Issuu on Google+

#1 | AUTUMN

2012

FREE

SKATE | MUSIC | ART | CULTURE


PHOTO: REICHE


Photo: Williams

DEPARTURE PROLOGUE

04 | DEPARTURE


CONTENTS 12 14 16 18 20 28 36 42 50 54 62

ICONS OF DEPARTURE D.I.Y. OR DIE EXPAT EXPOSURE INDEPENDENT IDEAS AMERICA... FUCK YEAH! MUSIC SAVED MY LIFE THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED CRUISIN’ FOR A BRUISING GUIDE TO THE CITY PRODUCT OF THE ENVIRONMENT FAMOUS LAST WORDS DEPARTURE

| 05


ISSUE #1 | AUTUMN 2012 PUBLISHER Clayton Petersen clayton@departurequarterly.com

EDITOR Melissa Williams melissa@departurequarterly.com

ART DIRECTOR SĂŠamus Casserley seamus@departurequarterly.com

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS Melissa Williams Michael Tymbios CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Alice Edy Suzy Snakes Chad Wilson Tyler B Murphy Mike Tymbios Ed Winstone DEPARTUREQUARTERLY.com

The views and opinions expressed within the editorial and advertisements of DEPARTURE do not necessarily reflect those of its staff, nor any of its associates. DEPARTURE and everything contained within is copyright. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form whatsoever, copied or stored electronically without prior permission in writing from the publisher. For submissions or advertising enquiries please contact: Melissa Williams <melissa@departurequarterly.com>

06 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE | 07


Music Saved My Life A project initiated by Verb as a way of connecting creative people who are as excited about making their art as they are about supporting a noble cause. The undertaking pairs up musicians, artists, designers and illustrators to create a limited edition series of skateboard decks. A portion of the funds raised from the sale of the products will be donated to SLED (Sign Language Education and Development); the idea being, as Verb explain, “We can now use the music that we love so much to aid those who aren’t able to hear it.” Verb: Creativity. Activism. Pushing forward...


weareverb.com PHOTOS: MARCUS MASCHWITZ


12 | DEPARTURE

Illustration: Tymbios


ICONS OF DEPARTURE

THE UPSETTER

by Melissa Williams

The Upsetter, a mad man, a producer, songwriter, musician, artist, poet, punk, a Rastaman and prophet. In his prime, Lee “Scratch” Perry was fuelled by a spiritual awakening that saw him blaze a fiery new path in the world of music. Perry was Born in Kendal, Jamaica in 1936. It was through working in construction that he received his “musical education”. He picked up sonic vibrations from the rocks he worked with. As the rocks clashed, he heard drums. He heard sounds in the wind, in the roll of thunder and the lighting flash and learnt everything from stone. From his humble beginnings he went on to invent the genre of Reggae as well as the genre of Dub, the foundation of all electronic music that we know today. At the peak of his career he wrote up to 20 songs a week for 5 years straight. He wrote the original hit songs ‘Duppy Conqueror’ and ‘Soul Rebel’ for Bob Marley, that saw his rise to fame and the international growth in popularity of Reggae music. Perry also wrote songs and produced for many other artists, helping seminal bands such as The Clash invent their reggae-influenced, punk sound. Perhaps his greatest contribution to music however, was how he used the mixing desk as an instrument, blending songs together, breaking them down and bringing in samples and effects to alter the sounds. He was the first person in musical history to make use of a recorded sample in a song, that of a crying baby. The producer was transformed into the artist and his technique contributed to what became known as the Jamaican art form of “Toasting”, a style which went on to influence the birth of Hip Hop. Over and above his enormous contributions, it is his true passion for music that is perhaps the most inspiring of all and will see him live forever through his creations. In the words of the great Lee “Scratch” Perry, “Music is immortal, how can the music die?”

NEED TO KNOW BOB MARLEY Soul Rebel Soul Rebels 1970

HIT SINGLE COLLABS FEATURING LEE “SCRATCH” PERRY THE CLASH Police and Thieves The Clash 1977

DEPARTURE

| 13

BEASTIE BOYS Dr. Lee, PhD Hello Nasty 1998


14 | DEPARTURE


D.I.Y. OR DIE

WORKINGCLASS

by Alice Edy

Late 2010; Durban creatives Tyrone Bradley and Skullboy team up to curate a skateboarding culture/art show: “Our Lives of Deckadence”. After the success of the show they bring Christian Mugnai onboard and hook up a gallery space above Spiga D’ora. So now WorkingClass has a home and it’s all-systems-go. How was WorkingClass born? It kinda started purely so that we could get a chance to take part in shows. We weren’t seeing the kinds of exhibitions and events that we wanted to take part in, so we figured, “Lets do it ourselves.” And that’s exactly what we did. What is the process you follow in making an exhibition happen? It usually goes like this: Think of something rad that you’d like to see; invite other rad people who you’d like to see take part; tell other rad people that something rad is going to happen; do hours of (un)rad admin; arrive at the rad event to see rad art, rad people and drink rad Black Label. Who or what inspires and informs what you guys do? The Beautiful Losers crew comes to mind. We try not to follow anyone’s specific footsteps, but we make decisions and act with a goal of promoting and cultivating the incredible talent that we have here in our local cities. People are doing such amazing things so we want to align ourselves with them and create a platform for them to keep working and exhibiting and ultimately, having fun. Has working with different artists changed the way that you work as artists? Working with artists and creatives definitely makes things interesting. Creatively, you have an inside-look at the future, which in turn inspires and pushes you in your own craft. On the other hand, creatives can be terrible at admin. Dealing with other creatives definitely pushes you to get your own shit together so that when the time comes, you’re jacked-up, organized and good to work with. 3 Words for what you have already done: Nice, Very Nice. 3 Words for what 2012 will be about: Oh. My. God. DEPARTURE

| 15


Photo: Maschwitz

Steel Panther London 2011

18 | DEPARTURE


EXPAT EXPOSURE

MARCUS MASCHWITZ

by Alice Edy

After finishing school in Joburg in 2000, Marcus Maschwitz spent a year exploring London and San Diego with his skateboard, camera, and friends. Upon his return home he found that he’d taken hundreds of photographs along the way, and had accidentally discovered his passion. Over a decade later Marcus is living in London photographing the bands that continue to inspire him. From his early skate pics, his focus has shifted to predominantly the music scene; his impressive portfolio includes every band that has changed your life. Marcus is a formidable combination of talent, hard work, professionalism, insomnia, and a sweet beard. He’s also the most down-to-earth, humble guy you’ll ever meet. How is living and working in London? London isn’t for everyone, but I honestly love living here. Work has been really good to me although I did have to start from scratch when I first arrived. I feel more pushed here, the scene is a lot bigger and the people that I work for actually pay me, which helps. My family still live in South Africa and I miss them a lot. Who are some photographers that inspire you? I’ve always loved Platon’s work. Annie Liebovitz, Atiba Jefferson – he was the first photographer I really noticed – and Ross Garrett captures people beautifully. How many pics do you shoot on average per show, and how many do you use? It really just depends. Sometimes we only need a single shot, but I normally shoot about 90 photographs during a set. I studied on film so I learnt early on to wait for “a moment”. Also, I don’t want to scan through hundreds of photos every two days. Colour is a strong element of your work. Do you think about this when shooting? Thank you. I think this stems from being forced to shoot entirely in black and white for a year while studying. I try to create images that are quite dark but with colours that stand out, to really focus on the subject. DEPARTURE

| 17


18 | DEPARTURE

Photos: Tymbios


INDEPENDENT IDEAS

DELUXE COFFEEWORKS

by Mike Tymbios

“You’re only as good as your last cup.” This is the work motto of Cape Town’s Deluxe Coffeeworks. Departure spoke to co-owner, Carl Wessels, about the highs and lows of running an independent venture and how together with his partner, Judd Francis, they’ve gone from humble backyard beginnings to being Cape Town’s favourite cup of coffee. How many years has Deluxe Coffeeworks been running?  Two and a bit. Where are you located?  25 Church Street and soon we will be opening a new place on Roodehek Road, just off Buitenkant in Cape Town. What exactly do you do?  We roast coffee, we make coffee, and we sell coffee. What made you decide to go it alone? Deluxe is the brainchild of Judd. We met in a bar and got to talking. He told me about this “third wave of coffee.” It sounded great. So I sold the shares that I had in a production company, gave Judd a call, and the next day we were roasting in my backyard. Since then we’ve never looked back. I guess when people see how we roast and make the coffee, that they just have to come back for more. The guys in the shop also add to what we have and the experience of simply drinking coffee. Best and worst parts of running your own show?  The best part is that sometimes I can be late for work. The worst part is having to tell people that we are sold out. What does being independent mean to you? Independent?! That makes us dependent on the people drinking our product day after day. As Judd always says, “You’re only as good as your last cup”.

DEPARTURE

| 19


20 | DEPARTURE


AMERICA... FUCK YEAH! At the end of 2011, tattoo artist Tyler B Murphy of Sins of Style Richly Finished Tattoos, took a trip to the States to visit some friends. He grouped together some photos of the typical and weird things that he saw along the way and gives us a little more insight into them with his handwritten captions.

DEPARTURE

| 21


Caption

22 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE

| 23


Hand-written photo caption 24 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE

| 25


Hand-written photo caption 26 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE

| 27


Late last year I went to the states to visit some friends. I grouped together some photos of the typical and weird things that I saw.

Photo: Tymbios

MUSIC SAVED MY LIFE


MUSIC SAVED MY LIFE Renowned for their creative progression and activist ethic, Verb presents Music Saved My Life â&#x20AC;&#x201C; an inspiring series of collectable skateboards that celebrate the collaboration of some of SAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most ground-breaking bands and leading artists and illustrators.

DEPARTURE

| 29


Photo: Tymbios 30 | DEPARTURE


WHAT IS MUSIC SAVED MY LIFE? by Ed Winstone We’ve all had that epiphany-moment. That mysterious instant when what was once Noise becomes Sound, and then that Sound itself becomes more than tones and notes and keys. It becomes bigger than the sum of its pieces, somehow it becomes more than itself and there’s no going back.

M

DEPARTURE

| 31

DIE ANTW OORD by Ninja

FUZIGISH by Marchan d

THE KING BLUES by Wesley van Eeden

FOKOFPO LISIEKAR by Louis M innaar

ZEBRA & GIR by Alice Ed AFFE y

usic Saved My Life (MSML) is a project that was started by Verb as a way of connecting creative people who are excited about making their art and supporting a good cause at the same time. It makes sense that a brand like Verb would be inspired by music; the innate and shared passion that is found so strongly in so many people, not just musicians. Verb is, after all, about creativity, with skateboarding as a metaphor for that. The MSML series pairs up musicians, artists, designers and illustrators to create a limited edition series of skateboard decks. Finally, a portion of the money raised from the sale of these decks will be donated to SLED (Sign Language Education and Development). As Verb explain, “We can now use the music that we love so much to aid those who aren’t able to hear it.” The bands and artists who have worked with Verb on the project come from mixed backgrounds with the common connection of having been involved with the local art, music and skateboarding scene over the years. Visually, the decks are all dramatically different from one another, as each artist was given room to take their own personal approach to representing the particular band. Music and art are both incredibly personal – to state the blatantly obvious – so what you as the idividual take away from this series depends ultimately on you. The decks are 3-in-1: artworks, skateboards, and band posters. Which some may say is a proper bargain, or a considerable feat in multi-tasking at the very least. The Verb x Music Saved My Life series launches nationwide this Autumn. You can buy the decks at reputable skateboarding stores across South Africa, with all that money you’ve saved by downloading your music online.


Photo: Tymbios 32 | DEPARTURE


MARCHAND ARTWORK FOR FUZIGISH What is the concept behind your piece? The concept behind my design was to create the ultimate skanking monster. The guy at the Fuzigish shows with the ducktail hairstyle and all the tattoos who never leaves the mosh pit. He breaks bones and just goes off. Generally speaking, is music a strong influence in your work? There’s always music playing through my badass speakers. Can’t work without ’em. What do you listen to while you work? It all depends on what mood I’m in and what type of design I’m working on. Some of my most played bands are Arctic Monkeys, AC/DC, The National, Bob Dylan, Ramones, Fokofpolisiekar, aKING, VCK, The Hives and The Rolling Stones.

LOUIS MINNAAR ARTWORK FOR FOKOFPOLISIEKAR What was your process in approaching the Verb Music Saved My Life project? I almost always start with a good pencil drawing and then import into whatever graphic application. I then do digital lines, colours, etc. I completely re-work the piece into vectors to give it a nice, clean, crisp look. The rest is simple. Click, click... What is the concept behind your piece? I’ve had the privilege of working with Fokofpolisiekar before, so I know a bit about their history and the impact they’ve made on the Afrikaans music scene. Coming up with the concept was just a matter of finding imagery that would show how desperately the music scene needed them. I really dislike like the idea of drowning, so I chose water as my villain and simply illustrated characters grasping onto the band name for dear life. Generally speaking, is music a strong influence in your work? Yes, I’m very involved with the music scene. I do a lot of music graphics for bands, music videos, and I also play in my own band called Bittereinder. DEPARTURE

| 33


Photo: Tymbios 34 | DEPARTURE


WESLEY VAN EEDEN ARTWORK FOR THE KING BLUES What was your process in approaching the Verb Music Saved My Life project? As I’ve been in bands before I know how important it is to represent visually what they stand for. I’d heard The King Blues’ music before, but really wanted to get to know them a little more by listening to all of their recordings, interviews and videos. I did a series of sketches for the band and after a number of revisions we decided to go with the one that is now on the boards. Generally speaking, is music a strong influence in your work? If I’d not discovered alternative music, especially hardcore, straightedge and along with it DIY ethics, I’d not be doing graphic design, art, illustration, etc. There were aspects of those music scenes that inspired me to be creative along with skateboarding. They taught me that you don’t have to study art at school and that it’s okay to do whatever. There’s something special about a bunch of kids making music, creating zines and painting on their skateboards just for the fun of it. What do you listen to while you work? I work on my own in a studio and sometimes I just like the quiet.

ALICE EDY ARTWORK FOR ZEBRA & GIRAFFE What was your process in approaching the Verb Music Saved My Life project? I’d already worked with Zebra & Giraffe on the album artwork for The Inside almost a year before the Verb project, so I had a relationship with the band, their music and the themes of the album before I began. We’d already established the visual tone of the album, so for the Music Saved My Life project I just ran with it. What is the concept behind your piece? I wanted to find a visual way of exploring the act of listening. For me, the process of listening to music and taking one’s own personal journey through an album is where I find the meaning. I thought a pinball machine would be an interesting metaphor for the idea of an experience, or journey. DEPARTURE

| 35


36 | DEPARTURE


THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED FALLEN FOOTWEAR CATALOGUE IMAGES FROM SOUTH AFRICA

Photography by Chad Foreman

DEPARTURE

| 37


01 WHITE RHINO Wildlife Park

02 BRIAN HANSEN Skateboarding 101

03 BILLY MARKS

Nollie Inward Heel

38 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE

| 39


40 | DEPARTURE


01 JACK CURTIN Table Mountain

02 TOMMY SANDOVAL Smoochie-Boochies

03 TOM ASTA

Backside Tailside

DEPARTURE

| 41


CRUISIN’

FOR A BRUISING

by Chad Wilson

There’s simply no denying the recent surge in the rise of popularity of skateboarding and with that surge the subsequent demand for a multitude of board styles to meet the desires of the masses. Along with this however, come the safety concerns from the general public and the increased harassment from the law. It now seems that the Western Cape Government are taking steps to make skateboarding – in any public space whatsoever – totally illegal and punishable by fine, or even imprisonment. Departure spoke to some local skateboarders and skate industry people to find out their opinions on this harrowing matter... 42 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE

| 43

Photo: Williams


44 | DEPARTURE

Photo: Williams


KENT LINGEVELDT LONGBOARDER AND OWNER OF ALPHA LONGBOARDS What do you think about the increase in popularity of skateboarding in all its different forms? From a business point of view I think it’s really good, but as a skateboarder who’s already experienced numerous highs and lows in our culture’s history, I do fear society’s misconceptions and misunderstanding of what we do. Of how we live. I also fear the new breed of skaters’ attitude and gung-ho inconsideration for their fellow community members. That attitude can only aggravate negative opinions. How do you feel about skateboarding being made illegal in the Western Cape? It’s a very saddening state, the illegality of our lifestyle. The authorities don’t realise that skateboarding has, does, and will continue to change lives for the better.

“WHO CARES WHAT KIND OF BOARD THEY’RE RIDING. AS LONG AS THEY’RE SKATING, THAT’S ALL THAT MATTERS.” WARREN TALBOT SKATEBOARDER AND MARKETING MANAGER OF VANS What do you think about the increase in popularity of skateboarding in all its different forms? It’s so good to see people, both young and old, cruising down the streets on their longboards, cruisers and normal boards. Just enjoying the feeling of skating. As long as people are getting out there and having a good time, there’s absolutely nothing wrong. If they’re riding a skateboard, who cares what kind of board they’re riding. As long as they’re skating, that’s all that matters. How do you feel about skateboarding being made illegal in the Western Cape? They can make it illegal, but that’s never going to stop anyone from skateboarding. Skating has been outlawed in plenty of cities, but has always found a way to progress through it.  DEPARTURE

| 45


46 | DEPARTURE

Photo: Williams


CLAYTON PETERSEN SKATEBOARDER AND FOUNDER/OWNER OF REVOLUTION What do you think about the increase in popularity of skateboarding in all its different forms? I think it’s quite historic, how for the first time in ages skateboarding is going through an up-cycle and is appealing to all ages across all skate disciplines. From the Rad Dad who used to skate in the ’70s, to the little grom doing his first push. It’s amazing to see all types of people skating and enjoying it in all its different forms. How do you feel about skateboarding being made illegal in the Western Cape? I’ve seen this happen through every skate rebirth. The “kids” take over the streets, the “peace-keepers” don’t know how to deal with it, so they ban it, which only aggravates the situation. There’s no stopping it and the more people that rebel and protest against it, the more the powers that be will have to listen. I remember them banning it in 1989 and 200 strong of us protested at the municipal buildings, blocked the entrance and chanted with picket signs. The racket we caused got front cover of the local newspaper and a few weeks later they started to build concrete parks and the schools opened their parking lots for us to skate. You’re not breaking any law, you’re being physically active and creative.

MOSES ADAMS SKATEBOARDER What do you think about the increase in popularity of skateboarding in all its different forms? It amps me to see the increase of skateboarders. We now share a common interest. “Love of Skate” kids are inspired, dedicated and put in effort to land tricks. It’s a fun way to keep their minds occupied, preventing them from common negative influences, such as drugs and other crimes. Being focused on achieving the best they can be at skateboarding. How do you feel about skateboarding being made illegal in the Western Cape? Without skateboarding my life would be pointless. My heart would literally be ripped... I live to skate. DEPARTURE

| 47


“I FEAR SOCIETY’S MISCONCEPTIONS AND MISUNDERSTANDING OF WHAT WE DO. OF HOW WE LIVE.”

T

here’s an obvious lifestyle appeal to skateboarding. That joyful feeling of simply rolling along on a board means there’s a world of people out there who do just that, without ever venturing into what many say is the only true form; progressive street skating. The categories and opinions are endless, but skateboarding – in the broadest sense of the word – covers everything, from the trance hippy on the longboard, and the hesher on the shred-sled, to the retro hipster on the vintage cruiser, and the tech skater on the toothpick; along with everything else in between. At the end of the day, these groups all have their own unique sub-cultures within skateboarding. Their own styles, practices, general vibes and opinions. Something for everyone. Anyone who has ever skated for a decent amount of time will at some point have been harassed – at least once – by the police, security guards, or some over-zealous citizens. We all accept this to a certain extent as a part in what we do, but the recent news of the Western Cape Government making skateboarding in any public space whatsoever, totally illegal and punishable by fine or imprisonment is taking a simple means of (clean) transport, fitness, freedom and expression to disastrously low levels, with no consideration for the individuals involved. We can all laugh at how ridiculous it is that ballet and gold teeth are forbidden in a country like Kazakhstan, but essentially that’s just how ridiculous it is to make skateboarding illegal in a developing country like South Africa, where any creative and potential income-generating activity should be strongly encouraged. It is undeniable that skateboarding itself is an unstoppable force. Even if the entire skateboarding population were eliminated, future generations would always rediscover it and continue to push its boundaries. So why take something so positive, a means of transport, exercise and progression, something with an evidently powerful amount of energy, and try to smash it down by making it illegal, and by not offering any alternative solutions such as “legal” places to skate, or alternative transport solutions?

NEED TO KNOW

HOW YOU CAN HELP MAKE A CHANGE FOR SKATEBOARDING

Sign the official petition to legalise skateboarding in South Africa. Go to National Skate Collective on Facebook for more, or email: dave@worshipskatin.co.za 48 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE

| 49


Photo: Tymbios 50 | DEPARTURE


GUIDE TO THE CITY

KHULU DLAMINI

by Suzy Snakes

Originally from Durban, Khulu Dlamini has more recently been hustling a life for himself in Cape Town. Aside from his steez on a skateboard, he’s also a beer pong aficionado who has the CT party scene all figured out. Departure caught up with Khulu to discuss his skateboarding and the guide to his four favourite drinking spots. How many years have you been skating for? It’s been around 10 years now. Who are your current sponsors? RVCA, adidas, Plan B and Rafiki’s. Did you and all your brothers start skating around the same time? Me and my older brother started earlier, before Dlamini. He only started after we had already been skating for about two years. Then I stopped for like a year. Is it rad being able to skate with all your brothers? Yeah, it’s super rad. It’s the best thing ever. We all help each other out pretty much. And Dlamini just has some crazy natural talent? Hey I dunno what he’s got, maybe it’s all that bread he eats or something. What’s been your best skate-related trip so far? The adidas trip to Mozambique was super rad. The best trip I’ve been on so far, just chilling with all the homies. I couldn’t have asked for anything better. You’re stoked to be one of only three guys on adidas? Super stoked, they treat us super good. No complaints at all. What are your plans for this year? Trying to hit up Europe or maybe Cali. Just keep pushing, it’s the only way forward. I’ll see how my time in Cape Town is gonna be and how long I can last out here.

DEPARTURE

| 51


A MERRYMAKER’S GUIDE TO THE CITY Cape Town’s Four Finest Watering Holes According to Khulu Dlamini

RAFIKI’S

ABANTU

52 | DEPARTURE


Illustration: Tymbios

CARNIVAL COURT

DOWN SOUTH

DEPARTURE

| 53


PRODUCT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

SNEAKING SUSPICION Rumour has it that skate sneakers are now as essential a part of any wardrobe as blue jeans and plain white t-shirts. Here then are a few standout silhouettes for Autumn 2012.

54 | DEPARTURE


FALLEN – SLASH

Safari / Cement / Puzzle

Black / Keeper

DVS – CONVICT

VANS – ERA

Brown Suede

Neoprene Dark Shadow / Orange

DEPARTURE

| 55

Photo: Williams

GLOBE – NULLARBOR


PRODUCT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

SNEAKING SUSPICION

Photo: Williams

SNEAKING SUSPICION ADIDAS – RONAN “ELDRIDGE” Cardinal / White / Black

DC – TONIC MID Army / Olive

56 | DEPARTURE


SNEAKING SUSPICION Rumour has it that skate sneakers are now as essential a part of any wardrobe as blue jeans and plain white t-shirts. Here then are a few standout silhouettes for Autumn 2012.

DEPARTURE

| 61


PRODUCT OF THE ENVIRONMENT

GLOBE – (021) 447 6801 sales@revolution.co.za

DVS – (021) 447 6801

FALLEN – (021) 447 6801

sales@revolution.co.za

sales@revolution.co.za

VANS – (021) 709 0084 administration@chappersd.co.za

ADIDAS – (084) 290 5095

DC – (031) 313 14000

pieter.retief@adidas.com

marketing@dcshoes.co.za

58 | DEPARTURE


DEPARTURE

| 59


SKATER OWNED AND OPERATED STOCKING AFRICA’S WIDEST RANGE OF SKATE BRANDS AND PRODUCTS

GO TO REVOLUTIONONLINE.CO.ZA TO BUY THE ADIDAS RONAN ELDRIDGE MODEL AND SEE MORE FROM ADIDAS FOOTWEAR

CHECK OUT PRODUCT FROM PETE ELDRIDGE’S OTHER SPONSORS

FOR MORE INFORMATION EMAIL: INFO@REVOLUTIONONLINE.CO.ZA CRESTA (011) 678 1685 • FESTIVAL MALL (011) 397 9660 LONG STREET (021) 423 3482 • MENLYN (012) 384 2959


FAMOUS LAST WORDS

CONTENTS 10 26 40 44 48 54 58 58 58 58 58

R.I.P.

REGULAR 1 REGUALR 2 REGULAR 3 REGULAR 4 FEATURE 1 FEATURE 2 GALLERY FEATURE 3 CITY GUIDE PRODUCTS ENDER

WOODSTOCK INDUSTRIAL CENTRE “What goes up, must come down.” –ABOVE

62 | DEPARTURE


Photo: Williams

Leon Bester. Wallride | Photo: Reiche

DEPARTURE

| 63



Departure Quarterly Issue 1