Page 1

ArizonaHomeowner

VANN

Vol. 6 Issue 9

Maricopa County By The Numbers SEPTEMBER 2019 7/11/19 – 8/11/19

8,054

AVG SOLD PRICE

$

TOTAL #

CLOSED

354,740

99

60

LIST/SELL PRICE RATIO

When Your Offer Doesn’t Go Through…

[

[

AVG DAYS ON MARKET

The heartbreak is real when you lose out on the dream house you wanted. Experts say “get back out there.” There are so many homes for sale, you might start wondering how you got so fixated on just one anyway. Source: Trulia.com

Your La Solana neighbor and property expert.

Lesley Vann

If you or someone you know is thinking of buying or selling, call Lesley today!

M.Ed., PLLC, Realtor®

480.599.1119 Direct Lesley@LesleyVann.com LesleyVann.com • La Solana 33107 N. 25th Drive | Phoenix | 85085 Call Lesley today if you are thinking about a new home! If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.

Produced by DLP Marketing • (480)460-0996 • DLPmarketing.com

A Celebration of Life! Dia De Los Muertos

Phoenix Bat Cave Phoenix, AZ

Apple Cinnamon Crepes GoodNes


LOCAL VENUE

right here in Arizona: Sedona, Flagstaff and Oak Creek. In fact, according to the National Park Service the darkest skies in the country can be seen from the Colorado Plateau, which include parts of Arizona, Colorado and Utah.

Phoenix Bat Cave

It’s more than just finding a remote location in which to star-gaze. Experts say that the reduction of light pollution can improve our health, lower energy costs and benefit wildlife. The citizens of Flagstaff in Northern Arizona have taken this effort very seriously for decades, becoming the first city to enact outdoor lighting ordinances to help combat the glare.

Phoenix, AZ

T

T

he colorful Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos – or Day of the Dead – is sometimes confused with Halloween, but originated thousands of years ago with the Aztecs and Toltec people, long before the All Hallows’ Eve of Christianity. The differences between the holidays are profound, however, and the calendar dates differ as well.

Source: AtlasObscura.com/phoenix-bat-cave

Some of the important components and symbols of the Mexican holiday include:

THE OFRENDA This temporary altar provides families a way to celebrate their loved ones and help them on their journey to the afterlife. They often include photos and items belonging to the person, plus symbols of the four elements: water, paper banners representing wind, bread and food for earth, and of course candles for fire to help the spirits find their way.

MARIGOLDS

Astronomers estimate there are at least 100 billion stars just in our own Milky Way galaxy, and as many as 10 billion galaxies in the universe that we’re able to observe. It’s staggering when you do the math, but what’s even more shocking is that a full 80% of people in the United States can’t see the Milky Way due to light pollution – city glare that obliterates the stars from here on Earth.

Arizona has become a popular draw for “astro-tourists” from around the world who want to see the multitude of stars. A number of observatories and sky centers in the state provide opportunities for viewing parties, tours and special events that cater to visitors. Visit DarkSky. org for additional information. • Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory • The Mt. Graham International Observatory • Kitt Peak National Observatory • Lowell Observatory • Flandrau Science Center & Planetarium • Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter • Arizona Science Center

Fortunately, if you live in Arizona your opportunities are exponentially better. A nonprofit organization in Tucson called the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) is committed to preserving the endangered night skies by offering Dark-Sky designations to locations around the globe. There are currently 14 certified communities worldwide, with the densest grouping

There are also resorts and accommodations where you can enjoy a blanket of stars overhead, including Bright Angel Lodge at the Grand Canyon, L’Auberge de Sedona or Boulders Resort & Spa in north Scottsdale. Don’t forget to make a wish on every shooting star you see!

A bright flower native to Mexico is often placed around the graves and used to line the path between the cemetery and home, guiding the loved ones.

Apple Cinnamon Crepes

BUTTERFLIES The image of the monarch butterfly is ubiquitous in celebrations as it’s believed to hold the departed spirit. This is due to the monarch migration to Mexico which would arrive around the first of November.

SKULLS AND SKELETONS As another reminder that life is to be celebrated, skull images are brightly and whimsically decorated, bearing little resemblance to a death mask. These symbols and the name came from sweet treats and toys – sugar skulls – left on altars of departed children. A famous Mexico City mural painted in 1947 by Diego Rivera depicts an elegant female skeleton named Catrina. She has become one of the most recognizable symbols of Dia de los Muertos. Thanks in part to the award-winning movie Coco, this culturally rich holiday has gained mainstream attention in recent years beyond Mexico, Central and South America, and the marketing that goes with it. However, we really love the idea of embracing and reaffirming all stages of life in its natural cycle, even when that life is over. Happy Dia de los Muertos!

LIFEWISE

FLAVORFUL

Who knew Batman’s summer home was in the center of Phoenix? Though the tall masked vigilante will remain elusive, this flood control tunnel offers an incredible (and free!) opportunity to view thousands of Mexican Free-Tailed bats. Every year from May to October approximately 10,000 to 20,000 bats flock to Phoenix on their migration south to Mexico. During the day, they gather within the “cave” to rest and sleep. But at night, they emerge and fill the sky. Don’t miss them!

Celebrated on November 1st and 2nd, Dia de los Muertos is much more about life than death. The ancient Mesoamericans believed that death was just part of the journey and they considered their departed loved ones still be members of the community to be remembered and honored. The fall festivities would be joyous with music, dancing, food and love – a vibrant departure from the spookiness and mischief associated with Halloween.

he 50th anniversary of the historic moon landing had everyone looking skyward this past summer, and although we can reliably enjoy the different phases and visibility of earth’s celestial satellite many nights out of the year, the same can’t be said for the countless stars beyond.

INGREDIENTS 3

apples

4 tbls

melted butter, divided

1 tbls

cornstarch

1/4 cup granulated sugar

2

large eggs

1 tbls

1 cup

flour

1/4 cup Coffee Creamer

powdered sugar

1/2 cup water

1 tbl

lemon juice

2 1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided

1 cup

lowfat milk

DIRECTIONS Blend milk, Coffee-mate natural bliss Creamer, 3 tablespoons butter, eggs and flour in blender; cover. Refrigerate for about 1 hour. Brush medium, nonstick skillet with some of the remaining tablespoon butter. Pour ¼ cup batter into skillet; swirl to coat bottom. Cook for about 1 ½ minutes or until edges are dry; flip over and cook for an additional 30 seconds. Repeat with remaining butter and batter. Place granulated sugar, cornstarch and 2 teaspoons cinnamon in a medium saucepan; stir well. Stir in apples, water and lemon juice. Bring mixture to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, stirring occasionally, until apples are tender. Spoon about ¼ cup apple filling on half of one crêpe; fold in half. Fold in half again to make a triangle. Repeat with remaining crêpes and filling. Combine powdered sugar and remaining ½ teaspoon cinnamon in a small bowl. Pour into small strainer and dust crêpes. Serve immediately.


LOCAL VENUE

right here in Arizona: Sedona, Flagstaff and Oak Creek. In fact, according to the National Park Service the darkest skies in the country can be seen from the Colorado Plateau, which include parts of Arizona, Colorado and Utah.

Phoenix Bat Cave

It’s more than just finding a remote location in which to star-gaze. Experts say that the reduction of light pollution can improve our health, lower energy costs and benefit wildlife. The citizens of Flagstaff in Northern Arizona have taken this effort very seriously for decades, becoming the first city to enact outdoor lighting ordinances to help combat the glare.

Phoenix, AZ

T

T

he colorful Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos – or Day of the Dead – is sometimes confused with Halloween, but originated thousands of years ago with the Aztecs and Toltec people, long before the All Hallows’ Eve of Christianity. The differences between the holidays are profound, however, and the calendar dates differ as well.

Source: AtlasObscura.com/phoenix-bat-cave

Some of the important components and symbols of the Mexican holiday include:

THE OFRENDA This temporary altar provides families a way to celebrate their loved ones and help them on their journey to the afterlife. They often include photos and items belonging to the person, plus symbols of the four elements: water, paper banners representing wind, bread and food for earth, and of course candles for fire to help the spirits find their way.

MARIGOLDS

Astronomers estimate there are at least 100 billion stars just in our own Milky Way galaxy, and as many as 10 billion galaxies in the universe that we’re able to observe. It’s staggering when you do the math, but what’s even more shocking is that a full 80% of people in the United States can’t see the Milky Way due to light pollution – city glare that obliterates the stars from here on Earth.

Arizona has become a popular draw for “astro-tourists” from around the world who want to see the multitude of stars. A number of observatories and sky centers in the state provide opportunities for viewing parties, tours and special events that cater to visitors. Visit DarkSky. org for additional information. • Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory • The Mt. Graham International Observatory • Kitt Peak National Observatory • Lowell Observatory • Flandrau Science Center & Planetarium • Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter • Arizona Science Center

Fortunately, if you live in Arizona your opportunities are exponentially better. A nonprofit organization in Tucson called the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) is committed to preserving the endangered night skies by offering Dark-Sky designations to locations around the globe. There are currently 14 certified communities worldwide, with the densest grouping

There are also resorts and accommodations where you can enjoy a blanket of stars overhead, including Bright Angel Lodge at the Grand Canyon, L’Auberge de Sedona or Boulders Resort & Spa in north Scottsdale. Don’t forget to make a wish on every shooting star you see!

A bright flower native to Mexico is often placed around the graves and used to line the path between the cemetery and home, guiding the loved ones.

Apple Cinnamon Crepes

BUTTERFLIES The image of the monarch butterfly is ubiquitous in celebrations as it’s believed to hold the departed spirit. This is due to the monarch migration to Mexico which would arrive around the first of November.

SKULLS AND SKELETONS As another reminder that life is to be celebrated, skull images are brightly and whimsically decorated, bearing little resemblance to a death mask. These symbols and the name came from sweet treats and toys – sugar skulls – left on altars of departed children. A famous Mexico City mural painted in 1947 by Diego Rivera depicts an elegant female skeleton named Catrina. She has become one of the most recognizable symbols of Dia de los Muertos. Thanks in part to the award-winning movie Coco, this culturally rich holiday has gained mainstream attention in recent years beyond Mexico, Central and South America, and the marketing that goes with it. However, we really love the idea of embracing and reaffirming all stages of life in its natural cycle, even when that life is over. Happy Dia de los Muertos!

LIFEWISE

FLAVORFUL

Who knew Batman’s summer home was in the center of Phoenix? Though the tall masked vigilante will remain elusive, this flood control tunnel offers an incredible (and free!) opportunity to view thousands of Mexican Free-Tailed bats. Every year from May to October approximately 10,000 to 20,000 bats flock to Phoenix on their migration south to Mexico. During the day, they gather within the “cave” to rest and sleep. But at night, they emerge and fill the sky. Don’t miss them!

Celebrated on November 1st and 2nd, Dia de los Muertos is much more about life than death. The ancient Mesoamericans believed that death was just part of the journey and they considered their departed loved ones still be members of the community to be remembered and honored. The fall festivities would be joyous with music, dancing, food and love – a vibrant departure from the spookiness and mischief associated with Halloween.

he 50th anniversary of the historic moon landing had everyone looking skyward this past summer, and although we can reliably enjoy the different phases and visibility of earth’s celestial satellite many nights out of the year, the same can’t be said for the countless stars beyond.

INGREDIENTS 3

apples

4 tbls

melted butter, divided

1 tbls

cornstarch

1/4 cup granulated sugar

2

large eggs

1 tbls

1 cup

flour

1/4 cup Coffee Creamer

powdered sugar

1/2 cup water

1 tbl

lemon juice

2 1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided

1 cup

lowfat milk

DIRECTIONS Blend milk, Coffee-mate natural bliss Creamer, 3 tablespoons butter, eggs and flour in blender; cover. Refrigerate for about 1 hour. Brush medium, nonstick skillet with some of the remaining tablespoon butter. Pour ¼ cup batter into skillet; swirl to coat bottom. Cook for about 1 ½ minutes or until edges are dry; flip over and cook for an additional 30 seconds. Repeat with remaining butter and batter. Place granulated sugar, cornstarch and 2 teaspoons cinnamon in a medium saucepan; stir well. Stir in apples, water and lemon juice. Bring mixture to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low; cook, stirring occasionally, until apples are tender. Spoon about ¼ cup apple filling on half of one crêpe; fold in half. Fold in half again to make a triangle. Repeat with remaining crêpes and filling. Combine powdered sugar and remaining ½ teaspoon cinnamon in a small bowl. Pour into small strainer and dust crêpes. Serve immediately.


Real Estate with a View...

YOURS!

If you are considering selling or purchasing real estate in the Greater Phoenix area, we will market your property and/or help you find your next home with exceptional service and results. Peter Shambreskis REALTOR®, ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR

Corinne Howard

REALTOR®, e-Pro, GRI, SFR, SRS

480.229.6468 480.229.6467

Arizona residents since 2002, we are committed to our clients’ total satisfaction through our strong work ethic and our local market knowledge of the various communities in the Greater Phoenix area, also known as The Valley of the Sun. We specialize in the Northeast Valley, which is comprised of Scottsdale, Fountain Hills, Paradise Valley, Carefree, Cave Creek and Rio Verde, and we would be happy to show you how we can help you with your next real estate transaction. When you are ready to purchase a home or sell your current residence, let our many years of real estate experience, listing and selling hundreds of homes, go to work for you. Your interests will always be our first priority.

For the latest real estate information or a complimentary consultation, go to www.ShambreskisAndHoward.com or email us at info@ShambreskisAndHoward.com

Partnering To Make Your Real Estate Transaction A Success If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.

Produced by DLP Marketing • (480)460-0996 • DLPmarketing.com

Profile for DLP Marketing

Shambreskis & Howard | Arizona Homeowner  

Shambreskis & Howard | Arizona Homeowner