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deluxxdigital.com I S S U E 22 • D E C E M B E R 201 3

TIM LABENDA • UNITED NUDE • BLESSA V I E N N A D I T T O • G E N O V E VA A R T E A G A - R Y N N T O M O K A Z U H A M A D A • AT E L I E R D E L’ A R M É E • N I C K A I T K E N M A U R I Z I O FA N T I N I • FA I S A L M O H A M M E D • L I Z D U N G AT E K E N TA K I K U C H I • Y O S H I TA K A K O N O


WWW.ELEVENPARIS.COM


[CONTENTS] TIM

LABENDA

UNITED

NUDE

BLESSA VIENNA G E N O V E VA

DITTO

ARTEAGA-RYNN

TOMOKAZU

HAMADA

AT E L I E R

L’ A R M É E

DE

NICK

AITKEN

MAURIZIO FAISAL LIZ

FANTINI

MOHAMMED D U N G AT E

K E N TA

KIKUCHI

Y O S H I TA K A design front

&

art

KONO

direction:

STEPHEN

J

LEE

c o v e r : p h o t o g r a p h y : G E N O V E VA A R T E A G A - R Y N N model:

ELLA

make-up:

costume assistant:

WEBB

LOUISE

@

GINGERSNAP

STRACHEN/LEILA

designer:

KIERAN

BECKY

HUGHES

&

AGENCY SIMON

PHILLIPS

JAMES

WRIGLEY

deluxxdigital.com is a unique online publication which creative platform for the latest up-and-coming artists to their work. Wi t h h i g h l y c r e a t i v e f a s h i o n p h o t o g r a p h y, with features and interviews on fashion, music, art and these elements blend to form the incomparable creativit deluxxdigital.com If you would like to submit work for future issues please contact: info@deluxxdigital.com www.deluxxdigital.com

offers a showcase together culture, y that is


[ TIM LABENDA ] R

E

S

E

T

“RESET” presents itself as the first ever women’s collection from German designer, Tim Labenda. Tim’s previously been known as a menswear designer only, however this recently changed when he was invited to take part in the Vogue Salon, hosted by Vogue Germany. In order to take part in the exhibition, Tim was required to create his first ever womenswear collection – even though it was daunting, he got stuck in and had something wonderful put together by the end of the process, which he completed with a shoot in London. Tim’s Spring/Summer 2014 collection, “RESET”, is exactly what it says – Tim resetting everything he previously knew, creating new patterns and starting over with his designs. However, maintaining his devotion to menswear, the entire collection is influenced by Tim’s signature clean-cut designs and masculine silhouettes, but with a slight feminine edge to ensure the collection was established as authentic rather than androgynous. The Tim Labenda woman is sexy, flirty and fun; the type of woman who wakes up in the morning and throws on her boyfriend’s t-shirt, or pulls on a pair of his jeans to pop down the shops. She has effortless style, and that’s exactly what Tim has adopted with “RESET”, creating numerous ensembles that are entirely versatile and easy to style. One side of the collection is a contrast of tight blouses with narrow button panels and collars, and the voluminous pants with pleated details and a narrow ankle leg. On the other half of the collection there is a skinny rubber pant in combination with an egg-shaped jacket or an oversized double breasted blazer. The silhouette of the shoulder in the blazer is always sharp and edgy, contrasting with the fluent, voluminous way of the pants. The range of materials is vast, with the aim to ensure the collection is as three dimensional as possible. Natural indigo dyed linen is in contrast to neoprene and soft cotton, and silk combinations contrast against technical materials such as that of the waterproof rain coat. All of the technical materials, especially the rubber jersey, are double faced so that the interior of each garment is always comfortable and cosy. The palette presents numerous shades of blue, white, black, grey and green tones, with the print pulling the palette together.


photographer: BASTIAN JUNG model: CHARLOTTE NOLTING @ MODELWERK hair: MAKI TANAKA make-up: NATSUMI NARITA photographer Assistant: ADAM KANIOWSKI & BASTIAN ACHARD set assistant: DEJAN POLETAN


[UNITED NUDE] Rem

D

UNITED the

Koolhaas,

NUDE

Nova

Creative

talks

shoe

,

Director

exclusively

collaboration

to

and

Co-Founder

deluxxdigital.com

and

the

retail

of

about

experience

text: Annie Hall United Nude has a strong ethos of innovative collaborations. What do you think it is that makes these so beneficial to a brand? We take our collaborations much further than most other brands as we primarily design and develop new products from scratch and we collaborate with those who are different enough from us to make it worthwhile. Our collaboration projects are mostly content driven, as where often we have to re-invent a whole new way of shoemaking, like with our Zaha Hadid and Iris Van Herpen collaborations. These cutting edge products, which are sometimes only for the show and not for sale, then simply become stories that lead to exposure.

needed most and the shoes are the show. The store setup is more an installation than an interior design. They are designed to impress its visitors. They are designed to remember.

You now have 12 flagship stores with the most recent being opened in Israel. What was it that attracted you to this market? Tel Aviv belongs to the trendiest cities in the world. This market is an attractive market as many people are independent, open minded and educated. And hence fits well with our brand. We have a very good relationship with our partner there. She is an experienced fashion retailer and distributor. The combination of the above makes Tel Aviv an excellent choice for our expansion.

Zaha Hadid is known for her futuristic architecture and your recent collaborative project sees you once again push the boundaries of design. How did this partnership come about? And why do you think architecture can easily translate so successfully into shoes? I met Zaha a few years ago at a private dinner in Hong Kong. I had heard already about her love for shoes so I brought her a pair. We stayed in contact and when we opened our UN store in London one of her associates suggested the idea to do a shoe with us. I think we started that same month. The better and cooler architects aim to innovate and push boundaries. I was trained as an architect myself, so I understand that. We often break rules in design; not because we want to, but simply by not knowing them.

Like your shoes your stores are extremely conceptual. What is your main inspiration when creating a retail experience for your customer? For us retail is about experience. Our shops are designed like a theater, there’s a lot of darkness and there is only light where it’s

You have always embraced new technologies. How do you think developments such as 3D printers are going to affect the future of fashion design? As the technology continues to improve and the costs continue to go down, it will play a bigger role. Having said that, there are not many fashion designers who know how to draw 3D in the computer so they will mostly have to collaborate with others such as architects and product designers.


The Nova shoe defies all traditional design rules. What did the creative journey of the Nova shoe involve? And how do you ensure you get a balance between a creative aesthetic and the comfort of the shoe for the wearer? If I work with an architect, I like to see this reflected in the shoe. So when we defined the briefing for the shoe, I wanted something that didn’t look too much like ‘ a shoe’. Zaha came up with many designs and we finally picked this one. The design process was very time consuming and precise. The making was very challenging as there was hardly any conventional shoe making involved. The result is a shoe that when worn in the street, cars stop to make compliments. They are so eye catchy that they are hard not to see. Sometimes I like that kind of loudness in fashion. The comfort we took care of with experience and testing. You often speak of the story of the shoe and the wearer. What is the story you hope the Nova shoe will go on to inspire? Not only the Nova, but also our entire brand: We like to inspire people to try new things, to create new things, to be open-minded, to surprise yourself and to surprise others. www.unitednude.com


[BLESSA] With

the

release

of

their

debut

track

“Between

Times”

edging

c l o s e r, w e c a t c h u p w i t h B l e s s a , t h e f i v e - p i e c e b a n d f r o m S h e f f i e l d text: Jade Mordente You are creating a new niche of indie music, we’ve seen described as daydream pop - the delicate vocals coherent with an atmospheric grunge edge to produce powerful, energetic sounds. How would you describe your music? Is there a particular mix of genres you look to for inspiration? When writing songs, we work under the assumption that just as the artists’ initial impression is often unrecognisable in their final work of art, we can experiment with as wide ranging influences as possible and still produce something that is essentially us. As serious as our songs sound we have a lot of fun in deciding how the song should initially sound, and work from there. For example Bloom was written with Sky Ferreira’s ‘Everything is Embarrassing’ in mind, undergoing several regenerations before arriving at the point of the recorded track. Since graduating from University only last July, you seem to be on this rapid wave of progression, your gigs are becoming so much more widespread. It must feel humbling to be quickly gaining a large scope of recognition. What’s been your favourite moment so far? Our favourite moments are always the more private moments, the end of a long day of working on a song and finally fulfilling its potential, refusing to settle for anything not at a high standard, and creating something that eclipses everything that has come before it.

Although it’s still early days, you have been compared to some pretty iconic bands. Do you feel you will continue to experiment in the future, pushing the boundaries further and expanding your sound? Experimentation and progression are mutually re-enforcing with us. We don’t have a default mode of writing songs or if we do it’s not something that we value or find interesting, so we’re always exploring different structures, sounds and genres while retaining our identity. Further down the line perhaps we will be less afraid to push this further to create something less congruent with our perception of ourselves as it is always necessary to re-imagine oneself to a certain extent. You’ve previously said you take a lot of inspiration from poetry, particularly poets John Ashbery and Frank O’Hara. In what way has their literature been influential? Does it impact your songwriting? The literary influence on our music, especially where Frank O’ Hara is concerned, comes from a sincerity and expression of beauty that is hugely contrastive with the cheap sentimentalism and clichéd semantics of modern day pop music. It is central to our ethos that we will not and cannot tell the listener how to feel, and any engagement with our music (we hope) requires a meaningful interaction between the listener and the song rather than spoon-fed empty sentimentalism.


photo: CHARLOTTE PATMORE

The beauty created within your music definitely coincides with this amazing concept of youth and freedom, in a really chilled and uplifting sense. Do you, as a band, feel this way when you’re performing; is it the emotions you wish to evoke in your fans? Sometimes when we write a new song it is in a state of complete euphoria, and sometimes it is in a state of despair, disillusionment or whatever. These states of mind produce certain moods contained within the structures and Lyrics of the song but these are just abstractions. In a live setting we try and amplify this sense of joy or sorrow, for example, but it is up to the listener to decide what the songs mean to them. We hope 2014 is the year of Blessa; the hype around the release of both “Between Times” and “Bloom” makes this seem very promising. What does 2014 hold for you? Our immediate plans are to record an ep, which will hopefully be out in the spring of next year. We’re also looking forward to playing live a whole lot more and eventually be able to dedicate ourselves fully to Blessa and get way better as a result! https://soundcloud.com/blessa


[ VIENNA DITTO] V i e n n a D i t t o a r e t h e s e l f d e s c r i b e d “ Vo o d o o S c i - F i B l u e s ” b a n d , centered in the whirlpool of the underground music scene since 2009 text: Jade Mordente Each of your tracks hold so much familiarity, yet in a sense are weirdly unique. Do you find it important to be experimental with your sound to attract fans from different genres? Hmm… that wasn’t intentional actually; I mean that aspect of it wasn’t. Sure, we want as many people as possible to hear our stuff, and I don’t complain when they buy it (though we do give almost all of it away for free anyhow), but we’re not eclectic to be popular, we want to be popular because we do something a little bit different, and we try to be different by pilfering things from as far and wide as possible. It’s nice to have a bit of a contrast there- I’m beginning to think our whole shtick is based on contrasts actually; old/young; old/new; boy/girl; acoustic/electronic; sacred/profane, and we’ve had a little journey where, as the electronic thing progresses forward because it just does, the other side has gone back in time from rockabilly to blues to spirituals to sea shanties... But I don’t think there’s a massive difference between any of these genres, old or new. Not in some “hey man, it’s all music” sort of way, I mean it’s all actually quite similar.

Are there any particular musicians that are inspiring you at the moment? And do you still refer back to the same creative influences as when you first began creating music? Yeah, I like the whole juke/footwork thing and the way people are just abusing drum machines at the mo; I guess it’s quite an old idea but there’s folks like Wellbelove mixing it nicely with jungle, I think it was Kid 606 who pioneered that sound so hats off. I’m an… acolyte of Micachu; I think she’s quite visionary mixing Harry Partch with grime and a sort of Matthew Herbert sample junk aesthetic, but with very poppy songs. I’ve got to admit though; I’m struggling to think of truly great songs with a capital ‘s’ that aren’t pre- 1957. Maybe we’ve lost something there. Maybe it’s not London and New York that breed the real innovation now, but Kinshasa and Jakarta. I’m always going back to the old favourites, Lee Scratch Perry, Muddy Waters, Jeff Wayne’s War of the Worlds… They all had a seismic impact and actually you don’t stray too far, I’m living the life I dreamed of at 14. I don’t listen to Megadeth so much these days though.


You’ve previously said that you try and come up with a story to help you in the songwriting process; do you ever incorporate your own personal experiences into your songs? Oh yeah, they’re all personal to some extent. A lot of the time it’s kind of like automatic writing, you put some nonsense down to go with a tune, you tweak it and tweak it and then you step back and suddenly realise THAT’S what you were going on about! And it’s something that was happening to you at the time. I’ve realised that I’ve said some quite shocking things about friends in this way. With the release of your new EP “Ugly” do you feel that the band has now set a benchmark following on from the success of your first EP, “Long Way Down”, which obviously had a huge impact on your early career, being played on Huw Stephen’s Radio One show shortly after it’s release? Ah that’s nice of you to suggest it! Um… Dunno! Hope so. Funnily enough, he played it before we even released it or anything; we managed to bring it out a year later and sold about fifteen copies. As for a benchmark, I just hope we’re getting better with each release. When it gets to the stage of releasing anything I’ve always gone off it; totally picked holes in it cos I’ve listened to it too much and have some grandiose scheme for the next thing involving bagpipes and backward monks. Glastonbury must have been pretty amazing especially as this was your second live gig. Was this the most overwhelming moment of your career to date?

We did a Maida Vale session a couple of weeks after that, which was extremely overwhelming; honestly, about nine cameras pointing at us, some on little rails… talk about out of our depth… and then to put it all into context I just saw Hugh Laurie on t.v. saying how daunted he was playing in the same room at Maida Vale, as there’s a plaque on the wall commemorating Bing Crosby’s last session; and he’s Hugh Laurie, for God’s sake. Then straight after that was the Hollyoaks music show, which was totally and utterly surreal. I’ve never been to a television-set place before and it was funny how everywhere was designed to only look good from one angle, it really added to the artificiality of it. We even did questions on the sofa with some hot boy from the cast, I’m not sure he was feeling it. That was in this prefab complex of sets for internal room shots, accessed by ladders, that seemed to stretch on and on-up, down and in every direction; it was like Naked Lunch. What does the future hold for Vienna Ditto? Obscurity, alcoholism and destitution most likely but we also plan to release our debut album and do our first national tour of the UK next year. We’ve also had a fella use some of our music for a short animation; we want to do more of that! And finally, what’s the meaning behind the name Vienna Ditto? We used to have a drummer and he found a list of things I was going to do whilst inter-railing, like finding a campsite in Dubrovnik, Vienna Ditto. He thought it was a girl’s name and it kind of stuck. And now she’s weirdly taken over our lives...


i know a young lady who swallowed a fly photography: GENOVEVA ARTEAGA-RYNN costume designer: BECKY PHILLIPS


Jumper: DESIGNER CARLO VOLPI


this page Dress: SETH YEUNG opposite page Jumper: SETH YEUNG


this page Cardigan: SOMEDAYS LOVIN Knitted bralet: SHAE opposite page Dress: ELEVEN PARIS TING VELVET


photography: GENOVEVA ARTEAGA-RYNN www.genovevaarteagarynn.co.uk make-up: LOUISE STRACHEN/ LEILA SIMON costume designer: BECKY PHILLIPS model: ELLA WEBB @ GINGERSNAP AGENCY assistant: KIERAN HUGHES & JAMES WRIGLEYA this page Jacket: ELLY CHENG opposite page Jumper: SETH YEUNG


future couture photography: TOMOKAZU HAMADA styling: YOSHIKI HAYASHI


photography: TOMOKAZU HAMADA stylist: YOSHIKI HAYASHI hair: YOKO SATO(AVGVST) make up: NAMIKO TAKEMIYA(AVGVST) model: all clothes: YOUHEI OHNO


atelier de l’armée photography & styling: ATELIER DE L’ARMÉE


all photography & styling: ATELIER DE L’ARMÉE model: FRANCOIS VERKERK www.atelierdelarmee.com


my darkest dream photography: NICK AITKEN stylist: AMANDA MOORE


photography: NICK AITKEN styling: AMANDA MOORE hair: NICK AITKEN make up: NO MAKE UP model: JADE @ STARS MODEL MANAGEMENT - SF all clothing: LILI PHAM 2013 COLLECTION shoes: RESTRICTED TRAFFIC OXFORD PUMP (DSW)


time to change p h o togr aph y: M AURIZIO FANT INI styl in g: M ANICOM IX


this page VINTAGE LA PERLA


this page Jacket: LINEA PELLE Shirt: VERSACE VINTAGE opposite page Knit: ESPRIT VINTAGE Corset: VIVINNE WESTWOOD VINTAGE Accessories: VINTAGE


photography: MAURIZIO FANTINI www.mauriziofantini.it stylist: MANICOMIX hair & make up: ELENA DONATI www.elenadonati.it model: HARUKA ARAKAWA this page Dress: LUCA GIANNOLA opposite page Jacket: LINEA PELLE VINTAGE Shirt: VERSACE VINTAGE Gilet: MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA Vintage cap & accessories: STYLIST’S OWN


Blue Sweater: BAR III White Briefs: HANES Rugby Socks: AMERICAN APPAREL Holographic Shoes: URBAN OUTFITTERS


teen spirit photography: FAISAL MOHAMMED styling: ALISA MARIE HUTCHINSON


Beige Jacket: BANANA REPUBLIC White T-shirt: IMPULSE White Briefs: HANES


photography: FAISAL MOHAMMED styling: ALISA MARIE HUTCHINSON hair & make up: CHALENE BAUZO model: LENOX TILLMAN @ CLICK MODEL MANAGEMENT Navy Blue Sweater: H&M Striped Jacket: SANCTUARY White Briefs: HANES Brown Leg Warmers: STEVE MADDEN Holographic Shoes: URBAN OUTFITTERS


a private passion photography & styling: LIZ DUNGATE

Blouse: VINTAGE Tunic: RED QUEEN Trousers: LINE & DOT Shoes: ALDO


this page Hat: VINTAGE Collar: VINTAGE Dress: PRESS DRESS Socks: ANTHROPOLOGIE Shoes: DIESEL opposite page Capelet: VINTAGE Blouse: STELLA TWEED Skirt: CHELSEA NITES Shoes: MATERIAL GIRL


Hat: VINTAGE Blouse: GRASS COLLECTION Skirt: VINTAGE Shoes: FERGIE


this page Dress: EILLEEN WEST Collar: VINTAGE Shoes: ALDO opposite page Hat: VINTAGE Blouse: LEVEL 33 Dress: DKNY Tights: AMERICAN APPAREL


photography: LIZ DUNGATE www.lizdungate.tumblr.com styling, hair, make-up: LIZ DUNGATE using MAC www.lizdungate.blogspot.ca model: ELIZABETH @ WILHELMINA VANCOUVER www.wilhelminavancouver.com Dress: EILLEEN WEST Collar: VINTAGE Shoes: ALDO


cloud lobby photography: KENTA KIKUCHI stylist: YUTA KOTANI


Raincoat & polka dot shirt: CLOUD LOBBY


this page Sleeveles tops & one piece: CLOUD LOBBY opposite page Denim Jacket: CLOUD LOBBY


photography: KENTA KIKUCHI styling: YUTA KOTANI hair: YUJI OKUDA make-up: MARIKO SUZUKI model: EWELINA Raincoat: CLOUD LOBBY


all that glitters photography: YOSHITAKA KONO stylist: FIONA FAGAN


Jacket: ZARA Dress & boots: ALLSAINTS


this page Jacket & trousers: WHISTLES Shoes: ALLSAINTS Shirt: TOPSHOP opposite page Dress, boots & shirt: ALLSAINTS Hat: VINTAGE


Tee: TOPSHOP Gillet: ALLSAINTS Shirt: VINTAGE Boots: ALLSAINTS


photography: YOSHITAKA KONO styling: FIONA FAGAN hair & make up: NATALIE BENNETTE model: ASIA @ M&P photography assistant: EVGENIA MARKOVA Dress: TOPSHOP Coat: EUDON CHOI Shoes: ALLSAINTS


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deluxxdigital com issue 22