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March 28 through April 1, 2011 •Year I •Number 001

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‘Hatsume Fair’ at Morikami becomes Congressman gives tribute, relief effort for stricken Japan students slice of life on Capitol Hill See page 3

College Funding “Tip of the Week” See page 7

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens By Donovan Ortega DELRAY BEACH - The 32nd “Hatsume Fair” March 19 at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens took on a deeper, more profound meaning this year in light of the recent earthquake and tsunami that decimated entire towns in Japan and left thousands dead and unaccounted for. A moment of silence was observed at 2:30 p.m. on all three stages as a public showing of solidarity with Japan’s struggle to rebuild. There had even been talk of canceling “Hatsume,” but festival organizers decided to form a partnership with the American Red Cross and use the event as an avenue to raise money for relief efforts. The Red Cross had an on-site tent that acted as both a donation and information center. Joe Hansen, a spokesperson for the Red Cross, was extremely happy with the response from the community. “We have a lot of very generous people in our area. People really give from their hearts and more often than not the American Red Cross is the outlet they choose. We are really proud to be a part of the relief efforts,” said Hansen. As he spoke, a man approached a large bucket for cash donations that sat beneath the tent.

See page 10

Children found in canal, Swedish Charity has office in See page 8 mother laid to rest South Florida See page 3 Delray Beach TRIBUNE Your closest neighbor

Delray dancer wins local competition, heads to nationals to compete for $10,000

YOUR CLOSEST NEIGHBOR.

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Municipal News

March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 3

Delray Beach Tribune

Congressman gives students slice of Children found in canal, mother life on Capitol Hill laid to rest DELRAY BEACH – Congressman Ted Deutch visited Atlantic High School on Tuesday, March 22, to speak on the responsibilities of today’s leaders and took questions from the class. His stop was part of his ongoing “Congress in the Classroom” series aimed at boosting youth involvement in civics. He held a mock session to demonstrate to students in the leadership class how the US Congress operates. Deutch responded to questions on a wide range of issues including education funding, health care reform legislation, jobs, funding for international affairs and college loans. Meetings like Tuesdays are critical to the public policy process because they provide an opportunity for him to hear about the most pressing concerns of students and to elaborate on the work that he and his colleagues are tackling in Congress, which impacts students most, he said. “We had good conversations about a variety of

issues that are important to the daily lives of South Florida students and residents alike,” said Deutch, who lives in Boca Raton. “In these challenging economic times South Florida residents of all ages are committed to improving our community and I thank the students for their participation in the class.” The All-Stars Leadership Academy, conducted by the Knights of Pythagoras Mentoring Network, teaches the students leadership skills. Each week, community leaders or local role models serve as guest speakers on topics including Character traits, Life skills, conflict resolution, student government and leadership development.

“Having the Congressman here was an opportunity for us students to see a real person who works to implement laws and effect change that can truly impact our lives,” said Ashely Weatherspoon, president of the organization. A huge part of the work as mentors and educators, especially in history and government, is to make the work interesting and relevant to the students. The Congressman’s visit accomplished this, officials said. “We are extremely grateful to Congressman Deutch for his visit,” said C. Ron Allen, founder and CEO of the Knights of Pythagoras Mentoring Network. “Our students appreciated the opportunity to have a conversation with him and they learned quite a lot from the experiences he shared. It is through these opportunities and commitment from our community leaders that our young people are able to get a larger world view and a greater understanding of the needs of those around us.”

Hundreds of family, friends and other members of the community gathered on Saturday to say their final goodbyes to two local children found dead in a canal recently and their mother, whose body was found at a county garbage dump last August. Felicia Flint, 25, and her two children – Ju’Tyra Allen, 6, and Jermaine McNeil, 10, – were reunited, at least in spirit, in a spirited two-hour service at St. John Missionary Baptist Church in Boynton Beach. “Today was a wonderful celebration of three beautiful lives in our community,” Chuck Ridley, a family friend, said. Flowers and photos adorned the three white caskets that were surrounded by cards and letters from classmates, and even artwork created by students at Pine Grove Elementary, where Ju’Tyra attended. Kristin Marra, Ju’Tyra’s kindergarten teacher, said she was a bright and wonderful student who made the principal’s honor roll twice. “I’ll always remember her

for having her beads, dancing with a happy smile and contagious laugh,” Marra, said. Tolliver Miller, a director of the Boca Jets youth football program, where Jermaine was a popular player, also recalled her as a vibrant fan. Like a cheerleader, she would bounce long the sidelines at her big brother’s football games, shaking a water bottle full of rocks, he said. “We’ll remember the happy children they were and celebrate all the joy they brought to all of us,” said Miller, president of the Optimist Foundation of Boca Raton, which oversees the Boca Jets football team. Jermaine’s teammates wore their jerseys to the funeral service. Music, speeches and praise punctuated the service. While the choir belted out a rendition of “God Is My Everything,” the children’s great-grandmother, Barbara Flint, 72, jumped out of her front row seat, then

clutched each of the three white caskets while dancing. On Friday, about 100 people attended a public visitation at the church. Earlier, the family and close friends held a private memorial service. The children’s bodies were found in a duffel bag and a suitcase, respectively, on March 2 floating in the C-15 canal between Delray Beach and Boca Raton. Police later linked their deaths to their mother. Flint, who also goes by Felicia Brown, was found dead on Aug. 16, 2010, at the Palm Beach County Solid Waste Authority processing facility. She had been listed as a Jane Doe until police identified her from the names of her two children that were tattooed on her leg. Although the Palm Beach County Medical Examiner has conducted autopsies, detectives have not made Continued on page 4

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4 - March 28 through April 1, 2011

Delray Beach Tribune MUNICIPAL NEWS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

Children found in canal, mother laid to rest

Continued from page 3

public the details about what caused the children’s deaths. Flint’s ex-boyfriend, Clem Beauchamp, 34, of Delray Beach, is considered a suspect in the killings. Beauchamp already had been facing a federal charge of possessing an unregistered, silenced pistol. In a three-count indictment Thursday, a federal grand jury added two additional charges of felon in possession of a handgun and possession of a gun with no serial number. None of the federal charges is related to the deaths but the move let the government take Beauchamp into custody immediately after the discoveries were made. The bodies were interred at Delray Beach Memorial Gardens. The nonprofit Optimist Foundation of Boca Raton is raising money for the family. Donations can be made in the name of Jermaine McNeil at any Wachovia Bank using the account number 2000051864183. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, at 188 S. Swinton Ave. in Delray Beach, also started a fund to cover funeral expenses. Those wishing to help can write checks to the church in care of the Brown/Allen family.

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March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 5

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Coral Springs Tribune EDITORIALS/LETTERS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

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6 - March 28 through April 1, 2011

Delray Beach Tribune EDITORIALS/LETTERS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

THOUGHTS FROM THE PUBLISHER By Douglas Heizer

Communities must invest in ‘their’ newspapers’ so they’ll survive Newspapers in general have reached a critical point in their existence. After years of big-city papers dominating most of the market, many metro dailies are either falling into bankruptcy or going out of existence entirely. Readership is dropping in favor of TV news, the Internet and handheld devices that deliver instant articles. Smaller, community newspapers are popping up - and succeeding - where their old counterparts have either failed or have had to rein in their page counts as revenue dropped sharply. Those who study the news market say community papers - particularly those hooked to a web site (the Tribune currently has three) - have a good chance of staying around. They cater to the older readers who want to have hard copy in their hands, but also provide what many young and tech-oriented people want something that can be read online or via some handheld device. Technology aside, however, there is something that no newspaper can survive without - and that’s money. We have heard lately from a number of journalists who have lost their jobs due to cutbacks and layoffs. They say the community newspaper is the way to go - and they are looking to get back

in. Even former writers for such papers as the Sun Sentinel and Palm Beach Post now populate community papers - or have created their own (i.e., The Coastal Star, published mainly by former Palm Beach Post personnel left without jobs). Let’s look a bit more closely at the Boca Raton Tribune. It opened its doors just a few months after Boca Raton lost the hometown newspaper it had called its own for more than 50 years. At least one reason for the demise of the Boca Raton News, officials from the defunct paper said, was financial. As I said in my column last week, the Boca Raton Tribune is free to the public, but there are costs involved in creating it. I’m not too proud to say that many people who work here give of their free time and have other jobs to support themselves. They often find it difficult to get by with part time jobs, particularly in an economy that is still stifled. They have a passion to be here because they don’t want Boca Raton not to have a local newspaper. We don’t want to go back to those days from mid-2009 to early 2010 when there was no Boca paper. But this paper must have money to continue. And that is why I ask, with all

my heart, for community support. We aren’t just pleading to the business community, but to individuals as well. If you have a small business, buy a business card ad. It’s less than $35 an issue. Many small ads can bring in the revenue of large ads. We offer space to many non-profits and for restaurant and theater reviews and other free publicity. It hurts us to see them advertise in other media, but forget that we gave them something for nothing when they needed it and didn’t return the favor when they had some extra money to spend. We at the Boca Tribune want this paper to survive, because we love what we do and we love serving the community. We appreciate the phone calls, the emails and many positive comments. We feel wonderful that more than 900 people have us on their Facebook page. But the reality is that our staff and contributors all have families and bills and expenses. They give what they can for the newspaper, then go to other places and work more. We are not complaining, we are just stating facts. We want to continue to be your “closest neighbor,” but your financial support is necessary to make it work.

POSITIVE LIVING By Dr. Synesio Lyra, Jr.

Have no fear to change! In human life, change should always signify improvement. Growth is continually necessary in the life and experience of every individual; advance is essential. Room for improvement is more than a commodity in the architecture of any life! Never resign yourself to a mediocre life since you have at your disposal all the tools necessary to improve it. New opportunities and varied experiences afford us the occasions to change for the better. No one should ever state, “I am that way and nothing will change in me!” As the late Norman Cousins asserted, “we belong to an unfinished species. We have limitless capacities for growth.” Therefore, don’t be content with the way things are, for everything can be made much better. Each new day offers us the opportunity to move forward with what we have started, as it equally provides us new challenges

that we can begin to tackle and carry on consistently into successful fulfilment! Every 24 hours we are being brought from the past into a new day, not to remain stuck there but to use that as a new starting point for significant ventures in living! Each new day should never become a mere extension of yesterday’s successes or distresses but, rather, a fresh opportunity to triumph in whatever we attempt! In our process of growth, we’re often allowed to enter a period of “wandering in the wilderness” before we are ushered into “the promised land” of creativity, actualisation, and of genuine contributions we make to humanity. If we can endure the wilderness and meaningfully learn from the experience, we shall more successfully perform, and eventually deliver, as we move on in the world. In the advances we make,

the excitement and glories of any moment should never portray the way things will permanently remain. Similarly, the difficulties and distresses of any day or season, are not to be viewed as what is in store for the rest of one’s life. There’s no status quo when growth is occurring, and if it is to continue! Let us never waste life while we possess it, but consistently direct it into new levels of significance for advantage to others, besides for our own individual benefit. Always be who you are, wherever you are, in whatever you do, and withersoever you go! Nevertheless, be sure that what you manifest today represents an improvement from previous days and years, anticipating an even better “you” tomorrow, as you shape yourself continually into the person you’ve been designed to become!

Dr. Synesio Lyra, Jr. is a Florida resident who, for many years, was a professor at the post-graduate level. He is a writer, a sought-after conference speaker, a man who lived in five continents of the world, having received his education in four of them. When he resided in southern California, he wrote a weekly column for the daily “Anaheim Bulletin,” which was carried for about six years, until he moved to south Florida.

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Community News

March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 7

Delaray Beach Tribune

College Funding “Tip of the Week”

Does it seem like there’s never enough time in the day to get everything done? Feel like you’re always running late? Here are some tips for taking control of your time and organizing your life. 1. Make a “To Do” List Every Day. Put things that are most important at the top and do them first. If it’s easier, use a planner to track all of your tasks. And don’t forget to reward yourself for your accomplishments. 2. Use Spare Minutes Wisely. Get some reading done on the bus ride home from school, for example, and you’ll kill two birds with one stone. 3. Its Okay to Say “No.” If your boss asks you to work on a Thursday night and you have a final exam the next morning, realize that it’s okay to say no. Keep your short- and longterm priorities in mind.

4. Find the Right Time. You’ll work more efficiently if you figure out when you do your best work. For example, if your brain handles math better in the afternoon, don’t wait to do it until late at night. 5. Review Your Notes Every Day. You’ll reinforce what you’ve learned, so you need less time to study. You’ll also be ready if your teacher calls on you or gives a pop quiz. 6. Get a Good Night’s Sleep. Running on empty makes the day seem longer and your tasks seem more difficult. 7. Communicate Your Schedule to Others. If phone calls are proving to be a distraction, tell your friends that you take social calls from 7-8 p.m. It may sound silly, but it helps. 8. Become a Taskmaster. Figure out how much free

time you have each week. Give yourself a time budget and plan your activities accordingly. 9. Don’t Waste Time Agonizing. Have you ever wasted an entire evening by worrying about something that you’re supposed to be doing? Was it worth it? Instead of agonizing and procrastinating, just do it. 10. Keep Things in Perspective. Setting goals that are unrealistic sets you up for failure. While it’s good to set high goals for yourself, be sure not to overdo it. Set goals that are difficult yet reachable. Consider these tips, but personalize your habits so that they suit you. If you set priorities that fit your lifestyle, you’ll have a better chance of achieving your goals. Implementing these strategies will help you to be more successful in high school and in college and eventually in your career. Until next week… Your Friends At College Planning PhD, Inc. PS. As always, if you have any questions on how

you’re going to pay the upcoming astronomical costs of college, please do not hesitate to contact us at College Planning PhD, Inc. We can walk you through several different payment options to help determine the right one for you. Making TimeDoes it seem like there’s never enough time in the day to get everything done? Feel like you’re always running late? Here are some tips for taking control of your time and organizing your life. Put things that are most important at the top and do them first. If it’s easier, use a planner to track all of your tasks. And don’t forget to reward yourself for your accomplishments. Get some reading done on the bus ride home from school, for example, and you’ll kill two birds with one stone. If your boss asks you to work on a Thursday night and you have a final exam the next morning, realize that it’s okay to say no. Keep your short- and longterm priorities in mind. You’ll work more effi-

ciently if you figure out when you do your best work. For example, if your brain handles math better in the afternoon, don’t wait to do it until late at night. You’ll reinforce what you’ve learned, so you need less time to study. You’ll also be ready if your teacher calls on you or gives a pop quiz. Running on empty makes the day seem longer and your tasks seem more difficult.7. Communicate Your Schedule to Others.If phone calls are proving to be a distraction, tell your friends that you take social calls from 7-8 p.m. It may sound silly, but it helps. Figure out how much free time you have each week. Give yourself a time budget and plan your activities accordingly. Have you ever wasted an entire evening by worrying about something that

you’re supposed to be doing? Was it worth it? Instead of agonizing and procrastinating, just do it. Setting goals that are unrealistic sets you up for failure. While it’s good to set high goals for yourself, be sure not to overdo it. Set goals that aredifficult yet reachable. achieving your goals. Implementing these strategies will help you to be more successful in high school and in college and eventually in your career.Until next week…Your Friends At College Planning PhD, Inc.PS. As always, if you have any questions on how you’re going to pay the upcoming astronomical costs of college, please do not hesitate to contact us at College Planning PhD, Inc. We can walk you through several different payment options to help determine the right one for you.

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8 - March 28 through April 1, 2011

Delray Beach Tribune COMMUNITY NEWS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

Swedish Charity has office in South Florida

“Star of Hope 4 Kids” is the name of an international charity, with its world headquarters in Sweden. Serving now 22 nations of the world, this organization started in 1970 in Brazil, when a famous Swedish speaker was touring that land, while addressing various conferences.

After one of his meetings, in the state of Minas Gerais, a single mother holding her infant boy in the arms, greeted the foreign guest and placed the baby in his hands, saying: “I would like for you to take care of him for I am unable to offer him the life he needs and deserves.”

So impressed with that experience, and aware of the widespread nature of that social problem in Brazil, Erik Gunnar Eriksson returned to his native Sweden and raised enough funds to build the first of many DayCare Centers for children (ages 0-6) from among the poorest of the poor. Since

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its inception, this vision is now preventing countless kids from malnutrition, all kinds of vices, and from the possibility of growing into illiteracy, a life of crime, drug trafficking and use, sexual promiscuity, deadly illnesses, and countless more abuses which would prevent them from a satisfying and productive youth and adulthood. At each Day-Care Center led by The Star of Hope, parents or a single parent, bring(s) the child or children into one of the facilities very early in the morning, before proceeding to their place of employment. They know their newborn baby or school age child shall receive many nutritious meals each day, have time for rest, moments of recreation, a loving, caring atmosphere, and those of school age attend daily classes, fulfilling the national, academic curriculum for each appropriate grade level, within the Day-Care Center campus. Each evening, after working hours, the parent returns to take the child home where they spend the night together, thus maintaining the family unit and the necessary parent-child relationship intact. Sunday is the only day when the child remains all day in the company of the family for 24 hours. Currently, The Star of Hope is completing the construction of what will become Brazil’s largest, model Day-Care Center, in the city of São Vicente, off the coast of the state of São Paulo. In that same property a Soccer School is also being built for children ages

7-14 who, after school hours, shall receive instruction in that national favorite game. This may develop in some of those kids the unique abilities and skills which can enable some of them to become professional soccer players in the future, enjo-ying a good livelihood and the satisfaction of participating in a national sport which is loved and cheered by the fanatic population of Brazil. The south Florida office is led by Dr. Tomas Söderberg, an orthopedic surgeon in Brazil, a minister, and also a former city councilman in the city of Santos (São Paulo state), where he also served as Secretary of Health by appointment of the Mayor of the city. Now, a permanent resident of Ft. Lauderdale with his family, Dr. Söderberg presides over a staff of six highly competent individuals, who are always open to inquiries about this agency, welcoming also any donations which shall enable “Starofhope4kids” to maintain and expand its noble task. This is a

(501) (c) (3) organization. Gifts may be safely made online at the web site www. starofhope4kids.com or sent by mail to its office at 2440 E. Commercial Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33308. American author, Frederick Buechner, commented in one of his books that “a babe is hope for better things to come.” You can see this hope fulfilled by sponsoring one child for $ 35.00 per month, or by giving in any other fashion whatever you can, which shall be utilized 100% for your designated purpose. Contemporary Yale University scholar, Prof. Miroslav Volf, offers a positive challenge with the thought: “Wealth doesn’t make us givers; poverty can’t prevent us from being givers!”

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March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 9

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Delray Beach Tribune COMMUNITY NEWS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

Delray dancer wins local competition, heads to nationals to compete for $10,000 The Delray Beach resident earned that title after winning home the top prize at South Florida’s National Society of Arts and Letters Dance Competition recently. The March 12 event was held at Old School Square’s Crest Theater. Twenty-three talented dancers, ranging in age from 18 to 32, competed for $2,000 and bragging rights. They showcased their choreography talent in ballet, modern, or jazz before an audience of family members, friends, judges, and curious onlookers. Abreu performed her piece “Unaccompanied” to Prelude by Bach. “It’s surreal to think my choreography has gotten notice,” she said. “This was my first opportunity to showcase my work and I am so grateful that everyone enjoyed my movement.” Abreu said she was inspired to perform the piece after reading a quote. “It stated that an artist is

usually unaccompanied and they like their alone time and are considered loners,” she said. “I completely disagree with that thought. The music, lights, everyone in the audience is our com-

pany. I may not physically have someone with me but the energy, the mentality of performing for someone in the audience always surrounds us. I am never unaccompanied. The music

alone is my partner.” A graduate of the Dreyfoos School of the Arts in West Palm Beach, Abreu is no stranger to the stage. She performs as a dancer with Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines and will soon be a featured dancer with the company O Dance in West Palm Beach. With the win Abreu will compete for $10,000 at the national competition in Birmingham. She also will perform at one of NSAL’s signature events, The Red Rose Gala, in Deerfield Beach in April. Ronderrick Mitchell, who performed his piece “Get Out” to Lauryn Hill’s music, finished second, and Ivy Canapa finished third, for her piece titled Homeward Bound. The competitors were judged by a group of distinguished arts and dance professionals. Past South Florida NSAL winners include actress Shirley MacLaine and Broadway stars Megan Hilty and Gelan Lambert, Jr.

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10 -March 28 through April 1, 2011

Delray Beach Tribune COMMUNITY NEWS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

‘Hatsume Fair’ at Morikami becomes tribune...

Red Cross volunteers in tent at “Hatsume Fair.” “Does this go straight to Japan?” he asked. When he received a reply of “yes,” he quickly dropped a bill in the bucket. Hansen also wanted to make note that despite the disasters’ immense death toll, the impact could have been much worse were it not for the general preparedness of the Japanese people. “More than 700,000 lives were saved in Japan because of the simple use of escape plans and heeding evacuation warnings. We have hurricane season approaching, so it’s important to start building your hurricane kit and make plans in case of disaster,” said Hansen. Even though the “Hatsume Fair” was overshadowed by the sad happenings in Japan, the partnership with the Red Cross offered a ray of hope. It was less of a memorial to the dead and more a tribute to the strength of Japanese culture. Like any good festival, “Hatsume” had all the trimmings: shaved

Fushu Daiko ice, mothers with excited children eating shaved ice, authentic samurai swords and decorative daggers for $16, eccentric collectors, artists and cultural enthusiasts - teenagers dressing up as their favorite manga and anime characters. David Coplon, a local teen, said he got a Japanese culture book when he was a child and soon fell in love with manga, Japan’s version of American comic books. Coplon was dressed as the character “Urhana” from the manga series, “Full Metal Alchemist.” His friend, Rachel Glismann, couldn’t contain her excitement about being at “Hatsume.” “The people are really friendly! People give you a lot of attention. It’s so much fun!” said Glismann, who quickly turned to wave at other festively dressed teens. Both Coplon and Glissman are self-proclaimed “otakus,” a Japanese term for those obsessed with manga and anime.

Continued from page 1 Along with the homemade costumes, the normally tranquil Morikami Park was lined with art and food vendors selling authentic Japanese artwork and cuisine. The festival had three stages on which Japanese acts preformed. The crowd favorite was taiko drumming by the local troop, Fushu Daiko. Their performances seemed to embody the type of spirit that will propel Japan past the unspeakable effects of the earthquake and tsunami. Fushu Daiko consists of 12 drummers and their remarkable enthusiasm, physicality, guttural yelps and timing punctuated the “Hatsume Fair’s” efforts of bringing the soul of Japan to South Florida. “I want people that see Fushu Daiko to be moved,” said Ben Miller, a member of the group since 1998. “We strive to play with spirit, nothing else matters. We want all our hearts to play as one.” Like many of the acts, Fushu Daiko had contemplated not performing at the “Hatsume Fair” out of respect for Japan. But with the addition of the Red Cross, Miller thought it was important that Fushu Daiko play. “When I think of Japan, I think of their strong warrior spirit. I think of duty and commitment. I think those things come through in the performance of taiko. Transmitting that spirit is why we play,” said Miller. To donate to the relief effort in Japan, visit www.redcross.org.

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Columnists

March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 11

Delray Beach Tribune

FAITH

By Pastor Sandy

Culture There is a subtle, almost undetectable force which is as unobtrusive as the air we breath, that forms and shapes us into who we are. It is almost as profound as gravity yet as obvious as the blue sky and it is what we call culture. Culture is the atmosphere in which we are immersed and consequently we are rarely conscious of it. It is something akin to asking a fish what it thinks about water, or a bird about the air. Do you think about why you drive on the right-hand side of the road instead of on the left as people of other countries do? Have we even stopped to think about why we wear pants and a shirt instead of a kurta and dhoti as traditional men in India wear. Culture is the common things that we all share, those daily norms, the humor, the acceptable and unacceptable behaviors, the politics and most of all the slants that we take on almost everything. It is reflected in what we wear, the way we think, how we behave and even what we think is “cool, neat or in.” What is culture? Culture is the way of life of a group of people--the behaviors, beliefs, values and symbols that they accept, generally without thinking about them, and that are passed along by communication and imitation from one person and one generation to the next. Clearly, there are different cultures within different groups of humanity and these differences can be a source of diversity and strength or prejudice and contention. Culture is often intertwined with strong feelings of right and wrong which will be passionately defended, even if

poorly articulated. The question is not whether culture is a profound force or not; the question is how do I respond to it? Culture, like tradition can be good or bad; beneficial or detrimental. Paul writes in Romans 12:1-2... “Do not conform any longer to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.” We are to observe and analyze culture and make decisions regarding our proper actions and reactions within it. Harry Blamires writes: “No thoughtful Christian can contemplate and analyze the tensions all about us in both public and private life without sensing the eternal momentousness of the current struggle for the human mind between Christian teaching and materialistic secularism.”(Harry Blamires, Recovering the Christian Mind (Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity, 1988, 10). Every individual is to join the struggle. But in order to struggle meaningfully and with some hope of influencing our culture, we must be informed and thoughtful citizens. Church history demonstrates that one of the constant struggles of Christianity, both individually and corporately, is with culture. Where should we stand? Inside the culture? Outside? Ignore it? Isolate ourselves from it? Should we try to transform it? The theologian Richard Niebuhr provided a classic study concerning these questions in his book Christ and Culture. Briefly, he suggests that there are only five views concerning our response to culture:

1.“Christ Against Culture”total separation, and hostility toward culture. 2.“Christ of Culture”-bring culture and Christianity together. 3.“Christ Above Culture”-correlate the fundamental questions of the culture with the answer of Christian revelation. 4. “Christ and Culture in Paradox”-the Christian belongs “to two realms (the spiritual and temporal) and must live in the tension of fulfilling responsibilities to both.” 5. “Christ the Transformer of Culture” -convert the values and goals of secular culture into the service of the kingdom of God.” As citizens of this great nation, we should be actively involved in the transformation of culture. As the social critic Herbert Schlossberg says, “The ‘salt’ of people changed by the gospel must change the world.”(Herbert Schlossberg, Idols for Destruction (Nashville, Tenn.: Thomas Nelson, 1983, 324.) If we are to be transformers, we must also be “discerners.” We are to apply “the faculty of discerning; discrimination; acuteness of judgment and understanding.”(The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, s.v. “discernment.”) In order to transform the culture, we must continually recognize what is in need of transformation and what is not. This is a difficult assignment. As the theologian John Baille has said, “In proportion as a society relaxes its hold upon the eternal, it ensures the corruption of the temporal.”(John Baille, What is Christian Civilization? London: Oxford, 1945, 59.)

Pastor Sandy Huntsman - Administrative Pastor Boca Glades Baptist Church - www.bocaglades.org

DIVORCE FLORIDA STYLE By Mike Gora

Hanging by our thumbs On deadline once again. On the Iphone and waiting for my burger at DaDa’s. Thinking about a speech heard at lunch made by Florida Bar President Maryanne Downs, Orlando lawyer, single mom, and making her point. In the year 2000 Florida was ranked fifth in the United States in the number of trial court judges per citizen. Ten years later, we are all hanging by our thumbs when it comes to having our various rights adjudicated by our courts. “Now Florida is ranked forty-fifth among the states in judges per capita,” she says, “ because the legislature blindly believes that it has more important places to put our tax dollars.” Each year, the Florida Supreme Court certifies the need for new judges in each circuit, and Palm Beach County’s certified need for new judges has been rejected by the Florida Legislature for two years. Send your state rep or senator an e-mail. Divorce cases now hang around for one to two years without a trial date. Ask for a trial date today and you might get one in December or January. Not so bad for lawyers, as the longer a divorce case hangs around,

the more fees are generated, but hell extended for men, women and children. The real estate market and banking industry tied up in knots because the judicial system is not capable of processing the thousands of mortgage foreclosures because of the lack of judges. Personal injury cases face the same crises, forcing plaintiffs and defendants to hang by their thumbs in cases that can’t be settled, or forcing cheap settlements. The longer personal injury cases hang around, the more money the insurance companies have tied up in reserve funds, lowering their profits and raising prices for all of us. It goes on. Landlords lose rent, businesses cannot collect legitimate debts and hundreds of other types of cases languish. Palm Beach County Circuit Court Clerk Sharon Bock gets squeezed to the point where she considers closing down a regional courthouse to make ends meet, which would mean that in Palm Beach County, larger than the state of Rhode Island, citizens would have to spend a lot more money and time on gas and lost wages to get to a courthouse or send their lawyers to a courthouse.

The Clerk’s staff has been cut to the point where the typical wait time to get to the window to file papers with an assistant clerk has gone from 15 minutes to two to three hours, increasing the cost of litigation for all of us, as runners, process servers and lawyers cool their heels and bill time while reading their Kindles in court clerks’ waiting rooms. The truth is that the legal system can support itself if the legislator keeps its hand off the money generated by the legal system. The filing fees, penalties, fines, and recording fees can pay for all of the judges and other service required. The legislature treats this income as its own and spends it elsewhere. To put it in perspective the legal system can be run with no tax dollars if the legislature would allow. The income could be put into a trust fund earmarked for the legal system. The key word is “trust”. Of course, the Florida legislature has made a habit of invading any “trust” fund that it ever approved. “Justice delayed is justice denied,” but justice delayed costs us all a lot more money. Where is that damn burger?

Michael H. Gora has been certified by the Board of Specialization of The Florida Bar as a specialist in family and matrimonial law.

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12 -March 28 through April 1, 2011

Delray Beach Tribune COLUMNISTS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

By Carter Helschien

So What’s the Deal with Texting? 3,339. That’s the number Nielsen reported in October 2010 for the average number of texts a teenager sends per month. A phenomenon that has left many parents questioning why it is such an obsession with teens, texting has defined a generation. As brilliant minds of the parent community congregate to attempt to identify the reason texting is the preferred form of communication for teens, the phenomenon grows. Some parents speculate that teens must enjoy typing more on their phones. Other parents speculate that teens enjoy reading more and thus would rather read responses than hear responses. Take it from a teen, however, that all of these responses are wrong. In reality, teens choose to text more and more for one simple reason: convenience. One of the main reasons teens like me today love texting is the fact that it provides plenty of time to think about appropriate responses. Teenagers today are as concerned as ever about how to fit-in with the cool crowd, and so it is a teenager’s main concern when carrying a conversation with another friend that he or she does not say anything embarrassing, weird, or “un-cool.” For example, let’s say a boy, we’ll call

him Johnny, is trying to have a conversation with a girl he likes, named Sally. Scenario one is Johnny is talking to Sally over the phone. Sally says she thinks Johnny is very nice and funny; Johnny, upon hearing this, is unsure what to do. On one hand Johnny likes Sally very much and would love to tell her he likes her, but on the other hand he is not sure if she is just generally being nice and does not actually have the same feelings for him. Not wanting to take a risk and embarrass himself, Johnny loses his courage and awkwardly says nothing while he tries to think what to say. Sally, having gone out on a limb to be nice, realizes that there is a pregnant pause in the conversation and decides Johnny must not like her. Sally and Johnny say goodbye, both disappointed and embarrassed. Scenario two is Johnny and Sally are texting each other. During the conversation Sally says the same nice comments. Reacting the same as in the first scenario, Johnny is unsure what to say, but he knows he has plenty of time as Sally will not know whether or not he was busing doing something else and had not had time yet to read the text. With the pressure off and being less nervous to go out on a limb (worst case

scenario he could always blame it on his annoying brother stealing his phone and jokingly sending a text message), Johnny admits his true feelings for Sally. Fortunately, Sally is relieved to hear that Johnny feels the same way and the two become girlfriend and boyfriend. As the above example shows, having a conversation by texting is appealing to teenagers as it is more convenient due to the impersonal nature of texting. Consequently, questions that a teenager might be afraid to ask in person or on a cell phone are easy to ask in a text message. The impersonality of text messaging is not the only reason teenagers enjoy texting over talking in person or on the phone, however. Specifically, the fact that text messaging is so quick and instantaneous allows teens to hold multiple conversations with multiple friends at the same time. For example, a typical teenager might be holding a conversation through text with five or six different people at once, texting person A, then person B, then person C, back to person A, and so on. As a result, texting provides an ideal solution to have conversations for the ninety-percent of teens who just don’t have enough patience to sit

down and devote their time to one telephone conversation, while they could be having five or six conversations by texting. Lastly, however, teenagers also find texting convenient due to the fact that they can talk to friends in places it might be awkward or inappropriate to have a conversation on the phone. For example, going back to the earlier example, if Johnny wants to talk to Sally, but he is in the car with his parents and brother and does not want to talk to her in front of them, he can simply text Sally. Through texting, Johnny can have a private conversation with Sally without having to worry about anyone eavesdropping on what they say. So if you are ever worried that your teen is texting too much, or that he or she must not have many friends because you never hear him or her talking on the phone, fear not. For if your teen has a cell phone, you can bet your life savings that he or she texts regularly to various friends. Hopefully, after reading this, parents will realize just how convenient and efficient texting can be for teenagers; for in reality, texting is not simply just another feature on a cell phone, but a way of life.

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Business

March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 13

Delray Beach Tribune

WHAT BUSINESS ARE YOU IN? By Gerald Sherman

Sell yourself first or you’ll sell yourself last Don’t shortchange yourself. Be the best you can be and then don’t sell yourself short. To be the best you can be, take advantage of the opportunities that are available to you. Knowledge is one of the keys to success. Learn to be an expert or highly knowledgeable in your field. Be up on the new trends and technology related to your industry. To this end, attending trade shows and subscribing to trade papers can be productive. You can get a lot of recognition by joining and participating in groups associated with your industry. Verbal communications is another key because it has a lot to do with the impression you give to others. Good communication skills are an advantage in presenting yourself. In my experience as a Competent Toastmaster, I have found that the non-profit Toastmasters International provides business people with

the tools that enable them to become effective communicators and leaders. Toastmasters training helps employees give better sales presentations, hone their management skills, work with fellow employees effectively, develop and present ideas, offer constructive criticism and accept criticism more objectively. It is an excellent resource for improving communication skills. Become involved in your community by sharing some of your expertise, know-ledge with people starting their own careers. Lecture at organizations that feature speakers. You can reach the younger generation by being a guest speaker on career days at high schools and colleges by exposing them to things in your industry that they might find appealing. Just as you would like to be known to your fel-

low professionals and the community so do you want to be recognized by your clients. Don’t be afraid to promote yourself; toot your own horn and talk about your accomplishments. Without letting your ego take over, sell yourself. People who find new and innovative ways to keep their good names and good work in the minds of their clientele will reap the tremendous benefits that good will generates. Networking offers another opportunity to meet and form relationships with others who share similar interests, usually in the same geographic area. In a formal sense, networking groups consist of business people who agree to meet together, stay in touch regularly and offer each other support, advice, and business referrals. Informally, it is a group of people who create busi-

ness relationships outside the office through social interaction and community work. Opportunities can present themselves everywhere, providing you broaden your scope. Joining groups such as the local Chamber of Commerce, Rotary Club and other well-known nonprofits will enhance your chances of offering your services to the community and getting yourself known. There is a saying among business professionals, “Sell yourself first or you’ll sell yourself last.” In other words, if you don’t show yourself in the best light, you can be sure there will be someone else that will take your place. Excerpts from the book, The Real World Guide to Fashion Selling & Management, Gerald J. Sherman & Sar S. Perlman, Fairchild Publications, Division of Conde Nast, (N.Y.).

Gerald J. Sherman, of Sherman & Perlman LLC., is a marketing and public relations consultant, sales coach and author who has written several books and articles on these subjects. jerry@ shermanperlman.com http://www.shermanperlman.com

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14 -March 28 through April 1, 2011

Delray Beach Tribune BUSINESS Coral Springs, Parkland, Margate, FL

BOCA VIEW By Al Zucaro

Boca Raton, Delray Beach have long had ties to the global community Author’s note: It is with great horror, sadness and shock that we are witnessing the devastating effect of the earthquake and the tsunami that took place a couple of weeks ago in Japan. It is very difficult to comprehend the force that destroyed so many lives, properties and institutions in such a short time. I write on behalf of the WTCA Board and its members to convey our deepest sympathies in such a difficult and emotional period. Our thoughts and prayers are with the WTC Tokyo, its staff and their families and all the people of their beloved country. The people of Japan are very disciplined and proud. We are all at your disposal for any assistance and help you may need within and outside the WTCA family in this period. It is amazing how much there is to learn when one sets down the path of institutional and historical knowledge. The Boca Raton Historical Society recently conducted an evening’s activity featuring the history of Boca Raton. Arthur Abrams, teenage son of Commissioner and Mrs. Steven Abrams, presented a gripping story of the Yamato Colony and efforts to create a community of Japanese farmers converting land west of the city into pineapple plantations around the turn of the century, in 1904. As folklore would have it, young Japanese men were recruited to farm in the colony, an early immigration experience bringing seasonal agricultural workers to harvest crops and package them for worldwide distribution, an industry of great importance even today. Historically, the Yamato Co-

lony never grew to its potential. The Colony’s land was confiscated during World War II and converted into the Boca Raton Army Air Force Base, a precursor in the aviation and aerospace industries - industries of great significance in modern day economic development. Today, that land is Florida Atlantic University attracting foreign students from locations worldwide. Finally, the municipalities of Boca Raton and Delray Beach have since evolved together as an international destination of significance for the South Palm Beach County area. So what does this trip down memory lane have to do with international economic development? Well, dare I say a whole lot… Today, South County has become a significant international setting perched to take full advantage of its strategic geographic position in the hemisphere; the growth and expansion of international trade opportunities exiting Miami and the diverse quality of life experiences. Expressions dating back to the Yamato Colony can be found in a modern day experience. The Morikami Museum and Japanese Garden is a worldclass destination for the culture and achievements of those early settlers. A sister city program features the international destinations of Miyazu, Japan and Moshi, Tanzania. Even the world of golf, a truly internationally renowned industry cluster, contributes with an annual Mayor’s Golf Tournament raising funds for sister city activities. High school students regularly travel to Japan for a living experience with families in Miyazu. These students immerse

themselves in the country’s language, culture, and history, supporting the notion that culture and education are indeed precursors to commerce and trade. Delray Beach’s case to be recognized as an international destination is evidenced in its 25 year effort at building a world class downtown. Today’s downtown is an economic generator attracting thousands upon thousands of foreign visitors yearly. Anecdotal evidence exists to demonstrate that international interests are attracted to the Boca Raton - Delray Beach area, from foreign destinations such as Brazil, Canada, Germany, and Spain. Florida’s new governor is on board with an aggressive international growth initiative that South County is perched to take full advantage. Governor Scott has opened discussions with economic development ministers in Japan, Canada, South America and Western Europe. Enterprise Florida states that Brazil is South Florida’s largest trading partner and the local Brazilian community ranks in the tens of thousands. The New York Times featured Delray Beach citing the city’s cosmopolitan appeal and sophisticated restaurant scene. Culinary delights can be found in Italian, Thai, Brazilian, Mexican, Creole, French, Cuban, Chinese, Japanese, Irish and British cuisines. Delray Beach completes South County as a significant destination for international business persons, diplomats and celebrities; and it complements the argument that South County is the epicenter of the western hemisphere, a story just now unfolding and soon to heralded around the globe.

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Your Life

March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 15

Delray Beach Tribune

OLEDA TALKS Oleda Baker

Your Voice Has Power… More so, If You Learn to Take Advantage Of It! I’m not old enough to remember silent movies and the popular film stars of the 1920’s, but, many of the public’s illusions about those very famous people were destroyed when “talkies” came to movie theaters. Grand impressions of flawless faces and figures were shattered when some actors’ voices were actually heard for the first time. We may not be movie stars but the sound and quality of our voice is just as important- not only in our careers, but also in relating to loved ones and friends and in our day-to-day conversations in general. You Don’t Have To Be “Stuck” With The Voice You’ve Had All Your Life. You Can Change It. Your voice is a wind instrument. Your lungs provide air, your vocal cords are vibrators, and your throat and mouth act as a “horn.” When everything is in harmony, the voice can be like music to the ear, soothing and persuasive. But, when “off key,” it’s like a musical instrument that needs tuning. Don’t Speak Too Slowly Or Too Fast.

Our voices can do a great job of either turning listeners on or turning them away. Fast talk sounds impersonal and overbearing. Slow talk suggests you are bored, so you may find the people you’re talking with soon become bored as well. Is Your Voice Nasal? The main cause of a weak, nasal, voice is tension in the muscles at the back of the tongue. “Talking through your nose” is usually caused by not opening your mouth wide enough when speaking. When that happens, sound will be forced to come through your nose. Train the muscles at the back of your tongue to relax. Test this by holding your hand in front of your mouth and nose, and then feel the air as you blow it alternately through your mouth, then your nose. To be clear and crisp when speaking, the air should be coming through your mouth. Do You Have A Piercing, High Pitched Voice? Some women have a highpitched voice that is penetrating. A lower-pitched voice strokes the body, is

more pleasing and gets more attention. If your voice is highpitched and penetrating, take a few deep breaths and say, “I don’t think it’s going to snow.” Then lower your voice and say it again… keep doing this until you reach a level you’re comfortable with. Practice this low “tone” until you are accustomed to it. Think of the musical scale, “ do re mi fa so la ti do.” Go up and down…see what range you really have? Do You Mumble? Speak In A Monotone? This has an easy solution. Stretch open your mouth as wide as you can and repeat the vowels, A E I O U. See how closed the mouth has been? Practice this and you will soon “hear” yourself when you mumble. Don’t forget to use your new sound on the phone too. Your voice really counts there. I remember many years ago thinking I needed to lower my voice a little . . . and I did! Until next time, Love, Oleda

Oleda Baker, now 75, began her career as a high fashion model with the prestigious Wilhelmina Model Agency, based in New York City and doing print and TV assignments in New York and Europe. She has written ten books on beauty, diet and health.

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16 -March 28 through April 1, 2011

Games

Delray Beach Tribune

Nest Heads

On a Claire Day

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Pet Society

March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 17

Delray Beach Tribune PET OF THE WEEK

Nico is personable and outgoing. Want to adopt him? Nico is a 2-year-old, neutered male, domestic shorthair cat. He is a very personable and outgoing guy who loves to discuss politics and flirt with the ladies. Nico is a playful, wellmannered gentleman who is also declawed. His adoption fee has been waived as part of Animal Care and Control’s adoption promotion, “If I’m Close to Three, I’m Free!” Please reference animal ID#1563226. Palm Beach County Animal Care and Control has many wonderful furry com-

panions waiting to share a lifetime of love with you and your family. Visit the shelter located at 7100 Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach, about five miles west of I-95, and immediately west of the Florida Turnpike overpass. All animals are adopted to qualified applicants on a first-come-first-served basis. Adoption fees are $58 for adult dogs, $67 for puppies, and $54 for cats and kittens. Palm Beach County residents 55 years and older are offered an adoption dis-

count fee. Adopted dogs and cats come with a health care certificate, which must be used within seven days of the adoption release date or is no longer valid. The certificate offers a free exam for your pet from one of the local participating veterinarians in the program and includes health care if the animal becomes sick with a shelter related illness within the first seven days of the adoption. If you have questions, contact the Adoption Office at (561) 233-1272 during

business hours. If you live in the Boca/Delray area, call, 276-1344 ext. 41272. Business hours are: M-F, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sun 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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18 -March 28 through April 1, 2011

Sports

Delray Beach Tribune

Palm Beach County Hosts Tournament for one of the Fastest Growing Sports WEST PALM BEACH The Palm Beach County Sports Commission has worked in partnership with Aloha Tournaments, Inc to secure a major lacrosse tournament for Palm Beach County. Aloha Tournaments has joined forces with Cottle Lacrosse, HoganLax, Premier Players and the Florida Possums Lacrosse Club to present the inaugural Big Kahuna Lacrosse Tournament. The inaugural Big Kahuna Lacrosse Tournament will be taking place at Village Park in Wellington on December 10-11, 2011. According to the National Governing Body, US Lacrosse, Lacrosse is one of the fastest growing team sports in the United States. Youth participation in the sport has grown over 138% since 2001 to nearly 300,000. No sport has grown faster at the high school level over the last 10 years and there are now an estimated 228,000 high

school players. Lacrosse is also the fastest-growing sport over the last six years at the NCAA level with 557 college teams in 2009. The Big Kahuna Lacrosse event is expected to attract

more than 40 traveling teams. Collectively, over 600 athletes are expected, in addition to coaches and spectators. The two-day tournament is anticipated to generate over 700 hotel room nights with an estimated economic impact of over $245,000. This will be a great opportunity for hotels to see a pick-up in hotel room nights in addition to promoting an extended stay for families traveling with players looking for a vacation experience. The event will showcase

boy’s middle school and high school aged teams from across the country. Divisions include U11, U13A, U13B, U15A, U15B, High School A and High School B. Each team will be scheduled for five games, three on Saturday and two on Sunday. There will also be an opportunity to showcase high school players to college coaches in competitive situations. Tournament officials will educate the participating players on the recruiting process by collegiate coaches. The City of Wellington is also a major partner in this endeavor. Village Park will serve as the host venue and provide access to at least eight multipurpose fields. This is an opportunity for the Palm Beach County Sports Commission to highlight one of the area’s premier facilities and for Palm Beach County to build its resume of hosting lacrosse events, strengthening its relationship with the lacrosse community.

Core Golf Workout For A Power Golf Swing By: Mike Pederson

There is a lot of confusion with golfers on what to focus on when trying to improve power in the golf swing. Your power comes from your core. Just like in any other sport, your core is the engine to the swing. Participating in a core golf workout for more power in your golf swing does not take fancy equipment or for that matter a lot of time. Getting creative with what you have laying around your house or even your office will do just fine. A good example is at your office. You’re sitting in your chair in front of your computer and your back gets stiff. Don’t just let it get stiffer, do a rotational stretch right there on the spot in your chair. Reach around the back of your chair with one hand, and leverage the other hand against your thighs to rotate as far as you can. Hold it for 10 seconds and

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go to the other side. How simple was that? Try it right now as you’re reading this article! That would be considered one exercise for your core golf workout that will improve your power golf swing. Do this several times a day, and try to rotate farther each time you do it. You’ll notice you can go much farther the more you do it. How about a strength exercise for your core? Get creative. Grab anything you have in your home or office that you can hold in your hands. While sitting or standing, extend your arms straight out in front of you and while looking straight ahead, rotate with your arms as far as you can to the right holding this object. Now rotate to the left. Do this a total of 20 times. You’ll notice you will be able to rotate farther and farther after each rotation! How hard was that? No

gym. No fancy equipment. Just a can of soup, or even a half gallon of milk. If you’ve got some hand weights gathering dust, that’s even better. Try to increase your weight as time goes on. Hopefully you’re getting the idea of what a core golf workout is that will improve your power golf swing quickly. As a golfer, always pay attention to the physical requirements of the golf swing. What position your body is in. What movement your body goes through. And at what rate of speed. When you approach your golf exercise and golf stretching program with this mindset you’re on your way to a power golf swing that will be the envy of your foursome. You won’t have to wonder what is a core golf workout for a power golf swing. Article Source: http:// www.golfarticles.net

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March 28 through April 1, 2011 - 19

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Tribune of Sports

East /West Boca Raton, Highland Beach , Delray Beach FL - March 28 through April 1, 2011 •Year I •Number 001

Palm Beach County Hosts Tournament for one of the Fastest Growing Sports See page 19

The Delray Beach Tribune Ed1  

The 1st Edition of The Delray Beach Tribune

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