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DENIZEN SPRING 2014 ISSUE II


DENIZEN


SPRING 2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS: Letter from the Editor 04

How to Style: Summer Essentials 06

Deciphering the Dress Code 12

Intern Diaries 15

Cyber Style 16

Style Spotting 18

Campus Brand Ambassadors 20

In Defense of Fashion 22

Drifters 24

Color Me Nana 36

Alex Sloane 42

Pack Your Bags 46

Nick Perr 50

Geography of Style 54


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR As a kid, my summers were spent in the back seat of our family’s hatch back SUV—Game Boy in hand—venturing anywhere from the Sierra Nevadas to the Grand Canyon. The only barrier between my brother and I that kept us from killing each other was a cooler full of snacks in the middle seat. I still remember watching the temperature gauge on the dashboard rise as we drove out of our Southern California oasis and towards our destination. At the time, the trips felt like torture (6 hours in a car and no TV?!) but now I only look back fondly, aching for the sight of the warm desert sunsets whizzing by my window. As Summer 2014 approaches, I can feel UCLA students like myself begin to feel antsy in anticipation of adventures that lie ahead. For some, it’s a study abroad trip to a destination where you don’t speak the language. For others, it means graduating and trying to get a footing in the real world, that eerie, mystical place we’ve heard stories about but never actually seen before. And then there will be those that prefer a “staycation” either here in Westwood or at home. This quarter at Denizen, we prepared our “On the Road” issue with road trips and sightseeing in mind. For our “Drifters” shoot, we traveled to LA’s own Chinatown and enjoyed playing tourist for the afternoon among the street vendors and souvenir shops. For our cover shoot, however, we chose to stay close to home. The hilly pavement that served as the location for our Matrix-inspired look, is actually the road behind Royce Hall—proving that adventure can be found even if you’re not traveling beyond the 90024. A packing guide, alum interview and highway inspired art submission round out our second quarterly issue of Denizen. Sam Reed


Editor In Chief Sam Reed Managing Editor Phoebe Neuman Photo Director Arthur Pham Creative Director Xiaoman Zheng Designer Elena Cullen Contributers Phoebe Lai Kerianne Grant Cailin Lechner Mary Pettas Elise McKelvey Allison Gillis Noor Gill Quinn Gibson Jeffrey Hsiao


STYLE

HOW TO: ST Y LE SUMMER ESSENTIALS

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STYLE

Give your favorite button down the summer treatment by tucking it into a pair of wide-legged yet relaxed look.

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Reinvent your favorite bold strapless dress by layering a sheer and sleeveless button-down blouse underneath. Earn extra style points by adding a bag in an equally bright color and a sassy pair of sunglasses.

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STYLE

Edge out the inherent girliness of a mint midi by styling it with Keep your jewelry minimal in order to tie the two parts of your look together.

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Take your overalls out of little-kid territory by pairing them trendy Birkenstocks.

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STYLE

Deciphering The Dress Code You’ve landed the internship, but now comes the real tough part-- what

to wear?! Whether you’re in a business professional environment or working in a casual start-up, we’ve got the low down on how to make a good impression on the office while still maintaining your personal style.

Business Casual by picking a button down in a sumwith a pair of tailored shorts. Throw on a blazer for an extra pop of color and A.C kicks in.

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Business Professional For a professional internship, stick to tried-and-true workwear basics, such as pencil skirts and blazers. Showcase your personal style by choosing pieces in fun colors and adding on a statement necklace.

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Casual

Make your favorite pair of jeans office-ready by styling them with a crisp white button down in an unusual silhouette and adding a pair of structured black sandals to anchor the look.

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INTERN DIARIES

LIFE

The fashion industry has a notorious reputation when it comes to entry level jobs and internships (The Devil Wears Prada, anyone?). But did you ever wonder what really goes on behind the glitz and glamour? One former intern shares the ups and downs of intern life as a graphic design intern at a LA based fashion magazine.

BY ELENA CULLEN For about six months, I was a graphic design intern at An-

At times we had huge problems booking covers, finding ven-

nex Magazine, a small, up-and-coming fashion magazine that that

ues, having enough money to cover all the expenses, and worst of

focused on “high street fashion.” There were only fifteen of us, in-

all, dealing with Hollywood agents. There were also times where

cluding a few other interns, so everyone did a little bit of everything.

we were simply turned down, or just couldn’t produce what we had

At times I had to help out with social media, blogging and really

hoped to. But watching my boss, and the rest of the team deal with

anything else my boss told me to do. While I did learn a lot about the

these setbacks opened my eyes as to how to achieve what I wanted to

fashion industry, different designers, celebrities, and makeup during

in life. While I can honestly say that my internship wasn’t the most

my time at Annex, the most important lessons were not learned from

exciting, being able to watch a woman right out of college achieve

the glamorous parts of the job.

her dreams was an experience I’ll never forget.

It was amazing that a group of underaged and unorthodox college students could complete and publish a full-blown magazine cover-to-cover, featuring celebrities, models, hair and makeup, basically everything “real” magazines had. My boss was the most interesting person I worked with; she was the CEO/Editor-in-Chief/founder of the magazine at only twenty-two! That was the most unbelievable thing I had ever heard. She was maybe two years older than me and was already running a magazine.

I spent most of my time at Annex doing graphic design for the magazine. I did a lot of smaller projects, such as Instagramming photos, making small edits and masking images. However, I also got to help with largest spreads of the magazine too, such as our Tallia Storm photo spread. I also spent a decent amount of my time on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and all other social media platforms trying to gain new followers. My least favorite job was adding people to these networks. Occasionally, I would add so many people at one time that the sites wouldn’t let me add anyone else for a full 24 hours. For the most part, it was a typical internship with small jobs and no pay, but I did learn how to become a better designer and, most importantly, work as a cohesive group.

The author’s design for Annex Magazine’s Tallia Storm photo spread.

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INDUSTRY

Cyber

Style

It’s the warning heard round suburbia—“once you post a photo online, it’s there for anyone to see.” But the advice echoed by worried moms and dads, whose children have just created their very first Facebook profiles, may also be the very foundation of the future of the fashion industry.

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e

BY SAM REED Twenty years ago, the tastemakers, trendsetters and muses of the seemingly out-of-reach fashion industry were

style guides, advice, and inspirational images, the ratio of exposure to actual purchases is on the decline.

celebrities and socialites, made famous by their appearance

With the power of social media and the inf luence of

on the covers of glossy magazines or paper tabloids. However,

bloggers who constantly cross promote different products,

in the 21st century world where anything less than instant is

teens and young adults are constantly engaged in “nonstop

old, fashionistas from around the globe have the opportunity

shopping that’s not necessarily aimed at purchasing merchan-

to be made famous instantly thanks to the blogosphere’s abil-

dise.”

ity to circulate photos and information at an alarming speed.

The Intelligence Group has deemed this trend of poten-

Prior to the Internet era, personal style functioned as

tial consumers undergoing the entire shopping progress ex-

a form of self-expression and communication through which

cept for actually purchasing an item “fauxsumerism.” Online

one shared artistic tastes and their preferred lifestyle. But in

shops have enhanced this Internet-window-shopping trend

the digital age, when so much of our identity is wrapped up in

by offering “wishlist” options or allowing customers to con-

our web presence, our Pinterest boards are beginning to rival

tinuously “add items to cart,” while having a difficult time

our closets when it comes to the most important platform of

converting interest into sales. To add insult to injury, many

self-expression.

consumers also research products online prior to purchase,

Thanks to social media sites such as tumblr, Pinterest and Instagram, would-be high end consumers can curate

scouring for better deals or cheaper alternatives and further delaying the buying process.

blogs and boards to echo their personal style—regardless of

Despite a low browse-to-purchase ratio among millen-

whether or not they have the funds to purchase all of the items

nials, there is one niche that has benefited significantly from

they would wear if they had the opportunity. By pinning and

the exposure of high fashion that Internet allows. Fast fashion

posting photos of the small group of bloggers who actually

retailers like H&M, Forever21, and Zara cater to the needs of

can afford the goods (or who have been sponsored by the

young fashionistas operating on a budget by creating garments

brands themselves and given items for free), young fashion

with the “luxury brand look” minus the luxury. According to

lovers can live vicariously through virtual strangers as well

New York Magazine’s The Cut, young consumers prioritize

as by curating their own online closets.

the look of quality over actual quality. “Disposable” cloth-

A 2014 study conducted by the Intelligence Group finds

ing and items barely skating the thin line between “inspired”

that among 14-34 year olds, the act of browsing ecommerce

and “knockoffs” have become the answer to their over-budget

sites has become in itself a new form of entertainment. Nearly

tastes.

one third of the study’s participants stated that they actively

While that’s not to say that online shops aren’t success-

browse products online that they don’t necessarily plan to buy

ful (they are), one has to wonder if the fauxsumerism trend is

for “fun.” This fact combined with an already sour national

creating a generation of digital fashionistas who choose to ex-

economy is driving retailers—and especially e-tailers—crazy.

press themselves by reblogging their favorite outfits uploaded

This phenomenon has serious implications for the fash-

by other anonymous users, or if these social media gurus will

ion economy. While the general public, especially the younger,

actually begin purchasing the items in their virtual shopping

tech-savvy generation, has more exposure than ever to free

carts once they accrue more money than a weekly allowance.

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CAMPUS

S T Y L E SPOTT I NG

Eight AM class is no excuse for sweatpants. Take a cue from these fashionable Bruins who caught our eye with their great style. Photos by UCLA Streetsnaps & Lifestyle.

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CAREER

CAMPUS BRAND AMBASSADORS You see them on campus handing out free merchandise, and they’re always blowing up your Twitter with news of #sales. But did you ever wonder what it was really like to be a campus brand ambassador? We asked two brand reps to share their experiences.

Kasey Ong for Asos

Megan Thomas for Vince Camuto

3rd year, Political Science and Communications Major

2nd Year, Communications Major

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K A S E Y O N G

MEGT H O M A S Is this your first Brand Ambassador job? How did you get connected with Vince Camuto?

What got you interested in becoming a Brand Ambassador?

Tell me more about getting connected through Youth Marketing Connection. So you just applied to this Youth Marking Connection company?

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What does your job for Vince Camuto entail?

What do you do for Asos on social media? -

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What sort of events have you held? What events have you guys held this year? -

What have you gained from this internship? What’s one of your favorite things about working for Asos? -

Social media is extremely important in our generation. How do you promote Vince Camuto on social media?

What has Asos been able to offer you through this experience? So you have some sort of supervisor?

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What advice do you have for anyone looking to get into marketing or even just being a Brand Ambassador on a college campus?


IN DEFENSE OF

f

a

h s

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n io


LIFE Career shaming. For those of us who want to go into the fash-

collection after collection and stand-out red carpet looks are not

ion industry, facing criticism for the field you want to go in from

air headed or superficial as they are often imagined to be by those

your parents, peers and advisors is nothing new. During my first

outside of the fashion industry.

ever discussion section here at UCLA, I eagerly told my TA and the

Take Eva Chen, the editor-in-chief of Lucky magazine. She

class that I wanted to be a fashion journalist after I graduated. We

attended Johns Hopkins University as a pre-med student before

had been doing an icebreaker activity, and everyone else’s career

switching her major after she interned at Harper’s Bazaar. Now,

goals had received little comment from my TA, but when it came to

Chen is the youngest editor-in-chief of the major fashion glossies

mine, she stopped in her tracks and asked why I would want to waste

and has taken the social media world by storm, and no one would

my education in that way. I could feel myself start to blush and the

dare to call her anything other than extraordinary.

students around me squirm at the awkwardness. She then proceeded

Despite the deceiving up-speak, stylist extraordinaire Rachel

to explain to the class why going into fashion or entertainment is a

Zoe also attended a prestigious university before moving into the

waste of society’s resources and that I should consider a different,

fashion industry. She studied psychology and sociology at George

more worthy career path. Ouch.

Washington University, and then relocated to LA to execute her

This misconception of fashion being a waste of intelligence or

takeover of the celebrity styling industry.

a lesser industry to aspire to is extremely common. People assume

These women are just a small example of the kind of brain-

that working in fashion is the equivalent of playing dress up all day,

power that the fashion industry houses. Fashion people may work

and something that only air heads would aspire to be a part of.

in an industry that society has deemed frivolous, but the reality is

While “playing dress up” can be part of working in the industry, especially if styling is your passion, the reality of the fashion industry is so much more than a bunch of girls getting together to decide what shoes they like best with that dress.

that the fashion industry is one of the world’s largest industries and generates billions of dollars worldwide every year. While fashion is definitely a beacon of creativity and cultural innovation in the same way that art and literature are, at the end of

Although many people don’t think of fashion as being an intel-

the day, the main goal of anyone who works in the fashion industry

lectual pursuit, it is as much of a cultural marker as art is. Individual

is to sell a product. Although someone in the fashion industry may

designs, as well as whole collections, can be read in the same way

be working to sell luxury handbags instead of insurance or high-

that one would read and analyze a piece of literature or a painting.

tech equipment, the ultimate goals of these people are all the same:

For example, Diane Von Furstenburg’s iconic wrap dress is more

to make their company a profit. In this way, going into the fashion

than just a figure-f lattering piece of jersey, it has come to represent

industry is a no less intellectual pursuit than going into a more “sen-

women’s liberation and sexual freedom. The cultural and emotional

sible” business position.

ties that we have attached to the wrap dress can be analyzed in the

While my TA was not completely wrong in her critique of

same way as our cultural ties to Betty Friedan’s feminist manifesto,

fashion as a waste of education, as evidenced by low-brow install-

The Feminine Mystique.

ments such as Fashion Police or the “who wore it best?” segments

While literature is typically lauded as a more “valid” and cul-

of entertainment news and magazines, these are not the only career

turally relevant art form, fashion can be infinitely more accessible.

options in the industry. Going into fashion is really what you make

Not everyone may understand the argument laid out in Friedan’s

of it. There are plenty of people who would love to fit into the ste-

manifesto, but the sexual freedom and empowerment implied by

reotypical fashion image and career, but there are also many others

the wrap dress’ easy-on, easy-off design is something that can be

who aspire to something that requires much more thoughtfulness

understood just by looking at a woman in the dress.

and creativity. You will always meet people who are ready to mock

Those who work behind the scenes to produce these cultural markers by writing your favorite publications and turning out

your career choices, but remember that following your passion, no matter what the perception of it, is always an admirable path.


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e t r f i s r D Getting cultured while exploring L.A's Chinaown felt a little more authentic with online boutique ThreadSence's bohemian pieces in tow. Photos By Arthur Pham

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CAREER

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1. At UCLA, you studied American Literature and Culture. How (if at all) did your choice of major translate into your current work?

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2. What inspired you to start a blog? What have been some of the greatest benefits to your career as a result of blogging?

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3. Bloggers often receive free clothing in exchange for publicity. How do you remain true to your style while running your blog as a business?


CAREER “MY BLOG STARTED AS MY LITTLE OUTLET TO EXPRESS MY CREATIVITY WITH WHAT I WORE, AND TO WRITE OUT MY FEELINGS IN A WAY THAT CONNECTED MY INSPIRATIONS TO REAL LIFE. I NEVER REALLY SAW MY BLOG TURNING INTO A JOB. I JUST WANTED TO CREATE SOMETHING THAT WAS APPROACHABLE AND INSPIRING, AND MOSTLY FOR MYSELF.”

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4. You and your sister Natalie collaborate with Modern Vice for a shoe collection. What has been the most rewarding aspect of this experience?

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6. What advice do you have for students who don’t attend an arts/fashion school but who want to pursue a career in fashion? 5. As a blogger, consultant/ shoe designer for Modern Vice, and social media strategist for Adore Me Lingerie, you wear many hats. How would you describe a typical day balancing each of these commitments?

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7. What are your top three must-have pieces for summer?


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x sloane ale PHOTOS BY QUINN GIBSON

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CAMPUS BY MARY PETTAS

Packell, but she just goes by Alex Sloane. On the day of our inter-

With regards to the pressure women feel to always look perfect, she comments, “the way I dress is an act of rebellion against that ideal.”

view, she is in a matching skater skirt and crop top set in a rainbow

tion to leading to her learn martial arts (she is a second degree black

sherbert print, high platform sneakers, a sparkling hot pink back-

belt), also contributes to her conception of beauty. For example, the

pack, and spidery, fake lashes. Alex’s reputation precedes her in

long lashes on both her upper and lower lids adhere to the wide-

both her fashion sense as well as her musical talent—she recently

eyed look that is characteristic of “Chinese baby girl makeup,” as

released a single, “Plastic,” that has garnered a large fan base.

she calls it. “I choose between Western and Chinese standards of

She’s hard to miss—she’s that girl on the hill, f loating through the crowd in the dining halls or dorm hallways in wild outfits, long blond hair f lipping behind her. Her full name is Alexandria Sloane

Though she claims with a laugh that her bandmates might

beauty, and adhere to certain ones,” she observes.

call her a diva, in reality, she is anything but. As we talk, Alex is

She is also fascinated by Harajuku, or Japanese street style, as

soft-spoken, down to earth, and very easy going. She also arrived

evinced by Gwen Stefani, an artist known, much like Alex, for her

to meet me over half an hour early, patiently reading a book on

taste in both music and fashion. Another artist that inspires her is

Kerckhoff patio. It is clear immediately that although she is only a

Lorde, a musician that has blazed onto the scene in the past year at

freshman, she is confident in her interests and abilities—she seems

the tender age of sixteen. Comparisons can also be drawn here, as

to know very well who she is.

both Alex and Lorde are very young, yet display unique and deter-

She is strikingly intellectual in this way; nothing like the Val-

mined perspectives in both their style and music.

ley girl stereotype that is generally associated with the San Fernan-

Similar to the way Lorde comments on class differences in her

do area where she grew up. Her roots do have quite an affect on her,

hit single “Royals,” Alex also incorporates her opinions as a social

though. She references the musical inf luences she experienced in

activist into her music. On the surface, her single “Plastic” is bright

high school, including EDM as well as a South African rap group

and bubbly, much like herself. However, dig a little deeper and you

called Bloody Contacts. She insists that the the Valley is a musical

realize the lyrics are actually about gender roles. She comments on

microcosm, “you get a lot more exposure to different kinds of mu-

the pressure that women feel to always have a perfect exterior, say-

sic.”

ing that this expectation is fake, like plastic. It wasn’t only her environment that inspired her as a child, but

With regards to the pressure women feel to always look per-

also her artistic parents. Her mom’s knack for styling and her fa-

fect, she comments, “the way I dress is an act of rebellion against

ther’s musical talent are united in Alex. Her dad took a very hands-

that ideal.” As always, her fashion and her music are inextricable,

on approach to develop Alex’s voice, teaching her how to record

and it is clear to that the move to make the song catchy yet meaning-

music and helping her with the logistics of going to gigs. Her mom,

ful was a very conscious decision.

on the other hand, took a more gentle approach, and let Alex develop her own style, even if the result was sometimes questionable.

When I ask if she believes this rebellion against cultural norms is what defines both her style and music, however, she he-

“I wore basketball shorts and converse for all of third grade,”

sistates to be so easily labeled. “Well, it fits together. It’s a part of

Alex laughs, “It was tomboyish. My mom laughed at me, but she

me, but there’s definitely so much more than that, too.” She shrugs

was also totally supportive. Sometimes now she emails me lists of

apologetically, but looks me straight in the eye. Despite her pause,

what to wear for certain events.”

it’s clear that whatever is ahead for Alex Sloane, it will be done

Another way her parents inf luenced her was by giving her

with the same conscious intent that has brought her success thus far.

strong cultural ties that have come to play in her look. Alex is

With a strong look and equally strong musical ambitions, she seems

Hapa—half Chinese and half French/Scottish. Her culture, in addi-

to be unstoppable.

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LIFE

P A C K

Y O U R B A G S F E E L I N G L I K E YO U ’ R E F O R G E T T I N G S O M E T H I N G ? C H E C K O U R G U I D E A L L O F YO U R T R AV E L E S S E N T I A L S B E F O R E YO U H E A D O F F TO YO U R S U M M E R D E S T I N AT I O N . KERIANNE GRANT & PHOEBE LAI

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THE ESSENTIALS 6.

4.

7.

1. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Denizen Magazine Wa l l e t Sleep Mask Wrinkle -free jacket Dental supplies sunglasses moisturizer hair ties Id card

2. 5.

3.

2.

9.

3.

CA R R Y- ON

1.

8.

4.

LUGGAGE

7.

6.

5.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Hair straightener hair brush comfortable flats ucla t-Shirt skater skirt camera Makeup case DENIZENMAGAZINE.COM | 47


LIFE

1. 2.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

5. 3.

Button down shirt headphones aviators converse vintage t-shirt denim shorts

4.

ROADTR IP

6.

BACK PACK ING

1.

3.

2.

4.

5.

6.

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Flannel jeans long sleeve shirt hiking boots thick socks chapstick


1.

3.

4.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Casual dress flats floppy hat cat eye sunglasses cross-body purse

2.

5.

SIGH TSEEING 1.

2.

BEACH

4.

3. 6.

5. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Sun hat strapless dress sunscreen bathing suit sandals

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SUBMISSIONS

NICK PERR 310 TO MY CI TY

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SUBMISSIONS

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POINT OF VIEW

Geography of

Style

I grew up in both Boulder and Denver, Colorado, two cities that have very unique styles. Boulder goes for a more hippy vibe, rocking Keens and Birkenstocks with tie-dye skirts and dreads, while Denver leans more eclectic and urban. As for my personal style, I take inspiration from eclectic Denver, and, like many of my fellow Bruins, mix it with my newfound UCLA pride. Whether you’re at Kerckhoff, the Sculpture Garden or on Bruin Walk, you’ll be sure to see lots of blue and gold UCLA gear go by. This common Bruin pride doesn’t make our school’s street style dull, however. While people watching, you’ll notice the incredible diversity that UCLA students show through their clothes. I believe that a person’s

Claire, -

weather has made Claire a master at the art of layering and also infused her style with a sweetheart charm. Her family, unlike the weather, is not so extreme. They are a blend of liberal and conservative values, which Claire’s style emulates. While her personal style is simple and neutral, aligning more with the conservative side of her family, she can also slip on a daring dress that showcases her more liberal roots. Claire likes to choose modern pieces from stores like Zara, and then mix them with tried-and-true basics from Target and Gap. Her style is as classic and American as her

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San Francisco, California. Her urban-but-classic style stems from her conservative family living in one of the most liberal cities in

itself in Kathleen’s style through her combination of tailored basics from J. Crew and fun printed pieces from boutiques. Always mixing prim-and-proper with downtown cool, she loves to wear

to always look pulled together comes from her family’s lessons to

Nikki, Hermosa Beach, California. She grew up in a liberal family full

in herself and her womanhood. Nikki loves rocking unique works of art with crazy patterns that are inspired by the openness of the beach environment in which she grew up. She never wears something that is considered boring or mainstream, and mostly shops at


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Denizen, Spring 2014