Issuu on Google+

HUMAN ITIES p o s t g r a du a t e S t ud y 2 0 1 4

School of Humanities Faculty of Arts, Design and Technology University of Derby Kedleston Road Derby DE22 1GB T: +44 (0)1332 591736 E: adtenquiry@derby.ac.uk

www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

Š University of Derby 2013


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

1

2

Preparing for your

F utu r e C A R E E R The Faculty of Arts, Design and Technology embraces art, design, humanities, media, and technology, and the many specialised areas within these fields.

We have a longstanding reputation for excellence in all our subjects and many of our staff are active researchers at the highest level.

Professor Huw Davies Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Design and Technology

Our high calibre graduates and alumni have won many national and international awards and have gone on to establish enviable reputations in their chosen professions. We have made considerable investment in our physical resources, which include modern purpose built facilities and some of the very latest in new technologies. We offer a unique environment in Derby Theatre – our very own learning theatre in the heart of the city. Our excellent facilities are supplemented by our valuable links and partnerships with industry and the professional world, including QUAD (Derby’s multimedia centre), Déda, and the network of Derby’s museums and galleries. In choosing to undertake postgraduate study and research at Derby, you will be setting out on a new or enhanced career, enabling you to secure the relevant knowledge, skills, abilities, and links with industry to follow your dreams.

Anne Wales Head of the School of Humanities

CONTENTS Preparing for your future career 

1

Why choose Derby? 

3

Develop your career 

6

Derby: Marvel of the Midlands 

7

International students 

9

Rethinking research 

11

Our courses 

16

Visit us 

29

Contact us 

30


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

3

Why choose

DERBY? We’ve been rated in the top 10% of UK universities for management and quality procedures by government inspectors, so you can be sure that you’ll be studying a well managed, high quality, and relevant course.

 We’ll

support whatever you want to do. You will work with leading researchers to develop your knowledge, skills, and expertise. All of our postgraduate provision is regularly updated to make sure that you’re kept up to date with the latest thinking and research.

 All

our experienced tutors are active researchers and practitioners in the humanities, which means that your seminars and tutorials will be led by expert and committed academics. They’re friendly and approachable, and focused on making sure that you get the support and guidance you need.

 You

can follow your research passions by exploring the areas of research that most excite you. You will have the opportunity to follow your own research interests and undertake traditional, theoretical, or applied projects in the humanities subjects, including American studies, creative and professional writing, English literature, film studies, history, media studies, or theatre studies.

 We’ll

help and support you throughout your course. From your initial enquiry right through to graduation, we will give you the advice, guidance, and direction you need to reach your potential.

 You

will be part of a research centre. All staff and postgraduate students in the School of Humanities are members of the Identity, Conflict and Representation Research Centre. You will engage with the key methodologies and ideas used by humanities scholars and apply these to your own projects, with the opportunity to explore interdisciplinary and single discipline topics, and new and challenging ways of approaching your research.

4


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

5

DEVELOP your career

If you are taking a course to improve your career prospects, our courses are focused on helping you to get where you want to be.

Your research, your future

Support and guidance

We’ve designed our postgraduate courses to provide you with skills and knowledge relevant to a range of careers.

If you’re not already working, our Student Employment Agency can help you to find relevant part time work to build up your experience. And you can use our Career Development Centre while you’re here and for up to three years after you graduate.

You will receive training in research methodologies – essential if you want to move on to an MPhil or PhD in a humanities discipline and follow either a research or academic career path. You will also develop skills that are required by employers in a number of industries, including arts or public service administration, publishing, broadcasting, archival services, professional writing, and librarianship. A research degree has many benefits; it can help you to get an academic post or a full time research role. If you’re already working in a humanities related role, you can study the course as part of your professional development. Most importantly though, it is about both extending and developing your knowledge and enhancing the understanding of academic and wider communities too.

Our careers advisers will help you:  plan your career  research your options  improve the skills needed for that dream job or a promotion  find vacancies for placements or a graduate job  improve your employability skills by working with a mentor.

6


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

7

D E R B Y: Marvel of the Midlands The Independent

With good job prospects, an affordable standard of living, and a resilient economy, Derby is a great city to make your home when you graduate. Whatever you want from life, you’re sure to find it here. With the Peak District National Park and the National Forest on our doorstep, you can have the best of both worlds – the cosmopolitan bustle of the city and the peace and quiet of beautiful countryside. And, in such a vibrant community, you will find that Derby is a great place to network with potential employers and fellow professionals. The city offers an exciting cultural scene. It’s home to a regional dance centre and orchestra, 36 cinema screens, theatres, art galleries, and a UNESCO World Heritage site at Derwent Valley Mills. QUAD is Derby’s newest contemporary arts centre, showcasing visual arts, film, and media. As well as hosting exhibitions from international artists – it was home to the first BFI Mediatheque outside London – its facilities and services connect people and businesses, creating opportunities for entertainment, employment, and education. Then there’s Déda, the dance-focused arts venue that houses performance spaces and professionally equipped dance studios. And, of course, our own Derby Theatre, home to top-rated touring shows and providing an inspirational learning environment for our students. Hailed as ‘the city of festivals’ by the Financial Times, Derby hosts the Format International Photography Festival, Derby

Festé, iD film festival, Derby Jazz Festival, the UK’s largest free outdoor classical concert, and its own renowned Food and Drink Festival, held in the spectacular grounds of historic Elvaston Castle. For shopping, the city’s blend of modern and traditional charm has something for everyone: quirky shops and pavement cafés in the Cathedral Quarter, a modern shopping mall – Westfield Derby, high street brands in St Peters Quarter and the bustling Eagle Market. There are over 100 cafés, bars, pubs, and restaurants, so whether you want a quiet drink in ‘the real ale capital of the world’ (Lonely Planet), a night out watching sport on the big screen, or cocktails in fashionable bars, you’ll find it here. We’re a diverse multicultural community, with at least 182 nationalities and 71 languages, and that’s reflected in the vast array of cuisines available, from authentic Far East to traditional English fare. Getting around is easy. The Unibus links the city centre, railway station, hospital, and all our sites and halls. It runs every ten minutes and student fares are subsidised. If you live further afield, you can get a train to Derby station or catch the Red Arrow bus between Derby and Nottingham. There are 35 trains to London St Pancras International from Derby every weekday – a 90-minute journey, so a day trip to the capital is definitely on the cards.

What places like QUAD do is make creativity visible. It’s a point where people can find out what’s going on and get inspired. Keith Jeffrey, Director of QUAD, Derby

8


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

9

I N T E R N AT I O N A L students

A dedicated International Student Centre

Choosing to study overseas is a big decision, but don’t worry, you won’t be on your own. We have around 1,000 international students from about 120 countries worldwide, and links with colleges and universities in Asia, the USA, Africa, and Europe.

We pride ourselves on offering an exceptional level of friendly, practical support to international students. We will support you from the moment you start thinking about which course to choose, right through to your graduation – for help and advice, just ask.

Events and local agents in your country We have a dedicated team of international officers who attend a number of overseas education exhibitions and visit many countries throughout the year. They can help you with your application and issue on the spot offers. For more information go to www.derby.ac.uk/international/ events-in-your-country We have agents and representative offices in many countries. They can help and support you during the application process. To find an overseas agent go to www.derby.ac.uk/international/ overseas-agents

Helping you to settle in Our welcome programme for international students takes place a week before the UK students arrive. You can take part in social and cultural activities, such as a visit to Derby or a tour of our Multi-Faith Centre. During the week you will receive lots of useful information, make new friends, start to find your way around and, most importantly, get answers to all your questions. You can even join us on free trips to London and elsewhere. One of our current students will help you to settle in. We offer a free airport pick-up from several airports around the UK. For more information go to www.derby.ac.uk/international

Improving your English If English is not your first language and you want to improve your skills, you can take one of our English language courses to help you when you start your degree. We can also help with your English throughout your course. Our International Student Centre runs informal conversational groups, which will help you to improve your English and meet other international students.

Entry requirements You will usually need a qualification equivalent to a UK undergraduate degree (lower second or above). For equivalent qualifications from your country go to www.derby.ac.uk/international/ applying

You will also need an English language qualification We accept all UK Border Agency approved tests. You will usually need at least:  IELTS 6.0  TOEFL 80 (internet based)   International GCE O Level English Language grade C   International GCSE English or English as a second language grade C   PTE score of 53. We also accept high school English qualifications from some countries.

For MPhil and PhD programmes, we normally expect you to have a first or second class honours degree, a masters degree from a UK university or qualifications that we consider to be equivalent. For more information go to www.derby.ac.uk/research/degrees/ apply

You may need a Certificate of Good Conduct If you’re from outside the UK, you may also need to provide us with a Certificate of Good Conduct from the country or countries you have been living in since the age of ten.

Course fees Our course fees for international students for postgraduate humanities courses for 2013/2014 are £10,455. If you pay your fees in full before you enrol you will qualify for a discount of £500 (not available to research students). For the most up to date information on fees please visit our website.

Scholarships We have some merit based £1,000 scholarships available to all international students (including research students). For more information go to www.derby.ac.uk/international/feesand-scholarships

For more information go to www.derby.ac.uk/international/ applying The new route PhD is intended for recently qualified graduates with good honours degrees, who are keen to progress immediately to a research experience in their preparations for a career in which the ability to undertake research will play a key role.

› Contact us International Enquiries T: +44 (0)1332 591360 E: international@derby.ac.uk

10


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

11

RETHINKING research

All our research has a clear purpose. It plays a significant role in supporting what we teach, publish, and create. The impact of our research is felt in many spheres, including the creative sector through exhibitions and performances, and by influencing and challenging ideas and imaginations. Our research informs our taught curriculum and provides students at all levels with genuine world leading expertise. All our research centres and groups combine the best of both worlds by having strong connections with the Derbyshire region and active international links. The School of Humanities houses the Identity, Conflict and Representation Research Centre, where scholars are working with international groups and research organisations, as well as collaborating with regional partners. The Centre is a dynamic research community, running a seminar series that serves as a platform for the dissemination of research and scholarship and provides opportunities for postgraduate students, academics, and external speakers to present papers and test work in progress. It hosts conferences, like the East Midlands Enlightenment Conference 2013 and the Nationalism, Identity and Belief Symposium 2013.

12


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

13

P ostg r aduate

Some of our

RESEARCHERS

research degrees

Recent publications All the staff in the Identity, Conflict and Representation Research Centre are active scholars and researchers.

Professor Paul Elliott

Professor Neil Campbell

Professor Elliott’s primary research interests include the history of science and medicine, cultural and historical geography, local, regional, and urban history, and the history of education. He has recently published The British Arboretum: Trees, Science and Culture in the Nineteenth Century (2011), Enlightenment, Modernity and Science: Geographies of Scientific Culture and Improvement in Georgian England (2010) and The Derby Philosophers: Science and Culture in British Urban Society, 1700–1850 (2009).

Professor Campbell’s main research project concerns the cultural representations of the American post-1945 West. He has completed a trilogy of books: The Cultures of the American New West (2000), The Rhizomatic West (2008), and Post-Westerns (2012). Coming out of this work, he has developed a website focused on expanded critical regionalism to cultivate a network of resources and shared opinions.

Some of their recent books include:  Professor Jason Lee (2013) The Psychology of Screenwriting (Bloomsbury); (2009) Celebrity, Paedophilia and Ideology in American Culture (Cambria)  Professor David Crouch (2010) Flirting with Space (Ashgate)  Dr Teresa Barnard (2009) Anna Seward: A Constructed Life (Ashgate)  Dr David Holloway (2008) 9/11 and the War on Terror (Edinburgh University Press)  Professor Carl Tighe (2008) Druid’s Hill (Five Leaves Press).

A PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) is a programme of sustained and detailed study in a specific area, requiring you to make an original contribution to knowledge and become an expert in your field.

Throughout your study you will be supported by expert supervisors, and will be encouraged to take part in the work of the Identity, Conflict and Representation Research Centre and other research centres and groups at our University.

We offer both the traditional route PhD, for students who already have a masters degree or equivalent, and a new route PhD, which offers you a programme of online taught modules with an MRes skills component to improve your research skills while you start considering and developing your research project.

Recent and ongoing areas studied by our postgraduate research students include explorations of the ‘Yugoslav factor’ in Soviet foreign policy, women and post-colonial literature in Africa, and media and politics in Nigerian elections. Find out more about our research www.derby.ac.uk/research

14


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

15

Our courses

MA Humanities 

17

MA Humanities: Horror and Transgression 

21

MA Writing for Performance

23

MPhil or PhD Humanities

25

16


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

17

MA Humanities

Essential Information Location Derby Campus, Kedleston Road Duration One year full time or two to three years part time Start dates September or January

About the course

Course details

This postgraduate course offers you the opportunity to develop your research skills and interests within the humanities. By combining both taught and individual research elements, it will allow you to focus on your independent research while exploring different approaches to humanities scholarship.

For the Postgraduate Certificate, you will study Research Skills in the Humanities plus one other taught module. For the Postgraduate Diploma, you will study one taught module plus the Research module.

The course reflects what has been termed the ‘new humanities’, which include a range of disciplines such as American studies, creative writing, English literature, film studies, history, media studies, and theatre studies. One feature of the new humanities is the increasing application of interdisciplinary approaches, especially in relation to shared methodologies and theories. MA Humanities is taught using a combination of approaches to study, reflecting the need to develop your research in line with contemporary trends in humanities scholarship. These approaches include traditional types of research as well as research designed for a more public output, such as engagement with creative writing, performance, or exhibitions. The MA Humanities will provide a foundation if you wish to consider moving on to a doctoral programme and will help you develop an appropriately high level of research skills for further postgraduate research. It is also ideal if you wish to develop your skills for other professional research

activities and projects or want to undertake a stimulating interdisciplinary masters programme to pursue your research interests. You will be taught by staff who are active researchers and scholars. Our recent success in the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) and the continuing development of our Identity, Conflict and Representation Research Centre together reflect the School’s profound engagement with scholarship. Members of our teaching team include published researchers, who have produced essays, journal articles, edited collections, and monographs. As tutors, our staff will use their own success to help you to develop as one of the next generation of researchers. We also offer an MA Humanities: Horror and Transgression (see page 21). If you don’t want to complete the full MA, you can take the Postgraduate Certificate in Humanities (60 credits) or Postgraduate Diploma in Humanities (120 credits).

You will take these modules: Research Skills in Humanities This module introduces you to the cross-disciplinary research skills and techniques that are used by humanities scholars. You will explore historical research techniques, develop the ability to identify and evaluate resources, acquire library and bibliographic skills, and be introduced to the different search tools used by humanities researchers. Research Methodologies in Humanities During this module you will use research methodologies to carry out individual case studies. You will explore a range of research methodologies, historiographies, and theoretical paradigms and apply these to your chosen topics. Even though your work will focus on particular areas of study, you will need to demonstrate your understanding of its position within the broader context of contemporary humanities scholarship and to explore more than one set of methodologies, including those related to the moving image, the still image, creative writing, theatre studies, history, and English. Critical Issues in Humanities This module introduces you to current theoretical debates in the areas that cut across disciplines within the humanities. In individual sessions you will engage with particular concepts and areas of debate, drawing on examples from literature, history, theatre, film, and popular culture, as well as a range of critical perspectives.

Entry requirements An undergraduate degree (lower second or above) in a relevant discipline, or equivalent

You will choose a further 80 credits from these modules: Research Project You will choose an area of research for intense study and explore it in depth. Your focused research will see you produce a substantial piece of scholarly activity with the possibility to engage with or produce research. You can take a single disciplinary or multidisciplinary approach to your work.

and:

or: Extended Dissertation You will research in depth a negotiated humanities field, issue, or debate of your choice and write a dissertation with tutorial support. This research may take the form of a traditional piece of academic writing or the production of a piece of creative work relevant to humanities, based on substantial research and supported by a piece of critical reflection.

Fees 2013/2014 fees for UK/EU students are £495 per 20-credit module. You will study the equivalent of nine 20-credit modules in total. For the most up to date information on fees please visit our website How to apply www.derby.ac.uk/applyonline International students Please see page 9 for further details

Dissertation You will choose and research a negotiated humanities field, issue, or debate and write a dissertation with tutorial support. This research may take the form of a traditional piece of academic writing or the production of a piece of relevant creative work.

› Contact us Teresa Forde T: +44 (0)1332 591736 E: adtenquiry@derby.ac.uk

18


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

19

S t ud ent p ro f ile Cheryl Hunter MA Humanities

We have had some very interesting guest speakers, including writers, artists, and intellectuals from all over the world.

Find out more www.derby.ac.uk/videos/cheryl-hunter

The best thing about studying humanities is the diversity. There are so many different areas that you can look into and my particular interest is psychogeography. I have been able to do some hands-on research on how landscape affects you on a really personal level. It’s all about experiencing the environment, being aware of how it affects you emotionally and spiritually, how it can evoke memory and how it can even make you think about the future. I chose to study my masters at Derby because I had such a positive experience here in my undergraduate days. As a student with disabilities, I have found the University to be extremely supportive. I don’t think I would have coped without that support.

We have had some very interesting guest speakers, including writers, artists, and intellectuals from all over the world. The tutors are very helpful: you feel that you are on an equal level with them. My future career plans are to continue with my research because there is so much more to explore. I have been asked to do some guest speaking, with the possibility of publishing my work in magazines. I don’t really want to ever leave the University – so, if I had the opportunity to do further research here, I would do it! It is such a good place to study.

As a student with disabilities, I have found the University to be extremely supportive. I don’t think I would have coped without that support.

20


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

21

MA Humanities: Horror and Transgression

Essential Information Location Derby Campus, Kedleston Road Duration One year full time or two or three years part time Start dates September or January

About the course

Course details

This is an innovative postgraduate course in film, literature, and cultural studies, which offers you the opportunity to work both critically and creatively.

You will take these modules:

It is supported by internationally renowned horror author Clive Barker and rising star of the British film industry Steven Sheil, so you can be sure you will be learning the most up to date thinking about the genre. Drawing on the expertise of internationally renowned, practising writers and critics, you will study the themes of horror and transgression and explore the boundaries of culture and society. Through the analysis of culture, you will develop your understanding of what defines us collectively and individually as humans and what is beyond the human. This MA is international and transnational in scope and includes work on cinema and literature in the East and world cinema. This course will suit you if you’re interested in diverse forms of film and literature. You have the option to undertake creative coursework if you wish. This may also be the course for you if you’re interested in philosophical and literary theoretical developments, from Nietzsche to Bataille, Foucault,

Kristeva, and Deleuze, and transgressive writers, such as Burroughs, Ballard, and Burgess. Our teaching team includes published researchers, who have produced essays, journal articles, books, creative writing, films, and scripts. As tutors, our staff will use their own success to help you to develop as one of the next generation of researchers and writers. Several of our tutors have successfully written and directed short horror films that have received acclaim at international film competitions and attracted praise and media attention worldwide. You will benefit from our strong relationships with external institutions and cultural entities operating under the banner of horror and transgression, such as the Dead By Dawn Horror Film Festival in Edinburgh and the Mayhem Horror Film Festival in Nottingham.

Research Skills in Humanities This module introduces you to the cross-disciplinary research skills and techniques used by humanities scholars. You will explore historical research techniques, develop the ability to identify and evaluate resources, acquire library and bibliographic skills, and be introduced to the different search tools used by humanities researchers. Research Methodologies in Humanities During this module you will use research methodologies to carry out individual case studies. You will explore a range of research methodologies, historiographies, and theoretical paradigms and apply these to your chosen topics. Even though your work will focus on particular areas of study, you will need to demonstrate your understanding of its position within the broader context of contemporary humanities scholarship and to explore more than one set of methodologies, including those related to the moving image, the still image, creative writing, theatre studies, history, and English. Horror without Boundaries This module introduces you to theoretical and critical enquiry into horror as a phenomenon that crosses cultural and national boundaries. You will examine horror in literature and folk traditions; through visual, oral, and dramatic expression; in its cinematic manifestations within national cultures; and in transnational exchange. This module will give you the chance to examine case studies of, for instance, the relationship between gothic literature and cinema, or between Kabuki and

Entry requirements An undergraduate degree (lower second or above) in a relevant discipline, or equivalent Noh theatres and contemporary Japanese horror, as manifested in cinema and manga.

of transgression alters across different historical periods and cultural formations.

You will also study theories of horror in relation to its diverse cultural settings, including psychoanalysis and Julia Kristeva’s theories of abjection; the work of Gilles Deleuze; contextual and historical approaches to horror in national cinema; audience and fan cultures; theories of gender and social difference; and the aesthetics and performance of horror.

Beginning with the theories and aesthetic practices of the Marquis de Sade in the late 18th century, you will investigate a range of literary, cinematic, and theoretical texts that can be considered to be transgressive or concerned with the notion of transgressions, borders, and limits. You will also consider theorists such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Georges Bataille, and Jacques Lacan.

Transgression: Theories and Practices This module allows you to explore a range of theories of transgression, engaging with questions of aesthetics, ethics, and social boundaries and norms. You will examine a wide range of transgressive texts from world literature, film, and art. The selection of materials you will study will encourage you to consider ways in which the notion

Fees 2013/2014 fees for UK/EU students are £495 per 20-credit module. You will study the equivalent of nine 20-credit modules in total. For the most up to date information on fees please visit our website How to apply www.derby.ac.uk/applyonline International students Please see page 9 for further details

Dissertation You will research a negotiated humanities field, issue, or debate of your choice and write a dissertation with tutorial support. This research may take the form of a traditional piece of academic writing or the production of a piece of creative work relevant to humanities.

› Contact us Teresa Forde T: +44 (0)1332 591736 E: adtenquiry@derby.ac.uk

22


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

23

MA Writing for Performance

Essential Information Location Derby Campus, Kedleston Road, and Derby Theatre Duration One year full time or two to three years part time Start date September 2014

About the course

Course details

This course covers writing for both live and recorded performance. It offers you the opportunity to specialise in writing for film, television, radio, new media, or theatre. Combining both taught and individual research elements, we offer you an individual approach to writing, opportunities to explore personal interests and subjects, while providing a firm structure from which to experiment with the dramatic form.

You will take these modules:

This course emphasises the relationship between theory and practice, and following a first semester of lecturer input, a combination of approaches will broaden and enhance your learning experience. This may include, depending on your academic interests, traditional forms of theatre and influences on and contemporary trends in staging and research (verbatim, site-specific, multimedia, community), approaches to writing for radio, finding the ‘voice’ for recorded performance, and writing for television. You will develop excellent research skills and enjoy frequent opportunities for script development, collaboration, and staging.

As well as the chance to work with postgraduate and undergraduate students from the Faculty of Art, Design and Technology, you will also learn from visiting professionals, Derby Theatre staff, and alumni. Throughout the programme, you will work with staff who are active researchers and who are fully engaged in the field. We also have strong links with QUAD, the BBC, independent writers and directors, and regional production and theatre companies. This will mean you will have the support of both academics and professionals during your studies.

Performance Writing: The Art Form The module provides a grounding in performance writing and introduces you to a range of genres, styles, and approaches. You will map the contemporary writing landscape, focusing on structure and disruptions of typical forms of storytelling, post-dramatic texts, and multimedia writing practices. Performance Writing: The Craft The module introduces you to a range of practical skills and exercises that will develop your writing skills and support experimentation. Throughout the module, you will be encouraged to value drafting, redrafting, and experimenting with genres and styles, all of which will support you to find your voice as a writer. Workshop practice will be at the forefront of our teaching, and you will work with lecturers, visiting professional writers, and your peers to hone your craft and discover ways of working that will aid your writing. Producers and Markets This module supports your individual interests in the field of writing for performance with special attention given to the wider contexts of audiences, industries, and markets. The key element of this module is situating creative work in the professional world, emphasising the place of writing in relation to entrepreneurship. You are encouraged to become an independent artist, enabling you to consider self-employment, with sessions on funding applications, pitching work, and developing an effective professional artistic portfolio within a competitive marketplace.

Advanced Workshop Practice This module will help you develop your writing practice in preparation for your production of a full script for your Creative Project. You will study in a workshop environment, sharing your ideas with your fellow students, and working closely with a tutor to develop your ideas. There will also be opportunities to consider the performance of the written word and the interconnections between script and performance. Throughout, there will be the

opportunity to work with fellow writers to explore texts and script ideas as well as experimenting with genre and style. Creative Project For this module you will produce a full script in your chose performance genre, with the support of a tutor. There will also be the opportunity to take part in scriptwriting surgeries, and workshops.

Entry requirements An undergraduate degree (lower second or above) in a relevant discipline, or equivalent Fees You will study the equivalent of nine 20-credit modules in total. For the most up to date information on fees please visit our website How to apply www.derby.ac.uk/applyonline International students Please see page 9 for further details

› Contact us Yvonne Hunt T: +44 (0)1332 591736 E: adtenquiry@derby.ac.uk

24


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

25

MPhil or PhD Humanities

Essential Information Location Derby Campus, Kedleston Road Duration The MPhil is studied over two years. You can study the PhD for three years full time, or six years part time. The new route PhD is studied over four years Start dates You can start any time between August and May

About the course

Entry requirements An undergraduate degree (lower second or above) in a relevant discipline, or equivalent

Your supervisor will advise and support you throughout your studies. You will study alongside research students representing diverse backgrounds and nationalities, giving you a broad perspective on your studies. There are numerous research groups you can join, and regular events to attend.

There are three routes to a higher degree:

MPhil This is for graduates who want to gain a strong knowledge and understanding of the subject, and then take the discipline forward through an approved programme of original research.

New route PhD The new route is for recently qualified graduates with good honours degrees who are keen to progress immediately to a research experience. This will prepare you for a career in which the ability to undertake research will play a key role. It normally takes four years of full time study.

Traditional route PhD This route entails a programme of research that normally takes three years of full time study. You can choose to take it part time over a period of up to six years. The traditional route enables capable and qualified individuals with a masters degree to pursue an original research investigation into their chosen topic within a field of enquiry.

We’ll design an individual research programme to suit your topic and you will regularly meet your supervisor for guidance and progress monitoring. We offer PhD supervision in a wide range of areas. Current research projects include: PhD in English and part time lecturer in English and American Studies Joanne Bishton Joanne’s research draws on fictional accounts of lesbian desire and erotica. Specifically, she is interested in the way in which mainstream writers such as Sarah Waters appeal to a mass audience, while transgressing the boundaries of heteronormativity and initiating their audience into a lesbian sub-culture. She says, ‘Research is a large part of any postgraduate experience – mine has been enhanced by membership of the Identity, Conflict and Representation Research Centre.’

PhD in Cultural and Media Studies Godwin Oboh Godwin’s thesis is entitled: The political communication model of the news media in the conduct of elections in post-colonial African countries: the Nigerian experience. His research examines the role of the media in the conduct of elections in Africa, with a focus on the 2007 Nigerian elections, in order to determine the contributions made by the media to elections. Godwin says, ‘I chose the University of Derby because of the interdisciplinary approach of the institution towards postgraduate research programmes.’

Fees 2013/2014 fees for UK/EU students are: £3,900 (each year) for full time study of the MPhil, PhD, and new route PhD; £1,950 (each year) for part time study of the MPhil and traditional route PhD; and £2,350 (each year) for part time study of the new route PhD. For the most up to date information on fees please visit our website How to apply www.derby.ac.uk/research (use forms RD2 and RD3) International students 2013/2014 fees for non-UK/EU students are: £9,895 (each year) for full time study of the MPhil, PhD, and new route PhD; £4,948 (each year) for distance learning study of the MPhil and traditional route PhD; and £6,340 (each year) for distance learning study of the new route PhD Please see page 9 for further details

› Contact us Professor Neil Campbell T: +44 (0)1332 591736 E: adtenquiry@derby.ac.uk

26


27

www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

28


www.derby.ac.uk/postgraduate

29

VISIT US

Our open days provide you with the perfect opportunity to:     

talk to our tutors and students visit our accommodation see our facilities explore Derby and the surrounding area make sure we’re right for you.

C O NTA C T us

School of Humanities Faculty of Arts, Design and Technology University of Derby Kedleston Road Derby DE22 1GB T: +44 (0)1332 591736 E: adtenquiry@derby.ac.uk www.derby.ac.uk/humanities

Open days at our Derby campus Saturday 7 September 2013 Saturday 12 October 2013 Saturday 23 November 2013 Saturday 1 February 2014 Saturday 15 March 2014 Saturday 12 April 2014 Saturday 7 June 2014 Saturday 12 July 2014 Saturday 27 September 2014 Saturday 11 October 2014 Saturday 22 November 2014 Book now www.derby.ac.uk/opendays

Find out more about online learning You can visit our stand at the open days listed above. Alternatively, if you can’t get to Derby, you can attend one of our webinars. You can also contact our online learning advisers by email, phone, or Skype. For more information www.derby.ac.uk/online

The University of Derby makes every effort to ensure the information in this guide is correct at the time of going to print. However, as this guide is printed as far in advance as possible to help you make your decision, some information may have changed. Please check our website for the most up to date information about studying at the University of Derby.

www.derby.ac.uk

To obtain a large print copy of this guide, or to enquire about other formats: T: +44 (0)1332 591044 E: marketing@derby.ac.uk

30


Pg humanities brochure aw lres