, Peter,

James and John

in her anguish, at the foot of the

seems

to

viii.

touching and lovely picture the Master

just fallen into the sleep of death.

JAIRUS,

In

standing by the side of the maiden

is

background appear the three favored

the

while the bereaved mother has thrown herself,

;

couch whereon her daughter

be regarding the face of the beautiful young

girl,

Jesus, with

lies.

hand extended,

so soon to be restored to

life

and

health by his miraculous touch.

"And when he came and John, and the he

said,

Weep

she was dead. arise.

And

her meat.

And

her

And

man what was

is

And

not dead, but sleepeth.

he put them

spirit

no man

and the mother of the maiden.

father

not, she

into the house, he suffered

came

all

again,

out,

And

to all

go

in,

save Peter and James,

wept, and bewailed her; but

they laughed him to scorn, knowing that

and took her by the hand, and

called, saying,

and she arose straightway; and he commanded

her parents were astonished

:

but he charged them that they should

done." 72

Maid,

to give tell

no


THE GOOD SAMARITAN. See Luke

HE

x.

among thieves has always been of interest to Biblical readers, both young and old. The whole account is so graphic, so replete with signification and so happy in its appeal to human sympathy with woe, that, like a tale oft told and well beloved, neither its moral nor its memory dies away. "A certain man went down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell among thieves, which stripped him of his raiment, and wounded him, and departed, leaving him half dead. And by chance there came down a certain Priest that way, and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side. And likewise a Levite, lively history of

when he was

at the place,

him who

fell

came and looked on

But a

him, and passed by on the other side.

came where he was; and when he saw him, he had compashim, and bound up his wounds, pouring in oil and wine, and set him

certain Samaritan, as he journeyed, sion on him,

on

his

own

and went

beast,

to

and brought him

to

an Inn, and took care of him.

And

on the morrow when

he departed, he took out two pence, and gave them to the host, and said unto him, Take care of him, and whatsoever thou spendest more,

when

I

come again

these three, thinkest thou, was neighbor unto him that

He

that

shewed mercy on him.

Then

fell

I

will

among

said Jesus unto him, Go,

the thieves

who

?

And he

of

said,

and do thou likewise."

Tn this beautiful design are finely exemplified the noble generosity

of the Samaritan,

Which now

repay thee.

and

fraternal solicitude

plods wearily along the lonely, rugged country, guiding the spirited steed

and keeping poised

in

indeed "neighbor."

The whole scene

the saddle the is

wounded and

nearly exhausted man, to

wrought out with exacting

whom

care, the tender

he was

and pitying

expression of the one and the suffering helplessness of the other being perfect, while the land-

scape and sky glow with the fervid beauty of the East. 73


ARRIVAL OF THE SAMARITAN AT THE See Luke

HE

x.

Samaritan has at length arrived at the "Inn."

sultry noontide

INN.

The weary road

is

passed, the

and the exhausting journey terminated, and the pitying reception

of an Eastern's hospitality comes to relieve and soothe both traveller and his charge; while in the utter prostration of the

wounded man,

as his preserver helps him off his beast at

the inn door, in the receiving landlord and the mistress, perhaps, of the house, looking over the balustrade,

we have admirable

meaning of the

touches, that convey, in the liveliest manner, the pregnant

tale.

74


;

THE PRODIGAL

SON.

See Luke xv.

HE

story of the

Prodigal's

return

is

considered a Gospel within a Gospel, and

is

It contains one of the most beautiful and instructive of the parables of Jesus. its graphic narrative not alone the wanderings of the erring soul, not alone those the first impulses of repentance, the longings for return to truth and duty; but also longings acted upon the sweet and tender reception and forgiveness of a father's love. The Scribes and Pharisees had rebuked Jesus, saying, "This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them," when he replied by this parable:

within

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

"And he

man had two

And

younger of them said to his father, And he divided unto them his living. Father, give me the portion of goods that falleth to me. And not many days after the yonnger man gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living. And when he had spent And he went and all, there arose a mighty famine in that land; and he began to be in want. And joined himself to a citizen of that country, and he sent him into the fields to feed swine. he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him. And when he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father's have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger! I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy son make me as one of thy hired servants. And he arose, and came But when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and to his father'. ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him. And the son said unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy son. But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet; and bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it: and let us eat, and be merry. For this my son was dead, and is alive again he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry. Now his elder son was in the field and as he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard music and dancing. And he called one of the servants, and asked what these things meant. And he said unto him, Thy brother is come and thy father hath killed the fatted calf, because he hath received him safe and sound. And he was angry, and would not go in therefore came his father out, and entreated him. And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends but as soon as this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf. And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine. It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad for this thy brother was dead, and he is alive again; and was lost, and is found." said, a certain

sons:

the

;

:

;

;

;

;

:

The scene presents

the father clasping to his heart the returning prodigal, his face raised

heaven with an earnest, almost painful look of thanksgiving, as if the grief of the past was scarcely as yet obliterated by the joy of the present. The servants, with animated gestures, hurrying towards him, with the welcoming dogs, form a charming adjunct to the picture. to

75


75


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

LAZARUS AND THE RICH MAN. See Luke xvi.

HERE

was a

certain rich

man, which was clothed

purple and fine linen, and fared

in

sumptuously every day: and there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, which was

and desiring

laid at his gate, full of sores,

the rich man's table: the beggar died,

and was carried by the angels in hell

he

lift

And

bosom.

in his

send Lazarus, that he may dip the

mented

up

into

said,

said,

Son,

And

beside

all

this,

remember

Then he

house; for

I

have

place of torment.

them. repent.

said,

five

I

now he

between us and you there

pray thee therefore,

brethren; that he

Abraham

father, that

may

saith unto him,

testify

from

to pass that

man also died, Abraham afar off,

rich

my

tongue; for

I

am

tor-

that thou in thy lifetime receivedst

is

comforted, and thou art tor-

is

a great gulf fixed;

which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to thence.

came

fell

Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and

of his finger in water and cool

tip

it

and seeth

in torments,

thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but

mented.

And

his sores.

Abraham's bosom: the

being

his eyes,

he cried and

But Abraham

this flame.

in

be fed with the crumbs which

moreover the dogs came and licked

and was buried; and and Lazarus

to

us, that

so that they

would come from

thou wouldest send him to

unto them,

lest they also

They have Moses and

my

come

the prophets; let

father's

into this

them hear

And he said, Nay, father Abraham: but if one went unto them from the dead, they will And he said unto him, If they hear not Moses and the prophets, neither will they be

persuaded, though one rose from the dead."

A

scene of

the pleading,

oriental

pitiful

banqueting

figure of Lazarus

is is

happily in

fine

portrayed contrast.

in

The

this

engraving, with which

accessories of the dogs

the beggar's only friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the imperious slave, warning off the mendicant's petition, and the

crowding servants above, are

telling

specimens of Dore's ever-fine side-touches. 76


THE PHARISEE AND PUBLICAN. See Luke

UMILITY in

in

contrast with pride or loftiness of heart

the Bible.

That God

is

with the lowly in spirit

as tenderest of sacred teachings.

betore

xviii.

Here

engraving

tells

the tale admirably

all-discerning Master, with his

"down

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

in the

to his

a theme strongly dwelt on

is

one of the

the self-satisfied

God, and, without seeking a blessing, returns to

Publican, confessing his sins, goes

is

house

his

loftiest

as well

Pharisee praises himself

home, while the self-humiliated

justified rather than the other."

The

kneeling Publican, the haughty Pharisee, and the

group of witnessing followers behind. 71


11


AND THE WOMAN OF SAMARIA.

JESUS

See John

OURNEYING (Sychem) the well, and

"

How

Samaria?

for

unto her,

If

woman

is

came

from the

forth

Then

"

to drink."

drink

a Jew, askest

knewest the

thou

who

of God, and

gift

of me,

draw water

unto him,

well,

and said unto

Jesus answered and said

me

Give

thee,

of the

give him

shall

saith

unto

Jesus

said

water?

and drank thereof

himself,

that

Whosoever drinketh

water that be

me

this

unto her, Go,

call

thy husband,

thou

neither

water,

;

The woman

truly.

in this

water

and come

and ye

unto her,

;

worship him must worship him

know

the

for

that Messias cometh, which

Jesus saith unto her,

things.

but the water that

I

life.

come

I

is

in

spirit

called

and

Christ

in

hast

hither

that speak unto thee

draw.

is

have no husband:

I

not thy husband

Jerusalem

:

in

the place

is

salvation

is

of the

Ye

truth.

God is a The woman is

worship

But the

Jews.

worship the Father

shall

where

me, the hour cometh, when

believe

am

to

perceive that thou art a prophet.

when he

;

shall

I

The woman

The woman answered and

Father seeketh such to worship him.

that

:

;

into everlasting

say, that in

Woman,

:

in

from

:

But whosoever

:

mountain, nor yet at Jerusalem, worship the Father.

and

truth

thirst

now

thou

we know what we worship for hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers

ye know not what

The

Jesus answered

?

again

hast well said,

said unto him, Sir, ;

thirst

hither.

Thou

whom

his cattle

not, neither

thirst

I

and

shall

never

shall

that

and he

mountain

Jesus saith

this

in

his children,

Jesus said unto her,

husbands

five

Our fathers worshipped men ought to worship. shall

him

give

him, Sir,

For thou hast had saidst

and

of this

give

shall

I

deep

is

to

Art thou greater than our father Jacob, which

him a well of water springing up

in

have no husband.

I

nothing to draw with, and the well

hast

living

her,

drinketh

thou

Sir,

at

woman of Samaria which am a woman of

that saith to

is

it

city to

saith the

Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans.

the

saith

gave us the

ye

me

thou, being

that

it

whence then hast thou

that

A woman

buy meat.

to

thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water.

;

said,

"Jacob's Well," his disciples having gone into the city

at

Jesus said unto her, Give

unto him,

drink

from Judea into Galilee, Jesus passed through Samaria, and being-

down alone

weary, sat

iv.

Spirit

come, he

in

spirit

and they

:

said unto him, I will

us

tell

all-

he."

This incident, so vividly and forcibly rendered by the Evangelist, receives an exquisite setting

in

the picture

and dignity of the dor.

A

before

text.

Stillness has crept

weary

a woman,

It

is

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;well

suited, in

its

poetic

quality, to

high noon, and the whole scene

over earth and sky, but the

figure, with calm,

who has come

us

unworldly countenance,

-is

the

bathed

in

measured grace meridian splen-

air vibrates with its fullness of

sits

at the well.

forth from the city light-hearted

Leaning upon

enough even

to

a stranger

who

not alone has told her

bright vistas of joy

all

its

curb,

converse with a

Jew, lingers, arrested, subdued and sobered by the quickening force of his speech is

warmth.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

for here

things she ever did, but has opened before her

and holiness and peace. 73


.

JESUS,

AND THE WOMAN TAKEN See John

HE

language employed by Jesus on

ADULTERY.

IN

viii.

occasion shows not only his ever-present

this

sense of justice, but also his deep sympathy for the distressed and ready compassion for the erring

:

"Jesus went unto the mount of

people came unto him

the Temple, and

all

the Scribes and

Pharisees

had

the

sayest thou

brought unto him a

They say unto

set her in the midst,

Now Moses

the very act.

This they

?

you, let him

wrote on the ground.

And

up

at the eldest,

it,

And

Jesus had

Woman, where are No man, Lord. And Jesus

last

:

up

lifted

The and most

and

sin

artist

?

is

alone,

left

man

hath no

has caught the

force

them

in

be condoned by sure

and his

significance of the

beautiful

repentance, and

picture.

Christ

lesson here

I

condemn

The has

sins

taught by Christ,

even of

She, crouching

at

his

polluted creature from his touch

;

feet,

stricken

and condemned, appears

while her clamorous accusers

ing knowledge and stern reproof. 79

this

fallen

no fear from contact with

her, but places his fingers gently on her shoulder as a token both of protection

giveness.

that

no more."

subtly inwrought

woman may

He

not.

and saw none

himself,

said unto her, Neither do

go,

But Jesus

and Jesus was

condemned thee? thee:

but what,

being convicted by their own conscience,

those thine accusers

said,

:

again he stooped down, and

but the woman, he said unto her,

She

adultery, in

in

and said unto them,

himself,

even unto the

When

the midst.

in

taken

such should be stoned

us, that

cast a stone at her.

first

they which heard

went out one by one, beginning

and the woman standing

;

woman was

on the ground, as though he heard them

lifted

into

sat

tempting him, that they might have to accuse him.

So when they continued asking him, he

among

morning he came again

down and taught them. And woman taken in adultery and when they and he

him, Master, this

fingers wrote

his

;

early in the

commanded

the law

in

said,

stooped down, and with

without sin

And

Olives.

to

seem abashed

and of

shrink

for-

like

a

at his search-


79


THE RESURRECTION OF LAZARUS. See John

O

the

little

household

xi.

Lazarus, Jesus was most tenderly attached. the

and

died,

Lord with ointment and wiped

first

therefore the

saw her weeping, and the Jews and was troubled, and

spirit,

come and them this

see.

Could not

said,

man

grave.

Jesus wept. this

was a

cave,

and a stone lay upon dead,

thank thee, that thou hast heard

laid.

me.

because of the people which stand by,

it.

forth,

bound about with a napkin.

God ?

And Jesus And I knew said

that

it,

bound hand and Jesus

saith

unto

of the Jews which came to Mary, and

on him.

Jesus

"When

jesus

And some cometh

time he

this

up

that

they

his

thou

may

eyes and

believe that

But some of them went

their

foot with grave-clothes

them, Loose

him and

let

to the Pharisees,

and

told

stone

always

:

hast

but

And

face

did,

I

sent

forth.

his

;

thou

if

him go.

had seen the things which Jesus

ways

stinketh

the

thou

and

:

stone.

said, Father,

me

nearest

to the

the

Then they took away

lifted

of

have caused that even

not unto thee, that

I

in

said unto him, Lord,

Take ye away

said,

unto him, Lord, by

saith

in the

he groaned

her,

himself,

in

and

each

loved him.

blind,

sick

fell

he thus had spoken, he cried with a loud voice, Lazarus, come

he that was dead, came

many

I

died."

They

?

how he

Jesus saith unto her, Said

from the place where the dead was

not

groaning

therefore again

Jesus

?

been dead four days.

And when

ye laid him

man, which opened the eyes of the

wouldest believe, thou shouldest see the glory of

me.

had

weeping which came with

also

said the Jews, Behold,

Martha, the sister of him that was for he hath

brother

Where have

said,

Then

should not have died

It

my

Lazarus

their distress, saying

in

brother

their

Mary which anointed

that

her hair."

his feet with

been here

thou hadst

if

was

" It

Martha, then Mary, came to the Master

same words, "Lord,

Martha and

Bethany, consisting of Mary,

in

was

Then

believed

them what things

Jesus had done.

The artist

the

awful

indication of the

power of

has here endeavored to unveil.

The

the Almighty over

Life

and Death

figure of Christ, the awe-struck

is

beholders, and

shrouded form of him who comes from the portals of the tomb once more

with his fellow-men are the striking components of the scene.

80

what the

to

mingle


.

\


MARY MAGDALENE. |HE gloomy surroundings with

the

spirit

soothing contrast to

pentance entailed.

A

lovely

ness of a contrite, womanly

this

the

as

hinted

this

at

keeping

picture, are quite in in

Sacred Writ, as with the

sombre scene were the hopes which

and prominent spirit,

life,

in

which the after record of her career sets forth

figure in the Master's history,

;

but

in

that

heart-felt re-

full

of the noble-

she stands the beacon -star of hope to the seemingly lost

and hopeless, and a marked example of

showed towards

Magdalene,

sad story of her early

deeply repentant bright and

of the

that tender care

weak and broken-hearted.

and love which our Saviour over


8i


THE LAST SUPPER. See Matthew xxvi.

OW My

saith,

the first day of the feast of unleavened

saying unto him,

Where

And

into the

time

he at

is

;

betrayed

as it

!

it

is

had been good

they were

disciples,

which

is

and

eating, Jesus said, Take, eat

to them, saying,

shed for

henceforth of this Father's kingdom.

many fruit

for said,

took :

Drink ye

made ready

my the

Master

disciples.

And

passover.

Now

And as they did eat, he said, me. And they were exceeding sorrowLord, is it I ? And he answered and

twelve.

;

in

same

the dish, the

and blessed

bread,

my

all

And

body.

of

it;

for this

betray me.

shall

they had sung an

and brake

it,

it,

and gave

it

to the

he took the cup, and gave thanks, and

my

is

But

remission of sins.

when

of the vine, until that day

And when

thy house with

at

but

this is

for the

passover?

The Son of woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is Then Judas, which that man if he had not been born. He said unto him, Thou hast said. And Master, is it I?

written of him

betrayed him, answered and

it

the

unto him,

to say

hand with me

that dippeth his

man goeth

gave

with

say unto you, that one of you shall betray

I

He

said,

as

down

sat

for thee to eat the

such a man, and say unto him, The

them, and they

appointed

and began every one of them

ful,

city to

we prepare

keep the passover

will

I

was come, he

the even

Verily

hand

as Jesus had

the disciples did

when

Go

said,

wilt thou that

bread the disciples came to Jesus,

blood

of

say unto

I I

drink

it

the

you,

new

hymn, they went out

I

new

testament,

will

not drink

with

into

you

the

in

my

mount of

Olives."

To

those

together, the

The

artist

who have

associated themselves in spirit with

the

little

group thus gathered

remembrance of the occasion must always awaken tender and solemn emotions.

has finely grouped his subject, treating 82

it

with quiet dignity and effectiveness.


THE AGONY

IN

See Luke

T

THE GARDEN. xxii.

awe and commiseration that we behold this ag<Dnizinor scene in Alone, deserted, the our Saviour's life. The consummating hour draws nigh. Lord of Life struggles with the mysteries of Death. "And there appeared an angel unto him from heaven, strengthening him." The burden of our sorrows, the dayspring of our hope all are concentrated in that tremendous hour, and he " who doeth all The picture is a veritable gem. The countenance of Jesus has things well " conquers. is

with tender

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

settled into calmness

and "bloody sweat."

and repose, but there are

still

All the accessories are artistic

83

traces

of that

conflict

and well defined.

of

bitter

agony


83


PRAYER OF JESUS

IN

THE GARDEN OF

See Luke

ESUS

is

alone

ket, in thoroughfare or at board.

redemption of

This design is

is

The solemn

his

He

race —

night

prayer of his heart-broken

No more

per" has just been concluded. his work, the

xxii.

his three disciples sleep.

awe, witness the agonized

in

prays "

—the

Not my

OLIVES.

The

spirit.

he mingles with

his

"

heavens

Last Sup-

fellow-men in mar-

prayer that seals the consummation of

will,

but thine, be done."

one of the most affecting and beautiful of the Bible

wrought out with unusual care and precision.

the silent

air,

The landscape

is

rich

series.

Every

and

with mighty

full,

detail

upspringing trees and gracefully sweeping branches, yielding turf and tufted masses of flowering plants

;

the sky

is

warm and

tender,

and an evening softness

has been deeply moved by the incident, and as of Christ, upturned

in prayer,

we gaze upon

with the disciples

solemnity of the scene are revealed to us.

84

"

is

in the air.

The

artist

the rapt and holy countenance

sleeping for sorrow,"

all

the sadness

and


THE BETRAYAL HIS scene the

four

of a treachery so tremendous that

Evangelists.

Judas, the

it

arch-traitor,

has no

— he

parallel,

is

related

who had been

by

all

of:

with Jesus, had

witnessed his miracles, his numberless deeds of mercy, and had associated with

him as one of the chosen twelve for

—he of

all

others to betray his Lord, could bring no palliation

Untouched by the beauty and majesty of a spotless

the deed.

life,

without mercy, he

•'persecuted the poor and needy man, that he might even slay the broken in heart." stillness

of night, ruthless and determined, he stole

Lord and Master, with a

upon

his victim,

In the-

and betrayed him,. his

kiss.

The scene presents most vividly the tumult and confusion which have broken in upon this sacred retreat. The pressing, clamorous crowd, with flickering torches, led on by the " cruel soldiery all come out as against a thief with swords and with staves " form the

background, against which are relieved the chief figures Judas.

What more

striking than the contrast

in

this

awful

drama, Christ and

between the serene and sacred beauty of

countenance of Jesus, and the wicked and leering face of 85

his betrayer!

the:


CHRIST FAINTING UNDER THE CROSS. See

HE

artist

has given his feeling upon

and tender expression. cross, "

is

Roman

"

is

xv.

this

Christ, crushed

a conception infinitely

one Simon a Cyrenian

the well-grouped

Mark

pitiful,

heart-touching incident most sympathetic to

the earth by the

and the sturdy and finely-drawn

energetic and noble to a high degree.

soldiers.

The design 86

is

cruel weight of the figure of

The background shows

executed with great vigor.


THE FLAGELLATION. See Mark xv.

HIS

mind

sensitive

upon for his

it

was he

represents a

picture

"

the

recoils

who,

in

it

with horror

most degraded criminals

the

tree,"

cross, despising the shame,"

ject,

from

of punishment so monstrous and

;

but

by whose stripes ye were healed,"

own body on

flowing cup.

mode

The

artist

figure

and

and move each heart

to

he

"

in "

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a its

form imposed full

he who

reality his

it

own

is

at

cruel that

that

the

early

day

more dreadful

self

still,

bore our sins in

who, for the joy that was set before him, endured the

who had

this

draught of bitterness added to

his

already over-

has most sympathetically and admirably rendered the central utter touchingness of submission pity.

87

and

pain,

sub-

must chain each tongue


THE

CRUCIFIXION. See Matthew xxvii.

HE

artist,

in

this picture,

exhibit the

strives to

The

panied the death of our Lord.

phenomena of nature which accom-,

appalling blackness of the heavens he has

illuminated with piercing rays of light, that reveal the ghastly details of the heart-

rending scene.

The mounted

soldiery,

the

various spectators,

dim and undefined

in

the

cavernous obscurity, the shrouded women, the dying malefactors, the broad brilliancy of the lightning flash that brings out the person of the details

vivid

and

terribly effective as

genius can ever hope to portray describe this thrilling event, though

in

an

artistic

colors

we have

Redeemer

into fullest

rendering of

equal to

its

reality.

only noted the

first

prominence

scene which

a

All the four in

order.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

all

are

no human Evangelists


â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

CLOSE OF THE CRUCIFIXION. See Matt,

HE

terror

of the

earthquake

xxvii.

upon

is

the

Roman

Centurion and

fleeing horses, the distracted figures, the wild desire to escape

horrible

which

God

this

!

"

for

untutored natures to endure,

their

all

But

utterly in their

Light, which

it

is

finished

" ;

the deed

is

done

;

grand and sublime, with a

man

that

loftiness

cometh all

its

89

was the Son of

Truly, this

into

to shine forth

the world."

more

The

brightly that

picture

own, and a power which the

surpassed.

effect

and the Powers of Darkness, vanquished

seeming triumph, which but makes

lighteth every

"

the

from something too

prove the supernatural

event has produced upon them, bidding them cry out, "

guard;

his

is

"

true

wonderful

artist

has rarely


THE BURIAL OF

JESUS.

See John xix.

OW, a

new

fore,

At length who died but

to

the to

sepulchre, wherein

tragedy

is

win them eternal

friends

again

life,

to

tenderly bear

morn, which

is

his

is

silent

;

was a garden; laid.

Jesus there-

was nigh

at hand."

form of him who only lived for others, and

everlasting

him from the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

the garden

in

laid they

for the sepulchre

borne to the tomb

women

There

and

all

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not,

indeed, to

kingdom of happiness bitter

cross

to

his

see

corruption,

and peace.

sepulchre.

His

Joseph

of

are there, as yet unconscious of the resur-

soon to gladden their hearts and verify so intensely

consolatory verse of the Psalmist,

morning."

was never man yet

and the

over,

Arimathea, Nicodemus, the weeping rection

crucified, there

because of the Jews' preparation day

gloriously rise

mourning

he was

the place where

in

"Weeping may endure

for a night, but

to

them

joy cometh

in

that

the


THE ANGEL AT THE SEPULCHRE. See Matthew xxviii.

N

the end of the Sabbath, as

came Mary Magdalene, and there

and came and like lightning,

rolled

and

his

as

:

began

to

the other

was a great earthquake,

for the

dawn toward

Mary,

raiment white as snow.

And

the

first

the dawning of the new.

It

falls

most appropriately from her eager picture

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; executed

And

behold,

And

it.

His countenance was

for fear of him, the

keepers did shake,

Angel answered, and said unto the women, Fear not

He is

is

since the world

not here

:

for

he

is

began

light that shoots

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the

over our

dying out of the

first

on woman, our brightest earthly comforter, and

lips

that the. disciples learn the joyful news.

with telling force and power. 9i

risen,

illuminated by the figure of the

glowing ray of consummated

tomb

hither side from the portals of the

day of the week,

Angel of the Lord descended from heaven,

I

Angel of the Resurrection, the

first

to see the sepulchre.

know that ye seek Jesus, which was crucified. he said: come see the place where the Lord lay." The gloom of the sepulchre, in this striking picture, for

the

back the stone from the door, and sat upon

and became as dead men. ye

it

A

old, it

is

charming


9i


THE JOURNEY TO EMMAUS See Luke xxiv.

HIS

picture

the

and mission of

life

Two

Christ.

day of the week, succeeding the

first

of his disciples were at

of the

marvellous

they came to the

The same day

stone was

in

rolled

away and

shining garments and said unto them,

Emmaus, a

these disciples went to

tomb of Christ— that when

the

was found empty, but

it

"

He

is

not here, but

wondrous things

And

came

that

told them,

and of these they talked

communed

together and reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them.

one another.

to

know

eyes were holden that they should not

named

Cleopas, answered

Jerusalem, and saying to him besides, the sepulchre, and found said

spoken.

And

it

O

unto them,

"

Ought not

Christ

even so as

fools

and

all

the-

he

way by

bound by

— even

the

illustration.

of Jesus

his discourse.

the

unto

But

their

What man-

them,

had been

that

all

told

And certain of them which were with the women had said but him they saw ;

suffered

believe

to

these

things,

all

and

that

to

prophets, he expounded unto

them

" ?

at

us went to not."

Then

the prophets have into his glory

enter

them,

in

all

?

the Scrip-

the Evangelist of this meeting vividly impresses the

The

figures

are

full

is

is

touchingly sad, and his

Around them

shadowy town

in

stretches the sky, vast, deep,

the

is

distance

and solemn as the 92

left

night.

in

a

to

The

mind

quiet and

both their attitude

that occupy their minds.

companions appear awed and

a moveless scene.

—seems

conveyed

of dignity, and

and expression betray the seriousness and gravity of the thoughts

The countenance

to pass that whiie they

said

solemnity of the occasion, and the same impression

beautiful

had been

concerning himself."

The simple account given by with

the

it

him, recounting

slow of heart

have

to

beginning at Moses and

tures, the things

"

And

him.

risen."

have one to another as ye walk and are sad

ner of communications are these that ye of the two,

"

is

that

about seven miles distant from Jeru-

village

salem, and as they journeyed their thoughts were only of the

he

on the

Jerusalem

and were among those who had

crucifixion,

they had witnessed at

things

sepulchre, the

two men appeared

One

illustrating

by Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and other women of

been told Galilee,

one of the most touching and suggestive of the series

is

air is

them alone;

hushed; while

spell-

the earth

above them


THE ASCENSION. See Luke xxiv

UR

Lord's ministry

finished

is

years of unswerving surable

to

mortal

toil

men

accomplished, the victory gained to Bethany," for "

up

And

into

it

one

came

heaven.

And

The ascending is

in

the lowly boyhood, the struggling youth, the painful

and benefaction, the closing scenes of an anguish immea-

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

all

are

The agony

ended.

and now, leading

and solemn

to pass, while

and were continually

ing worshippers,

last

;

;

farewell,

"

he

forth lifted

his

up

is

past, the

beloved

his

perfect

work

"

far as

disciples,

as

hands and blessed them.

he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried

they worshipped' him, and

returned to

the Temple, praising and blessing God.

figure of our Saviour, rising

powerfully expressed

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

93

with great joy:

Amen."

above the group of

wondrous upward

depths of a perfect sky.

Jerusalem,

flight

his

joyful yet sorrow-

against

the

profound


93


MARTYRDOM OF See Acts

.

ND

in

when

those days,

murmuring of neglected

the

number

Grecians

the

vi, vii.

of

the disciples

Then

was

multiplied, there

Hebrews, because

against the

the daily ministration.

in

STEPHEN.

ST.

their

twelve called the

the

arose

a

widows were

multitude of the

we should leave the word of God, and serve tables. Wherefore, brethren, look ye out among you seven men of honest report,, full of the Holy Ghost and wisdom, whom we may appoint over this business. But we and

disciples unto them,

give

will

man

full

ourselves

synagogue, which

among

prayer, and

that

to

the

them, for

it

is

" "

Stephen,

Then

Stephen, a

"

ministry of the word."

says of him that

and miracles among the people."

and of them of

to resist the

seven, and full

there

evidently

brew

the

arose certain of

history,

Cilicia,

synagogue of the Libertines, and Cyrenians, and Alexandriand of Asia, disputing with Stephen. And they were not able

the spirit

representation lifted

Priest

by which he spake.

Then they suborned men, which

and the Council, Stephen answers

consummating

ers " of Jesus.

Cut of

the

called the

wisdom and

High

a

of faith and power,

to

this,

the the

in

a brief condensation

of He-

an accusation of themselves as the "betrayers and murder-

heart, they first

in

said,

Brought

have heard him speak blasphemous words against Moses, and against God."

before

in

not reason

of faith and of the Holy Ghost," was one of these elected

did great wonders

We

It is

continually to

very prominent one

ans,

said,

drag him out of the

Christian

martyrdom, Stephen

countenance, bearing the pitiless storm

every attitude of deadly rage and malice.

94

of

missiles

from

city lies

and stone him. against

his foes,

the

In the

wall with

who surround him


94


SAUL'S CONVERSION. See Acts

ND

ix.

Saul yet breathing out threatening^ and slaughter against the disciples of the

Lord, went unto the high Priest, and desired of him letters to Damascus, to the

Synagogues, that

he found any of

if

he might bring them bound unto Jerusalem.

this

And

as he journeyed he

and suddenly there shined round about him a

light

and heard a voice saying unto him,

why

art thou

And

Lord?

to kick against the

Lord

the

have

me

told

thee what thou must do

do

to

?

And

the

said,

And

pricks.

Lord

And

man

;

vivid

and

scatter

of

persecutest

whom

the

And

for

this

and go

surprise, are

future alike

women,

is

to the earth,

he

said,

who

hard for thee

Lord, what wilt thou

and

it

shall

be

with him, stood speechless,

Saul arose from the earth, and when his eyes were hand, and brought him into Damascus.

and neither did eat nor drink."

representation of the conversion of St. Paul

dismay and terror among

the

said,

it

into the city,

men which journeyed

but they led him by the sight,

And he fell thou me ? And

trembling and astonished,

or

came near Damascus,

thou persecutest:

from heaven and the mysterious voice strike the

light

figure

Jesus

men

from heaven.

said unto him, Arise,

And

he was three days without

The moment chosen

am

I

he,

hearing a voice, but seeing no man.

opened, he saw no

Saul, Saul,

way, whether they were

his

fiery

trembling attendants.

Apostle to the Gentiles, his attitude of

is

when

the

persecutor to the earth

The

lithe

and vigorous

overwhelming wonder and

admirable, while the various postures of his affrighted retinue exemplify

and heighten the dramatic splendor of the scene. 95


DELIVERANCE OF See Acts

ST.

PETER.

xii.

IJETER, the impetuous Disciple, has been imprisoned. Since the taught him of deep repentance and contrition at the denial of buffet

and check has been tempering

his

forward

sharp lesson

first

Lord,

his

But Herod

spirit.

many

a

the king was

at this time persecuting the church, and so prominent a personage as Peter could hardly have

long escaped his notice

him

so,

;

to please the Jews,

into prison.

"Peter therefore was kept

God

unto

kept the prison. prison

And thee,

And

off

fell

thy sandals

:

and follow me.

from

And And

so

first

to

them of

forthwith the In

he

did.

even

side,

his

own accord

;

night Peter

and the Keepers before the door light shined

and raised him up, saying, Arise up

in

quickly.

And the Angel said unto him, Gird thyself, and And he saith unto him, Cast thy garments about

out,

and followed him, and wist not

but thought he

saw a

vision.

When

that

it

was true

they were past the city,

and they went out and passed on through one

which street,

Angel departed from him."

representing this incident the artist has given us a wild night scene, with the angel

leading the half unconscious Apostle

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;a

same

and the second ward, they came unto the iron gate that leadeth unto the

opened and

hands.

his

:

chains,

forth, the

Angel of the Lord came upon him, and a

he went

which was done by the Angel

was made without ceasing of the Church

brought him

bound with two

Soldiers,

behold, the

and he smote Peter on the

chains

his

bind on

:

prison, but prayer

in

And when Herod would have

for him.

was sleeping between two the

he lays hands on the Apostle, and thrusts

vivid

down

the rough stone steps,

amid the sleeping guard

rendering, in every detail, of what was evidently the semi-unreality of the scene

to St. Peter himself.

96


PAUL AT EPHESUS. See Acts xix.

had been preaching at Ephesus. "And God wrought special miracles by the hand of Paul, so that from his body were brought unto the sick handkerchiefs or aprons, and the diseases departed from them, and the evil spirits went out of them." Thus the reputation of the Apostle became thoroughly known, and great reformation ensued, so that " the name of the Lord Jesus was magnified, and many that believed came, and confessed, and shewed their deeds. Many of them also which used curious arts, brought their books together and burned them before all men and they counted the price of them, and found it fifty thousand pieces of silver. So mightily grew the word of God, and prevailed." The picture is full of life and motion. The zealous people are bringing their books to cast into the flame, Saint Paul exhorting and encouraging them from the steps of the temple.

|OR

the

space

of two

years

Paul

:

97


97


PAUL MENACED BY THE JEWS. See Acts xxi.

A.UL, on

his

returning journey to Jerusalem,

that city, but

still

he

is

determined to proceed.

by the elders of the church, and to have run into them.

him the

in

the Temple, seize

Roman

The thronging him,

is

and he

is

notified of his

On

his arrival

precautions to avoid

in his

coming troubles he

is

in

again warned

difficulties,

seems only

up by the Jews, who had beheld danger of being killed, when he is rescued by

multitude, stirred in

soldiery.

The engraving shows Paul on the castle stairs, "borne of the soldiers for the violence of the people," who form a confused mass of struggling figures below one of those threatening and fearful mobs of which Jerusalem was often the scene, through national pride,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

religious zeal

and hatred towards

their oppressors.

98

â&#x20AC;˘


PAULS SHIPWRECK. See Acts xxvii.

T.

PAUL'S

shipwreck, of which he himself has given so vivid an account, has ever

been considered one of the most striking episodes of Malta

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; supposed

St. Paul's

Bay

present engraving

the

ter,

and

is

to

be the ancient Melita

now shown

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;was

his

The

probably the scene of

island of

this disas-

to the curious tourist as the veritable locality.

prominent figure of

St.

to the shore.

99

In the

Paul dominates over a stormy sea, strewn

with pieces of the wreck, while the inmates of the ship are struggling

and ways

life.

in

various attitudes


99


DEATH ON THE PALE HORSE. See Revelation

JHE

description of this scene in

Holy Writ

the utterances of the inspired Exile of horse,

and

his

name

that sat

vi.

is

one of the most vivid and wonderful of

Patmos

"

And

on him was Death, and

I

looked, and behold, a pale

hell followed with him."

It is

the opening of the fourth seal.

M. Dore has shown the

In his treatment of this subject

thought.

The

under proper design

is

subject

restraint,

—one

is difficult

without at

grand and mysterious, as

steed, with fiery nostrils its

all

resistless

easily

exaggerated

impairing his

befits the

facility,

theme.

and wildly flowing mane, the

way, the terrible figure of death with

beholder with a nameless dread. ioo

;

fine imaginative quality of his

but he seems to have kept himself originality or inventive power.

The headlong fearful its

The

career of the apocalyptic

blackness through which

attendant train of fiends

it

all

flashes fill

the


IOO


**


'

--

.' .

Profile for Bibliothèque / beaux-arts / graphisme / typo /

The Doré Bible Gallery, 1890  

By Gustave Doré, Henry Altemus Philadelphia, 1890.

The Doré Bible Gallery, 1890  

By Gustave Doré, Henry Altemus Philadelphia, 1890.

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