Issuu on Google+

D. Ortiz

landscape architecture portfolio


Denisse A. Ortiz 178 Palisade Ave. Cliffside Park, NJ 07010-1230 +1(347)531.9379 dortiz.arq@gmail.com

Education

September 2010 - May 2013 Masters of Landscape Architecture (MLA) Department of Landscape Architecture School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Rutgers University New Brunswick, NJ January 2006 - May 2006 Department of Landscape Contracting Penn State University University Park, Pennsylvania

Courses Taken: • Horticulture 269 (Residential landscape planning), • Horticulture 120 (Computer applications for landscape design)

September 2001 - October 2005 Universidad Central del Este (UCE) San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic An ADRU, ADAA, CONES and ADUAL Accredited University

Awards 2012 2001 2000 2000 2000

B.A., Architecture

Award of Excellence, A park for the People studio submission Full Undergraduate Scholarship from the UCE Scholarship from the Youth National Ministry Scholarship from the Santo Domingo Technological Institute Municipal Youth Award


Experience

April – May 2012 Parks for the People Student Competition, Van Alen Institute / NPS (Rutgers University, Landscape Architecture Department, SEBS, New Brunswick, NJ) February – April 2012 R&S Landscaping (Midland Park, NJ)

February – May 2008 Drive Medical (Long Island, NY)

September – January 2008 Las Americas Institute of Technology (Dominican Republic)

Landscape Design Intern Teamed with four students and worked on the design and production of final submission. My responsabilities included CAD drafting and rendering of master plan.

Landscape Design Intern Assisted the team with CAD drafting and rendering of residential landscape designs. Had the opportunity to take on solo design assignments. Accounts Payable Intern Sort, enter and issue payments according to company procedures Reconcile invoices, statements, payments, and reports Landscape Design Intern Site analysis, layout, estimating, surveying, and design drafting

Skills

AutoCAD; ArcMap/GIS, Adobe Design Suite (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign), SketchUp, MS Office Suite (Word, Excel, Outlook), Design research, Architecture, Landscape Design, Concept Design, Construction Drawings, Hand drafting and sketching, Placemaking, Community Design & Site Planning.

Languages

Spanish (native) & English (fluent)


01 Latino Urbanism:

A Case Study of the Meaning and Use of Streets as Place in the Dominican Community of Washington Heights, New York City MLA Graduate Project

02 The Experiencial Wallk:

Rutgers Greener Garden Urban / Suburban Design

03

Hopewell Furnace NHS, A Park for the People:

Retrofiting SP 7

Praxis Studio / Van Alen Institute Student Competition Winners

04 Landscape First:

Lawrence Brook Greenway Regional / Ecological Studio

05 An UniGenu

Edible Garde

Landscape Plants


09

Hand Drafting

08

Mixed Media Representation

07

Models:

Studio Fundamentals / Enviromental Design

The Rutgers Garden Project

us Garden:

en

s Design

06

Grading:

Construction I

05

Selected Work


Latino Urbanism:

A Case Study of the Meaning and Use of Streets as Place in the Dominican Community of Washington Heights, New York City

MLA Graduate Project The project focuses on the Dominican community that resides in this community, given that its population hosts a significant number of Dominicans. The goal of this research is to raise awareness of the criticality of social and cultural norms that manifest in usage patterns, spatial practices, and physical characteristics that derive from a particular group, history, time, and place. The research explore how can the design of streets as public open spaces aid in constructing place that supports placemaking and convey cultural meanings and uses to adapt in transculturalized contexts? The study discloses current socio-cultural and behavioral patterns displayed on the streets of Washington Heights. This is relevant in the design process as a response to issues with users and uses. It also studies and comprehends how design can be conveyed with “layering and separation� (Cooper & Francis 1990) to allocate trans-cultural and transnational interactions in public open spaces. Lastly, it seeks to establish how Latino urbanism and placemaking approaches can help carry cultural and social meanings in the everyday landscape.


Inwood

Geor

ge W ashi n

gton

Brid

ge

I

95

No

rt

h


Dominicans are one of the fastest-growing groups of Latinos in the United States and fastest-growing segment of the population in New York City taking the fifth place following Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Ecuadorian and Salvadorians (Census 2010). The way Dominicans experience, use and interact in public spaces is different from other cultures. For them, it means to socialize and interact with neighbors in the public realm but also it serves as a medium to assimilate into mainstream American culture. The fact that public space has not been designed to be adaptable in to support other types of uses other than the norm, can result in malfunction and degradation of the urban form as well as in a lack of attachment to a place. This research argues that culture can contribute strongly to the design of public urban places that could preserve a healthy city form and environment. Research shows that design is often misguided or misused due to the subjectivity of the designers and, more precisely, due to the different cultural backgrounds of the users. The lack of micro-level details not taken into account when designing (e.g. cultural values and timeframe elements) does have the potential to adversely affect the social and spatial quality of the space. In an effort to fill this void and add socio-cultural elements to the design process, the research develops both a theoretical and practical response to this lack of cultural emphasis. The purpose of this study is to get a better understanding of how the designed landscape responds to cultural adaptation and placemaking (or not). This said, however, Latinos have fought for the “right� of the city. One example of the long history of Latino struggle for this right is that Latinos identity has become embedded in New York City’s public spaces and neighborhoods even while they are being contested (Angotti 2012). Dominicans as part of this Latino group are not the exception. Their culture, identity, appeal of merengue1 music and other forms of Dominican popular culture has been captured in the city space even though most scholars and researchers have neglected the study of this cultural identity in the U.S. from a design standpoint (Duany 1994, 2008). 1 Merengue is the national dance of the Dominican Republic.


Latino Placamaking Ideas

Expresion

Instrumentality

Latino Urbanism

Place Making & Meaning

Cultural Preferences

Lifestyle

Physical Environment

Assertive Space

USE

Adaptive Space

Urban Improvisation

Negotiative Space

Addaptive City Form

Like other immigrant clusters, many Dominicans choose to stay together within the same geographical location. In Washington Heights, where they have established their community, a distinct Dominican identity has emerged and continues to flourish. The neighborhood has become a hotbed of cultural diffusion and interchange of Dominican culture. Many restaurants offer ethnic eateries, local stores often advertise in both Spanish and English; church services are frequently held in keeping with Dominican traditions, and medical assistance is not only available in “standard� Spanish but in the Dominican dialect of Spanish. The language on the street is Spanish, and the Dominican flag flies proudly next to the American one from apartment windows and storefronts. Therefore this study analyses how space is being adapted and use, and place is being produced.

Economic Needs


Building Use

Accessibility

Land Use


For this scale the site was analyzed at a general level understanding its existing uses and accessibility and how people react to these. There were separations and barriers in the neighborhood due to components of the urban form or physical barriers. Entering the neighborhood at 155th Street, the presence of Trinity Cemetery offered an edge where the site started. Broadway Mall, a key identity of Broadway starts at Columbus Circle in midtown Manhattan and extends north to Washington Heights where it is the center artery of the neighborhood and where people have the opportunity to interact. At 168th Street, New York Presbyterian hospital was the Broadway Malls end and the more populated and vibrant zone began. At 178th Street, the George Washington Bridge and Bus Terminal literally cuts through the neighborhood separating what can be called the north and south parts of Washington Heights. The last element was the 181st St. shopping district connector to Interstate 95 and the Bronx. North of the 181 St. shopping district marked the beginning of a more residential area The inventory showed the preference of users to open space oriented towards facilities and access. These physical barriers were all related to Broadway. Trinity Cemetery, New York Presbyterian, George Washington Bridge & Bus Terminal and the 181st shopping districts were facilities and areas that were service oriented, with an expected major inflow and outflow of users. 182nd Street and above was more residential and community oriented with less street and commercial activity. Access to neighborhood parks, government institutions and churches along Broadway were in this area.


Spatial Aspect of Broadway Blvd at Washington Heights

181 st

178 st

175 st

172 st

Geo

rge

Was hin

gton

Brid

ge 171 st

I9 5

No

rt

h 169 st

168 st

166 st

155 st

N 0

0.25

0.5

Mile

Sections not to scale

SCALE 2

At this scale, the orientation of the analysis was towards Broadway. The goal was to understand its character and spatial composition as well as to understand how people react to its components. At this point, understanding the transition of Broadway into Washington Heights from a boulevard to a very busy strip was very crucial. By understanding its spatiality, it helped to study and establishes relationships on how space is being used in the neighborhood. Mapping and people tracking identified issues in pedestrian safety and the need for acomodations. Based on the activities taking place on street sidewalks, one can assume that the existing buildings ’interior and exterior layout did not foster social interaction, like the open space to which Dominicans are accustomed in their home country. Social activities were intrinsically tied to Dominican culture and raised fundamental questions about what it means for a Dominican to take ownership of a place. In order to take ownership of a space, it has to be modified by its users and stamped with personal appreciation for aesthetics, elements, and activities. The meaning of a place is defined by the values embedded within it. The users of this area have implanted their ideas of what a public space should be given the limitations of space that they have encountered.


This scale focused on the site where most conflict occurred and stressed the analysis of physical elements and social qualities where Latino placemaking was being produced hence Broadway from 168th St – 181nd St. The edge of the sidewalk played a big role in what kind of activities take place. On this site, there were 177 stores including medical offices, delicatessens, supermarkets, banks, multiservice agencies, hair and nail salons and restaurants, from which 85 (or 50%) were Latino related businesses. The greatest numbers of Latino stores were found in the northern portion of this site, specifically from 174th St. to 181st St. In this section, improvisation and reinvention of the built form was most frequently encountered. This was a busy commercial and heavily transited area with many residential buildings. It was the core of this busy Broadway Street where most people passed by and ran errands. From this scale, the selection of three possible sites for intervention were identified based on the overlap of the criteria selected. The goal of these selected sites was to demonstrate how these interventions can be implemented at different locations along Broadway to support the needs for this community.


Dominicans transfered symbolic power and ownership of space by naming streets, claiming space and celebrating their heritage in the neighborhood. These traces are signs of Latino placemaking that showcase their values and interest as well as the need for other ammenities in their space.


The study identified three sites with the most issues on uses and quality of the space. For this community, the streets represent the most valuable social space. Presently, Broadway at Washington Heights does not offer spaces with the quality for socialization. Hence the study proposes a system that is dedicated to social, cultural and commercial space needs; it also offers versatile spaces that can be adapted to different needs and activities. The system delimits and reclaims people’s space to be used solely for people to stop and take a break, places to meet and talk, a cultural space adaptable to different needs and spaces for commerce at designates areas all through Broadway. The interventions were approached in a culturally sensible way to allocate different identities as time passes by, hence improvisational spaces. Along Broadway only one cultural space was delineated, The Plaza element, that allows this communities to showcase their cultural and recreational preferences. Spaces to meet stop and talk where delineated based on the location and type of activities taking place during inventory process. These spaces are mainly related to building uses and store fronts.


Cultural Space, The Plaza


The Experiencial Wallk:

Rutgers Greener Garden Urban / Suburban Design

* Co-designed with Mukta Jadhav

The project’s idea was to design a versatile space that displays green technology and teach gardeners how to implement new techniques at many design scales. The design showcases a series of terraces that support the surrounding vegetation and borrows the Lawrence Brook as one of its main focal points. The conformations of these terraces are concentric to the entrance to the garden. Functionally, the design program responds to the need of allocating administrative buildings, a parking deck that displays green infrastructures techniques, indoors and outdoors classrooms, a versatile space that allows for a farmers market once a week during summer time and other activities, as well as a series exhibition gardens.


*


Hopewell Furnace NHS: A Park for the People: Retrofiting SP 7

Praxis Studio / Van Alen Institute Students Competition Competition Winners

By author

Park for the People was a student competition presented by the Van Alen Institute in partnership with the U. S. National Park Service to reimagine America’s National Parks. Our Praxis studio recived the Award of Excellence. Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site is a historic landscape of the iron making era.


The Rutgers design methodology conceived of historic preservation, ecological restoration, and public outreach as part of an ongoing spatial narrative in which each design intervention becomes a new thread of change interwoven into a complex cultural tapestry. The studio consists of 14 proposals united by a trail system connecting the site to the surrounding eco-preserve and State park. The trail system is framed by a carefully orchestrated sequence of design and programmatic elements that integrate cultural and natural history with recreation activities and landscape management plans. Design elements include a new campground/picnic area, a wetland boardwalk with vernal pool, a bat hotel, meadow restoration, and new dramatic overlooks. The proposal combines a good walk in the woods with historic tales of manufacturing and the Underground Railroad, and a highly pragmatic forest maintenance and restoration scheme. A site branding exercise incorporates the use of signage, brochures, cell phone apps, billboards, and an inner city wall mural into the overall re-imagination of the park.


A Park for the People:

Retrofiting SP 7

Praxis Studio / Van Allen Institute Students Competition

My intervention consisted of a series of campground and picnic areas that takes place on the existing footprints of the Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) site SP-7, an archeological site presently not preserved. The footprint of the CCC camp was preserved to showcase narratives and materials used for the construction and rehabilitation of the furnace to the public. This intervention takes place on four of the footprints of the campground. The remaining were preserved to showcase narratives and history of the place. The design consisted on four elevated cubicles, all at different heights connected by a central pathway. The variation in heights plays with the topography giving users different view sheds of the site.


Lawrence Brook GREENWAY

Recreational Land Propose Extention of Green Corridor

Flood Area targeted for Preservation

Suitable Soils for Intervention Strategies

! A ! A !! A A !New Brunswick ! A

A

! ! A A ! ! A A

Recreational Land Agriculture

South River Borough

Barren Land Forest

! A

North Brunswick Township

! A

! A

! A

! A

Franklin Township

! A ! A South River Borough South River Borough !

A

! A ! A

! A

! A East Brunswick Township

! A ! A

! A

Suitable Soils for Intervention Strategies

Land Use withing Trgeted Zones

! A

Wetlands

! A ! Milltown Borough A

! A ! A Ã Ã Ã Ã Ã Ã

Transit Overlay Districts

ÃÃ

DUNELLEN BORO

à Ã

MATAWAN BORO

Ã

NEW BRUNSWICK CITY

Ã

A

South Brunswick Township

! A ! A ! A

! A

! A

Ã

à à Ã

Proposed Lightrail

! A ! A ! A

Wildlife corridor Intersections ! A ! A ! A

Ã

Proposed Lightrail Trail Network

Recreational Land

Wildlife corridor

Intersections Development Zones

Area of Focus

¯

Ã

Ã

Trail Network

Suitable Soils for Intervention Strategies

Ã

Ã

Ã

Propose Extention of Green Corridor

Ã

Ã

Proposed Development Zone

!

! A ! A

Proposed Lightrail

Ã

Trail Network

Scenario Proposal

Urban

South River Borough

! A ! A ! A

! A

! A ! A ! A ! A

! A

! A

! A

! A

! A


Landscape First:

Lawrence Brook Greenway

OPPORTUNITIES Head of TRAIL, extending Burnet St. bike lane as an enhancement of existing connections

Located on dense development provides opportunities to reuse old abandon rail line over the damn and connected to existing trail along Millpond and propose trail

Connections with existing park areas and residential zones

Opportunities to connect to parks trail system Connections of existing park trail system to the green corridor

Opportunities to connect to parks trail system and extend to Riva Ave. pedestrian and bike access

Opportunities to enhance habitat connections between exiting preserved open space and sorrounding habitat patches

Opportunities to connect Riva Ave. & Church Ln. proposed pedestrian and bike access to fishing point access

Need to provide safe wildlife habitat bridging over Major Roads

Connections with existing park areas and residential zones

STRATEGY

Connecting Ryders Lane existing bike and Pedestrian access to Rutgers Gardens and incorporating it to tha lextentions of the proposed trail along the Brook and provide accessibility to existing fishing point

Thick wetland and forest patch ideal for the extention of wildlife habitat

Opportunities to expand connections with existing bike friendly roads and intersections with proposed trail

Need to provide safe wildlife habitat bridging over NJ Turnpike

Connections with existing park areas and residential zones

COMPLETE STREETS

Regional / Ecological Studio

The Lawrence Brook Watershed is a region intercepted by a considerable amount of transportation infrastructure resulting in an unbalanced ecosystem ecologically speaking. Our design group worked on a scenario where ecosystem services were the priority. Putting ecosystem services first and taking advantage of existing features of the brook as recreational open space and habitat, this intervention concentrates on knitting smaller habitats into a system that balances human, animal and vegetal life. The greenway is a response to the needs of preserving and enhancing these ecosystems by creating a green corridor for habitat and humans. The Lawrence Brook is at the center of this region, and is one of the main assets to this community as a preserved and recreational open space. But, unfortunately, many people lack accessibility to it. The first stage of the design was to identify weak interceptions along the brook that could be improved to support the ecosystem services as well as open space for its residents.After understanding the physical characteristics and potential of these intersections, the goal was to implement a system that could knit together all the segregated portions of the brook into one main spine of open space open for different recreational activities that extends to larger habitat corridors of the region.


! A

Intersections

! A ! A

! A

! A

! A

7’

5’

11’

! A ! A ! A ! A

! A

On Neighborhood Resedential Roads

A

Implementation

!

! A ! A ! A

! A

! A

! A

! A

Brook

Section / View M

Quality INTERSECTION

TYPE Neighborhood Residential Intersection

Connectors

WHY?

HOW?

OUTCOME

Complete Street

Complete Street

No access developed

Bikes and Pedestrian Trail

Limited Access No Access for wildlife

Brige for habitat only

No Access for wildlife on Residential roads

Allocate for wildlife crossing

Wildlife Corridor

On Non -existing Connections


On Neighborhood Connectors 7’

6’

9’

15’

15’

30’

Peds &Bike Ln

9’

7’

Peds &Bike Ln

Designated Bike Ln

Expanded Sidewalk

Designated Bike Ln

Crosswalk

Designated Bike Ln

Expanded Sidewalk Scale 1:10 0

ain St. at Milltown Boro

10

20

40

On Neighborhood Main Streets

Yield to bike sign

Merging traffic option 1

Regional Studio Denisse Ortiz 12/12/2012


An UniGenus Garden: Edible Garden

Landscape Plants Design An edible garden that displays a breed for different traits in the cruciferous genus. The approach focuses on a practical and traditional design in its use. With regards to form, it creates small rooms within the garden and uses the idea of “enclosure” by enhancing entry ways using vertical elements such as pergolas and wooded fences accentuated by plants clusters. Since the plant palette is limited in height, the focus is the colors and textures founded in this composition. In terms of planting, cottage gardens tend to be very densely planted. The design is composed of four sections that display different plants of the same genus sharing a small space for human interaction (seating area for instance) and Their practicality centers in the use of the garden as an educational place and a place for people to be in, but also as a display of a “kitchen garden” for the use of herbs, vegetables and a mix array of ornamental plants as well.

The design makes emphasis on the display of plants that form part of the cruciferous genus with the purpose of showcasing how plants in this group forms part of by being classified for different traits. The botanical lesson focuses on how the parties of plants are selected to become specie based on the edible parts of the plants. Some characteristic that will be showcase in the garden are the roots, leaves, stems, terminal buds, flowers and also some ornamental varieties of this genus. The garden has been separated in four parts that display different varieties of these plants. The root garden: for instance is a collection of edible hardy plants that its edible parts are roots. In this category the selection of plants was based on architecture, color and suitability for this region. Most of the leaves structures in this portion of the garden are similar and green. To enhance it, the introduction of plants which edible parts are the swollen stems; bring a good contrast of color and form to the garden. Some of which are Kohlrabi, Radish, Horseradish and so on. The flower and stems garden: offers a varied composition of plants that its edible parts are the flowers, inflorescence or the stems. Here a display of different types of Broccoli and Cauliflower offer to the viewer a great selection of plants used in the everyday life and other options to be incorporated as well. The ornamental garden: by adding ornamental variety of this genus to the garden, especially in areas to be more like resting space, offer to the user a better understanding of how vast and ample a genus can be. The ornamental plants offer beauty and layers of colors to the garden. Lastly, the leaves garden: as to be implied, edible parts are the leaves. Offering a great variety of winter greens that showcase textures and color as product of soil PH and intensity of the sun or cool season.

rendered plan

functional diagram

people’s space roots garden leaves & ornamental flowers & stems garden ornamental garden paths & connections

RS

(KO) Kohlrabi

(K) Kale

http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/botany/brussels-sprouts-info.htm

(B) Broccoli

(H) Horseradish

SATIVUS

(RS) Radish

http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/botany/cabbage-info.htm http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photo-ornamental-kale-image21752305

(BS) Brussel Sprouts

(C) Cabbage

(CA) Cauliflower

http://www.burpee.com/flowers/ornamental-kales/flowering-kale-song-bird-red-prod002429.html

(OK) Ornamental Kale (OK) Ornamental Kale


B

A

B’

A’ Ornamental veriety sitting area

planting plan

plants list

Broccoli and Cabbage variety garden flowers and stems

(CA) seedlings

(CA.PRL)

KEY

LATIN NAME

COMMON NAME

SIZE

QUANTITY

PLANT’S INTEREST

Ornamental Plants

(B) seedlings

(FC)

(BR)

(OK)

(OK) (FC)

(FC)

(B)

OK

BRASSICA OLERACEA

ORNAMENTAL KALE

1.5’

14

FC

BRASSICA RAPA

FLOWERING CABBAGE

1.5’

12

Variety of purple-ish and cream color modify leaves Variety of purple-ish and cream color modify leaves

H

ARMORICA RUSTICANA BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA RAPA

1’

15

Roots

3’’ - 25 seedlings tray 3’’ - 25 seedlings tray 3’’ - 25 seedlings tray 3’’ - 25 seedlings tray

4

Leaves color and textures Textures

Vegetables (BF)

r

(B.PRL)

K

(CA.PRL) (CA.C)

BR

(C)

(BN)

C

(NO) (RC) (H)

RC

(BR) (RS)

(BS) (T) (KO)

BS

(K)

(BN) (K)

(K)

(K) (K) seedlings

(KO,T,BN,NO) seedlings

(K)

KO

B

BF

BR

CA

Roots and Stems variety garden

Kale variety garden leaves

T

BN NO

RS

BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA OLERACEA Var. capitata f. rubra BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA OLERACEA BRASSICA RAPA BRASSICA NAPUS NASTURTIUM OFFICINALE RAPHANUS SATIVUS

HORSERADISH KALE CHINESSE CABBAGE CABBAGE RED CABBAGE BRUSSELS SPROUTS KOHLRABI BROCCOLI

3’’ - 25 seedlings tray Seeds

2 2

Architecture

2

Color

2 1pk

Architecture Architecture and color

3’’ - 25 seedlings tray 3’’ - 25 seedlings tray 3’’ - 25 seedlings tray 3’’ - 25 seedlings tray Seeds

1pk

Roots and color

RUTABAGA WATERCRESS

Seeds Seeds

1pk 1pk

Roots and color Roots and color

RADISH

Seeds

1pk

Roots and color

BROCCOFLOWER BROCCOLI ROMANESCO CAULIFLOWER TURNIP

2

Color

2

Color

2

Compositions and color

2

Architecture


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Grading: The

BERM MOUND

MOUND

Rutgers Garden Project

DRAIN INLET

DRAIN INLET

Construction I

UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK DRAIN INLET MOUND

DRAIN INLET

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

BE R

M

DRAIN INLET

BERM

DRAIN INLET

+96.5

96

+90

98 97 96 95 94 93 93 92 91 90 89 88 87 86 85 84 83 82 81 80 79 78 77 76 75 74

RIM - 95.1 INVI - 90.9

+94

+93

PIPE SLOPE - 2%

T.W +88 INVI + 88

T.W +88

+85

B.W +81

Section A-A’ PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

C

98

PIPE SLOPE 1.7%

INV - 98.84’

101

100

100

106

97

PIPE SLOPE 1.5% 109

94 99

93

INV - 94’

+101.5

RIM - 101’ INV - 99.1’

96

95

+95

+98

+102

B

100 99

100.84’

99

92

Water Management Storage 8406.5 ft2

98

91

100

90

A'

97 89

88 86

96

87

99

96

Section B-B’

98

97

95

Pump for Irrigation System

Flo-Cell 30mm drainage cell

96

A

98

97

STORMWATER HARVESTING TANK

C'

96 87 95 94 88

93 92 91 90 89

*

With Mukta Jadhav

Liner

Geotextile

Flo-Cell modules

B'


Structure

Earth

Plants


Models: Studio Fundamentals / Enviro-

mental Design

Models are a very useful media to explore thoughts in the design process. It helps with the verbalization and expression of an idea to inform the design.


Mixed Media Representation


Hand Drafting Samples


©2013 D.A.O.


Denisse Ortiz Landscape Architecture Portfolio