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F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen


F11: DIGITAL PAINTINGS FOR FULL SCREEN

5901 Palisade Avenue | Riverdale, New York 10471 718.581.1596 | RiverSpringLiving.org/art


F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen Emily O’Leary, Associate Curator

The significance of digital painting and how it’s accessed has been given new relevance in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic. At a time when many art spaces are closed or open at limited capacity, different strategies of how to deliver an authentic museum experience in virtual space have emerged at an exponential pace. Museum and galleries have been forced to migrate to online platforms while their visitors—and the rest of the world—rely on screens to escape isolation and enjoy the kinds of cultural experiences they had long taken for granted. One of the first technologies to provide virtual access to a distant museum—one located in a different country, for example—was Google Street View, which has existed since 2001 and mapped numerous museums around the world since 2011. However, such a project may not be easy for smaller institutions to manage. Another approach is to install a real life exhibition and photograph it from multiple angles from which a navigable three-dimensional environment can be created online. While such exhibitions can be produced each time a new exhibition is installed, artworks also may be 1


installed virtually in a recreation of a real space. Either of these strategies, however, can be expensive. Another tactic is to “install” images of artwork in a completely fictitious virtually rendered gallery. Numerous companies have developed these platforms at a rapid rate to meet increased demand, with some even renting out temporary virtual gallery spaces for a fee. Although this type of virtual exhibition tends to be more affordable, it may not allow for high resolution viewing or smooth navigation. Some online exhibitions have taken the simpler form of a curated webpage with a collection of high resolution images to showcase artworks that exist as objects in the real world. If it’s a gallery exhibition and a collector purchases one of these artworks from the online exhibition, it will arrive at the door in a crate. This is where digital art becomes particularly significant because such works are created for virtual spaces. The concept of F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen is to invert the typical online museum and gallery exhibition practices that have emerged, especially within the last year: It features digital paintings best exhibited in a virtual space where the optimal way of viewing the work is on-screen. 2


Elaine Chao (b. Flushing, New York, 1990; lives and works in New York, New York), Umi-e, still from Moving Image, 2019, animated .gif, 3500 x 3316 pixels. Courtesy the artist.


The medium of digital art isn’t new, but the technology and tools to create it have become more affordable and, therefore, more accessible. Smartphones, tablets and computers— devices used to make digital art—have become ubiquitous even compared to a decade ago. The 10 artists in this exhibition, who live and work in different places in the United States and internationally, employ diverse digital strategies to create their works, which are linked by the exhibition’s conceptual framework, not thematically. In most cases, their works provide examples of how digital painting and traditional media both intersect and diverge. Some of the artists begin with work they have created in traditional media as a base that they transfer to the program they’re working with to create their digital work. This is essential to the work of Elaine Chao, Polina Protsenko and Samhita Kamisetty, for example. Chao begins by transferring photographs of her acrylic paintings encased in gloss gel to Photoshop. She then “excavates” layers of paint, enhancing sections of color and texture to create animated .gifs. Three works included in this exhibition from her series Moving Image (2019) explore complex color combinations and light through digital manipulation. She is the only artist represented by animated abstract paintings, which depend to a greater degree than other types of digital painting on the idea expressed by the 4


core concept of this exhibition because a .gif can only be viewed in movement on-screen. How to describe the medium of Chao’s work in a printed caption raised the question of what to call a static image of her animated work. The word “still” was used in the same way an image from a video artwork would be labeled. Chao’s Umi-e (2019) was chosen for the evite to promote F11, allowing it to be seen fully animated as it was intended. Protsenko also develops her digital abstractions with traditional media, beginning each work with monochromatic color swatches she paints in watercolor on paper. Photographs of these images are transferred to the computer and collaged, rotated and layered in Photoshop, resulting in ethereal abstract works. Photoshop tools allow digital images to be manipulated in innumerable ways: layering color and shape and adjusting opacity, to name a few. Protsenko describes watercolor painting as “natural and fluid,” an art-making process that is partially out of her hands. Digital art, on the other hand, provides a tightly controlled format with which to explore purely formal concerns of color and composition. Like many of the artists in this exhibition, Protsenko only began experimenting with digital art during the pandemic. For her, the process is therapeutic, exploring formal elements as she 5


Polina Protsenko (b. Tartu, Estonia, 1993; lives and works in Los Angeles, California), Sunset Scape 2, 2020, watercolor swatch on paper digitally collaged and manipulated in Photoshop, 7800 x 7800 pixels. Courtesy the artist.


Samhita Kamisetty (b. Portland, Oregon, 1996; lives and works in New York, New York and Bangalore, India), Kitchen Table and Strawberry Darts, 2020, digital painting in Photoshop over permanent marker underdrawing, 3508 x 2501 pixels. Courtesy the artist.


“digitally paints together” the swatches. Kamisetty begins her digital works with drawings on paper in permanent marker. Her drawings executed on colored paper function as underdrawings, mapping out shapes and color schemes, before she transfers them into Photoshop, where she applies rich textures and hues with digital brushes. As with traditional media, the artist can make digital brushes from scratch or download them as sets. Working in digital format after laying out her drawing provides Kamisetty a versatile space to work in. Color and form are essential to the paintings included in this exhibition in which she explores how physical spaces and seemingly mundane objects within them can be emotionally transformative and acquire symbolic meanings. The private domestic interiors depicted in her paintings are based on her home in Bangalore, India, chosen for associations with comfort, such as Kitchen Table and Strawberry Darts (2020). The flat compositions saturated with color and populated with elaborate patterns comprised of flowers, fruit, leaves and insects create a joyful, lively atmosphere achieved through digital tools. Adopting a different approach in his digital work and beginning with found photographs mined from libraries and 8


free image banks, Luise Eru works exclusively in Photoshop to create painterly digital collages. Eru enriches his compositions with lush layers of color and botanical forms. His works are striking images that highlight the conditions of political chaos, poverty, marginalization and violence that Black people endure in his home country of Brazil. He describes his compositions as images of beauty that disrupt the violence surrounding him while retaining the aesthetic richness that Black culture and skin carry. In Building My House (2020), for example, a found black and white photograph of a woman in a hard hat is overlaid with sumptuously colored images of flowers that merge into her form. According to the artist, this work was inspired by his mother and grandmother who worked in quarries to build their houses. Eru’s work is explicitly personal and lyrically emotional, reflecting on gender constructs of masculinity, childhood memories and familial traditions. Carlos Torres Machado translates his paintings in traditional media directly into digital paintings. When he began working from home due to the pandemic, he was compelled to expand his artistic practice. The digital paintings featured in this exhibition are a continuation of his series Data Centers (2015–present) that began as large-scale canvas polyptychs. Describing his style as “extremes of rigorous geometry and lyrical abstraction,” his compositions explore the organization 9


Luise Eru (b. Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1998; lives and works in Belo Horizonte), Building My House, 2020, found photographs digitally collaged in Photoshop, 3603 x 2400 pixels. Courtesy the artist.


Carlos Torres Machado (b. Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1981; works in Brooklyn, New York), Data Center #19, 2020, digital painting in Photoshop, 10302 x 6900 pixels. Courtesy the artist.


of social and technological information through pattern and complex color combinations. Working in Photoshop allowed him to create these works on a smaller scale and to experiment with new structures and forms while maintaining the core color relationships that underpin his work. For some of the artists in this exhibition, the digital medium is directly related to an interest in exploring the nature of digital space itself. Collin Pollard’s work (cover) centers around the relationship between the physical world and its depiction within the digital realm, particularly the vastness of digital space itself. During the pandemic, only a screen could provide a look into the outside world, which was otherwise impossible to reach physically. His paintings are derived from computer screenshots of glitches that appeared in YouTube travel videos he watched. They reflect on the stagnancy of the on-screen experience—the irony of being able to access the boundless space that digital technology has to offer while simultaneously being confined to a limited physical space. Pollard created these digital paintings by collaging high-resolution photographs of his own mark-making in acrylic paint or marker and screenshots of glitches, resulting in frenetic compositions with geometric shards of color. 12


Annie Lee is represented by a series of three abstract digital paintings entitled Smudges and Dust (2020) that ruminate on the unorthodox experience of earning a practical art degree online and the reliance upon screens to replace the physical classroom experience. Lee began exploring this concept by focusing on human marks left behind on the screens of smartphones, tablets and computers, which have become a necessity of everyday life during the pandemic. Inspired by the dusty, grimy screen of her own laptop, the monochrome blackness of these digital works is accented with impressions of fingerprint smudges. The paintings question where the boundary of digital and physical space lies and invite viewers to reflect on their own marks left behind on devices that are constantly swiped, touched and tapped when activating digital space. Lee’s paintings are best viewed enlarged on-screen and carefully studied to reveal their complexity. Her marks on the digital canvas are faint and her work is minimalistic and monochromatic compared to other digital paintings in this exhibition. When enlarged to full screen, however, their subtlety and careful planning become apparent. Monochrome paintings are thought-provoking though at times frustrating for viewers and require a great deal of “looking.” Perhaps the most famous “black paintings” are the works of American Abstract Expressionist Ad Reinhardt in the 1960s. 13


These paintings are comprised of such subtle strategies of depth and pattern that it’s essential they be viewed in-person. Arden Reed’s 2014 article in The Brooklyn Rail aptly summarized this quality of Reinhardt’s black paintings: “What everybody knows about Ad Reinhardt, even if they know nothing else: his black paintings take a long time to see. The black paintings build in an obstacle by challenging most viewers’ patience.” Lee’s digital black paintings require an appropriate exhibition platform to facilitate a similar and necessary in-depth act of visual study. In this case, that platform is on-screen. Since the early 2010s, devices for displaying artwork digitally— though not necessarily solely digital artwork—have been made and sold by many different companies. Big box brickand-mortar stores have sold digital picture frames that rotate personal photographs for years. This concept isn’t new. In culture writer Alyssa Buffenstein’s 2016 article “Here It Is, Your Guide to Displaying Digital Art” in VICE, she described the various platforms and devices then available to display both contemporary digital art and high resolution images of physical art, most commonly famous paintings from museum collections. David Hockney’s iPad drawings have brought the practice of displaying digital art on a screen to the mainstream following his retrospective at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2017, which included one gallery devoted to displaying them on iPad tablets. 14


Stefanie Wolfson (b. New York, New York, 1992; lives and works in Yonkers, New York), Maranta Leuconeura, from Plant Portraits, 2020, digital drawing in Procreate, 1446 x 1205 pixels (top); Sansevieria Laurentii, from Plant Portraits, 2020, digital drawing in Procreate, 1446 x 1205 pixels (bottom). Courtesy the artist.


Stefanie Wolfson also executes her paintings as purely digital compositions meant to be viewed on screen, drawing directly onto her tablet with a stylus. In her series Plant Portraits (2019– present), Wolfson’s subjects intersect directly with the equally digital world of social media. She depicts plants that commonly appear in Instagram posts and are associated with a trendy design aesthetic popularized by social media influencers. The species depicted in Wolfson’s digital paintings represent some of the most overused plants that help the Instagrammer or Vlogger achieve a desired atmosphere to boost follower counts. Her project emphasizes the shallowness of social media’s fixation on keeping up with trends and reliance on superficial metrics of success. Wolfson’s portraits also touch on the damaging impact that over-consumption of these plants has on the environment. In a different approach to digital art, Donald Hargrove’s lush landscapes are rendered with painterly strokes, textures and subtle color gradations. Working from photographs, sketches executed both digitally and on paper, pure imagination or en plein air, Hargrove approaches digital art the same way as traditional painting, describing it as working with “pixels rather than paint.” He began exploring the medium for the first time during the pandemic after a long period of inactivity, describing working in a digital format as “reviving my own 18


creativity but also my identity as an artist.” His Cape Flowers (2020), employing painterly strokes and textures, could as easily exist as a painting in traditional media as it could a digital work. However, Hargrove makes use of many of the tools digital art offers that traditional mediums do not. In a short timelapse video that shows the creation of River in Bloom (2020) in Sketchbook, he uses layers as he experiments with different textures in the work. This tool allows the artist to choose different parts of a painting to manipulate, visually removing actual layers to alter different elements of the composition. Digital painting also offers opportunities for artists to focus not just on painterly concerns but specifically on culture and history. Adam Blitz’s 2018 project Digital Apamea attempts to reconstruct the lost mosaic floor of a fourth-century synagogue at Apamea on Orontes in Syria. In one of three works included here, Bema Mosaic (2018), he recreated what he says “is arguably the most important structure from the ancient synagogue in so far as it was likely the site of liturgical activity.” Using Photoshop to create a complete image, he began by tracing and then utilizing the burn and dodge tools to replicate and to alter the exposure of certain areas of the image. Since there are no extant sources for the color scheme of the Bema Mosaic, Blitz utilized comparisons of similar mosaics in Syria, Turkey and Italy. He then colorized the digital image by hand 21


Adam Blitz (b. Miami, Florida, 1966; lives and works in London, England), Bema Mosaic, 2018, digital drawing with hand-coloring manipulated in Photoshop, 2803 x 2727 pixels. Courtesy the artist.


and used filters to create the final work. Blitz describes the Digital Apamea project as sitting between “archaeology, art and digital heritage.” Although they were constructed using available references, including black and white photographs, he refers to the resulting digital paintings as “fictions” since the available historical information is fragmentary and archaeological methods were used to complete them. The resulting complex and painstakingly detailed composition Synagogue Floor (2018), which incorporates the two other works on view, consists of over 20 lifted sections of mosaics (“stone carpets”) which are themselves composed of many more fragments. Although all of the artists in this exhibition produce works that are purely digital regardless of whether they begin with a physical object or draw directly onto a digital canvas, it’s common to make prints of digital paintings or drawings. Fine art limited edition prints of Hockney’s iPad drawings, for example, are sold alongside his artworks in traditional media. Some of the artists in this exhibition also offer their digital work for sale printed on canvas or paper. This raises questions about the potential market for contemporary digital art displayed in its original form—an issue heightened by the pandemic. The recent high profile sale at Christie’s of a digital work by Mike 23


Winkelmann, also known as Beeple, entitled Everydays: The First 5000 Days (2007–2021), for $69.3 million USD with unique ownership guaranteed through the use of an NFT signaled a watershed moment in the contemporary digital art market. The rise of NFTs, otherwise known as non-fungible tokens based on blockchain technology, exist in a purely virtual space and establish a system of buying and selling digital art that was widely unnoticed in the mainstream art world until now. There are conflicting views on the value and legitimacy of NFT technology to support a digital art market that remains exclusively within the digital realm. It nonetheless indicates how rapidly the art world has turned toward investigating the potential for exhibiting digital art, and also monetizing it. F11 presents artwork that can be seen nowhere else in its original form except on-screen and ideally in full-screen. The exhibition experience is brought directly to the viewer on their device rather than attempting to replicate the in-person museum experience that was possible pre-pandemic. What place such artworks will hold in the world of mainstream commercial galleries and museums, however, has yet to be determined.

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The Artists Adam Blitz (b. Miami, Florida, 1966; lives and works in London, England) A dual US-UK citizen based in London, Adam Blitz is a digital artist, Near Eastern Studies scholar, accredited journalist and Fulbright recipient. He studied at University of Edinburgh, University College London, The University of Michigan, Humboldt University, Berlin (Theology/Jewish Studies/Modern German Thought) and University of the Arts, London. His accomplishments include Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute, London; The Ronin Institute, New Jersey, and is a committee member and trustee of The Association for the Study and Preservation of Roman Mosaics (ASPROM) and ICOMOS – ICORP (International Council on Monuments and Sites - International Scientific Committee on Risk Preparedness). His research focuses on cultural heritage, digital art and archaeology with particular reference to Syria. digitalartistresidency.org/ remember-me/adam-blitz/ Elaine Chao (b. Flushing, New York, 1990; lives and works in New York, New York) Elaine Chao is a visual artist and arts organizer based in New York City. She earned her BA in Art from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, in 2013 and has exhibited in such venues as The Greenpoint Gallery, Brooklyn, New York; Colors of Humanity Art Gallery (online), Everett, Pennsylvania; Local Project Art Space, Queens, New York and NYC Arts Empire, New York City. She is currently Art Director at Orenda Art Works, a community arts organization intended to encourage art production and reduce barriers to exchange. chaoelainebetty.myportfolio.com Luise Eru (b. Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1998; lives and works in Belo Horizonte) Luise Eru is a self-taught artist based in the Santa Cruz neighborhood in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. He began creating his digital collages in Photoshop in 2019. He has exhibited in such virtual venues as Area Noir, London, 25


England; The Other Art Fair, Chicago, Illinois; Doncaster Art Fair, Doncaster, England, and EIXO Arte, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. www.saatchiart.com/ luiseeru Donald Hargrove (b. Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, 1961; lives and works in Glasgow, Scotland) Donald Hargrove studied at the Bulawayo School of Art before relocating to Scotland where he earned a BA from Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, Dundee, in 1983. He established a studio in London and exhibited broadly as a painter and and sculptor, as well as organizing exhibitions and working with theatre design. In 1996 he earned his post-graduate certificate in secondary education and resettled in Glasgow to work as a teacher of art and design. After a major health crisis in 2017 that resulted in the loss of his right arm, he has found digital art to be a more accessible medium due to lack of handling materials, and especially during lockdown due to Covid-19. www.donaldhargrove.co.uk Samhita Kamisetty (b. Portland, Oregon, 1996; lives and works in New York, New York and Bangalore, India) Samhita Kamisetty was born in Portland and raised in Bangalore where she is currently based. She graduated from New York University, New York, New York, with a BFA in Studio Art in 2019. Her work draws upon ways things come together to form a visual language through an exploration of domestic interiors, objects and abundant landscapes. www.samhitakamisetty.com Annie Lee (b. London, England,1999; lives and works in London) Annie Lee completed a foundation diploma at University of the Arts London: Central Saint Martins and is currently pursuing a BA at the Slade School of Fine Art in London. Lee’s work has been exhibited at Barbican Center and Clarendon Fine Art Mayfair, both in London; Corridor Gallery, Brooklyn, New York, among others. Her practice centers around personal 26


feelings and universal experiences, often within unnoticed moments of everyday life. www.annabellalee.co.uk Carlos Torres Machado (b. Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1981; works in Brooklyn, New York) Carlos Torres Machado received his BA in Contemporary Arts and Communication, with minors in Photography and Psychology, from Universidad de las Artes in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Universidad San Francisco in Quito, Ecuador. He is the recipient of the New York Regional Award of the Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series in 2017 and a grant from NYFA and Foundation for Contempory Arts to support his practice through the pandemic. He has completed residencies in Brooklyn at the Bushwick Generator in 2019 and Trestle Art Space in 2016. His work has been shown at such venues as Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York; The Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural & Educational Center, Denise Bibro Fine Art and Harlem School of Arts, all in New York, New York; SCOPE Art Show, Miami, Florida; Museo El Cuartel, Ibarra, Ecuador; Museo Municipal de Arte Moderno and Nómade Biennial, both in Cuenca, Ecuador. Machado is the co-founder and Director of ArteLatAm, an arts organization dedicated to the support of LatinX visual artists. www.torresmachado.com Collin Pollard (b. San Jose, California, 1994; lives and works in San Jose) Collin Pollard creates photographs, mixed media paintings, and videos that explore the line between the physical world and the ways in which it is digitally represented. He is the co-founder of the virtual exhibition space, The Garage 408, in San Jose, California, and holds a BA from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, and an MFA from San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, California. His work has been exhibited at such spaces as Diego Rivera Gallery, San Francisco, California; Embark Gallery, San Francisco, California; Space Place Gallery, Nizhny Tagil, Russia, and Midwest Center or Photography, Wichita, Kansas, among others. www.collinpollardphoto.com 27


Polina Protsenko (b. Tartu, Estonia, 1993; lives and works in Los Angeles, California) Polina Protsenko is an interdisciplinary artist and educator who holds a BFA with distinguished honors in Studio for Interrelated Media and Art Education from Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts, and an MFA in Performance from School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. She has exhibited at Chicago Young Authors, Overlook Gallery Residency at Anna’s Project and Defibrillator Gallery at Zhou B Arts Center, all in Chicago, Illinois, and CyberArts, Boston, Massachusetts. She was the recipient of MASS MoCA’s CapacityBuilding Grant for Massachusetts artists. Protsenko considers teaching as an extension of her artistic practice and has worked with nonprofit organizations as a visiting artist to public schools in Boston and Los Angeles. She currently holds the position of adjunct professor of Art Education at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. www.polinaprotsenko.com Stefanie Wolfson (b. New York, New York, 1992; lives and works in Yonkers, New York) Stefanie Wolfson is a painter and printmaker who received her BFA in Printmaking from SUNY Purchase College, Purchase, New York, in 2014. She has exhibited at such spaces as Blue Door Gallery, Yonkers, New York; La Mama Galleria, New York, New York and Rye Arts Center, Rye, New York, among others. Wolfson self-published a book of her Plant Portraits series in 2020 which is available online. www.cargocollective.com/stefaniewolfson

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Checklist of the Exhibition (Dimensions are height x width)

Adam Blitz (b. Miami, Florida, 1966; lives and works in London, England) Bema Mosaic, 2018 Digital drawing with hand-coloring manipulated in Photoshop 2803 x 2727 pixels Apamea Floor, 2018 Photogrammetry, composite images and digital drawing with hand-coloring manipulated in Photoshop 4081 x 2480 pixels Composite Mosaic, 2018 Photogrammetry, composite images and digital drawing with hand-coloring manipulated in Photoshop 2480 x 1654 pixels Elaine Chao (b. Flushing, New York, 1990; lives and works in New York, New York) Umi-e, from Moving Image, 2019 Animated .gif 3500 x 3316 pixels Moeru, from Moving Image, 2019 Animated .gif 1800 x 1800 pixels Sekimen, from Moving Image, 2019 Animated .gif 3500 x 3500 pixels Luise Eru (b. Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 1998; lives and works in Belo Horizonte) Masculinity, 2020 Found photographs digitally collaged in Photoshop 3725 x 2488 pixels 58 Rua Ferreira Bretas, 2020 Found photographs digitally collaged in Photoshop 3944 x 2817 pixels 29


Building My House, 2020 Found photographs digitally collaged in Photoshop 3603 x 2400 pixels Donald Hargrove (b. Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, 1961; lives and works in Glasgow, Scotland) Beech Tree Moonshine, 2020 Digital painting in SketchBook 1299 x 954 pixels Cape Flowers, 2020 Digital painting in SketchBook 1181 x 871 pixels River in Bloom, 2020 Digital painting in Procreate 1299 x 878 pixels Samhita Kamisetty (b. Portland, Oregon, 1996; lives and works in New York, New York and Bangalore, India) Kitchen Table and Strawberry Darts, 2020 Digital painting in Photoshop over permanent marker underdrawing 3508 x 2501 pixels Insects on the Chili Sofa, 2020 Digital painting in Photoshop over permanent marker underdrawing 3453 x 2318 pixels Starlight, 2020 Digital painting in Photoshop over permanent marker underdrawing 6880 x 4670 pixels Annie Lee (b. London, England,1999; lives and works in London) Smudges and Dust (no. 1), 2020 digital painting in Procreate 1080 x 1920 pixels Smudges and Dust (no. 2), 2020 Digital painting in Procreate 1080 x 1920 pixels 30


Smudges and Dust (no. 3), 2020 Digital painting in Procreate 1080 x 1920 pixels Carlos Torres Machado (b. Guayaquil, Ecuador, 1981; works in Brooklyn, New York) Data Center #19, 2020 Digital painting in Photoshop 10302 x 6900 pixels Data Center #21, 2020 Digital painting in Photoshop 6600 x 6818 pixels Data Center #22, 2020 Digital painting in Photoshop 7631 x 6085  pixels Collin Pollard (b. San Jose, California, 1994; lives and works in San Jose) Sandstorm, 2021 Digitally manipulated computer screenshot collaged with abstracted pixels in Photoshop 6000 x 7200 pixels Into the Landscape, 2021 Digitally manipulated computer screenshot 6000 x 9000 pixels Sunset Cove, 2020 Digitally manipulated computer screenshot collaged with photographs and abstracted pixels in Photoshop 5400 x 7200 pixels Polina Protsenko (b. Tartu, Estonia, 1993; lives and works in Los Angeles, California) Sunset Scape 2, 2020 Watercolor swatch on paper digitally collaged and manipulated in Photoshop 7800 x 7800 pixels Desert Scape, 2020 Watercolor swatch on paper digitally collaged and manipulated in Photoshop 4800 x 4800 pixels 31


Desert Scape 2, 2020 Watercolor swatch on paper digitally collaged and manipulated in Photoshop 4800 x 4800 pixels Stefanie Wolfson (b. New York, New York, 1992; lives and works in Yonkers, New York) Adiantum Raddianum, from Plant Portraits, 2020 Digital drawing in Procreate 1446 x 1205 pixels Maranta Leuconeura, from Plant Portraits, 2020 Digital drawing in Procreate 1446 x 1205 pixels Sansevieria Laurentii, from Plant Portraits, 2020 Digital drawing in Procreate 1446 x 1205 pixels

Hebrew Home at Riverdale 5901 Palisade Avenue Riverdale, New York 10471-1205 718.581.1596 RiverSpringLiving.org/art

This catalogue has been produced on the occasion of the virtual exhibition F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen on view at DerfnerOnline.org/F11 from April 11-August 10, 2021.

Pages 15-16: Annie Lee (b. London, England,1999; lives and works in London), Smudges and Dust (no. 1), 2020, digital painting in Procreate, 1080 x 1920 pixels. Courtesy the artist.

Pages 19-20: Donald Hargrove (b. Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, 1961; lives and works in Glasgow, Scotland), Cape Flowers, 2020, digital painting in SketchBook, 1181 x 871 pixels. Courtesy the artist.

About the Hebrew Home at Riverdale As a member of the American Alliance of Museums, the Hebrew Home at Riverdale by RiverSpring Living is committed to publicly exhibiting its art collection throughout its 32-acre campus, including Derfner Judaica Museum and a sculpture garden overlooking the Hudson River and Palisades. Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection provides educational and cultural programming for residents of the Hebrew Home, their families and the general public from throughout New York City, its surrounding suburbs and visitors from elsewhere. RiverSpring Living is a nonprofit, non-sectarian geriatric organization serving more than 18,000 older adults in greater New York through its resources and community service programs.

This exhibition is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Cover: Collin Pollard (b. San Jose, California, 1994; lives and works in San Jose), Sandstorm, 2021, digitally manipulated computer screenshot collaged with abstracted pixels in Photoshop, 6000 x 7200 pixels. Courtesy the artist.

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F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen  

This catalogue has been produced on the occasion of the virtual exhibition F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen on view at DerfnerOnline.o...

F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen  

This catalogue has been produced on the occasion of the virtual exhibition F11: Digital Paintings for Full Screen on view at DerfnerOnline.o...

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