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Delta Upsilon Fraternity Proposal for Partnership

West Chester University

Delta Upsilon Fraternity 8705 Founders Road Indianapolis, IN 46268 Phone: (317) 875-8900 www.deltau.org

Facebook.com/ deltaupsilon twitter.com/ deltaupsilon youtube.com/ deltaupsilonmedia

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Table of Contents Our Fraternity 4 Delta Upsilon History 5 DU In Brief 6 Fraternity Structure 7 Fraternity Headquarters Staff 8 LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT 9 University Learning Outcomes Assessment 10 Philadelphia Area Alumni 12 Membership Education 13 Associate member education 13 Involvement with the NIC 14 RISK MANAGEMENT AND Loss Prevention 15 Required Colony Loss Prevention Plan 16 Loss Prevention Policies 17 Our Partnerships 18 Colonization and Installation 19 Minimum Chapter Standards 20 Partnership Strategy 21 Partnership Commitment 22 Chapter Servicing Philosophy 23 Appendix A: Fraternity and Chapter Structure 24 Appendix B: Chapter Officer Responsibilities 25 Appendix C: CONSTITUTION and Bylaws 27

Delta Upsilon Partnership Proposal: West Chester University bit.ly/west chesterproposal The Cornerstone Delta Upsilon’s Guide to College and Beyond bit.ly/thecornerstone

The Ritual Book The rites and history of the Delta Upsilon Ritual bit.ly/ritualbook DU Quarterly, the official magazine of Delta Upsilon Fraternity bit.ly/thequarterly

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Division of Student Affairs West Chester University ATTN: Cara Jenkins 238 Sykes Student Union 110 W. Rosedale Ave West Chester, PA 19383 Dear Ms. Jenkins Delta Upsilon International Fraternity is interested in establishing Delta Upsilon at West Chester University. We would welcome the opportunity to partner with your fine academic institution and help strengthen the fraternity/sorority community. Delta Upsilon, the Men’s Premier Non-Secret Fraternity, is an international fraternity with a history that is rich in tradition and deep in pride. The oldest non-secret general fraternity, Delta Upsilon was founded on November 4, 1834 on the Williams College campus in Williamstown, Massachusetts. Our Founders selected Four Founding Principles as they established an association upon the ideal of Justice, Our Foundation: •

The Promotion of Friendship

The Diffusion of Liberal Culture

• •

The Development of Character The Advancement of Justice

Reflecting high aspirations, our Four Founding Principles serve a continuing challenge and as an inspiration to achieve greater excellence. Today’s Delta Upsilon is committed to advancing social justice, promoting civic engagement, developing global responsibility and aligning with the academic missions of our host institutions. We would like to thank you for this opportunity to express our interest in starting a chapter at West Chester University. By choosing Delta Upsilon, you will give West Chester men the opportunity to join a progressive organization committed to building men for a global society. If you would like more information about Delta Upsilon International Fraternity, please contact me at (317) 875-8900 ext. 213 or kirk@deltau.org. Interfraternally,

Justin J. Kirk Executive Director

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Our Fraternity Vision statement

Delta Upsilon is the premier men’s fraternity committed to Building Better Men for a global society through service, leadership development and lifelong personal growth of our diverse membership. Delta Upsilon mission

Building Better Men Founded

• • •

November 4, 1834 at Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts Founded as the first non-secret fraternity Sixth-oldest general men’s college fraternity (Fourth oldest still in existence)

Fraternity Profile

• • • • •

73 Chapters, 5 Colonies 81,000 Living alumni, 130,000 Total initiates 1,220 Initiates during 2011-2012 3,500 Undergraduate members 48: Average chapter size

Fraternity Headquarters

8705 Founders Road Indianapolis, IN 46268 Phone: (317) 875-8900 Prominent Alumni

• James A. Garfield, Williams 1856, President of the United States • Charles Evans Hughes, Colgate and Brown 1881, Chief Justice of U.S. Supreme Court • Lester B. Pearson, Toronto 1919, Prime Minister of Canada, President of the United Nations General Assembly, Nobel Peace Prize winner • Linus Pauling, Oregon St. 1922, Winner of two Nobel Peace Prizes • Kurt Vonnegut, Cornell 1945, Novelist • Louis L. Holtz, Kent State 1958, head football coach, Notre Dame, ESPN analyst • Peter V. Ueberroth, San Jose 1959, 1984 Olympics organizer and Commissioner of Major League Baseball • Michael D. Eisner, Denison 1964, CEO of Walt Disney, Inc. • Charles Kettering, Ohio State 1904, Inventor • Thomas Vilsack, Hamilton 1972, Current Secretary of Agriculture • Juan Miguel Santos, Kansas 1973 Current President of Colombia • Robert Cade, Florida 1945, Founder of LinkedIn • Dan Nye, Hamilton 1988, Inventor of Gatorade • Edward Prescott, Swarthmore 1962 Nobel Prize winner in economics.

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Delta Upsilon History

On the evening of November 4, 1834, 30 students - ten men from each of three classes (freshmen, sophomores, and juniors) at Williams College - “all good men and true,” met in the Freshman Recitation Room in West College and formed the Social Fraternity known today as Delta Upsilon International Fraternity. A new era had begun. The first 30 years were trying for the Social Fraternity, which adopted the name “Anti-Secret Confederation” (ASC) once an alliance was formed with other non-secret groups from Union College, Middlebury College, and Amherst College. The formation of the ASC led up to the Convention of 1864, which was critical for the young Fraternity. Delegates from three of its seven chapters were in attendance, but a fourth delegate was needed to establish quorum and enact legislation. Just as the group was about to discuss the formal disbanding of the ASC the delegate from the Rutgers Chapter arrived, completing the quorum. The Convention moved forward with its important discussion and legislation and officially adopted the name “Delta Upsilon,” which had already been in use by several of the chapters. The Convention of 1879 saw another important change for Delta Upsilon. The Fraternity had always been anti-secret, actively opposing the secret societies on college campuses. Though this was a hotly debated subject, the delegates felt that it was an outdated principle and chose to adopt a principle of nonsecrecy, working in harmony with the secret societies while keeping the key elements of the organization’s founding. By the following year, DU had grown to 15 chapters in the northeast. In 1898, DU became an International Fraternity, installing its first Canadian chapter at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec. After a strong period of growth around the turn of the century, the Fraternity was incorporated in the State of New York in 1909.

The chapters which had been established were consistently solid. Due to this strength the Fraternity did not lose any chapters through World War I or the Great Depression. In 1949, through the vision and generosity of Hugh E. Nesbitt, an alumnus from the Ohio State Chapter, the Delta Upsilon Educational Foundation (DUEF) was founded to provide educational scholarships to DU members. Over time, the DUEF expanded its purpose to include funding for educational programs such as the Leadership Institute and the Presidents’ Academy.

Oath of initiation

The late 1960s meant social upheaval and fraternities were among the institutions questioned about their relevancy. DU strongly emphasized the personal aspect of fraternity, rather than just its rituals and formalities. This was a strong argument for starting so many new chapters, with 18 chapters chartered from 1968 to 1971.

I solemnly promise that I will be loyal to the Delta Upsilon Fraternity and to this chapter, abiding by their rules, discharging my obligations to them faithfully, and using all honorable means to promote their interests.

Until 1969 Delta Upsilon rented office space in New York City to serve as the organization’s headquarters. In 1969, Delta Upsilon moved to Indianapolis, Indiana to service the Fraternity’s membership more efficiently. With a gift from an alumnus from the Pennsylvania chapter, Lester E. Cox, the Fraternity Headquarters was built in the College Park area of Indianapolis, Indiana. During the 1970s through the 1990s, issues such as drug use, alcohol abuse, sexism, racism, hazing, and other social issues came out into the open and were discussed, and actively attacked. While these are problems throughout society, Delta Upsilon has attempted to combat these issues in our chapters. The new millennium is presenting new challenges, which must be faced. Membership recruitment and education are a continued focus. Delta Upsilon continues to address tough social issues, risk management and loss prevention, and embrace more diverse demographics in an ever-changing college environment. Delta Upsilon has more than 175 years of experience in the fraternity world and is planning its strategies for the years and decades to come. Delta Upsilon has always been a leader and will continue as it builds the 21st century fraternity.

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I, of my own free will and accord, in the presence of God and of these witnesses, do hereby solemnly declare that the principles of this Fraternity as they have been explained to me accord entirely with my own views; and I solemnly promise that as a member of this Fraternity I will faithfully adhere to those principles endeavoring in every way to perfect myself morally, intellectually, and socially, and endeavoring also to act towards others according to that high standard of conduct required by the Fraternity.

I solemnly promise that I will share with my brothers the duties of my chapter; that I will uphold and encourage them in all that is honorable and right; that I will ever extend to each brother the right hand of sympathy; and that at all times and in all circumstances I will endeavor to cultivate those sentiments which should ever exist between brothers. All this I solemnly promise upon my honor, without any equivocation, mental reservation, or secret evasion of mind whatsoever. Fraternity Motto

Dikaia Upotheke: Justice, Our Foundation


DU In Brief Delta Upsilon International Fraternity remains steadfast in striving to be the premier non-secret fraternity for undergraduate men. When we enter into partnerships with academic institutions we highlight Delta Upsilon’s strong commitment to developing our student leaders holistically into renaissance men. Our student leaders will develop and grow personally as well as professionally and add value back to their fraternity/sorority and university communities through the combined efforts of university advisors, volunteers, alumni, and headquarters staff. Members of Delta Upsilon will cultivate a full range of human capabilities and an appreciation of higher education as a means to engage cultural, social, ethical and our fraternal values in service to others. It is with this collaborative attitude that we present Delta Upsilon’s partnership proposal. You will find included supplementary information that we see as advantageous to consider in distinguishing DU from any other fraternal organizations. Rich Fraternity Heritage

• • • • •

More than 175 years of brotherhood First non-secret, non-hazing international fraternity A ritual that has traditionally been and continues to be completely open More than 3,500 undergraduate men and 81,000 living alumni Prominent DU alumni who have spanned various fields and proven to be a cornerstone in North America’s history

Membership Development

• • • •

Proctors of the UniLOA assessment Chapter Excellence Plan Headquarters professional staff members specializing in expansion, recruitment, and educational programming on site. Commitment to service: Recently adopted the Global Service Initiative as the Fraternity’s international philanthropy

Risk Management

• •

Comprehensive loss prevention policies and guidelines on alcohol and substance abuse, hazing, sexual abuse and harassment, and fire and health safety Continuing education during twice-annual fraternity conference sessions on FIPG, campus and fraternity practices Utilization of GreekLifeEDU

Recent Publications

QR codes in the index of this proposal link to copies of our last four DU Quarterly magazines, our membership development program The Cornerstone, and our Ritual Book.

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Fraternity Structure Undergraduate Convention

The Undergraduate Convention is the undergraduate voting body of Delta Upsilon’s bicameral legislature. The Convention consists of one delegate from each chapter in good standing. Each chapter selects a delegate for the convention, held each summer. Assembly of Trustees

The Assembly of Trustees is the alumni voting body of Delta Upsilon’s bicameral legislature. The Assembly consists of one delegate from each alumni chapter in good standing. Each chapter selects a delegate for the convention, held each summer. By-laws and Constitution

The Fraternity’s bylaws and constitution are constructed of the Fraternity’s general laws. These documents outline the purpose and functions of DU. Amendments and additions to these governing documents can only be introduced and voted upon and passed by both the Convention and Assembly. Board of Directors

The Board of Directors manages the affairs of the Fraternity and serves under the Assembly. The members of Board are volunteers who serve two year terms. The Board’s officers are elected by the Assembly every two years. Two undergraduate members are elected to the Board yearly by the Undergraduate Convention. Undergraduate Advisory Board (UGAB)

The UGAB consists of 13 undergraduate members, one from each province. Members of the UGAB vote on any fee changes and serve as focus group of DU’s undergraduate membership. Province Governors

Province Governors are Fraternity volunteers appointed by the Chairman of the Board. The Province Governor’s role is to solicit, promote and encourage alumni interests in and support for chapters, colonies, and the Fraternity as a whole. Executive Director and IHQ Staff

The executive director is hired by the Board and serves as the chief operating officer of the Fraternity, running day-to-day operations. The staff is hired by the executive director to help the Fraternity advance its mission and achieve the strategic plan set by the Board.

Chapters and Colonies

Each active chapter and colony has an associated alumni chapter to support the needs and interests of both undergraduate and alumni members who attend or attended the academic institution at which the chapter is established as well as alumni from varying chapters who also live in the area. Currently there are 73 undergraduate chapters and five colonies. Alberta, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta Arizona State, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz. Arlington, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas Boise State, Boise State University Boise, Idaho Bradley, Bradley University, Peoria, Ill. Bucknell, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa. Cal Poly, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Calif. California, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. Carnegie (Colony), Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pa. Carthage, Carthage College, Kenosha, Wis. Central Florida, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Fla. Chattanooga, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Chattanooga, Tenn. Chicago, University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill. Christopher Newport (Colony), Christopher Newport University, Newport News, Va. Colgate, Colgate University, Hamilton, N.Y. Cornell, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y. Culver-Stockton, Culver-Stockton College, Canton, Mo. DePauw, DePauw University, Greencastle, Ind. Elon, Elon University, Elon, N.C. Embry-Riddle, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Fla. Florida, University of Florida, Gainsville, Fla. Georgia Tech, Georgia Institute ofTechnology, Atlanta, Ga. Grand Valley, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Mich. Guelph, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario Hamilton, Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y. Houston, University of Houston, Houston, Texas Illinois, University of Illinois, Champaign, Ill. Indiana, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. Iona, Iona College, New Rochelle, N.Y. Iowa (Colony), University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa Iowa State (Colony), Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa James Madison (Colony), James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Va. Kansas, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kan. Kansas State, Kansas State ,University, Manhattan, Kan Kent State, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio Lafayette, Lafayette College, Easton, Pa. Lehigh, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa. Louisville, University of Louisville, Louisville, Ky. Manitoba, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba Miami, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio Michigan, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. Michigan Tech, Michigan Tech University, Houghton, Mich. Minnesota, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn.

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Missouri, University of Missouri, Columbia, Mo. Nebraska, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. North Carolina, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C. North Carolina State, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. North Dakota, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, N.D. North Dakota State, North Dakota State University, Fargo, N.D. North Florida, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, Fla. Northern Illinois, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Ill. Northwestern, Northwestern University, Evanston, Ill. Ohio, University of Ohio, Athens, Ohio Ohio State, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Oklahoma, Oklahoma University, Norman, Okla. Oregon State, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore. Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Pennsylvania State, Pennsylvania State University, State College, Pa. Purdue, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. Rochester, University of Rochester, Rochester, N.Y. Rutgers, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J. San Diego, San Diego State University, San Diego, Calif. San José, San José State University, San Jose, Calif. South Carolina, University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. St. Norbert, St. Norbert College, De Pere, Wis. Swarthmore, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. Toronto, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario Tufts, Tufts University, Medford, Mass. Virginia, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va. Virginia Tech, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburgh, Va. Washington, University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. Washington State, Washington State University, Pullman, Wash. Western Illinois, Western Illinois University, Macomb, Ill. Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario Western Reserve, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio Wichita, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kan. Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Wis.


Fraternity Headquarters Staff Executive

Justin Kirk, Executive Director kirk@deltau.org, Ext. 213 Karl Grindel, Associate Executive Director grindel@deltau.org, Ext. 223 Jana McClees, Executive Assistant mcclees@deltau.org, Ext. 200 Tyler Stevens, Special Projects Coordinator stevens@deltau.org, Ext. 224 Educational Services

Noah Borton, Senior Director of Educational Programs borton@deltau.org, Ext. 206 Michelle Marchand, Director of Educational Programs marchand@deltau.org, Ext. 226 Global Services

Kaye Schendel, Director of Global Initiatives schendel@deltau.org Alumni Development

Colin Finn, Director of Alumni Development finn@deltau.org, Ext. 208 Loss Prevention

Laura Whitney, Director of Loss Prevention whitney@deltau.org, Ext. 203 Chapter Services

Mark Gehrke, Director of Expansion gehrke@deltau.org, Ext. 216 Matthew Nance, Director of Chapter Services nance@deltau.org, Ext. 217 Sean FitzGerald, Expansion Consultant fitzgerald@deltau.org, Ext. 209 Dominic Greene, Chapter Development Coordinator Communications

Cori Gilbert Wallace, Director of Brand Initiatives wallace@deltau.org, Ext. 211 Zach Thomas, Social Media Director thomas@deltau.org, Ext. 207 Finance/Membership Services

Mary Ellen Watts, Senior Staff Accountant watts@deltau.org, Ext. 210 Foundation Staff

Justin Kirk, Executive Director kirk@deltau.org, Ext. 213 Michael McRee, Ph.D., Associate Executive Director mcree@deltau.org, Ext. 212 John Duncan, Director duncan@deltau.org, Ext. 224 8


LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

EMERGING LEADERS EXPERIENCE

The Emerging Leaders Experience (DUEL) is a leadership institute for newly initiated members. Participants develop a better understanding of their personal leadership organized around their strengths. They analyze their leadership through the StrengthsQuestTM Inventory. They are then challenged to apply those strengths toward effectively addressing challenges within their chapters. In addition, this experience provides an opportunity to visit Williams College and connect with the history and founding of Delta Upsilon. Through the visit to the Fraternity’s founding location, DUEL provides an opportunity for the most intensive Ritual education offered through DU Educational Programs.

Delta Upsilon places high priority on programs of instruction and learning by offering a full slate of educational leadership conferences. Their purpose is to grow our chapters as a whole as well as educate our members to be lifelong, independent learners. All of these conferences are funded in whole, or in part, by generous donations from the Delta Upsilon Educational Foundation. PRESIDENTS ACADEMY

Presidents from each chapter participate in an institute style program. The curriculum emphasizes the mission and principles of Delta Upsilon as a foundation for effective chapter leadership. Experienced alumni and campus partners facilitate an intensive developmental curriculum. Presidents are challenged to identify key priorities for their upcoming year through a firm understanding of the core purpose and principles of DU. The Chapter Excellence Plan is utilized as a framework for evaluating the chapter and creating action plans for each president.

GLOBAL SERVICE INITIATIVE

The Global Service Initiative (GSI) offers an intensive short-term immersion service experience in domestic and international environments. Students, alumni and staff engage directly in service and cultural experiences while uniting DU principles and competencies. GSI is the most intensive of the Fraternity’s educational programs. The ultimate outcome of GSI is to develop globally-engaged citizens who are ready to make an impact on the world and serve others.

Advisors Academy

Delta Upsilon’s Advisors’ Academy provides a learning opportunity for individuals who interact regularly with a chapter or colony in an advisory capacity at the local chapter level. The academy is designed to help participants: learn and apply best practices in chapter advising; learn best practices in formulating working relationships with members; discover new resources and opportunities available to the chapters and colonies they advise; discover student development theory; and learn new updates and trends in the fraternity system and in Delta Upsilon.

Each participant is asked to commit to making an impact in their local community with an informed global perspective based on experience during GSI. DELTAU.ORG/SERVICE LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

As the annual fraternity conference, Leadership Institute serves as the highlight of the educational calendar. Each undergraduate chapter is asked to send a minimum of two members to participate. Undergraduate and alumni members participate in the program which includes social events, legislative meetings, province meetings, a Fraternity update and educational opportunities. Leadership Institute provides an opportunity to celebrate the accomplishments of a brotherhood which stands on a foundation of justice while targeting educational content to meet the challenges which students and alumni will address in the future.

REGIONAL LEADERSHIP SEMINARS

Conference style program organized around general sessions and breakout sessions. The program content emphasizes pragmatic skills and information which will prepare participants to successfully fulfill officer responsibilities. The Delta Upsilon Chapter Officer Core Competency model is used as a framework for developing session content. The Chapter Excellence Plan is utilized as a framework to help chapters evaluate their current reality and create a collective and individual plan of action.

Undergraduate Interfraternity institute (UIFI)

The Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute® (UIFI®) is a five day institute that brings together fraternity men and sorority women from across North America to create opportunities to explore, define, and enhance their leadership skills, personal awareness, commitment to their fraternity or sorority, and grow to expect values based action from themselves and those they lead. At UIFI®, you will be given the skills to improve your own leadership abilities and positively affect your chapter, council, and community.

At each of RLS a recruitment track is offered for chapter vice presidents of recruitment. This weekend-long training is designed to assist chapters and colonies in developing and implementing successful recruitment philosophies and strategies that address a constantly changing campus environment. The track features interactive sessions on year-round recruitment, learning and teaching recruitment skills and member motivation.

Delta Upsilon provides a limited number of scholarships available for students looking to attend the Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute.

BUILDING BETTER MEN WEEKENDS

Weekend chapter retreats facilitated by Delta Upsilon Staff. The Weekend includes a briefing with the chapter executive board, a one day retreat with the entire chapter and a follow up with the executive board and advisors. The retreat is tailored to meet specific chapter needs. This includes defining effective brotherhood within the chapter, identifying chapter priorities and creating a plan of action.

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University Learning Outcomes Assessment The University Learning Outcomes Assessment (UniLOA) is a reliable, “dashboard indicator” assessment instrument designed to measure student behaviors in seven domains regarded as critical by employers, academicians, managers, researchers, accrediting agencies, and a host of others. The UniLOA serves both diagnostic and prescriptive functions, allowing institutions to not only measure student behaviors but to guide in the planning, development, and introduction of programming designed to increase behaviors that complement students’ overall growth, learning, and development along the UniLOA’s seven broad domains. Delta Upsilon has made student-learning outcomes a top priority. By accurately understanding and measuring current levels of student behaviors Delta Upsilon can develop programs and interventions designed to overcome weaknesses. As a result, members are better prepared to succeed after graduation and to make significant contributions to the world around them. Assessment Domains

The items included in the UniLOA are written using a foundation of material collected through focus groups, individual structured interviews, web-based surveys, liberal arts and general education outcomes, and student development theory. In many cases, verbatim quotes about student learning outcomes were used to fashion the UniLOA’s items. Using these methods the authors contend that the UniLOA is strongly supported by existing research and practice, and presents a high degree of construct validity. Concurrent, criterion related, and discriminant validity studies will be conducted over time. Critical Thinking

The UniLOA’s authors consider critical thinking to be an active process where students use skills of evaluating, analyzing, assessing, interpreting, questioning and restating a problem or challenge. Effective problem-solving is bolstered by the individual’s skill in applying critical thinking skills to their academic lives and their lived experience. A skilled critical thinker should be able to examine and understand the fundamental qualities of problems, collect and analyze critical data, draw appropriate interpretations and conclusions, examine broad-based problem-solving options and effectively communicate and implement appropriate solutions.  Communications

In academic circles, there are many definitions of the construct “communication.” Yet, most contemporary definitions share common themes within them, including: • An active process where one person conveys a message to another through a variety of forms, including speaking, writing, or other non verbal cues. • Communication may be intentional or unintentional • That different levels of communication exist depending 10


on the relationship between the sender and the receiver • That it provides a means by which needs can be expressed from one person to another • That communication attempts to in some way impact the behavior of the “other” • Our effectiveness in communicating with others requires an understanding of the environment, relationship to the other and how effective the symbols chosen for the expression of needs, wants, or perspective are in affecting behaviors.

DiVersity

Diversity is an area of interest within higher education as it reflects an individual’s understanding and appreciation of “differences.” Those differences include such things as the recognition of values held by different people, cultures, ethnicity, politics, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation and a host of others. The understanding and appreciation of difference is necessary to establish and maintain pluralism in a way that will be complimentary to such things as social responsibility, cohesion and advancement of social structures, the bolstering of individual and group identity, equality and respect.

selF-awareness

Self awareness as a construct can be defined in multiple ways, but when those definitions are examined to identify common elements, consistency among the many definitions emerges. Selfawareness deals with awareness from the both internal and external perspectives. Those dual perspectives allow individuals to understand their place within the environment and to express behaviors and cognitions that compliment harmony between self and other. Self awareness is not a skill that is inherent within the human condition. To be sure, active self awareness comes only after conscious self-reflection comes to be a part of the lived experience.

But diversity goes beyond mere acceptance of difference, which in many cases may be mere tolerance. Indeed, moving beyond simple tolerance allows individual members of a social group the capacity to appreciate the positive contribution different people can make to the collective good of that social group, whether limited to small groups of individuals or on a global scale. citizensHip

Citizenship entails an understanding of one’s membership in a variety of “groups,” from the campus community to the global level, and a demonstrated commitment through behaviors that reflect active participation within those groups. Knowledge of the various rights, privileges

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An understanding of the various types of relationships a student will experience is necessary as they identify with groups, whether those groups are formal or informal. Within formal groups, individuals should recognize how they can contribute and be active in their participation, whether that participation is the holding of a recognized office with prescribed duties, or a member that contributes to the common good through active participation that supports growth and development of the collective body. relatiOnsHips

Interacting with others can be on a variety of levels including social, professional, intimate or others. An individual’s ability to influence others, to contribute to the meeting of self needs as well as the needs of others and to form individual identity as a result requires active management. The ability to effectively manage the “connectedness” between self and others allows individuals to be more productive to their own internal growth and development as well as to positively contribute to the growth and development of others.

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Philadelphia Area Alumni Identifying Potential Advisors

Delta Upsilon and the over 2,400 alumni in a 60 mile radius, are committed to supporting a new chapter at West Chester University. In addition, the Fraternity has several former Fraternity Presidents and Chairmen, Foundation Trustees, and staff members within the area. An email or mailing will be sent to all alumni living in the area of the expansion project to measure their interest in assisting a new colony and our efforts to screen interested individuals would begin. In order to provide adequate advisory support to the colony, Fraternity staff will work with the Greek Life staff to identify local campus and community persons who would be interested in helping develop the fraternity experience for these men. Recruiting Potential Advisors

Meetings with potential advisors start as soon as the project begins. By utilizing the Delta Upsilon Advisor’s Handbook the roles and expectations of a Chapter Advisory Board will be clearly outlined. It is the goal of the Fraternity to ensure that each position of the nine member Chapter Advisory Board be filled by the time of Chartering. Delta Upsilon’s Alumni Initiate Program provides a perfect opportunity to introduce non-affiliated men to the vision and values that have guided our Fraternity for over 175 years. Many represent the qualities and talents we look for in chapter advisors. In many cases they may be recruited to serve the colony as valuable, confident, and knowledgeable resources. Training Chapter Advisory Board

Training will be provided by Fraternity staff and will include materials and educational programs such as; the Delta Upsilon Advisor’s Handbook, attendance at the Advisors’ Academy, attendance at the Regional Leadership Seminar, and regular colony and chapter visits provided by staff. The Fraternity’s staff will work with the Chapter Advisory Board to measure the progress of the colony and identify their needs for additional assistance. Past Success

Within three weeks of the start of the advisor recruitment period at the University of Iowa this fall, all nine positions were filled with unique individuals. The diverse board includes three non-members, two women, and brothers from six different chapters. Similar success was had at James Madison University as well in October. All nine positions were filled with unique individuals. The board consists of brothers from 6 different chapters and three non-members who are current James Madison University faculty and staff members.

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Membership Education Throughout each member’s undergraduate experience in Delta Upsilon, opportunities for ongoing education are strongly encouraged and offered by both the chapter and the International Fraternity. Regular and annual workshops, as well as conferences and seminars facilitated by the Fraternity further supplement the learning opportunities offered to all of our members. All new and current members are responsible for knowing the chapter’s organizational structure. All members are also encouraged to participate and develop skills by holding a secondary position overseen by a member of the executive board. To ensure the executive officers are aware of their responsibilities, Delta Upsilon has employed the Chapter Excellence Plan (CEP). The CEP is an online tool that allows Delta Upsilon staff to track the progress of our chapters and give quick feedback to chapter submissions. The CEP contains operational criteria specific to each executive position, and the officer must submit proof the criteria has been met. If the officer has questions regarding his duties, he can immediately refer to a number of online resources available at www.deltau.org, including examples of submissions for each criterion, and soon, newly revised chapter officer manuals. Diversity, time management, and a wide array of other topics are all contained within The Cornerstone, Delta Upsilon’s handbook for all topics relating to the college man’s experience. A copy of The Cornerstone is provided to each new member when a chapter reports new members to Headquarters. All information included in The Cornerstone is aimed to be in conjunction with Delta Upsilon’s mission of Building Better Men. Associate member education

Delta Upsilon uses a big brother program, in which each associate member is assigned an undergraduate member as a personal mentor. The big brother will ensure the new member maintains an academic focus through the new member education period, as well as ensure the new member adheres to the signed honor code. The big brother will also assist in teaching the new member about the Fraternity’s history and the Four Founding Principles while fostering a healthy relationship for the duration of his undergraduate membership.

All new and current members are also responsible for knowing the history of Delta Upsilon. The organization’s history is found in new member and colony manuals, as well as The Cornerstone. Current and new members are encouraged to run for executive board positions. Delta Upsilon also requires attendance from each chapter at each of our leadership training seminars: Leadership Institute in the summer; Winter Educational Conference in the winter; and Regional Leadership Seminars in the spring. All new and current members are responsible for being aware of and paying all dues and fees in a timely manner. A sample of a fraternity budget and its explanation are included in new member and colony manuals. Each chapter of Delta Upsilon must send out a minimum of two alumni newsletters each school year (one per semester), and are responsible for keeping an up-to-date alumni list with e-mail and mailing addresses. Alumni Relations

Alumni are often the most valuable resource that a chapter possesses. For every successful chapter, there is likely active an alumni group to match. This is not to say that a chapter cannot prosper for a few years without alumni involvement, but to consistently succeed year in and year out, an involved group of dedicated alumni is necessary. There are three basic roles that our alumni play: organizing the alumni chapter to provide networking benefits beyond graduation; managing chapter property as the housing corporation and advising the chapter through the alumni advisory board; and providing financial support to the undergraduate chapter. Regardless of how the alumni group is structured, most alumni groups encompass all of these roles in some fashion. Additionally, each undergraduate officer is paired with a mentor (usually, alumnus from that chapter) to serve as an advisor to the undergraduate in his role as a chapter officer. Delta Upsilon seeks to recruit advisors who reflect the diverse mix of our membership body. There are numerous ways that alumni may become involved with their local chapter and they have the opportunity to be one of the chapter’s greatest assets. If and when Delta Upsilon is chosen, we will recruit, train and provide resources to an advisory board of 6 to 10 alumni and campus faculty advisors

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Colony Plan for Academic Excellence

Being a top academic preforming colony and chapter takes planning, preparation, support, and practice. To that end, having an effective and functional scholarship plan is essential. Here are a few things that are important in any academic plan: Academic Standards

The colony’s minimum cumulative GPA requirement is 2.5/4.0 and all officers must hold at least a 2.75/4.0 in order to hold office. In order to become a chapter, A colony is required to have a cumulative GPA above the campus all-men’s average. Other standards and requirements are outlined in the colony bylaws. Establish Study Hours

The Academic Excellence Plan should also establish colony study hours. “Study hours” are a time for all colony members to gather and prepare for upcoming class deadlines, write papers, review important course materials, etc. This environment provides support for members who are struggling in a particular area and gives them an opportunity to work with those who do well in that subject. Outline For the Vice President of Academic Excellence position description

As outlined in the colony’s bylaws, the vice president’s position should be reviewed within the plan. In addition, if the colony has an active scholarship committee, a committee overview and member selection should be outlined. Discuss the procedures if a member does not meet academic standards

The colony must outline what steps will be taken if any particular member falls below the minimum grade requirement. The procedures should provide constructive consequences for that individual that provides them with the time and resources necessary to improve their GPA and remain a member of the organization. Outline what educational training the colony will receive on scholarship

The plan should also include a tentative outline of what kind of scholarship and academic training will be provided it the membership. This can include, but is not limited to, workshops with professors and other campus officials on proper study methods, university requirements, etc.


Involvement with the NIC Delta Upsilon is a member in good standing with the NIC, of which it was a founding member in 1909. Delta Upsilon continues to remain committed to the ideals of interfraternalism and has many of its members involved in several capacities, including past NIC chairmen and board members. Delta Upsilon staff and volunteers have also continued to serve in a variety of volunteer roles with the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors (vice president of administration & finance), Fraternity’s Executives Association (Interfraternity Institute cochair), Center for the Study of the College Fraternity (board member and past secretary) and Fraternity Communications Association (past president, vice president and board members).

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RISK MANAGEMENT AND STANDARDS

Education on Risk Management and Hazing

In addition to the director of loss prevention, the Fraternity employs trained leadership consultants to assist our chapters and colonies. Staff are trained in many areas including membership recruitment, finances, membership education, and risk management. They spend the academic year visiting chapters and colonies to assist them in all areas of fraternity operations. • Member of FRMT, Ltd. (Fraternity Risk Management Trust, Ltd.) • Loss Prevention Policy sets expectations for issues including alcohol and drug use; hazing; sexual abuse; physical abuse; fire, health, and safety; and education. • Each chapter and colony required to elect a vice president of loss prevention. • Fraternity employs a full time staff-member, the director of loss prevention, whose primary focus is loss prevention and risk management. • $1 million liability insurance policy with a $10 million umbrella for a total of $11 million of liability insurance coverage per incident. • Chapters are given incentives to complete GreekLifeEDU, an online educational program that empowers students to make well-informed decisions and provides simple strategies to help keep them and their friends safe. • Fraternity produces several resources, which focus on loss prevention and risk management. • All infractions of the Fraternity’s Loss Prevention Policy are taken very seriously, and dealt with in a timely manner. • The Alcohol-Free Housing Policy shall prohibit any alcoholic beverages on the property and premises in which a participating undergraduate chapter is housed whether owned, rented, or leased by that Chapter, or any alumni organization affiliated with or related to that chapter.

GreekLifeEDU

Loss Prevention Policies

Delta Upsilon is a non-secret, non-hazing fraternity. All members are responsible for ensuring all activities occurring with or sponsored by the Fraternity are within the anti-hazing policies of Delta Upsilon. Delta Upsilon’s anti-hazing policies are found in the new member and colony manuals, as well as The Cornerstone. Policy Compliance

Delta Upsilon strives to assist our campus partners with membership experiences. Our Director of Loss Prevention will help a colony comply with Delta Upsilon, university as well as department policies and procedures and all local and state laws through the utilization of proactive coaching and standards accountability. These areas will be enhanced through ongoing training and to create a standards conduct board at the onset of the colony’s inception.

Since June 2001, Delta Upsilon Fraternity has partnered with Outside the Classroom to offer GreekLifeEDU - a nonopinionated, science-based course that aims not to preach but rather to teach the facts about alcohol, hazing and sexual assault. It is a Web-based prevention program using the latest prevention techniques and science-based research to educate students. GreekLifeEDU will empower our members to make well-informed decisions and help them better cope with the behavior of their peers. It offers a confidential, personalized experience for each student. The course includes: • • • •

4 modules of content featuring videos, discussion boards, blogs, interactive activities and more Helpful tools, like a BAC calculator and map of US laws Safe partying strategies and tips for helping a friend Answers to students’ most common questions about hazing and sexual assault

ResponseAbility Program

ResponseAbility is a program which addresses bystander behavior: when we see something happening that we know is not right and we say or do nothing. The training focus discusses several behaviors relatable to college campus such as hazing, drug/alcohol abuse, racism, homophobia, eating disorders, sexual assaults, and other inappropriate and unhealthy behaviors. The program uses actual undergraduates with real examples to help members relate to bystander intervention. This program is designed to empower and train students on ways to transform values into action by intervening when others exhibit these behaviors. Each chapter should have the ResponseAbility program within their library. International Conferences

All international programming curriculum includes an educational session on accountability and explanation of loss prevention policies. Depending on the program, it includes: interactive case studies, large and small group discussions on policy implementation, presentation on insurance policies, and training on appropriate response/reporting techniques. The educational programming mentioned above (GreekLifeEDU and ResponseAbility) is also integrated into the curriculum. This allows the men to understand the resources more clearly and effectively implement them to the chapter.

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Required Colony Loss Prevention Plan

Each colony and chapter is required to create and implement a sound Loss Prevention Plan. This includes: risk management practices, loss prevention policies, educational programming, and a crisis management plan. The chapter is to submit it to the Chapter Excellence Plan annually and evaluated by a professional staff member. Delta Upsilon also provides an insurance and crisis management plan for each chapter to adapt to their campus-specific resources. Reporting an Incident and International Standards Committee

If an incident occurs, the men should refer to the Loss Prevention Plan on communication and report the incident immediately. Reporting mechanisms include: online (http://www.deltau.org/membersresources/ reporting/incidentreportform), direct call to International Headquarters, email or fax. It is Delta Upsilon’s policy that we respond to all reported incidents within 48 hours. In the event that an incident violates Delta Upsilon International Loss Prevention policies, the chapter will meet (or conference call) with the International Standards committee to determine the status of the chapter, identify the support and needs of the men, and provide both punitive and educational sanctions to help them succeed.

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Loss Prevention Policies

Hazing

Delta Upsilon Fraternity is a member of the Fraternity Risk Management Trust (FRMT, Ltd.). The Loss Prevention Policy of Delta Upsilon includes the following provisions and shall apply to all fraternity entities and all levels of fraternity membership. All activities of all Delta Upsilon chapters and colonies must be in compliance with all Federal, state, and local laws at all times. Alcohol and Drugs

• • •

• •

• •

The possession, sale, use or consumption of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, while on chapter premises, during a fraternity event, in any situation sponsored or endorsed by the chapter, or at any event an observer would associate with the Fraternity, must be in compliance with any and all applicable laws of the state, province, county, city and institution of higher education, and must comply with either the BYOB or Third Party Vendor Guidelines. No alcoholic beverages may be purchased through or with chapter funds nor may the purchase of same for members or guests be undertaken or coordinated by any member in the name of, or on behalf of, the chapter. The purchase or use of a bulk quantity or common source(s) of alcoholic beverage, i.e. kegs or cases, is prohibited. OPEN PARTIES, meaning those with unrestricted access by non-members of the Fraternity, without specific invitation, where alcohol is present, are prohibited. No members, collectively or individually, shall purchase for, serve to, or sell alcoholic beverages to any minor (i.e., those under legal “drinking age”). The possession, sale or use of any ILLEGAL DRUGS or CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES while on chapter premises or during a fraternity event or at any event that an observer would associate with the fraternity is strictly prohibited. No chapter may cosponsor an event with an alcohol distributor, charitable organization or tavern (tavern defined as an establishment generating more than half of annual gross sales from alcohol) where alcohol is given away, sold or otherwise provided to those present. This includes any event held in, at or on property of a tavern as defined above for the purposes of fundraising. A chapter may rent or use a room or area in a tavern as defined above for an event held within the provisions of this policy, including the use of a third party vendor and guest list. No chapter may cosponsor or cofinance or attend or participate in a function where alcohol is purchased by any of the host chapters, groups or organizations. All recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter will be non-alcoholic. No recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter may be held at or in conjunction with an alcohol distributor or tavern as defined in this policy. No member or pledge / associate / new member / novice, shall permit, tolerate, encourage or participate in “drinking games.” No alcohol shall be present at any pledge/ associate / new member / novice program, activity or ritual of the chapter. This includes, but is not limited to activities associated with “bid night,” “big brother / big sister night” and initiation.

No chapter, associate member, student, alumnus, or employee of the Fraternity shall conduct nor condone hazing activities. Hazing activities are defined as: “Any action taken or situation created, intentionally, whether on or off Fraternity premises, to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol; paddling in any form; creation of excessive fatigue; physical and psychological shocks; quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside of the confines of the chapter house; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste; engaging in public stunts and buffoonery; morally degrading or humiliating games and activities; and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, fraternal law, ritual or policy or the regulations and policies of the educational institution, or applicable state/provincial law.” Sexual Abuse and Harassment

The Fraternity will not tolerate or condone any form of sexist or sexually abusive behavior on the part of its members, whether physical, mental or emotional. This is to include any actions which are demeaning to women or men, such as verbal harassment. The Fraternity will not tolerate sexual assault in any form. Physical Abuse

No member shall resort to or engage in any physical acts of violence of any kind against another individual or any acts of vandalism of any kind against another person’s property for any reason, except for the purpose of the defense of one’s self, or one’s own property and to the limited extent that the law would otherwise permit. Fire, Health and Safety

• •

• •

All chapter houses should meet all local fire and health codes and standards. All chapters should have posted by common phones and in other locations, emergency numbers for fire, police and ambulance and should have posted evacuation routes on the back of the door of each sleeping room. All chapters should comply with engineering recommendations as reported by the insurance company or municipal authorities. The possession and/or use of weapons of any kind within the confines and premises of the chapter house is expressly forbidden. The term “weapon” means any object, substance or chemical designed or intended to inflict a wound, cause injury or incapacitate, including but not limited to, all firearms, pellet guns, switchblades, knives and knives with blades five or more inches in length or dangerous chemicals.

Education

All student and alumni members shall annually receive a copy of said Risk Management / Loss Prevention Policy. A copy of said Risk Management / Loss Prevention Policy is available on the Fraternity’s website. Reporting

Each chapter shall report promptly each failure to adhere to any of these policies to the Fraternity. Self-reporting of loss prevention violations and the steps taken to address the violation will be considered positive factors in the deliberations of the Fraternity when reacting to violations of these policies.

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Partnership History Colonization Efforts: past five years

2007: Northern Illinois (chartered 2010) 2008: San Antonio (colonized 2008; suspended operation 2009) 2009: Embry-Riddle (chartered 2010); Virginia Tech (chartered 2011) 2010: Grand Valley State (chartered 2010); Chattanooga (chartered 2010); Boise State (chartered 2011) 2011: Elon; Iowa State; Carnegie 2012: Christopher Newport; Iowa; James Madison Current and Future Expansions

Spring 2013: Quinnipiac University, Sacred Heart University Fall 2013: University of Kentucky Winter 2014: University of Oregon Chapter Closures

2010-2011: Fresno (November 2010); Oregon (November 2010); Pacific (April 2011, standards); Pan American (April 2011, finances) 2011-2012: Webster (August 2011, size); Massachusetts (May 2012); Pace (May 2012)

Our Partnerships Financial Support

Each colony member is eligible to apply for our Delta Upsilon Educational Foundation (DUEF) Oak Circle scholarship for undergraduates, McQuaid Fellowship which provides undergraduate and graduate members fellowships, and Leadership Institute and Emerging Leaders Experience scholarships which cover the cost of attendance at the Fraternity’s premier educational programs. Additionally, the colony is advised on promoting positive relations with local area alumni and establishing fundraising opportunities as well. Membership Selection Criteria

Since its inception, Delta Upsilon has held only one qualification for membership: merit. Such criterion is blind to difference of race, creed, religion, sexual orientation, physical attributes, socioeconomic status, and national origin. The Constitution and By-Laws of Delta Upsilon Fraternity further specify the following membership criteria: Any male undergraduate enrolled in a college or university at which an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity is chartered or a Colony of the Fraternity is established, who is in good standing with that college or university, may be invited by the Members of that Undergraduate Chapter, the members of that Colony or by an organizing committee in the establishment of a new Colony, to pledge to membership in the Fraternity. Anyone so pledged shall be an Associate Member, but shall not be a Member of the Fraternity nor have the rights of Membership in the Fraternity until he is initiated by taking the Oath of Initiation in accordance with the Fraternity’s ritual.

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Colonization Requirements

When Delta Upsilon is invited to establish a colony on a campus we charge our new members first with establishing a colony. It is Delta Upsilon’s goal to colonize a group three to four weeks after the initial on-campus recruitment effort. Delta Upsilon’s colonization requirements are as follows: • The petitioning group must have a minimum of 20 members, and should have the realistic potential to be at or above the all-fraternity average in membership size within two years. • The group shall have a list of goals and objectives developed with the Fraternity’s principles and philosophy in mind. •

The group is encouraged to apply for university recognition with the intent of affiliating with Delta Upsilon.

The group shall have an advisor and meet with this person on a regular basis.

The petitioning group should be meeting on a weekly basis and should be developing a budget and dues system which covers the Fraternity’s insurance and fees.

Installation Objectives

After colonization, Delta Upsilon will implement an aggressive plan to establish the colony as a chapter. Below are the requirements which must be met for the colony to become fully recognized as a chapter. • Colony GPA must be at or above the campus’ all-men’s average and a written comprehensive scholarship program must be implemented. The colony shall also have established minimum GPA requirements for membership, initiation, and to hold office. •

Colony membership number must remain at a sustainable level (usually, at least 35 members) and will be carefully tracked throughout the expansion/colonization process. Factors to be considered will include the median fraternity size on campus, past recruitment results of the colony, alumni support and strength, and cohesiveness of the colony. The colony is expected to implement a year-round written recruitment plan that includes dates, events, and objectives for recruitment activities.

Colony must implement sound fiscal practices and remain current on all financial obligations to the university, IFC, the Fraternity, and all local vendors. A budget must also be submitted to Delta Upsilon International Headquarters.

Members should be familiar with Delta Upsilon’s foundation, philosophy, and history.

The group should have a positive working relationship with the fraternity/sorority advisor.

Must strictly observe the Fraternity’s loss prevention policies and implement a written loss prevention program.

If allowed, the group shall be encouraged to meet and participate in IFC meetings and activities and should uphold all standards and regulations prescribed by the IFC.

The group should establish a positive relationship with a nearby chapter selected by the Fraternity to serve as a mentor chapter.

Must attend all regional and international leadership programs including Leadership Institute, Winter Educational Conference, and their Regional Leadership Seminar. Campus and IFC programs are also strongly encouraged.

The group must complete and submit the Colony Application supplied by the Fraternity.

Must complete all necessary administrative requirements for Delta Upsilon International Headquarters and the university. This includes biographical reports from members, membership rosters, conference registrations and officer updates.

Must conduct regular officer and colony retreats to establish goals and strategies.

Colony must have at least two alumni/faculty advisors who meet regularly with the group.

Colony must develop and implement a sound new member and membership education program that meets the vital needs of its members and supports the Fraternity’s principles.

Must organize at least two alumni and/or parent events each year and shall distribute at least two alumni/parent newsletters.

Colony must sponsor or be involved in at least two service/ philanthropic projects each year, with one being sponsored solely by the colony.

Early Chapter Performance

As a colony transitions to a chapter, it is expected that the colony quickly transform into a high performing part of the Fraternity. This is accomplished through regular attendance at our annual educational programs, high academic standards, and regular fundraising for our international philanthropy. Additionally, we expect members from colonies to consistently participate in the Global Service Initiative as well as apply to have representation at the Delta Upsilon Emerging Leaders experience. Regular attendance at these programs will allow them to celebrate their successes with brothers from the United States and Canada, as well as learn about new initiatives their chapter can implement.

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Minimum Chapter Standards

Each academic term, the chapter must complete necessary administrative requirements for the Fraternity. These include annual and semester financial reports, membership records and other critical information and data. The chapter’s membership size (initiates and associate members) must be equal to or above the average fraternity size on campus. To help groups achieve this membership level, chapters will receive assistance from local alumni and the International Fraternity. The chapter must plan and execute at least two alumni/ parents events each academic year and produce and distribute at least two alumni/parents newsletters each academic year. The chapter must sponsor and/or be actively involved in at least two service/philanthropic projects each academic year. The chapter’s executive council shall conduct at least one retreat each academic year. The function of the retreat is to facilitate the chapter/officer goal-setting process. The chapter GPA must be at or above the campus’ all-men’s average and a written comprehensive scholarship program must be implemented to aid the chapter members in their academic endeavors. The minimum GPA is as follows: a. Chapter Officers (DU: 2.75) b. Chapter Members (DU: 2.5 membership) c. New Members (DU: 2.7) The chapter must have at least two alumni/faculty advisors. The chapter must meet once a month with the alumni/ faculty advisors.

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Partnership Strategy Phase one: 6 Months Prior

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Contact local alumni Meet with fraternity/sorority advisor, IFC, student activities office and other appropriate parties Expectations agreement with student activities office Develop code of conduct for colony Request recommendations/referrals (from faculty, staff, student activities, etc.) Outline founding father repository Develop contact lists (clubs and organizations, student leaders, etc.) Secure on-campus workspace and resources, lodging and location for colonization ceremony Secure meeting space for info sessions, tabling, events, etc. Begin marketing (listserv, newspaper, advertising, etc.) Identify potential alumni advisors/ faculty advisor/academic advisor Prepare an interest group website and Facebook group Outline day-to-day goals and tasks Customize the founding father packet Gather informational session and tabling materials Submit press release to campus media

Phase Two: 5 Weeks Week 1

• • • • • •

Meet with 10+ student organizations Host 2-3 recruitment tables Host one principle-related activity Build names list to 250+ Meet with 2-3 students per day Recruit 10 members

Week 3

• • • • • •

Week 4

• • • • •

Meet with 5+ student organizations Host 2-3 recruitment tables Host two informational sessions Host one principle-related activity Build names list to 500+ Meet with 2-3 students per day Recruit 10 members

Host two informational sessions Host one principle-related activity Reduce names list to around 150 Meet with 3-5 students per day Recruit 10-15 members

Week 5

• • • • • •

Host one principle-related activity Host an alumni meet-and-greet Meet with 3-5 students per day Recruit 10-15 members Hold first group meeting Exit meeting with student activities office

Phase Three: 6-12 Months Colonization

Public ceremony on campus

Transition (1 week)

• • • • • •

IHQ recruiters depart; chapter development coordinator arrives New colony begins to develop Goals are established Installation (chartering) time line is set Colony retreat held Officer elections and installations held

Colony Education (8 weeks)

• •

Week 2

• • • • • • •

Host two informational sessions Host one principle-related activity Reduce names list to around 300 Meet with 3-5 students per day Recruit 10-15 members Invite friends, family, staff, etc., to Colonization

First official advisory board meeting Colony officers and advisors implement associate member education program

Colony Success (4-10 months)

• • • •

Colony development plan implemented by headquarters staff, advisors, and officers Colony achieves installation requirements Public Installation Ceremony, including member Initiation, is held Members attend Leadership Institute to receive charter in front of hundreds of DUs

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Colony Fee Summary

Delta Upsilon’s fee structure is one of the most competitive amongst men’s college fraternities. For a glimpse of the fees assessed to a colony and its members, please review the information provided below. Individual colony members are responsible for the following fees: • Initial Colony Member Fee - $100 (one-time fee due at the time one becomes a colony member). • Colony Member Fee - $80.00 per term (due two academic terms after colonization). • Initiation Fee - $200 (one time fee due at time of Initiation after colony has become a chapter). The colony, as a group, is responsible for the following fees detailed above: • Insurance Assessment (due two academic terms after colonization). • Educational Conferences Assessment (due two academic terms after colonization). • Chapter Installation Fee of $750 (due at the Installation ceremony). In addition to these fees, Delta Upsilon colony members set their own local dues structure to cover costs such as Interfraternity or Greek Council dues, intramural sports fees, social function costs, educational costs, and office supplies needs. Dues assessed to each member of a Delta Upsilon colony vary from group to group depending on what other money the colony wishes to collect for its own operations. Typically, dues range from $300-$400 per member for one semester. Generally, this money is more than enough to cover the fees detailed above and any monetary needs the colony may have locally. Each colony is also placed on a colony assistance program provided by Omega Financial until chartered. The program helps the colony maintain an easilymanaged, reliable structure for collections while also allowing review and feedback by Headquarters’ staff. Delta Upsilon’s partnership with Omega Financial offers a valued service at a reduced cost.


Partnership Commitment

Delta Upsilon recognizes the foremost importance of developing an ongoing relationship with the West Chester University and the West Chester community. The Fraternity is committed to perpetuating student growth through leadership development and personal enrichment to benefit the entire West Chester community. Colony Development

• • • • • • • • •

The Fraternity is committed to providing the following resources and staff support during the colony period: Provide staff on location prior to and during the colonization period Develop a specific time line of the expansion process while on campus Select and train an alumni advisory board Recruit a minimum of 20 men before colonization; 40 (or campus average) men before chartering Assist colony members in setting up financial plan, such as their bank account and colony budget Coach colony members on recruitment strategies, and assist in future planning Train new officers and provide continued support throughout and following the colony period Provide ongoing communication between the campus and fraternity/sorority community, the colony and the Fraternity

Community Enrichment

As part of Delta Upsilon’s commitment to West Chester University, the Fraternity understands the equal importance of recruiting leaders within the community and developing leaders for the community in return. We look to foster deep community involvement wherever Delta Upsilon is established by charging our members to draw from the cultural and professional riches of the community and respond to its needs through educational and public service programs. Members are encouraged to extend their involvement through campus activities. Each DU chapter is required to participate in fraternity/sorority, campus and local service events, provide faculty and alumni programming and offer educational experiences that are open to the public as well. Partnership Budget

Delta Upsilon will spend approximately 10 weeks onsite with at least two staff members and will have an estimated budget of $30,000.

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Chapter Servicing Philosophy

Delta Upsilon recognizes that not all chapters need the same type of support, and that the type of support a given chapter needs in a given year is not necessarily what it needed in the past, or what it will need in the future. With this recognition, the headquarters does not participate in the traditional chapter-servicing model of providing every chapter with one three-day visitation by a recently graduated leadership consultant each semester/year. Rather, our approach contains the following facets: • Each chapter is assigned a primary staff liaison at the headquarters. The liaison proactively communicates with that chapter’s undergraduate and alumni leaders and advisors on all issues pertinent to all chapters, as well as specific areas of relevance to that particular chapter. Most of the education, guidance, and support provided by the liaison is via phone and electronic communication. • When electronic and phone support are insufficient to adequately address the needs of the chapter, pertinent headquarters staff (often including the executive director) collaborate and decide which staff and/or volunteers are best suited to travel to the chapter and address its specific needs. Sometimes, exactly what a chapter needs is a “traditional” three-day visit by a leadership consultant; sometimes, it’s a set of weekend workshops conducted by one of the headquarters’ fullor part-time, masters-level staff; sometimes, one chapter meeting led by a director or the executive director is what is most helpful; occasionally, a 7 or 10 day trip by a leadership consultant is required to make a significant impact. • Partnership with the key constituents, campus professionals and local alumni advisors, is the cornerstone of our approach to servicing our chapters. When we work together to create and achieve a shared vision, almost anything is possible. In cases where we do not, very little meaningful change can happen. Chapter Excellence Plan

The Chapter Excellence Plan (CEP) is Delta Upsilon’s way of ensuring each chapter is both operationally sound and firmly rooted in the Four Founding Principles. Each chapter officer is responsible for documenting chapter activity relative to his office by submitting information to the CEP website, a public site located at http://deltau.org/cep. The key elements of the CEP include: Operations-based Standards

Efficiency in certain operations is generally understood to be required for overall chapter success. Such areas include: academic performance, chapter management, membership education, membership recruitment, and financial management. principles-Based Standards

Delta Upsilon remains committed to upholding the Fraternity’s Four Founding Principles: the Promotion of Friendship, the

Development of Character, the Diffusion of Liberal Culture, and the Advancement of Justice. For each principle, there are a number of activities which, when completed by the chapter, demonstrate a commitment to upholding that principle. The activities range from relevant workshops and seminars to organization of and participation in philanthropic events. Balance

Exactly half the CEP points a chapter can earn during the academic year are tied to chapter operations and half are tied to our Four Founding Principles. This is a clear expression of the International Fraternity’s belief that without sound operational management, the very existence of a chapter is threatened, and without activities firmly rooted in our Four Founding Principles, the existence of a chapter is not worthwhile. The International Fraternity recognizes that many of our undergraduate members are “over-programmed” on their campuses, leaving precious little time to focus on academics, work, healthy relationships, and other pursuits that lead and individuals to be well-rounded members of society. With that in mind, a fundamental concept behind the CEP is that chapters will not be rewarded for “overdoing” it. A limited number of points are available for each standard; chapters are not able to accumulate points towards the overall goal by repeating one or two favorite activities again and again. Online Reporting

As each chapter activity is planned, the appropriate officer uploads the agenda and other materials related to the activity to the CEP website, for review by a full-time staff member who DU Headquarters employs to review each submission and offer immediate feedback. Chapters receive points for planning the activity ahead of time, and then additional points for completing the activity. This real-time, online reporting system allows Headquarters additional insight into the activities, opportunities, and needs of each chapter. Transparency

In keeping with the Fraternity’s endeavor to remain transparent, the online CEP is open to anyone. All chapter members, alumni, advisors, and other interested parties can view the progress and submissions of any Delta Upsilon chapter. This allows other chapters to view some of the best practices in given areas, as well as exchange and share programs and philanthropic ideas. Additionally, the CEP home page allows anyone a real-time “snapshot” view of where a particular DU chapter ranks in comparison to all other DU chapters. The Awards Program

At the end of the academic year, the Fraternity’s Awards Committee considers the CEP and other criteria and determines the chapters who achieved excellence in each of the 12 major operational areas. From these, seven chapters are chosen as finalists for the Sweepstakes Award, the highest honor a chapter can achieve. Of these seven, one is chosen as the Sweepstakes Award winner. Also presented is the Most Improved Chapter award, given to the chapter whose CEP score has improved most.

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Appendix A: Fraternity and Chapter Structure Internal Standards Board

Chapter President

VP Membership Education

VP Loss Prevention

VP External Relations

VP Membership Recruitment

VP Academic Excellence

Associate Member Educator

House Manager

Alumni Development Chairman

Recruitment Chairman

Brotherhood Chairmen

Kitchen Steward

Human Services Chairman

Intramurals Chairman

Family Relations Chairman

Programming Chairman

Social Chairman

VP Finances

Assistant to the VP Fiances

Historian

Recruitment Committee

Fundraising Chairman

Librarian

Summer Recruitment Chairman

Financial Review Board

Website Chairman

Academic Review Board

Special Events Chairman

Undergraduate convention

Assembly of Trustees

Constitution and By-Laws

Undergraduate Advisory Board (UGAB)

VP Administration

International Fraternity Board of Directors

Province Governors

Fraternity Committees

IHQ Executive Director

Headquarters Staff

Alumni Chapter

Undergraduate Chapter/ Colony

Chapter/Colony Officers

University fraternity/sorority Professional

Chapter members

Faculty/Staff Advisor

Advisory Board

House Corporation

Alumni Volunteers

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Appendix B: Chapter Officer Responsibilities Chapter President Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an Executive Council officer within the colony. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • Lead executive council and colony meetings. • Oversee all officers; ensure accountability and responsibility in all members. • Coordinate the goal setting process of the colony and executive council. • Ensure all goals are actively pursued and achieved. • Approve major financial expenditures. • Serve as a positive role model by adhering to Fraternity, FIPG, university, city, county, and state laws and guidelines. • Recruit and cultivate new leaders. • Keep in contact with Delta Upsilon International Headquarters and return completed paperwork in a timely manner. • Keep in contact with alumni chapter, chapter advisory board, chapter house corporation board, and alumni volunteers. • Keep in contact with province governor and undergraduate advisory board representative for your province. • Meet with the university officials/fraternity-sorority professional on a regular basis. • Serve as the chapter spokesperson. • Develop and maintain a detailed account of presidential activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers and committee members. • Develop position goals and budget. • Properly and adequately train all executive board members and replacements.

• • • • • • • • • • •

Men’s Average on campus. Develop and implement a written scholarship program which minimally includes: an academic resource list study skills information chapter tutorial programming a personal study hours schedule for members Enforce the academic eligibility requirement to vote at chapter meetings, hold chapter offices, for membership, and to initiate. Utilize campus resources related to academics such as tutorials, workshops/seminars, and library tours. Maintain a recognition program to reward scholastic achievement. Develop and maintain a detailed account of scholarship activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers and committee members. Develop position goals and budget. Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements.

Vice President of External Relations Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an Executive Council officer within the colony. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • Develop and implement a written plan for alumni, parents, Greek, and campus and community relations outlining newsletters, events, and other related programming designed to keep these audiences up to date on Fraternity activities. • Sponsor a minimum of two alumni and/or parents events per year such as Founders Day, Initiation, Parent’s Day, or Homecoming. • Publish an alumni and/or parents newsletter a minimum of two times per year. • Invite parents, faculty, and alumni to colonization and installation by written correspondence. • Ensure that all chapter publications, T-shirts, and events are in accordance with Delta Upsilon’s image as “The Gentlemen’s Fraternity.” Avoid using tasteless, insensitive, socially demeaning, or offensive themes. • Actively pursue positive relations with the campus and surrounding community. • Sponsor and/or be actively involved in a minimum of two service/philanthropic projects each academic year. • Develop and maintain a detailed account of public relations activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers and committee members. • Develop position goals and budget. • Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements.

Vice President of Finance Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an Executive Council officer within the chapter. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • Develop and execute the colony’s fiscal policies to guarantee a sound financial future. • Work with the Alumni Treasurer and IHQ staff to prepare an annual balanced budget to be submitted and approved by the membership at large. • Prepare and disseminate on a timely basis accurate monthly financial statements with comparisons to budget and prior year activity. • Communicate all significant financial activity and results to undergraduates, alumni officers, and the International Fraternity. • Responsible for the collection of all fees and past due accounts receivable in accordance with the chapter’s approved collection policy. • Distribute organized monthly bills to each chapter member. • Prepare all required regulatory reports as needed. • Submit payment to the chapter’s suppliers and vendors on a timely basis. • Develop and maintain a detailed account of treasury activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers. • Develop position goals and budget. • Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements.

Vice President of Membership Education Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an Executive Council officer within the chapter. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • Develop a written membership education program which includes a monthly agenda of activities. • Schedule a minimum of one guest speaker per month to speak on topics of educational value to the membership. • Sponsor two workshops per year with another fraternity, sorority, or campus organization. • Sponsor or attend cultural events twice a year. • Create a chapter activity directory, where members’ activities and honorary memberships are posted and updated regularly.

Vice President of Academic Excellence Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an Executive Council officer within the chapter. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • Ensure that the chapter’s GPA is above the All

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• • • • • •

• • • •

• • • • • • • •

Vice President of Administration Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an Executive Council officer within the chapter. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • Create a chapter member phone list and roster at the beginning of each semester. • Prepare outline form agendas for chapter and executive council meetings detailing all agenda items. • Record minutes from chapter and executive council meetings. • Responsible for all mailings to the International Fraternity Headquarters including the Colony Officer List, Leadership Institute Registration, Summer Officer Address Form, and chapter meeting minutes. • Produce a master chapter calendar for planning and coordinating events. • Develop and maintain a detailed account of secretarial activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers. • Develop position goals and budget. • Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements.

Ensure that the colony is an active part of the Greek community and attends all IFC meetings. Develop and maintain a detailed account of membership education activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers. Develop position goals and budget. Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements. Vice President of Recruitment Principle Responsibilities: Serve as an Executive Council officer within the colony. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. Develop and chair the Membership Recruitment Committee. In conjunction with the committee, and through the efforts of the entire chapter, coordinate, plan, and implement a successful recruitment program. In conjunction with the Membership Recruitment Committee set a recruitment goal for the chapter. Develop a written calendar of year-round recruitment events. With the committee, plan and implement events which utilize the chapter membership. Train chapter members on effective recruitment techniques through regular recruitment workshops. Compile and maintain a list of prospective members using all available resources including undergraduate and alumni members, university admissions and Greek affairs offices, International Headquarters, non-Greeks and other campus organizations. Track the progress made on each recruitment contact and follow up regularly with the prospective member or ensure that regular follow up is being made by the membership. Present candidates for membership to the chapter and determine strategy for delivering bids. Coordinate and oversee the bidding process. Work with the New Member Educator to ensure that all paper work and fees have been sent to Fraternity Headquarters for each new member. Develop recruitment materials and utilize available resources designed to educate potential members and their families about the benefits of membership in Delta Upsilon. Develop and maintain a detailed account of recruitment activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers and committee members. Develop position goals and budget. Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements.

Vice President of RECRUITMENT Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an executive council officer within the chapter. Attend executive council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • • Develop and chair the recruitment committee. In conjunction with the committee, and through the efforts of the entire chapter, coordinate, plan, and implement a successful recruitment program. • • In conjunction with the recruitment committee set a recruitment goal for the chapter. • • Develop a written calendar of year-round recruitment events. With the committee, plan and implement events which utilize the chapter membership. • • Train chapter members on effective recruitment techniques through regular recruitment workshops. • • Compile and maintain a list of prospective members using all available resources including undergraduate and alumni members, university admissions and Greek affairs offices, International Headquarters, non- Greeks and other campus organizations. • • Track the progress made on each recruitment contact and follow up regularly with the prospective member or ensure that regular follow up is being made by the membership. • • Present candidates for membership to the chapter and determine strategy for delivering bids. • • Coordinate and oversee the bidding process. • • Work with the associate member educator to ensure that all paper work and fees have been sent to Fraternity Headquarters for each new member. • • Develop recruitment materials and utilize available resources designed to educate potential members and their families about the benefits of membership in Delta Upsilon. • • Develop and maintain a detailed account of recruitment activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers and committee members. • • Develop position goals and budget. • • Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements.

Vice President of Loss Prevention Principle Responsibilities: • Serve as an Executive Council officer within the chapter. Attend Executive Council meetings and contribute input as to the advancement of the Fraternity. • Review and educate on FIPG, Fraternity, and university loss prevention policies with the entire membership annually. • Ensure that guidelines and laws of the Fraternity, FIPG, university, city, county, and state are adhered to by the chapter. • Schedule three speakers per year dealing with issues concerning Loss Prevention such as alcohol/drug abuse, hazing, sexual abuse, AIDS/STD’s, legal liability, etc. • Develop and enforce a written code of conduct for all members. This code will at a minimum include: • policies concerning the treatment of women • prohibitive measures concerning the use of illegal drugs • a statement concerning the abuse of alcohol and underage drinking • Develop and enforce the chapter’s loss prevention policy. • Develop and maintain a detailed account of loss prevention activities and compile an officer notebook to educate future officers. • Develop position goals and budget. • Properly and adequately train all assistants and replacements.

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Appendix C: THE CONSTITUTION OF DELTA UPSILON FRATERNITY ARTICLE I. THE FRATERNITY Section 1: The Name

This society, founded at Williams College in 1834 and incorporated in 1909 in New York State as a not-forprofit corporation, shall be called the Delta Upsilon Fraternity. Section 2: The Founding Principles

The principles of the Fraternity shall be: The Promotion of Friendship The Development of Character The Diffusion of Liberal Culture The Advancement of Justice Section 3: A Non-Secret Fraternity

The Fraternity shall be non-secret. Section 4: The Purpose

The purpose of the Fraternity shall be to establish and promote Undergraduate Chapters to enhance the development and education of Undergraduate Members. Section 5: The General Powers

The Fraternity shall have full power and authority to do all acts that are in furtherance of its purpose. Specifically, but not by way of limitation, the Fraternity shall have full power and authority to collect, receive, hold and disburse funds and property from gifts, devises, bequests and otherwise for the general purposes of the Fraternity and to collect, receive, hold and disburse funds and property from gifts, devises, bequests and otherwise for the benefit of any Undergraduate Chapter, Associate member or Alumni Chapter. Section 6: The Laws

The Laws of the Fraternity shall consist of the Fraternity’s Constitution and By-Laws, and all amendments thereto, adopted into law by the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees and the Fraternity’s Policies adopted and

published by the Board of Directors. To the extent that any provisions of the Fraternity’s By-Laws or the Fraternity’s Policies are inconsistent with any provisions of the Fraternity’s Constitution, the provisions of the Constitution shall control. To the extent that any provisions of the Fraternity’s Policies are inconsistent with any provisions of the Fraternity’s By-Laws, the provisions of the By-Laws shall control.

ARTICLE II. THE MEMBERS Section 1: Membership by Initiation

The Fraternity shall consist of all Members duly initiated by taking the Oath of Initiation in accordance with the Fraternity’s Ritual. All Members so initiated shall share equally the rights and responsibilities of Membership in the Fraternity. Section 2: The Undergraduate Members

(a) Any male undergraduate enrolled in a college or university at which an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity is chartered, who is in good standing with the college or university and who has been elected to Membership in the Fraternity by the Members of that Undergraduate Chapter, may be initiated by taking the Oath of Initiation in accordance with the Fraternity’s Ritual. Such Member shall be an Undergraduate Member of the Fraternity. (b) Any member of a Associate member of the Fraternity who is a male undergraduate enrolled in the college or university at which the Associate member is located, who is in good standing with that college or university and who has been elected to Membership in the Fraternity by an installation committee in connection with the installation of the Associate member as an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity, may be initiated by taking the Oath of Initiation in accordance with the Fraternity’s Ritual. Such Member shall be an Undergraduate Member of the Fraternity. (c) Any Member who is enrolled in a graduate or professional program at a college or university at which an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity is chartered, who has been elected to affiliate with that Chapter by its Undergraduate Members, shall 27

remain an Undergraduate Member of the Fraternity until he graduates or withdraws from the graduate or professional program. Section 3: The Alumni Members

(a) Any Member who graduates or withdraws from the college or university at which is located the Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity at which he was initiated or with which he has affiliated as an Undergraduate Member, or who has been declared to be an Alumni Member by a reorganization committee in connection with a reorganization of an Undergraduate Chapter, shall be an Alumni Member of the Fraternity. (b)Any male person who had been a member of a Associate member and who has been elected to Membership in the Fraternity by an installation committee in connection with the installation of the Associate member as an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity, may be initiated by taking the Oath of Initiation in accordance with the Fraternity’s Ritual. Such Member shall be an Alumni Member of the Fraternity. (c) Any male person who has distinguished himself as a civic, cultural, educational, religious, business or professional leader, who has provided or may provide valuable contributions to any Undergraduate Chapter, Associate member, Alumni Chapter or the Fraternity and who has been elected to Membership in the Fraternity by the Members of an Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors, may be initiated by taking the Oath of Initiation in accordance with the Fraternity’s Ritual. Such Member shall be an Alumni Member of the Fraternity. Section 4: The Associate Members

Any male undergraduate enrolled in a college or university at which an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity is chartered or a Associate member of the Fraternity is established, who is in good standing with that college or university, may be invited by the Members of that Undergraduate Chapter, the members of that Associate member or by an organizing committee in the establishment of a new Associate member, to pledge to Membership in the Fraternity. Anyone so pledged shall be an Associate Member, but shall


not be a Member of the Fraternity nor have the rights of Membership in the Fraternity until he is initiated by taking the Oath of Initiation in accordance with the Fraternity’s Ritual. Section 5: Not a member of Any Other Society or Fraternity

No Member of the Fraternity shall also belong to any society, membership in which shall be inconsistent with the principles of the Fraternity, nor shall any Member also belong to any other fraternity, except honorary or professional fraternities. Section 6: Suspension From Membership

For cause, an Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors, by a vote of a majority of the Members of that Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter present at a meeting of that Chapter or the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, in accordance with the procedures provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws, may temporarily suspend a Member from Membership in the Fraternity for a period not to exceed one year. An Undergraduate Chapter may suspend only an Undergraduate Member of that Chapter. An Alumni Chapter may suspend only an Alumni Member of that Chapter. A Member suspended from Membership in the Fraternity by his Chapter or the Board of Directors may appeal such suspension to the next Assembly of Trustees, whose decision shall be final. Section 7: Expulsion From Membership

For cause, an Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors, by a vote of three-fourths of the Members of that Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter present at a meeting of that Chapter or the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, in accordance with the procedures provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws, may permanently expel a Member from Membership in the Fraternity. An Undergraduate Chapter may expel only an Undergraduate Member of that Chapter. An Alumni Chapter may expel only an Alumni Member of that Chapter. A Member expelled from Membership in the Fraternity by his Chapter or the Board of Directors may appeal such expulsion to the next Assembly of Trustees, whose decision

shall be final. Section 8: Resignation From Membership

A Member of the Fraternity may resign his Membership in the Fraternity by sending a notice of his resignation to the Secretary of the Fraternity and to his Undergraduate or Alumni Chapters. ARTICLE III. THE UNDERGRADUATE CHAPTERS, THE COLONIES AND THE ALUMNI CHAPTERS Section 1: The Organization of the Fraternity

The Fraternity shall be organized into Undergraduate Chapters chartered by the Fraternity, Colonies established by the Fraternity and Alumni Chapters formed to support each Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member and the Fraternity. Section 2: The Undergraduate Chapters

Each Undergraduate Chapter chartered by the Fraternity shall be established to enhance the development and education of its Undergraduate Members. An Undergraduate Chapter shall consist of all Undergraduate Members of the Fraternity initiated and Associate Members pledged at that Chapter and any other Member of the Fraternity who is enrolled in the college or university at which that Undergraduate Chapter is chartered, who is in good standing with the college or university and who has been elected to affiliate with that Chapter by its Undergraduate Members. Every Undergraduate Member shall share equally the rights and responsibilities of his Chapter. Section 3: The Colonies

Each Associate member shall be established with the intent to become an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity and to enhance the development and education of its members. Associate member shall consist of all Associate Members pledged at that Associate member and any Member of the Fraternity or member of another Associate member who is enrolled in the college or university at which that Associate member is established, who is in good standing with the college or university, and who has been elected to affiliate with that Associate member 28

by its members or by an organizing committee in the establishment of a new Associate member. Every member of the Associate member shall share equally the rights and responsibilities of the Associate member. Section 4: The Alumni Chapters

Each Undergraduate Chapter chartered by the Fraternity or Associate member established by the Fraternity shall have an Alumni Chapter formed to advise, counsel, support and encourage the Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member in its several operations and activities or to assist in the organization or the reorganization of such Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member. An Alumni Chapter shall consist of all Alumni Members of the Fraternity initiated at the related Undergraduate Chapter or that Alumni Chapter or any other Alumni Member of the Fraternity who has been elected to affiliate with that Alumni Chapter by its Alumni Members. Every Alumni Member shall share equally the rights and responsibilities of his Chapter. Section 5: The Undergraduate Chapters’ Authority

(a) Except as otherwise provided in the Fraternity’s Laws, each Undergraduate Chapter (i) shall have full power and authority to do all acts that are in furtherance of its purposes; (ii) may adopt such by-laws and such organizational requirements and may undertake such operations as it deems appropriate, subject to certain minimum organizational requirements provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws; and (iii) shall have exclusive control over its separate assets and funds and the uses and disposition of such assets and funds, subject to the supervision and direction of the related Alumni Chapter, except that the Chapter’s membership and financial records shall be the property of the Fraternity. (b) Notwithstanding subsection (a), no alcoholic beverages may be purchased through the Undergraduate Chapter’s treasury or with Undergraduate Chapter funds, nor may the purchase of alcoholic beverages for Undergraduate Members, Associate Members, or guests be undertaken or coordinated by an Undergraduate Chapter, or any Undergraduate Member or Associate Member


in the name or on behalf of the Undergraduate Chapter. (c) Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Board of Directors may establish insurance and loss prevention programs and policies, require Undergraduate Chapters to fully comply, and levy assessments to fund such programs and policies as provided by the Fraternity’s By-Laws. (d) Notwithstanding subsection (a), the Board of Directors may establish minimum standards for Undergraduate Chapters and may specify, in the Fraternity’s Policies, further causes for which the Board may institute a reorganization of a Chapter, or seek to suspend or revoke a Chapter’s charter and operations. Section 6: The Colonies’ Authority

(a) Colonies shall be under the supervision, direction and control of the Board of Directors. For each Associate member, the Board of Directors shall appoint a associate member committee which may include the Fraternity’s professional staff and local area Alumni Members. The associate member committee shall have full power and authority to supervise, direct and control any and all operations of the Associate member until it is installed as an Undergraduate Chapter. (b) No alcoholic beverages may be purchased through the Associate member’s treasury or with Associate member funds, nor may the purchase of alcoholic beverages for Associate Members or guests be undertaken or coordinated by a Associate member, or any Associate Member in the name or on behalf of the Associate member. (c) The Board of Directors may establish insurance and loss prevention programs and policies, require Colonies to fully comply, and levy assessments to fund such programs and policies as provided by the Fraternity’s By-Laws. Section 7: The Alumni Chapters’ Functions and Authority

(a) The Alumni Chapter’s functions shall be to: (i) provide counselors to advise and assist the officers and Undergraduate Members of the related Undergraduate Chapter or members of the related Associate member; (ii) furnish competent and qualified corporate officers to serve a corporation, which shall own or lease

and exclusively manage any real or personal property for the use and benefit of the related Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member; and (iii) solicit, promote and encourage alumni interest in and support for the related Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member and the Fraternity as a whole. (b) Except as otherwise provided in the Fraternity’s Laws, each Alumni Chapter (i) shall have full power and authority to do all acts that are in furtherance of its purposes; (ii) may adopt such by-laws and such organizational structure and requirements and may undertake such operations as it deems appropriate; (iii) shall have exclusive control over its separate property and funds and the uses and disposition of such property and funds, except that the Chapter’s membership and financial records shall be the property of the Fraternity; and, (iv) such other duties such as reporting to the Board of Director on the status of the related Undergraduate Chapter and Alumni Chapter and the collecting and remitting of fees, as the Board may establish in the Fraternity’s Policies. Section 8: Establishment of a Associate member

The Board of Directors, by a vote of the majority of Directors present at a meeting of the Board, may establish and organize a local group at any college or university in the United States of America or Canada as a Associate member of the Fraternity. The Board of Directors, by a vote of the majority of the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, may recognize a petitioning group at any college or university in the United States of America or Canada seeking to affiliate as a Associate member of the Fraternity. The Board of Directors shall appoint a committee to organize the Associate member. The organizing committee shall have authority to pledge Associate Members and to establish the initial organizational requirements for the Associate member. Section 9: Chartering of an Undergraduate Chapter

The Board of Directors, by a vote of two-thirds of the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, may grant a charter to and authorize the installation of an Undergraduate Chapter of the

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Fraternity located at any college or university in the United States of America or Canada that meets the minimum requirements for such charter as provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws and Fraternity’s Policies. The Board of Directors shall appoint a committee to install the Chapter. In connection with the installation of an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity, the installation committee may initiate as a Member of the Fraternity any member of that Associate member or any male person who had been a member of that Associate member. Section 10: Reorganization of an Undergraduate Chapter

For cause, the Board of Directors, by vote of a majority of the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, in accordance with the procedures provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws, may institute a reorganization of any Undergraduate Chapter. The Board of Directors shall appoint a committee which may or may not include Alumni Members of the related Alumni Chapter to undertake such reorganization. The reorganization committee shall have full power and authority to direct and manage any or all of the operations of the Undergraduate Chapter. In connection with the reorganization of any Undergraduate Chapter, the reorganization committee may declare any Undergraduate Member of that Chapter to be an Alumni Member. Section 11: Suspension of an Undergraduate Chapter

For cause, the Board of Directors, by vote of a majority of the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, in accordance with the procedures provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws, may temporarily suspend the charter and any or all of the operations of any Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity. Any Member of that Undergraduate Chapter, member of that Associate member or Alumni Member of the related Alumni Chapter may appeal such suspension to the next Assembly of Trustees, whose decision shall be final. Section 12: Revocation of an Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member

For cause, the Board of Directors, by vote of two-thirds of the Directors


present at a meeting of the Board, in accordance with the procedures provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws, may revoke the charter and dissolve the operations of any Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity. Any Member of that Undergraduate Chapter, member of that Associate member or Alumni Member of the related Alumni Chapter may appeal such revocation of the charter to the next Assembly of Trustees, whose decision shall be final. Section 13: The Provinces and the Canadian Conference

The Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies shall be further organized into Provinces to facilitate and enhance the administration of services by the Fraternity to the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies. The Board of Directors may designate such Provinces and the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies to be located in such Provinces. Additionally, the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies located in Canada shall be further organized into the Canadian Conference to facilitate and enhance the administration of services by the Fraternity to the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies located in Canada. Section 14: The Alumni Clubs

The Board of Directors may provide for the establishment of Alumni Clubs for the social and educational purposes of the Alumni Members of the Fraternity residing in a geographical area. ARTICLE IV. THE CONVENTION AND THE ASSEMBLY OF TRUSTEES Section 1: The Legislative Authority

The legislative authority of the Fraternity shall be vested jointly in the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees. They shall have full power to adopt, amend or repeal the Fraternity’s Laws and to do all things necessary and proper to carry out the operations and to effect the purpose of the Fraternity. Except as otherwise provided by the Fraternity’s Laws, no action shall be law until both the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees have approved it. Section 2: The Convention

The Convention shall meet annually

at such date, time and place as the Board of Directors may determine. The Convention shall consist of one Delegate from each Undergraduate Chapter that is in good standing with the Fraternity. Each Undergraduate Chapter shall select its Delegate to the Convention; provided that such delegate shall be an Undergraduate Member of the Fraternity and that Chapter. Section 3: The Assembly of Trustees

The Assembly of Trustees shall meet annually at such date, time and place as the Board of Directors may determine. The Assembly of Trustees shall consist of one Trustee from each Alumni Chapter of a related Undergraduate Chapter that is in good standing with the Fraternity. Each Alumni Chapter shall select its Trustee to the Assembly of Trustees; provided that such Trustee shall be an Alumni Member of the Fraternity and that Alumni Chapter. In the event that any Alumni Chapter does not select a Trustee or the Trustee is unable to attend the Assembly of Trustees, the Board of Directors may appoint an Interim Trustee to represent that Alumni Chapter, who shall be an Alumni Member of the Fraternity but need not be a member of that Chapter. No Trustee or Interim Trustee may represent more than one Alumni Chapter at the same Assembly of Trustees. Section 4: The Province Meetings and the Canadian Conference Meetings

(a) The Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies within each Province shall meet annually at such date, time and place as the Board of Directors may determine. Each Province Meeting shall consist of a delegate from each Undergraduate Chapter and Associate member in that Province. Each Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member shall select its delegate to the Province Meeting; provided that such delegate shall be an Undergraduate Member of that Chapter or a member of that Associate member. During such Province Meetings, the Undergraduate Chapters in each Province that are in good standing with the Fraternity shall elect one Undergraduate Member to the Undergraduate Advisory Board. The Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies in that Province shall 30

consider such other business as that Province or the Board of Directors may prescribe. (b) Additionally, the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies in Canada shall meet annually at the Canadian Conference at such date, time and place as the Board of Directors may determine. The Canadian Conference shall consist of one delegate from each Undergraduate Chapter and Associate member in Canada. Each Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member shall select its delegate to the Canadian Conference; provided that such delegate shall be an Undergraduate Member of that Chapter or a member of that Associate member. During the Canadian Conference, the Undergraduate Chapters in Canada that are in good standing with the Fraternity shall elect one Undergraduate Member to the Undergraduate Advisory Board. The Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies in Canada shall consider such other business as the Canadian Conference or the Board of Directors may prescribe. ARTICLE V. THE OFFICERS AND THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Section 1: The Board of Directors

The Board of Directors of the Fraternity shall be an odd number neither fewer than 9 nor more than 21 members, as fixed in the Fraternity’s By-Laws. The Board of Directors shall consist of (a) each of the Officers of the Fraternity elected by the Assembly of Trustees; (b) three Undergraduate Directors, when the Directors on the Board number 15 or more, or two Undergraduate Directors, when the Directors on the Board number fewer than 15, elected annually at the Convention; and (c) the other Directors elected by the Assembly of Trustees for staggered terms of two years. The President and Treasurer shall be elected concurrently to a two-year term by the Assembly of Trustees in even-numbered years. The Chairman of the Board and the Secretary shall be elected concurrently to a two-year term by the Assembly of Trustees in odd-numbered years. Any Director who has served on the Board for six or more immediately preceding consecutive years shall not be eligible for renomination to the


Board, provided however that time served or to be served as President, Chairman, Secretary or Treasurer shall not be taken into consideration in such limitation. Section 2: The Board of Directors’ Authority

The executive and administrative authority of the Fraternity shall be vested in the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors shall manage the affairs of the Fraternity and shall report to and be under the direction and control of the Assembly of Trustees. All power and authority exercised by the Board of Directors or any Officer or Director shall be in accordance with the Fraternity’s Constitution and By-Laws. Section 3: The Officers

The Officers of the Fraternity shall be the President, the Chairman of the Board, the Secretary, and the Treasurer, each of whom shall be elected by the Assembly of Trustees. The President and Treasurer shall be elected concurrently to a twoyear term in even-numbered years. The Chairman of the Board and the Secretary shall be elected concurrently to a two-year term in odd-numbered years. In addition, the Board of Directors may appoint from its number one or more Vice Presidents and a Vice Chairman of the Board. Section 4: The President

The President shall be the Chief Rituals Officer of the Fraternity, shall appoint the Nominating Committee with the approval of the Board, as provided in the Fraternity’s By-Laws, shall preside at the Assembly of Trustees, shall make an annual report to the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees as to the state of the Fraternity, and shall perform such other duties as the Assembly of Trustees or the Board of Directors may require. Section 5: The Chairman of the Board

The Chairman of the Board shall be the Chief Executive Officer of the Fraternity, shall preside at all meetings of the Board of Directors, shall appoint all committees of the Board of Directors, with the approval of the Board, and shall perform such other duties as the Assembly of Trustees or the Board of Directors may require.

Section 6: The Secretary

The Secretary shall be the Chief Recording Officer of the Fraternity, shall keep the records of the Fraternity and the minutes of the Assembly of Trustees, and meetings of the Board of Directors, shall attest to all contracts executed by a duly authorized officer of the Fraternity and affix the seal of the Fraternity when so required, and shall perform such other duties as the Assembly of Trustees or the Board of Directors may require. Section 7: The Treasurer

The Treasurer shall be the Chief Financial Officer of the Fraternity, shall collect, receive and have the care and custody of all moneys and securities of the Fraternity, shall have responsibility, under the direction of the Board of Directors, for managing the financial affairs of the Fraternity in accordance with the Fraternity’s Laws, shall make an annual report to the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees as to the financial condition of the Fraternity, and shall perform such other duties as the Assembly of Trustees or the Board of Directors may require. Section 8: The Vice Presidents

If the Board of Directors should appoint one, the Vice Presidents, during the absence or disability of the President and in the order of precedence established by the Board of Directors, shall perform the duties of the President and shall perform such other duties as the President or the Board of Directors may require. Section 9: The Vice Chairman of the Board

If the Board of Directors should appoint one, the Vice Chairman of the Board, during the absence or disability of the Chairman of the Board, shall perform the duties of the Chairman of the Board and shall perform such other duties as the Chairman of the Board or the Board of Directors may require. Section 10: Succession of Officers and Directors

In the event of a vacancy in the office of any elected Officer or Director, the Board of Directors, by a majority vote of the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, may fill such vacancy until the next Assembly of Trustees at which

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an election shall be held to fill the unexpired term of such office. Section 11: Removal of Officers or Directors

For cause, the Assembly of Trustees or the Board of Directors, by a two-thirds vote of the Trustees present at the Assembly of Trustees or the Directors present at a meeting of the Board, may remove from office any elected Officer or Director. Section 12: The Undergraduate Advisory Board

The Undergraduate Advisory Board shall meet at a date, time and place as the Board of Directors may determine. The Undergraduate Advisory Board shall consist of one Undergraduate Member from each Province elected annually by the Undergraduate Chapters in that Province and one Undergraduate Member from the Canadian Conference elected annually by the Undergraduate Chapters in Canada; provided that no Member of the same Chapter as the Undergraduate Advisory Board member elected by the Canadian Conference may also serve as the Undergraduate Advisory Board member elected by any Province during the same year. The Undergraduate Advisory Board shall advise the Board of Directors on matters of importance to the Undergraduate Members and the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies, shall elect from its members the Undergraduate Directors, shall elect from its members the officers of the Convention, and shall approve concurrently with the Board of Directors the amount of any fees, dues and assessments. Section 13: The Executive Director

The Board of Directors shall select the Executive Director who shall serve at the will of the Board. The Executive Director shall be the Chief Operating Officer of the Fraternity, shall be a full-time employee of the Fraternity, shall organize, train and manage the Fraternity’s professional and permanent staff, shall manage the day-to-day operations of the Fraternity, shall carry out the policies and directives of the Board of Directors and shall perform such other duties as the Assembly of Trustees or the Board


of Directors may require Section 14: The Chaplain

The chairman of the Board, with the approval of the Board of Directors shall appoint a volunteer alumni member to serve as the Chaplain of the Fraternity. The Chaplain shall be responsible for the spiritual care and counseling of the Fraternity and shall perform such other duties as the Assembly of Trustees or the Board of Directors may require. Section 15: The Province Governor

The Chairman of the Board, with the approval of the Board of Directors, shall appoint for each Province, and the Canadian Conference, one volunteer Alumni Member to serve at the pleasure of the Chairman as Province Governor for a term of two years. Appointments shall occur in even-numbered years for even-numbered provinces, and the Canadain Conference, and in oddnumbered years for odd-numbered provinces. Province Governors shall solicit, promote and encourage alumni interest in and support for Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies and Alumni Chapters and the Fraternity as a whole. Province Governors shall report to the Board of Directors on the status of Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies and Alumni Chapters in their Province, and such other duties as the Board of Directors may assign. Section 16: The Board of Province Governors

The Board of Province Governors shall consist of one Province Governor from each province, and one Province Governor for the Canadian Conference. The Board of Province Governors shall meet at a date, time and place as the Board of Directors may determine. The Board of Province Governors shall advise the Board of Directors on matters of importance to the Provinces. ARTICLE VI. THE FINANCES Section 1: The Funds

The funds of the Fraternity shall be obtained by means of fees, dues and assessments to Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies, as provided for in the Fraternity’s By-Laws, and placed in the Fraternity’s Operating Fund, except for the Loss Prevention

Fees which shall be placed in the Fraternity’s Loss Prevention Fund and used to fund the Fraternity’s loss prevention and insurance programs. All fees, dues and assessments shall be collected by the Treasurer of the Fraternity. The amount of such fees, dues and assessments shall be established concurrently by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board and published in the Fraternity’s Policies. Section 2: Annual Financial Reporting

The Treasurer of the Fraternity shall submit to the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees an annual report on the financial condition of the Fraternity. Such report shall include the appropriate financial statements, including but not limited to, the statement of revenues and expenses, the statement of fund balance, the statement of changes in fund balance, and other appropriate financial statements. The Treasurer’s report to the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees may include preliminary unaudited year-end financial statements. The complete annual report on the financial condition of the Fraternity, including the appropriate financial statements and the report of a Certified Public Accountant who has audited the Fraternity’s financial statements, shall be published in the Delta Upsilon Quarterly. Section 3: Annual Audit

The Board of Directors or a committee of the Board, which shall not include the Treasurer of the Fraternity, shall arrange for the Fraternity’s financial statements to be audited annually at the end of the fiscal year by an independent Certified Public Accountant who shall issue a report to the Board regarding the Fraternity’s financial statements. Section 4: Fidelity Bond

Each of the elected Officers and Directors of the Fraternity, as well as each of the Fraternity’s professional and permanent staff, shall be insured under a blanket fidelity bond at the Fraternity’s expense.

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ARTICLE VII. AMENDMENTS Section 1: Authority and Notice of Amendments

This Constitution may be amended by two-thirds vote of the Delegates present at the Convention and the Trustees present at the Assembly of Trustees; provided that, at least 90 days prior to either such vote, notice of any proposed amendments shall have been provided to each Undergraduate and Alumni Chapter.

THE BY-LAWS OF DELTA UPSILON FRATERNITY ARTICLE I. THE FRATERNITY’S INSIGNIA AND HERALDRY Section 1: The Ritual and Oath of Initiation

The Board of Directors or a Ritual Committee appointed by the Board shall establish and publish the Fraternity’s Ritual of Initiation and other rituals. The Ritual of Initiation shall include the Oath of Initiation as follows: I, of my own free will and accord, in the presence of God and of these witnesses, do hereby solemnly declare that the principles of this Fraternity as they have been explained to me accord entirely with my own views; and I solemnly promise that as a member of this Fraternity I will faithfully adhere to those principles endeavoring in every way to perfect myself morally, intellectually and socially, and endeavoring also to act toward others according to that high standard of conduct required by the Fraternity. I solemnly promise that I will be loyal to the Delta Upsilon Fraternity and to this chapter, abiding by their rules, discharging my obligations to them faithfully and using all honorable means to promote their interests. I solemnly promise that I will share with my brothers the duties of my chapter; that I will uphold and encourage them in all that is honorable and right; that I will ever extend to each brother the right hand of sympathy; and that at all times and in all circumstances I will endeavor to cultivate those


sentiments which should ever exist between brothers. All this I solemnly promise upon my honor, without any equivocation, mental reservation, or secret evasion of mind whatsoever. Section 2: The Seal

The Seal of the Fraternity shall be as follows: within a circular band bearing the words “Delta Upsilon Fraternity 1834-1909,” a shield bearing or a balance scale proper on chief azure seven mullets of the first, four and three. Section 3: The Coat of Arms

The coat-of-arms of the Fraternity shall be as follows: DELTA UPSILON beareth; or a balanced scale proper on chief azure seven mullets of the first, four and three. Crest, on a knight’s helmet with visor raised, the badge of the Fraternity all proper. Motto, the words Δικαια Υποθηκη. Supporters, the bannerets of the arms of the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees. The CONVENTION beareth; or an oak tree rooted, branched and leaved proper on a chief azure five linked rings of the first in fesse. The ASSEMBLY beareth; azure a chevron between five coronets or, two, one and two. The arms of the Fraternity shall be uniform throughout the Chapters.

Section 7: The Flag

The flag of the Fraternity shall be in the following proportions: length of fly, 30 parts, length of hoist, 20 parts, end stripes each 9 parts wide and Sapphire Blue in color, middle stripe 12 parts wide and Old Gold in color. Upon the middle stripe there shall be the monogram of the letters Delta and Upsilon 10 parts high and 9 parts wide and Sapphire Blue in color. Section 8: Other Insignia

The Board of Directors may authorize and approve other official insignia of the Fraternity and may proscribe limitations on its uses and displays. Section 9: Founders’ Day

The fourth day of November shall be known as Founders’ Day and should be appropriately commemorated by the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies and the Alumni Chapters. Section 10: The Delta Upsilon Quarterly

The Fraternity shall publish and distribute at least quarterly a magazine for and about the Fraternity, the Members, the Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies and Alumni Chapters, and matters of importance to each of them. The magazine shall be called the Delta Upsilon Quarterly. ARTICLE II. THE MEMBERS

Section 4: The Colors

Section 1: Member’s Responsibilities

The colors of the Fraternity shall be Old Gold and Sapphire Blue.

Each Undergraduate, Alumni and Associate Member of the Fraternity shall: (a) Uphold and abide by the Oath of Initiation and Founding Principles of the Fraternity, to preserve and promote by all honorable means the interests and good name of the Fraternity, its Members and its Chapters; (b) Uphold and abide by the Fraternity’s Laws and the rules and regulations of his Chapter and discharge his obligations to the Fraternity, other Members and his Chapter faithfully and share in the duties of the Fraternity and his Chapter, including all financial obligations to the Fraternity or his Chapter; and (c) Abide by applicable federal, state, provincial and local laws, ordinances, rules and regulations.

Section 5: The Badge

The badge of the Fraternity shall be a monogram of the letters Delta and Upsilon overlapping, and shall bear upon the arms of Upsilon in Greek letters the motto Δικαια Υποθηκη. The badge shall not be worn by any person other than a duly initiated Member of the Fraternity, or the mother, wife, or fiancee of such a Member. Section 6: The Recognition Pin

The recognition pin of the Fraternity shall be a miniature of the badge. The recognition pin shall not be worn by any person other than a duly initiated Member of the Fraternity or the mother, wife or fiancee of such member.

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To the extent not inconsistent with the Fraternity’s Laws, the Board of Directors may specify, in the Fraternity’s Policies, further Member’s responsibilities and the causes for which a Member may be suspended or expelled from Membership in the Fraternity. Section 2: Non-discrimination

In any membership decision, including rushing, pledging, suspension, expulsion, or electing one to Membership in the Fraternity, a Member, Associate Member, Undergraduate Chapter, Associate member, Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors may not discriminate against any person on the basis of his race, color, age, religion, sexual/ affectional orientation, national origin, citizenship or physical disability. Section 3: Anti-hazing

No Member, Associate Member, Undergraduate Chapter, Associate member or Alumni Chapter may haze or cause another person to haze another Member, Associate Member or person. “Hazing” includes, but is not limited to, taking any action or creating any situation that produces in another person mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment or ridicule. Section 4: Procedures for Suspension or Expulsion From Membership

(a) No Member may be suspended or expelled from Membership in the Fraternity except upon written notice of the cause and an opportunity for a hearing. (b) The Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors, whichever is to consider the matter, shall provide the Member written notice setting forth a statement of the alleged cause, the possibility that he may be suspended or expelled, the date, time and place at which the Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors shall meet for a hearing on the matter and a statement of the rights and procedures to which the Member is entitled at such hearing. The Board of Directors may prescribe a form of written notice to be used in the Fraternity’s Policies. An appropriate officer of the Undergraduate or Alumni


Chapter or the Secretary of the Fraternity shall cause the written notice to be delivered to the Member at least 14 days prior to the scheduled hearing. (c) The Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors may appoint a committee to present the alleged cause at the hearing. The Member shall be entitled to the aid and assistance of any other Member to respond to the alleged cause. The Member shall be entitled to present such witnesses or other evidence as he feels appropriate and necessary to respond to the alleged cause. Should the Member fail to appear at the hearing as set forth in the written notice, the alleged cause shall be deemed admitted and conclusively established. During the course of the hearing and at all times, the Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors shall extend to the Member every assistance to establish the truth or to present any mitigating circumstances. (d) At the conclusion of the hearing the Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors shall vote first upon the alleged cause and, if found to be established, then upon whether to suspend or expel the Member from Membership in the Fraternity. If a Member is suspended or expelled, an appropriate officer of the Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter shall provide to the Secretary of the Fraternity or the Board of Directors shall record in its minutes a statement setting forth the cause found to be established, the vote and whether the Member was suspended or expelled. Until such statement is received by the Secretary of the Fraternity no suspension or expulsion shall be effective. Upon receipt of such statement, the Member shall be suspended or expelled from Membership in the Fraternity effective immediately, irrespective of whether any appeal has been or may be taken. A suspended or expelled Member’s rights in the Fraternity shall not be reinstated unless and until the period of suspension expires or the Assembly of Trustees reverses the suspension or expulsion and reinstates the Member. (e) Within 30 days of the vote of the Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors, the Member may appeal the decision by sending a notice of appeal to the Secretary

of the Fraternity setting forth a brief statement of any substantive or procedural reason why he should not be suspended or expelled. The appeal shall be heard at the next Assembly of Trustees. The Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or Board of Directors and the suspended or expelled Member each may appear and may make a statement. The Assembly of Trustees by majority vote may affirm, reverse or modify the order of suspension or expulsion and to reinstate the Member. The Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Assembly of Trustees shall provide written notice of the decision of the Assembly of Trustees to the suspended or expelled Member and to his Chapter. ARTICLE III. THE UNDERGRADUATE CHAPTERS, THE COLONIES AND THE ALUMNI CHAPTERS Section 1: Undergraduate Chapters in Good Standing

Each Undergraduate Chapter chartered by the Fraternity shall be in good standing with the Fraternity, except during any period in which: (a) the Chapter is in reorganization under the direction of a reorganization committee; (b) the Chapter’s charter and any or all of its operations are suspended by the Board of Directors; (c) the Chapter’s charter is revoked and its operations dissolved by the Board of Directors; or (d) the Chapter is four months or more late in paying any fees, dues, or assessments due to the Fraternity. Section 2: Minimum Organizational Requirements for Undergraduate Chapters

(a) The Officers of an Undergraduate Chapter shall include, but not be limited to: President; Vice PresidentMember Education; Vice PresidentLoss Prevention; Vice President-Public Relations; Vice President-Rush; Vice President-Scholarship; Treasurer; and Secretary. No person shall be elected as an officer of a Chapter who is not an Undergraduate Member in good standing at the college or university where the Chapter is located. If an officer of a Chapter shall cease to be qualified, his term shall terminate immediately and his office shall become vacant.

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(b) The President of the Undergraduate Chapter shall preside at all meetings of the Chapter, shall ensure that the Chapter and each of the Undergraduate and Associate Members observe and uphold the Fraternity’s purposes and the Founding Principles, and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. (c) The Vice President-Member Education shall coordinate the Chapter’s pledge education and Member education programs and such other activities that educate Members about and promote the Fraternity’s purposes and the Founding Principles and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. (d) The Vice President-Loss Prevention shall ensure that the Chapter and each of the Undergraduate and Associate Members complies with the Fraternity’s Loss Prevention programs, shall educate Members about such programs and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. (e) The Vice President-Public Relations shall plan, direct and coordinate the Chapter’s public relations program, including, but not limited to, relations with the college or university at which the Chapter is located, the community, the Chapter’s Alumni Members, other fraternities, other Undergraduate Chapters of the Fraternity, and parents, shall plan direct and coordinate the Chapter’s philanthropy programs and community service projects, and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. (f) The Vice President-Rush shall plan, direct and coordinate the Chapter’s rushing, recruiting and pledging of new Associate Members and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. (g) The Vice President-Scholarship shall plan, direct and coordinate the Chapter’s scholarship programs and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. (h) The Treasurer shall manage and maintain the Chapter’s financial affairs,


subject to the supervision and under the direction of the Alumni Chapter, and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. The Treasurer shall be elected by the Undergraduate Members of the Chapter for a term of not less than one year, subject to the approval of and removal by the Alumni Chapter. (i) The Secretary shall keep all Chapter records, shall keep written minutes of all Chapter meetings, and shall perform such other duties as may be prescribed by the Fraternity’s Laws or the Chapter. (j) To the extent any Undergraduate Chapter seeks to deviate from the minimum organizational requirements set forth in this section, the Chapter may petition in writing to the Board of Directors for specific approval of a proposed alternative organizational structure.

investigation instituted, the Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Board, shall provide written notice to the Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member and the related Alumni Chapter that an investigation has been instituted, the purpose of the investigation and the members of the investigating committee who will conduct the investigation, and if any operations or activities are temporarily suspended pending the investigation. Upon completion of any investigation, the investigating committee shall provide the Board of Directors a written report of its findings and recommendations. The Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Board, shall provide a copy of the investigating committee’s report to the Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member and the related Alumni Chapter.

Section 3: Investigation of a Chapter or Associate member

Section 4: Procedures for Reorganization of an Undergraduate Chapter

The Board of Directors may institute an investigation of any Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member. In the case of an emergency, the Executive Director with the concurrence of the Chairman of the Board may institute an investigation of any Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member. In such case, the Board of Directors shall the approve of such investigation as soon as practicable. The Board of Directors, or in the case of an emergency the Chairman of the Board, shall appoint a committee, which may or may not include the Fraternity’s professional staff or Alumni Members of the related Alumni Chapter, to conduct such investigation. When in the best interests of the Fraternity or others, the Board of Directors, or in the case of any emergency the Chairman of the Board, may order that certain of the Undergraduate Chapter’s or Associate member’s operations or activities specifically related to an alleged harassment, physical assault, sexual assault, and/or alleged contravention of a municipal, county, provincial, state, and/or federal law be temporarily suspended without a hearing pending an investigation. The length of such suspension shall be the earlier of 90 days or the next regular meeting of the Board of Directors at which a hearing could be held. For any

If the Board of Directors institutes a reorganization of an Undergraduate Chapter, the Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Board, shall provide written notice to the Undergraduate Chapter and the related Alumni Chapter that a reorganization is underway, the purpose or reason for the reorganization and the members of the reorganization committee, which may or may not include the Fraternity’s professional staff and may or may not include local area Alumni Members, who will undertake the reorganization. The reorganization committee shall have full power and authority to direct and manage any or all of the operations of the Chapter. In the course of a reorganization, the reorganization committee may interview each of the Undergraduate Members and Associate Members of such Chapter who wish to participate in the reorganization. Based on those interviews, the reorganization committee may declare any Undergraduate Member to be an Alumni Member or any Associate Member to be no longer affiliated with that Chapter. Upon completion of the reorganization, the Board of Directors, on its own recommendation or the recommendation of the reorganization committee, shall declare the reorganization completed and

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return the Chapter’s authority to the Undergraduate Members. Section 5: Procedures for Suspension or Revocation of an Undergraduate Chapter

(a) The Board of Directors shall not suspend or revoke an Undergraduate Chapter’s charter or any or all of its operations, except upon written notice of the cause and an opportunity for a hearing. (b) The Board of Directors shall provide the Undergraduate Chapter and the related Alumni Chapter written notice setting forth a statement of the alleged cause, the possibility that the Chapter’s charter and operations may be suspended or revoked, the date, time and place at which the Board of Directors shall meet for a hearing on the matter and a statement of the rights and procedures to which the Chapter is entitled at such hearing. The Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Board, shall cause the written notice to be delivered to the Undergraduate Chapter and related Alumni Chapter at least 14 days prior to the scheduled hearing. (c) The Board of Directors may appoint a committee to present the alleged cause at the hearing. Either or both the Undergraduate Chapter and the related Alumni Chapter may appear at the hearing. The Undergraduate Chapter and related Alumni Chapter shall be entitled to the aid and assistance of any Alumni Member or any other Member of the Fraternity to respond to the alleged cause. The Undergraduate Chapter or related Alumni Chapter shall be entitled to present such witnesses or other evidence as it feels appropriate and necessary to respond to the alleged cause. Should a representative of the Undergraduate Chapter or related Alumni Chapter fail to appear at the hearing as set forth in the written notice, the alleged cause shall be deemed admitted and conclusively established. During the course of the hearing and at all times, the Board of Directors shall extend to the Undergraduate Chapter and related Alumni Chapter every assistance to establish the truth or to present any mitigating circumstances. (d) At the conclusion of the hearing the Board of Directors shall vote first upon the alleged cause and, if found to


be established, then upon whether to suspend or revoke the charter and any of the operations of the Undergraduate Chapter. If the Undergraduate Chapter is suspended or expelled, the Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Board, shall record in the minutes a statement setting forth the cause found to be established, the vote and whether the Chapter was suspended or revoked. The Secretary of the Fraternity, upon the direction of the Board shall provide written notice of the decision to the Undergraduate Chapter and the related Alumni Chapter. Upon a decision to suspend or revoke an Undergraduate Chapter, the Chapter shall be suspended or revoked effective immediately, irrespective of whether any appeal has been or may be taken. A suspended or revoked Chapter shall not be reinstated unless and until the period of suspension expires or the Assembly of Trustees reverses the suspension or expulsion and reinstates the Chapter. (e) Within 30 days of the vote, the Undergraduate Chapter and the related Alumni Chapter may appeal the decision by sending a notice of appeal to the Secretary of the Fraternity setting forth a brief statement of any substantive or procedural reason why the Chapter should not be suspended or revoked. The appeal shall be heard at the next Assembly of Trustees. Any Member of the Undergraduate Chapter or related Alumni Chapter or any member of the Board of Directors may appear and may make a statement. The Assembly of Trustees by a majority vote of the Trustees present may affirm, reverse or modify the order of suspension or revocation. The Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Assembly of Trustees shall provide written notice to both the Undergraduate Chapter and the related Alumni Chapter of the Assembly of Trustees decision. ARTICLE IV. THE CONVENTION AND THE ASSEMBLY OF TRUSTEES Section 1: Notice of the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees

The Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Board of Directors, shall notify each of the Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies

and Alumni Chapters of the date, time and place of the regular annual sessions of the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees at least six months in advance. The Secretary of the Fraternity shall provide each Undergraduate Chapter, Associate member and Alumni Chapter the agenda of legislation to be considered at the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees at least 90 days in advance. Section 2: The Convention Quorum and Voting

Delegates representing a majority of the Undergraduate Chapters that are in good standing with the Fraternity shall constitute a quorum of the Convention. Except as otherwise provided in the Fraternity’s Constitution, all actions by the Convention shall be by a majority vote of the Delegates present at the Convention. The right of any Delegate to exercise his judgment on any matter before the Convention and to vote accordingly shall not be affected by any instructions from his Chapter nor shall he be held to answer for any deviation from any such instructions. Only Delegates present may vote at the Convention. No Undergraduate Chapter may grant its proxy to any other Undergraduate Chapter’s Delegate. Section 3: The Assembly of Trustees Quorum and Voting

Trustees representing thirty-three percent (33%) of the Alumni Chapters of related Undergraduate Chapters that are in good standing with the Fraternity shall constitute a quorum of the Assembly of Trustees. Except as otherwise provided in the Fraternity’s Constitution, all actions by the Assembly of Trustees shall be by a majority vote of the Trustees present at the Assembly of Trustees. The right of any Trustee to exercise his judgment on any matter before the Assembly of Trustees and to vote accordingly shall not be affected by any instructions from the Alumni Chapter that he represents, nor shall he be held to answer for any deviation from any such instructions. Only Trustees present may vote at the Assembly of Trustees. No Alumni Chapter may grant its proxy to any other Alumni Chapter’s Trustee. Section 4: The Officers of the

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Convention

The officers of the Convention shall be the Chairman and the Recorder and such other officers as may be required. The Convention Chairman shall be elected by and from the Undergraduate Advisory Board, shall preside at the Convention and shall perform such other duties as may be required of such office. The Convention Recorder shall be elected by and from the Undergraduate Advisory Board, shall keep the records of the Convention and shall deliver them to the Secretary of the Fraternity upon adjournment and shall perform such other duties as may be required of such office. Other officers of the Convention shall be elected by the Undergraduate Advisory Board. Section 5: The Officers of the Assembly of Trustees

The President of the Fraternity shall preside at the Assembly of Trustees. The Secretary of the Fraternity shall keep the records of the Assembly of Trustees. Other officers of the Assembly of Trustees shall be appointed by the Board of Directors. Section 6: Eligibility

The Delegates present at the Convention and the Trustees present at the Assembly of Trustees shall be the sole judges of the eligibility of any Delegate or any Trustee to vote on any matter brought before the Convention or the Assembly of Trustees. Section 7: The Order of Business

The Convention and the Assembly of Trustees shall determine the rules of their proceedings and the order of business to be brought before them. Except to the extent other rules are adopted, the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees shall be governed by Robert’s Rules of Order Revised. Section 8: Resolutions

All resolutions offered at the Convention or the Assembly of Trustees shall be submitted in writing to the Convention Recorder or the Secretary of the Fraternity. The Convention Recorder shall submit to the Secretary of the Fraternity all resolutions adopted by the Convention.


The Secretary of the Fraternity shall present all such resolutions to the next Assembly of Trustees. Section 9: Open Sessions

The Convention and the Assembly of Trustees shall be open. Any Member of the Fraternity may attend the Convention or the Assembly of Trustees. The privileges of the floor, but not the right to vote, shall be extended to all Members on any matter brought before the Convention or the Assembly of Trustees. Section 10: Recess, Adjournment and Recall

The Convention or the Assembly of Trustees may recess to another date and time for any purpose including awaiting action by the other body on any proposed legislation or otherwise to continue its business; provided that it shall not recess for more than three days. If the Convention or the Assembly of Trustees recesses, the Delegates or Trustees shall continue to serve. The Convention or Assembly of Trustees may adjourn sine die upon completion of its business, except that the Board of Directors may recall within three days of such adjournment either or both the Convention or the Assembly of Trustees for any purpose. Section 11: Minutes of the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees

The Secretary of the Fraternity shall provide to each of the Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies and Alumni Chapters the minutes of the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees, including all resolutions adopted by both and the names of the Officers and Directors elected by the Assembly of Trustees, within 90 days after adjournment. Section 12: Special Sessions

Ten percent or more of the Undergraduate Chapters that are in good standing with the Fraternity or ten percent or more of the Alumni Chapters of the related Undergraduate Chapters that are in good standing with the Fraternity may require the Board of Directors to call a special session of either or both of the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees by providing the Secretary of the Fraternity written

demand setting forth the purpose for such special session. The Board of Directors shall call such special session within 90 days of receipt of the written demand. No business shall be considered in a special session except that which is set forth in the written demand. The Secretary, at the direction of the Board, shall provide written notice of the date, time and place of any special session to each of the Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies and Alumni Chapters. Section 13: Joint Sessions

The Board of Directors may convene a joint session of the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees, if it finds it expedient, to hear Officer and committee reports or for other informational purposes. No legislation may be considered or approved in such joint session, but may only be considered and approved when the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees are in their separate sessions. Section 14: The Leadership Institute

A Leadership Institute for officers and members of Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies and Alumni Chapters shall be held annually at such date, time and place as the Board of Directors may determine. Section 15: The Regional Leadership Seminars

The Board of Directors may provide for Regional Leadership Seminars for the officers and members of Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies in one or more Provinces to be held in conjunction with Province Meetings. ARTICLE V. THE OFFICERS AND THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Section 1: The Number of Directors

The Board of Directors shall consist of thirteen (13) Directors constituted as provided in the Fraternity’s Constitution. The number of Directors may be changed by amendment to these By-Laws; provided that no decrease in the number shall have the effect of shortening the term of any incumbent Director. Section 2: The Nominating Committee

(a)At least six months prior to the

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next Assembly of Trustees, the President of the Fraternity, with the approval of the Board of Directors, shall appoint a Nominating Committee of five members to solicit, evaluate, and nominate candidates to stand for election for the office of each elected Officer and Director. To the extent practicable, the members of the Nominating Committee shall be constituted as follows: no two members of the Nominating Committee may be from the same Alumni Chapter and related Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member; at least one member of the Nominating Committee must be from each country in which the Fraternity has an Undergraduate Chapter that is in good standing with the Fraternity; at least one member of the Nominating Committee must be a past President or Chairman of the Board of the Fraternity; and at least one member of the Nominating Committee must be a president of an existing and active Alumni Chapter. (b)In soliciting, evaluating and nominating candidates to stand for election for the office of each elected Officer or Director, the Nominating Committee should give strong consideration to Alumni Members who have had direct experience recently with an Undergraduate Chapter or Associate member, have served as an officer of an Alumni Chapter, or have served as a member of the Fraternity’s professional staff. The Nominating Committee should seek to nominate Alumni Members who will provide the Board of Directors the greatest ethnic, generational, geographical, national, professional, occupational and Chapter diversity that is, nevertheless, consistent with the highest quality of leadership available to serve the Fraternity. (c)The Nominating Committee shall publish its report to each of the Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies and Alumni Chapters at least two months prior to the Assembly of Trustees. Section 3: Nominations for Officers and Directors

Notwithstanding section 2 of this Article, the Assembly of Trustees shall not be bound in any respect by the report of the Nominating Committee. Nominations for election to the office of any elected Officer or Director shall be opened to the floor of the Assembly


of Trustees. Any Member may nominate any Alumni Member of the Fraternity as a candidate to stand for election to any office of any elected Officer or Director. Section 4: Regular Meetings of the Board of Directors

The Board of Directors shall meet regularly at such date, time and place as the Chairman of the Board may determine. The Secretary of the Fraternity, at the direction of the Chairman of the Board, shall provide written notice of such meetings to each Officer and Director. Section 5: Special Meetings of the Board of Directors

Any three Officers and Directors may require the Chairman of the Board to call a special meeting by providing the Chairman of the Board and the Secretary of the Fraternity written demand setting forth the purpose for a special meeting. The Chairman of the Board shall call a special meeting within 30 days of receipt of the written demand. The Secretary, at the direction of the Chairman of the Board, shall provide written notice of the date, time and place and the purpose of such special meeting to each Officer and Director. Special meetings of the Board of Directors may be conducted by telephone. Section 6: The Board of Directors Quorum and Voting

A majority of Directors shall constitute a quorum of the Board of Directors and, except where otherwise provided by the Fraternity’s Constitution, all actions by the Board of Directors shall be by a majority vote of the Directors present at a meeting of the Board. The Board may also act by a vote of a majority of Directors sent in writing by e-mail, fax or mail to the Chairman of the Board. All Directors must be notified of such votes and such votes must be recorded in the minutes of the next regular or special meeting of the Board of Directors. Except to the extent that other rules are adopted, meetings of the Board of Directors shall be governed by Robert’s Rules of Order. Section 7: Ex Officio Members of the Board of Directors

Every Past President of the Fraternity shall be a member ex officio of the Board of Directors, without the right to vote.

Section 8: Compensation of the Officers and Directors

The Officers and Directors shall receive no compensation for their service, except that the Fraternity may reimburse the Officers and Directors for reasonable expenses they incur in performing their duties on behalf of the Fraternity, under written guidelines approved by the Board of Directors and published in the Fraternity’s Policies. Section 9: The Committees

(a) The Board of Directors may establish such Committees as it deems necessary to assist it in its duties, which may include the Committee on Administration, Alumni Chapter, Expansion, Finance, Graduate Activities, Housing, and Undergraduate Activities. The Board of Directors shall designate the duties to be performed by the Committees. Except as otherwise provided in the Fraternity’s laws, the Board of Directors may not delegate its constitutional duties or functions to a Committee of less than the whole Board. (b) The Secretary of the Fraternity shall provide to all the Undergraduate Chapters, Colonies, and Alumni Chapters notice of appointment of all committees of the Fraternity, including names of the committee members, upon their appointment or election or upon the establishment of the committee, within 30 days after the appointment, election or establishment of such Committees or the naming of new members to such Committees. 1 Comment: it is intended that “Committees of the Fraternity” shall include any committee named by the Convention, Assembly, Board, any Officer of the Fraternity, or under Constitutional mandate, such as the Nominating Committee. Section 10: Qualifications and Compensation of the Executive Director

The Board of Directors shall conduct an open search for selection of the Executive Director. The Executive Director shall be qualified by education or experience for such position and who has demonstrated (a) a commitment to the purpose of the Fraternity, (b) an ability to work with Undergraduate and Alumni Members, and (c) an ability to manage the operations of the Fraternity. The compensation of the Executive

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Director shall be specifically approved by the Board of Directors. The Fraternity may reimburse the Executive Director for reasonable expenses he incurs in performing his duties for the Fraternity, under guidelines approved by the Board of Directors. ARTICLE VI. THE FINANCES Section 1: The Budget

The Board of Directors shall establish an annual budget for the Fraternity’s operations. The Board of Directors shall set forth in the Fraternity’s Policies written procedures for the preparation, review and approval of an annual budget and for the management and control of expenses. Section 2: The Associate Membership Fees

The Fraternity may assess each Undergraduate Chapter and Colony an Associate Membership Fee for each person pledged as an Associate Member, in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently. The Associate Membership Fee shall be payable at the time of pledging. No Undergraduate Chapter or Colony may initiate an Associate Member as a Member of the Fraternity unless the Associate Membership Fee has been paid. Each Undergraduate Chapter and Colony shall report to the Secretary of the Fraternity the name of each man pledged within seven days after pledging. The Fraternity may assess any Undergraduate Chapter or Colony that fails to pay timely the Associate Membership Fee a late fee, in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently. Section 3: The Initiation Fees

The Fraternity may assess each Undergraduate Chapter, in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently. The Fraternity may assess a Colony an Initiation Fee for each Member initiated at the time the Colony is installed as an Undergraduate Chapter of the Fraternity, in the same amount as the Initiation Fees for Undergraduate Chapters. The Fraternity may assess an Initiation Fee for each Graduate Member initiated as a Graduate Member by any


Undergraduate or Alumni Chapter or the Board of Directors in the same amount as the Initiation Fee for Undergraduate Chapters. The Initiation Fee shall be payable at the time of initiation. Each Undergraduate Chapter or Colony to be installed shall report to the Secretary of the Fraternity the name of each man to be initiated as a Member of the Fraternity at least seven days before the initiation date. The Fraternity may assess a late fee in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently, to any Undergraduate Chapter or Colony to be installed that fails to pay timely the Initiation Fees. Section 4: The Undergraduate Membership Fees

The Fraternity may assess each Undergraduate Chapter and Colony Undergraduate Membership Fees for each Member and Associate Member of that Undergraduate Chapter or Colony, in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently. Undergraduate Membership Fees may be payable in two installments as established by the Board of Directors. Each Undergraduate Chapter and Colony shall report to the Secretary of the Fraternity the name of each Member and Associate Member annually. The Fraternity may assess any Undergraduate Chapter or Colony that fails to pay timely the Undergraduate Membership Fees installments, a late fee in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently.

Section 7: The Permanent Trust Fund

The Board of Directors shall establish and maintain a Permanent Trust Fund as an endowment fund for the Fraternity’s future. The Permanent Trust Fund shall be funded by gifts, devises or bequests to the Fraternity or other contributions, which may include contributions from the Fraternity’s Operating Fund as the Board of Directors may determine. Any use of the principal of the Permanent Trust Fund shall require the approval of the Board of Directors by a three-fourths vote of the Directors present at a meeting of the Board of Directors. The Treasurer of the Fraternity shall provide a complete accounting of the use of any principal of the Permanent Trust Fund during the prior fiscal year in his report to the Convention and the Assembly of Trustees and the Fraternity’s financial statements published in the Delta Upsilon Quarterly. Any interest, dividends or other income earned on the principal of the Permanent Trust Fund during any fiscal year may be used to fund the Fraternity’s Operating Fund and the general operations of the Fraternity or for other purposes or may be retained as principal in the Permanent Trust Fund, as the Board of Directors may determine. Section 8: Operating Fund

Section 5: The Loss Prevention Fees

The Fraternity may assess each Undergraduate Chapter and Colony an annual Loss Prevention Fees for each Member and Associate Member of that Undergraduate Chapter or Colony, in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently. The Loss Prevention Fees may be payable in installments as established by the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors may vary the Loss Prevention Fees between Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies based on insurance underwriting criteria and other risk factors. The Board of Directors may waive all or part of the Loss Prevention Fees for any Undergraduate Chapter or Colony that can demonstrate that it has purchased insurance coverage that is equal to or better than the insurance coverage provided through the Fraternity’s loss prevention program. The Fraternity may assess any Undergraduate Chapter or Colony that fails to pay timely the Loss Prevention Fees a late fee, in an amount established by the Board of Directors and the Undergraduate Advisory Board concurrently. Section 6: The Loss Prevention Fund

The Board of Directors shall establish and maintain a Loss Prevention Fund to be funded by the Loss Prevention Fees to the Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies. The Loss Prevention Fund shall be used to fund the Fraternity’s loss prevention and insurance programs including insurance coverage. Any excess funds in the Loss Prevention Fund at the end of the fiscal year may be retained to fund future loss prevention and insurance programs or may be refunded to the Chapters and Colonies, as the Board of Directors may determine.

The Board of Directors shall establish and maintain an Operating Fund to account for the income and expenses from the Fraternity’s general operations, and to provide funds for the Educational Fund. The Operating Fund shall be funded by Initiation Fees, Associate Membership Fees and Undergraduate Membership Fees and by gifts, devises or bequests to the Fraternity or other contributions, which may include contributions from the Fraternity’s Permanent Trust Fund as the Board of Directors may determine. Section 9: Educational Fund

The Board of Directors shall establish and maintain an Educational Fund to be used exclusively for educational programs, purposes and activities of the Fraternity. The Educational Fund shall be funded by interest, dividends or other income earned on the Permanent Trust Fund and by gifts, devises or bequests to the Fraternity or other contributions, which may include contributions from the Fraternity’s Operating Fund as the Board of Directors may determine. Section 10: Other Funds

The Board of Directors may establish and maintain such other funds in addition to the Fraternity’s General Fund, Insurance Fund and Permanent Trust Fund and may establish the uses and limitations on the uses of such funds. ARTICLE VII. AMENDMENTS Section 1: Authority and Notice of Amendments

These By-Laws may be amended by a majority of the Delegates present at the Convention and a majority of the Trustees present at the Assembly of Trustees; provided that, at least 90 days prior to such vote, notice of any proposed amendments shall be provided to each Undergraduate and Alumni Chapter.

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“i will absolutely be back to serve again, but until i do, i issue a challenge to the brothers of Delta Upsilon. Don’t come to jamaica to ‘feel all right’, come to jamaica to serve.” – Matt lucciola, rutgers, ‘14. Photo: grant Weekes, bucknell ’13 playing with school children while anthony giammalva, san jose ’13 takes a break from working during the january 2013 gsi trip.

get global: serve in jaMaiCa DeltaU.org/serviCe 40


West Chester Proposal  

Delta Upsilon Fraternity proposal for partnership with West Chester University.

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