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OCTOBER | 2017

What a celebration! Macedonia AME Church marks 99th anniversary Pearl City house of worship is oldest in Boca Raton By: Dale King Contributing Writer They sang. They prayed. They held hands and called upon the Lord to bless this holy building, the oldest house of worship in Boca Raton.

PHOTO

The congregation of Macedonia African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, one of three religious facilities in historic Pearl City, gathered in late August with friends and guests to celebrate the centennial-minusone-year of the recently reconditioned church. Pearl City is Boca’s oldest platted neighborhood, created in 1915 – 10 years before the municipality became a city. It was settled largely by blacks who worked in the produce fields of pre-industrial Boca Raton.

Connected Warriors offers yoga classes to veterans and their families free of charge. Photo by Robert Sturman.

Connected Warriors - Give peace a chance By: Diane Feen Contributing Writer Judy Weaver is a hero, not the type you see on the battlefield per say, but a hero nonetheless. Her career path began as a Yoga Therapist – one that combines mind, body and spirit. But her life changed in 2007, and so did those around her. “I met Beau MacVane, an Army Ranger, who had returned home after four tours of duty in the Middle East,”

Weaver said. “Beau had just been diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (known as ALS) and came to me for help. I worked with him for two and a half years twice a week teaching him yoga and meditation. I also worked with his family members and saw the huge benefits it was having on everyone.” Weaver may have started out as a teacher, but ended up a student. She learned (by witnessing the miracles that beset young MacVane) that Yoga’s inherent benefits were perfect for all

Poor quality pic

For the festivities, the exterior of Macedonia AME Church was welcomingly spiffy. Earlier this year, the newly installed pastor, the Rev. Troy K. Venning, replaced the rest rooms that flank the altar and also updated the pastor’s study. In the process,

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veterans and their families, not just the one she was working with. That’s why she created an organization called Connected Warriors. This selfless venture allows veterans and their families to attend Yoga Classes free of charge (regardless of when or where they served) through a national network of yoga teachers. Weaver teaches veterans to teach yoga as well. Commander Ken Bingham, a former Naval Officer and celebrated ROTC Teacher at Boca High School, is one of Weaver’s Yoga [CONT. PG 2]

Patricia Thompson speaks from the altar (Photo by Dale King)


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Connected Warriors - Give peace a chance teachers and a student at some of her classes.

[FROM PG 1]

The results have been stunning. “It helped me stay focused, sleep better and I lost 30 pounds,” said Bingham. It also affected his wife Carol. “I saw my husband much less wired after a week of work and I saw an overall change in him after he started taking classes. I said to myself, ‘I want to be like that as well.’” So that’s what they did. Others followed quickly behind. Before she knew it, Weaver had created an international organization that teaches Yoga for free to active duty military bases, Veterans Hospitals and VA Centers. They also send yoga kits to active duty servicemen with yoga mats, guided meditation CD’s, books and other material to help them

live in harmony with their surroundings. According to the organization, Connected Warriors was launched to guide the military toward inner peace in a healthy, purposeful way. It is one of the largest volunteer 501(c)(3) organizations that offers evidence-based Trauma-Conscious yoga therapy. For veterans who teach the class it’s been a rewarding experience unlike anything they’ve seen before. And for those who take the classes it’s also a life changer. “I have Parkinson’s disease and back problems but when I go to Connected Warriors yoga classes it gives me a feeling I’m accomplishing something. It helps my balance and it’s good for my back,” said 71-year-old Bill Johnson. It is Veterans like Johnson who come to yoga

class in Boca Raton, Delray or Deerfield Beach. They’re not your usual yoga students, as a matter of fact, it is surprising to see a room filled with older men (and some women) who don khaki shorts over leotards and tank tops. But it’s the camaraderie and reverie that stands out among the downward dogs and tree poses. It’s also an incredible journey for our servicemen and women across the globe (and in Palm Beach County) to be able to get relief from such maladies as PST, chronic headaches, insomnia, anxiety, elevated blood pressure and suicide. Because Connected Warriors is strictly a volunteer organization they depend on the kindness of strangers (and friends).

That is why everyone is invited to attend their 5th Anniversary Gala on Veterans Day, Saturday, Nov. 11 at the Boca Marriott Hotel. They are also looking for Corporate Sponsors and auction items. The event will include keynote speaker Barb Schmidt, International bestselling author of “The Practice,” a live and silent auction, dinner and dancing. Jenelle Taylor from Gala Gal Inc. will be the auctioneer during the live auction. Connected Warriors mission is “Helping the world feel better - One Breath at a time.” Help them to change the terrain for those who have sacrificed so much to serve our country. Call 954-278-3764 for information or email: info@connectedwarriors.org http://www.connectedwarriors.org

What a celebration! Macedonia AME Church marks 99th anniversary [FROM PG 1]

some papers from 1918 were discovered.

an offshoot of Ebenezer,” say historical records.

is nice to see so many of you here. We welcome you because we love you.”

Tents and hot buffet trays near the doorway hinted that food would follow the anniversary observance. Every participant who left the church afterward took home a Styrofoam tray filled with fried chicken, mac & cheese, collard greens and green beans, among other goodies.

“According to interviewed residents [of Pearl City from that era,] the church was the most significant institution in Pearl City. Church members attended Sunday school, the worship services, and afterwards sang spirituals and visited with one another.”

Documents created by researchers for the Boca Raton Historical Society say that “traditionally and historically, the church has served as the focal point for social as well as religious associations among the black communities of America.”

“Some members went to both churches.” Then-resident Bud Jackson recalled: “The first and third Sunday, we went to Ebenezer; the second and fourth, we went to Macedonia and that’s how we operated for years and years.”

“In Pearl City,” the documents say, “two black churches arose with their own small congregations. The first was Macedonia African Methodist Episcopal Church, handbuilt by the field workers. The structure, now stuccoed, stands on a lot at 128 NE 11th St., donated by George Long” [who became the first mayor of the City of Boca Raton]. With the restoration of the original street names in Pearl City, Macedonia AME Church is again at 128 Pearl St.

“In actual fact,” historic records say, “there was little to do socially except go to church.”

“You have been in existence for 99 years – and God isn’t through with you yet,” he said. “Good things are in store for Macedonia.”

The Aug. 27 anniversary service brought a number of congregants to the fore. Corrine Odom offered the invocation, which ironically sought prayers for the victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, unaware that Florida would be severely hit in barely two weeks.

The theme of his talk was that “God has allowed his glory to be accessible.” Quoting from the Gospel of Matthew, the fiery speaker said: “Matthew wants to help us solidly walk with God.”

“Plans for the erection of the Baptist Ebenezer Church began to crystalize,” the Historical Society documents say. “The Rev. J.H. Dolphus, Will Demery and others were instrumental in starting the Ebenezer Church. Their building was also erected on a lot donated by George Long.” “Later, in 1950, the Friendship Church was organized as

The crowd shared hugs throughout the small house of worship. During the special service, folks prayed together, held hands and greeted one another, even across the aisle. Visiting minister, the Rev. Jon Ingraham, from St. Paul AME Church in Miami, offered a sermon that wavered from soft to bombastic. Toward the end, he held a towel to wipe his brow as he spoke.

Odom reminded the audience that “the Lord taketh, and the Lord also restores. Father, everything is in your hands. Without you, we are nothing.”

Charles Cocklin, a minister of Macedonia Church and founder and CEO of the Breaking the Chains Outreach Ministry, said his church is the oldest in the city, built six months before Ebenezer Baptist. It was cited as the oldest worship center in Boca in a proclamation by former Mayor Susan Whelchel.

Doris Smith said she has been a member of Macedonia AME since 1993. Looking at the audience, she added: “It

Cocklin’s wife, Kellye, and daughter, Rahkell, both serve as directors of the outreach ministry.

She commented, prophetically: “Remember Texas, because it could be us.”

Doris Smith and Pastor Troy Venning prepare to address the crowd. Congregation responds to inspirational words. (Photo by Dale King) (Photo by Dale King)

Macedonia AME Church marks 99th anniversary. (Photo by Dale King)


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Holiday displays still welcome in Boca’s Sanborn Square By: Marisa Herman Associate Editor Christmas trees, Hanukkah menorahs and Satanic pentagrams are still welcome to be put on display at Boca Raton’s Sanborn Square this holiday season. The city council recently voted down a proposal that would ban private installations at Sanborn Square, which is located at 72 N. Federal Highway. Under the proposal, the city would be permitted to install a holiday display that could include a Christmas tree, creche and Menorah as well as other holiday symbols, but churches, synagogues or individuals would be banned from putting up removable displays at the park. The rule was proposed in response to a 10-foot pentagram with the words “In Satan We Trust,” that was placed in Sanborn Square last year. The display caused controversy and concern among city officials and residents.

But residents lined up to speak out against the ban during a public hearing citing concerns over entangling government and religion and eliminating an opportunity for freedom of speech in the location. “Forget changing the ordinance,” resident Charles Fix said. “Stay with what you have got. It’s the best thing you have.” Resident Ron Sheldon said it is not the government’s role to control what is displayed. “They are fantastic traditions,” he said of the displays. He said a little sensationalism shouldn’t change the rule, reminding the audience

that Baby Jesus and the Three Wise Men have disappeared more than once from the display over the years.

After hearing from the community, Councilman Jeremy Rodgers said his opinion had changed to vote the rule change down.

“I don’t care what’s displayed,” he said.

“It was embarrassing to have it in my town,” he said of the pentagram. “I really support freedom of speech even for those people whose message I can’t stand.”

The Rev. Andrew J. Sherman of St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church said while the pentagram was vile and offensive to him, he understands the importance of free speech. “We shouldn’t let that embarrassment keep us from doing what’s right,” he said. “We can celebrate our religious traditions in a public space in a way that we honor and respect each other.” Council members sided with the residents and killed the proposal. “I was elected to represent the people of the city and I have heard you loud and clear,” councilwoman Andrea O’Rourke said. Councilman Scott Singer called the discussion one of the stranger topics the city has debated.

Is Nadal Youth Tennis Program coming to Boca? By: Diane Emeott Korzen Contributing Writer & Park District Board to see if there was some interest in going forward with discussions with the Nadal foundation, without making a commitment. The Friday after Irma, two tennis players don’t let the storm’s aftermath stop them. Photo by Diane Emeott Korzen.

On Sunday, Sept. 10 — the same day Boca Raton residents were being hit with outer bands from the eye-wall of Cat. 4 Hurricane Irma — Spain’s Rafael “Rafa” Nadal beat South African Kevin Anderson in three sets(6-3, 6-3, 6-4) to win the U.S. Open in Queens, NY. The very idea that a tennis player of Nadal’s caliber— he is currently ranked No. 1 in the world in men’s singles tennis — might be considering locating a Youth Tennis Program bearing his name in Boca Raton,  is music to local tennis enthusiasts’ ears. Executive Director and Legal Counsel for the Greater Boca Raton Beach & Park District Arthur Koski informed the Board on Aug. 30 that while up in New York visiting his grandson, he took a Sunday meeting with Nadal’s manager regarding their desire to establish a tennis facility in Boca Raton, and to develop a relationship. Koski said he wished to gauge the Beach

After Beach & Park District Board members had a chance to ring in, a motion passed to allow Koski to proceed with further discussions with

City attorney Diane Frieser said the city began allowing private installations in 1990 after a Jewish group wanted to put up a menorah next to the city’s Christmas tree. A lawsuit filed over the request is what resulted in the current rule on the city’s books. She said the city can’t ban a display because of its content. That means the satanic display and others can return this holiday season. The limitation on displays may not come from the content of the display, but come with how much space is available. City officials said they will have to allow the requests on a first-come, first-serve basis. celled due to Hurricane Irma.) The Greater Boca Raton Beach & Park District and the City of Boca Raton jointly operate and maintain the park. For more information on Patch Reef Park Tennis Center, call 561-367-7090.

Nadal’s people regarding Youth Tennis. “To at least explore the use of Boca Raton as an avenue,” Koski said.

Commissioner Craig Ehrnst asked, “What is their [Nadal’s foundation] mission?” “He [Nadal] has $40 million invested in Spain, his home country, in a facility built for the youth of his community. He has a desire to see kids progress,” Koski explained. Commissioner Susan Vogelsang asked, “Are they suggesting they’ll pay for the facility and we provide the location? It’s no free ride.” The question was also raised if there was any indication of another location for the Nadal tennis facility? Koski said Nadal’s foundation had talked to the county. “It was their suggestion to look at South County Park (just south of Camino Real on A1A),” he said. Koski said he was instead thinking of Patch Reef Park as an ideal location, since the park already has a tennis facility, built in 1986, which is in need of some updates. “For our Patch Reef Park Tennis Facility to carry his name... [would be an honor],” added Koski.

There are 17 Plexicushion courts at current Patch Reef Park Tennis Center. Photo by Diane Emeott Korzen. Patch Reef Park was discussed as a possible location for Nadal tennis program. Photo by Diane Emeott Korzen.

Patch Reef Tennis The existing Patch Reef Park Tennis Center, tucked into the striking 55-acre Patch Reef Park at 2000 W. Yamato Rd., Boca Raton, 33431, features 17 lighted, Plexicushion courts, four practice walls, a pro shop, ball machines, lockers, showers and more. Once inside the park located 1/4 mile west of Military Trail onYamato, follow the winding road straight back to the Tennis Center. The facility offers tennis programs for all ages — Junior, Adult, Men’s & Women’s, Senior, as well as hosting USTA and Wheelchair tournaments. (A USTA Tournament slated for Sept. 16 to 18 was can-

Tennis academy in Spain Nadal opened his tennis academy in Manacor, Spain (where he resides) in 2016. The tennis academy features 18 multisport courts, a sports museum, classrooms, apartments and a special clinic. “It’s a very special day for me; our goal is to teach and explain the history of tennis and other Spanish sports at an international level,” Nadal said at the opening of his academy. The goal of the Rafael Nadal Sports Center is to guide and teach 140 students, ages 10 to 18, from 40 countries around the world. In 2015, Nadal’s foundation also developed a program to assist Spanish athletes in receiving scholarships and financial assistance at United States colleges.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Boca’s Ballroom Battle raises big bucks for scholarships By: Dale King Contributing Writer Boca’s Ballroom Battle, the annual “Dancing with the Stars”-style terpsichorean challenge that raises money for the George Snow Scholarship Fund, marked its 10th anniversary this year by setting individual and overall records for donations, according to figures compiled from the Aug. 18 event, held, again, at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. The final total for the evening of dance, raffles, food and fun that’s part of annual Boca Festival Days sponsored by the Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce, is still being tallied, said Debi Feiler, vice president of program services for the fund. But she did note: “This year’s event far exceeded our expectations and broke last year’s record number by substantially more than $100,000.” Dancers last year raised $325,000. Eight community leaders were chosen weeks ago to display their dancing prowess during the main portion of the “Battle.” Top money raisers among the dancers were Terry Fedele, who collected $124,000, and John Tolbert, whose tally of $193,000 set a new individual record for the 10-year-old competition. Terry has been a community volunteer in western Pennsylvania and in South Florida for the past 30 years. She rou-

tinely draws upon her experience as both a nurse and hospital executive in her volunteer activities. Her husband, Jerry Fedele, is president and CEO of Boca Raton Regional Hospital. Tolbert might have had a home field advantage in the Ballroom Battle. He is president and managing director of the Boca Raton Resort & Club, where the evening’s festivities were held. John is a leader in the hospitality industry, with extensive management experience and operational capabilities. He was president of sales and marketing for the Blackstone Group, which bought the Boca Resort a decade or so ago. It was during that time that he launched the LXR brand of luxury hotels. More than 700 people attended the August soiree that’s become one of the Boca Festival’s most popular and beneficial programs. Earlier this year, the George Snow Scholarship Fund awarded just over a million dollars in scholarships and scholar support services to 87 young men and women who needed financial assistance to further their educations. During the Ballroom Battle, community participants were paired with professionals from the Fred Astaire Dance Studio of Boca Raton. The contest hopefuls received a series of lessons to perfect their routines before they competed for the

Terry Fedele, Boca Ballroom Battle contestant who raised $124,000 during the 10th annual event held in August, receives flowers and the mirror ball trophy from presenter Jay DiPietro. (Photo by Dale King)

winning mirror ball trophies at the cocktail reception and dance showcase that included cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and raffles. Crowds of fans, friends and backers for each dancer crowded around tables in the Resort’s ballroom to cheer on their favorites. The theme for the night was “Dreams Do Come True.” Terry Fedele danced with James Brann to “Feeling Good” by Michael Buble. Derek Morrel tripped the light fantastic with Loreta Kriksciukaityte to the song, “Running on a Dream” by Tom Petty. Elizabeth Murdoch Titcomb displayed her dance ability by performing with Aleksandr Skarlato to Smashmouth’s cov-

John Tolbert, Boca Ballroom Battle contestant who raised $193,000 during the 10th annual event to set a new individual fundraising record, receives flowers and the mirror ball trophy from presenter Jay DiPietro. (Photo by Dale King)

er of the Monkees’ hit, “I’m a Believer.” Tolbert hit the floor with Sayra Vazquez Brann, and the pair danced up a storm to the song, “King of Wishful Thinking” by Go West. Heather Shaw partnered with James Brann and danced to Madonna’s “Like a Prayer.” Jim Dunn slipped on his dancin’ shoes and, joined by Kriksciukaityte, took a whirl to Stevie Wonder’s “I Wish.” Lisa Kornstein Kaufman showed the crowd her dance acumen, performing with Skarlato to Rachel Platten’s “Stand by you.” Logan Skees, the youngest of the community dancers at age 25, let the audience see that he knew his stuff. He joined Sayra Vazquez Brann for a zip around the floor to “Dream On” by screamin’ Steven Tyler and Aerosmith. Once the dancing was over, Rochard Moricette, a Snow scholar and now a second-year agribusiness student at Florida A&M University, told how receiving a scholarship changed his life.

Terry Fedele dances with James Brann to “Feeling Good” by Michael Buble during the Boca Ballroom Battle held Aug. 18 at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. (Photo by Vivianna Puga)

John Tolbert dances with Sayra Vazquez Brann to the song, “King of Wishful Thinking” by Go West during the Boca Ballroom Battle held Aug. 18 at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. (Photo by Vivianna Puga)

Rochard Moricette, a George Snow scholar, addresses the audience at the Boca Ballroom Battle held Aug. 18 at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. (Photo by Dale King)

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OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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things you need to know this October in Boca Raton 1 Prosperity Brew Co. has plans to open a tasting room at 4160 NW 1st Ave. The brewery will have a manufacturing area and a sampling counter to try the brews. It will be open at 5:30 p.m. on weekdays and 11 a.m. on weekends. It will close at 11 p.m. You will be able to order food in and on special occasions there may be food trucks on site. 2 Gumbo Limbo is now offering free

Sea Turtle Talks daily at 2 p.m. Get the inside scoop on the Sea Turtle Rehabilitation Facility. Last year, over 100 sea turtle patients were treated at Gumbo Limbo. Meet some of the current patients and hear their stories. All children under 18 must participate with an adult.

hosting a weekend music fest from Oct. 13-15 with Nefesh Mountain bluegrass band and popular children’s singer, Mama Doni. Nefesh Mountain will perform on Oct.13 and 14tin the Cohen/Friedkin Sanctuary at Congregation B’nai Israel, 2200 Yamato Road. Mama Doni, will perform on Oct 15. Nefesh Mountain pioneered a new sound that merges Jewish Soul with Bluegrass and Old-Time musical traditions.  Founded by husband and wife team, Eric Lindberg and Doni Zasloff, the group’s recent debut album also features a number of bluegrass greats. To purchase tickets, visit CBIBoca.org.

ancient and contemporary technology – ceramics, poetry, ambient sound, and video – in a holistic sensory experience.

6 The three finalists when it comes to

the sale of the Municipal Golf Course, GL Homes, Lennar Homes and Compson Boca Argent LLC, must complete a form contract this month. No amendments will be allowed except for price increases at the time of the hearing, which has not been scheduled. All three developers have different plans for building homes on the 27-hole course, 8111 Golf Course Road.

the Boca Raton Museum Art School at 801 W. Palmetto Park Road.

8 Faulk Center for Counseling offers a free “First Wednesdays” seminar on Oct. 4. From 11 a.m. to noon learn ways to handle yourself if an active shooter comes into your facility. The Active Shooter presentation will be led by Deputy John Ledford. 9 Shriek Week, a family friendly Halloween event, returns to Sugar Sand Park on Oct. 20, 21, 26, 27 and 28.

3 Head to Hook, Wine & Sinker on

Oct. 7 at 6 p.m. at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center. The “Nautical Art & Wine Extravaganza” benefits Boca’s Twin Palms Center for the Disabled. Entry costs $60 if you pre-register or $75 at the door. Enjoy live music, art and auctions.

5 Boca Raton artist Raheleh Filsoofi

4 Boca’s Congregation B’nai Israel is

received a $7,5000 grant from the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship Program, which is the largest regional, government-sponsored artists’ grants program in the United States. Filsoofi received a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts in Studio and Craft from Al-Zahra University, Tehran, Iran and a Masters of Fine Arts in Ceramics from Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida. Her work utilizes

7 Want your Instagram photos to be the best of your friends? Head to the Boca Raton Museum Art School for the fourth annual Boca Photo Workshops on Oct. 8 to learn how to take best photos. The event runs from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and is free and open to the public. Reservations are required via www.bocamuseum.org/artschool. Boca Photo Workshops is organized into three discussions and hands-on workshops led by professional photographers and instructors at

10 Saint Mark Greek Orthodox Church together with AHEPA Chapter 487, is planning an Inaugural “Smokin’ Greek Cigar Night” on Oct. 18 at Prime Cigar & Wine Bar at 7:00 pm. Proceeds from the event will go toward five nonprofits including Boca Raton Police Foundation, Family Promise, Florence Fuller Child Development Center, Golden Bell Education Foundation and Place of Hope. Tickets cost $40 in advance and $50 at the door. Admission includes two drinks, a cigar, food and a silent auction.

Boca Raton asked to take on title sponsorship of former Allianz Tournament By: Marisa Herman Associate Editor When Allianz pulled out from its more than decade-long commitment to sponsoring Boca’s PGA Champions Tour event, the news left executive director of the tournament Hollis Cavner shocked. Now, event organizers say they are struggling to find a new title sponsor that fits with Boca’s image to help pay for the event that brings senior tour players to Broken Sound Club for a weekend of golf in February benefiting the Boca Raton Regional Hospital.

nity for the city. The package includes allocating all the television commercial slots afforded to the title sponsor to showing off the city of Boca. From the beaches to golf courses to businesses to residences, the coverage would show off all of what Boca has to offer. “We are looking at this as a branding opportunity for the world to see you,” Cavner said. “This is all about Boca Raton and its assets.”

“Allianz pulling out was a shock quite honestly,” Cavner said. “We haven’t had a lot of time to get another title sponsor.”

The city already allocates nearly $500,00 to the tournament annually, which benefits the city’s hospital. If the council approved the new increased amount of an additional $1 million, City Manager Leif Ahnell said there is enough money in the city’s economic development budget to cover the increase.

So, he and chairman of the event and long time Boca resident Dick Schmidt approached the city council with an idea: the city become the title sponsor for the 2018 tournament. The event, renamed the Boca Raton Regional Hospital Championship, is scheduled for Feb. 5-11.

Council members said they support keeping the tournament in Boca, but needed more time to officially discuss committing any additional money. Council members agreed they would like to see the local business community step up to the plate to help cover the costs as well.

The price tag for the prestigious title: $1.5 million.

“This is one of the biggest events that we provide support for,” Councilman Scott Singer said. “It’s a lot to ask. I have some reservations. That number is a big number for me to get comfortable with.”

Cavner and Schmidt told council members during a recent council meeting that the ask is a one time opportu-

After 11 years, Allianz has pulled out from sponsoring the city’s PGA tournament. Now, event organizers are asking the city to become the title sponsor for the renamed Boca Raton Regional Hospital Championship. Submitted photo.

Council members said they would like to help explore ways for the city and other businesses to help. “This is something we would love to have and keep in our community,” councilwoman Andrea O’Rourke said.“Let’s put this out to the community and let’s see if we can get some other people on board.” Event officials said they will need a response from the city no later than December.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

The Learning Experience CEO Richard Weissman 1 Tell us a little bit about yourself and The Learning Experience.

to expand our footprint throughout the United States and had the wherewithal to do so in all economic conditions.

4 You are based in Boca Raton. How/ why did you decide to call Boca Raton home?

After working in Investment Banking for several years, I decided to join my parents in 1980 and work in the Early Childcare Industry. We then began expanding what is now the nation’s fastest growing Academy of Early Education for children ages six weeks to six years old, with over 300 locations open or under development nationally. The Learning Experience®  prepares children academically and socially via innovative scholastic and enrichment programs such as the L.E.A.P.® curriculum, a cutting-edge proprietary approach to learning which has 9 out of 10 of its children entering Kindergarten already reading. To complement the academic curriculum, The Learning Experience utilizes various enrichment programs crucial to advancing learning and overall balance, such as philanthropy, Yippee 4

We have seen a growing trend line of franchisees buying second and then multiple locations, and we are confident this will increase further across the country. As our brand continues to expand and permeate our target sectors, franchisees have realized significant gains and their desire to grow their businesses is in accordance. For 2016 in particular, the culmination of our increased size and new hires/processes were primary reasons 2016 had historical numbers.

Boca Raton has been my home my entire life; albeit a brief period living in New Jersey. I love the area and think with its growth structure and Geographic location makes it the ideal place for business.

Yoga™, Music 4 Me®, Movin’ N Groovin’®, manners and etiquette, and foreign language.

2 You were just named one of the

fastest-growing private companies by Inc. Magazine for the fifth year. Tell us about this honor and your growth over the past several years.

It is indeed an honor to continue to be recognized on the Inc 5000 list. As one of a mere 7% of companies who have been on the list for 5 consecutive years, we have been fortunate to experience 10-year CAGR of 25.6 percent annually. We have never slowed in our efforts

3 What plans do you have for future growth? We open a new center across the country at least twice a month and have a very robust pipeline. We are pleased to see our franchisees now purchasing multiple locations and we anticipate to continue.

5 Why is early education so impor-

tant?

While the childcare industry has been around for decades, parents in the last decade are more informed about the benefits of early education and that a truly educational format of preschool is now highly recognized as the requirement for their child. We believe that the emotional, physical, and social development of children at an early age sets the tone for their growth and ultimate success in the future.

Spanish River Community High School teacher wins room revamp Staff report A teacher at Boca Raton’s Spanish River Community High School received a

$1,000 classroom makeover thanks to the Professional Educators Network of Florida.

The professional group, known as PEN, provides development opportunities and legal support to teachers throughout the state of Florida.

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This past summer the group asked members to explain in a few sentences why they deserved a makeover of their classroom at the end of June. In July, PEN board members selected a winner based on the teacher’s needs, experience and commitment to education.

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The renovations were completed before students arrived for the first day of school.

The winner: Spanish River’s Kelly KayleGallon.

“Many people don’t realize it, but the average teacher spends $500 per year of his or her own money on classroom supplies,” said Cathy DeMoisey, executive director of PEN. “In addition to online classes, legal support and networking opportunities, PEN has given away thousands of dollars in makeovers and gift cards to our members. Our goal is to make Florida a better place for teachers to teach and students to learn.”

“I was delighted when PEN told me I had won the classroom makeover. I teach students who struggle with reading comprehension, so I want to offer them the most engaging and fun learning environment possible,” said Kayle-Gallon. “I moved into a classroom that had undergone some construction this summer, and there was drywall and dust everywhere. PEN helped me clean up the room, creating a new look and comfortable reading areas. PEN has energized me, and the classroom makeover will inspire my students to learn.”

The makeover of Kayle-Gallon’s classroom gave her students flexible seating options, the 2017 Florida Teen Reads set, new library shelving, lighting, rugs and organization systems throughout the classroom. PEN sponsored the classroom makeover, with Home Depot donating paint and wood for storage and seating. Home Depot also cut the wood to project dimensions at no cost. The school’s principal donated a large wall stencil of the school’s mascot, the shark. Volunteers helped paint and assemble items for the classroom.


LIFE

OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Humorous year ahead on FAU stage; ‘La Cage’ takes local actors to Rinker By: Dale King Contributing Writer The Department of Theater and Dance in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters at Florida Atlantic University has set the theme for its 2017-2018 season of plays. All four shows will be comedies. That’s quite a departure from last year’s schedule when master of fine arts students presented four productions of a somber tone – Omnium Gatherum, The Diary of Anne Frank, The Spitfire Grill and The Last Days of Judas Iscariot. Because of Hurricane Irma, “The Government Inspector has been moved to Friday, Nov. 10-Sunday, Nov. 19. This satiric comedy takes aim at greed, stupidity and political corruption – long before it was vogue. Written in 1836, it remains a relevant jab at politicians who use government to line their own pockets. The second show is The Rivals, by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, has been moved to Friday, Feb. 16 through Sunday, Feb. 25. Sheridan’s comic tale is a raucous comedy of manners that involves two couples thwarted on their way to matrimony. Featuring some of theater’s best comic characters – the windbag Sir Anthony Absolute and the foolish Mrs. Malaprop – The Rivals pokes good fun at our superficial, narcissistic and preening times. Finally, the Bard comes to the fore with The Merry Wives of Windsor, running April 13-April 22. It features one of William Shakespeare’s best loved comic characters, Sir John Falstaff, the loud, foolish, blowhard who adores liquor, ladies and money. When he sets his lecherous sights on two merry wives, Mistress Page and Mistress Ford, a battle of wits ensues in which the ladies have the last laugh and many a man gets his comeuppance. For more information about FAU’s Department of Theatre, visit www. fau.edu/theatre. La Cage aux Folles Marcie Gorman-Althof and Michael Lifshitz, producing partners

for MNM Productions, which performs in the 300-seat Rinker Playhouse at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach, have named the cast for its third show of the season, La Cage aux Folles. Some familiar names are on board. Albin and George, the two lead characters, will be played by Michael Ursua and Larry Alexander in the show that runs from Oct. 6-22. Ursua has appeared in numerous national tours and performed in both Mame and They’re Playing Our Song in Boca. Alexander is a veteran

Boys at Broward Stage Door Theatre. Also featured are Aaron Bower, Clay Cartland, AJ Cola, JR Coley, Jinon Deeb, Rebecca Diaz, Patti Gardner, Kimmi Johnson, Alex Jorth, Rio Peterson, Christie Rohr, Ashley Rubin, Keagan Tanner, Pierre Tannous and Frank Vomero.   Kimberly Dawn Smith, who directed and choreographed  A Chorus Line, Hair  and  Monty Python’s Spamalot, will helm the production, with award-winning Paul Reekie returning as music director. Tickets are $45 each and are now available for purchase online through the Kravis Center’s official website at  kravis.org and  by phone at 561-832-7469. Delray Beach Playhouse

Elijah Word is part of the cast of La Cage aux Folles.

of Broadway and TV. Also in the cast is Elijah Word, a North Broward resident first seen several years ago in Sounds of Simon at the Cultural Arts Center in Boca Raton. Word has also been in shows at the Wick and at Broward

The performance venue on the shore of Lake Ida in Delray Beach – the Delray Beach Playhouse – is ready to roll out its 2017-2018 shows. The theater opens with The Amorous Ambassador, by Michael Parker, Oct. 6-22. Then, Annie, Get Your Gun, by Dorothy Fields and Herb Fields, with music and lyrics by Irving Berlin, Dec. 1-17; And the World Goes Round - the Music of Kander & Ebb, a musical by David Thompson, Scott Ellis and Susan

INSIDE

Palm Beach County

Halloween at the Addison [8]

Troy Stanley, who performed recently in Beauty in the Beast, is part of the cast of La Cage aux Folles.

Stage, and was part of the hippie cast in MNM’s production of Hair. The roster of performers includes Troy Stanley, who was Belle’s pop in Beauty and the Beast in Boca and Peter Librach, who just completed a month-long run in The Sunshine

Peter Librach, who just completed a monthlong run in The Sunshine Boys at Broward Stage Door Theatre, is part of the cast of La Cage aux Folles.

Stomen, Feb. 2-18; Blackout, a mystery thriller by Rick Harlowe, March 23-April 8 and Edward Albee’s classic, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, May 18-June 3. The playhouse is located at 950 NW 9th St., Delray Beach. For tickets, call 561-272-1281.

Celebrate fall in South Florida [14]

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Don’t miss events returns on Oct. 14 at the Delray Beach Golf Club. The event will include a 4-person “Guaranteed Par” scramble, buffet lunch, goody bag, range balls and awards receptions. For more information, visit https://www.planmygolfevent.com/31048-DelrayKiwanis

1 The Junior League of Boca Raton’s (JLBR) 30th Woman Volunteer of the Year Luncheon will be held on Thursday, Oct. 5, at Boca Raton Resort & Club. Barb Schmidt has been named honorary chair and past-president Kirsten Stanley will serve as the event chair. The JLBR has partnered with the Christine E. Lynn Women’s Health & Wellness Institute as the Award Sponsor and Saks Fifth Avenue Boca Raton as the Fashion Show Sponsor.

p.m. and ends at midnight.

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Spa & Wellness Month in the Palm Beaches returns this month and will benefit the Palm Beach County chapter of the American Cancer Society. More than 30 offers including massages and facials from local hotels and spas are available during the second year of spa month in the county. In support of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, all participating businesses will donate a portion of their proceeds to the Palm Beach County chapter of the American Cancer Society. In Delray, the Delray Beach Marriott’s nSpa is participating.

5 The Boca Raton Mayors Ball will take place on Oct. 14 at the Boca Raton Resort and Club. Presented by the Rotary Club Downtown Boca, the third annual event will benefit local nonprofits with health and wellness initiatives through its “Service Above Self ” grant program. 2017 George Long Awards will be presented to Florida Atlantic University, Bobby Campbell and Kaufman Lynn Construction. Tickets cost $300 per person. VIP reserved tables for 10 guests cost $5,000. The night includes dinner, dancing and awards reception. 9 The 5th Annual Hope of Boca Bash will take place on Oct. 28 at 6:30 p.m. at Boca West Country Club. The theme is “A Night in Old Havana.” Guests will enjoy dinner, dancing, live music, entertainment, Hero of Hope award presentation and various fundraising opportunities, in support of the foster children and youth served by Place of Hope. This year, Gary Peters will be recognized with the Hero of Hope award for his support of area foster children through his foundation. Tickets are 275 until Oct. 25, and can be purchased at www.placeofhoperinker.org under “Events.”

2 The Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual chamber celebration “Luminary” on Friday, Oct. 27 from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Delray Beach Marriott. Tickets can be purchased at delraybeach.com/ luminary

6 The Research Park at Florida Atlantic University will hold its third annual Research Park Annual Awards on Wednesday, Oct. 4 from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at The Addison, 2 East Camino Real. The Research Park awards recognize distinguished contributions to the Research Park’s mission to create and sustain the ideal environment for innovation and invention, maximizing the academic and entrepreneurial talent and regional resources in South Florida to accelerate economic development and prosperity. Tickets cost $100 per person.

3 The University Galleries at Florida Atlantic University present the “2017 Biennial Faculty Art Exhibition” through Saturday, Oct. 14 in the Schmidt Center Gallery, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton campus. The exhibition will remain on view in the Ritter Art Gallery through Saturday, Nov. 4. It features the work of more than 30 FAU faculty members who simultaneously continue their practice as professional artists. 4 The 35th Annual Delray Kiwanis Charity Golf Classic

7 Celebrate Halloween at The Addison. The second annual Halloween event, which benefits Slow Burn Theatre Co. at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts is back on Oct. 31. Early bird tickets are $100 until Oct. 14. Then general admission costs $125 per person. A table for 10 costs $2,400. The theme is “A Horror Story” and will feature: a haunted walk-through and themed rooms, live music, food and cocktails. The event begins at 7:30

10 After a three year hiatus, laser shows return to the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium at 7 p.m. on Oct. 13 with a Halloween theme and costume contest. The laser shows are offered thanks to a grant from the Elsie and Marvin Dekelboum Family Foundation. On the second Friday of each month, the Science Center will host a show in their full-dome planetarium at 7 p.m., 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. starting with family-friendly performances and getting progressively more edgy as the night progresses. The donation covers upgrades to both the Elsie Dekelboum Theater and the Marvin Dekelboum Planetarium, including 20 new laser shows featuring the Zac Brown Band, Journey, The Beatles, Queen, Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon,” Metallica and Led Zeppelin. A haze machine and integrated cove lighting will make the shows appear 3D without the need for glasses. Food and drinks will be available for sale, and a portion of the exhibits will be open for visitors.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Junior League of Boca Raton announces nominees, fashion designer for 30th Annual Woman Volunteer of the Year Luncheon 42 Women Will Be Honored as Nominees for Woman Volunteer of the Year Staff report The Junior League of Boca Raton announced the fashion designer for its Woman Volunteer of the Year Luncheon and the 42 nominees for the award at a kickoff event hosted by Saks Fifth Avenue Boca Raton. The JLBR will celebrate the 30th anniversary of its Woman Volunteer of the Year Luncheon on Thursday, Oct. 5 at Boca Raton Resort & Club with a fashion show sponsored by Saks Fifth Avenue. Saks will present a Fall Trends runway show headlined by a curated assortment of looks from the contemporary readyto-wear line, Cinq à Sept, as well as a personal appearance from the brand’s Founder and CEO, Jane Siskin. Cinq à Sept is inspired by the hours between 5 and 7 p.m., a time when streets are washed in the glow of the setting sun and desks are abandoned for cocktails and unknown possibilities. is elated to showcase a line that inspires a more advanced sense of style in the contemporary market. “Saks is all about exposing clients to the coolest emerging brands and designers in the industry while maintaining a fresh assortment that appeals to the fashion-enthused customer,” Heather Shaw, VP and General Manager of Saks Fifth Avenue Boca Raton said. “Designer Jane Siskin hit the nail on the head with Cinq à Sept. It’s the perfect collection for women looking to step into pieces with gusto and sophistication. It’s a brand for it-girls and we’re proud to welcome Jane and her collection to Boca Raton.”

The annual luncheon celebrates local women in the community and recognizes nominees from nonprofit organizations throughout Palm Beach County for their dedication and expertise as volunteers. “We are thrilled to honor 42 incredible women who are making a difference not only for their nonprofit organization, but the community at large,” said Kirsten Stanley, Woman Volunteer of the Year chair. “It is quite remarkable the caliber of women that are nominated each year and as we enter the 30th year of the award, these women continue to raise the bar for future nominees.” The Junior League of Boca Raton’s mission focuses on training volunteers, developing the potential of women and improving the community through effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Each of the Woman Volunteer of the Year nominees embodies the League’s mission as women building better communities. The 2017 nominees are: Patricia Roseboom (Alzheimer’s Association), Felette Branch (American Cancer Society), Lulis Camerena (Best Foot Forward Founda-

tion), Roni Robert (Boca Ballet Theatre), Pat McCarthy (Boca Helping Hands), Mary Jo Visser (Boca Raton Christian School), Dianne Schellig (Boca Women’s Club), Alex Kennedy (Boca Raton Firefighter Benevolent), Joyce DeVita (Boca Raton Historical Society & Museum), Robin May (Boca Raton Museum of Art), Dr. Evelyn Bohm (Brain Matters Research), Dr. Lisa Martinez (Caridad Center), Morgan Green (Caring Hearts Auxiliary), Mary Kaub (Crockett Foundation), Patti Alexander (CROS Ministries), Debra Tendrich (Eat Better Live Better), Daniela Gordon (Experience Camps), Simone Spiegel (Florence Fuller Child Development Centers), Christine Brownstein (For The Children, Inc.), Stacey Packer (George Snow Scholarship Fund), Marilyn Blanco-Corey (Golden Bell Education Foundation and The Inner Circle Executive Club), Marie Herrera (Guardian ad Litem Program Palm Beach County), Helen Bass (Habitat South Palm Beach), Marla Jaffe (Hoping 4 a Cure for Multiple Sclerosis), Susan Brockway (Impact 100 Palm Beach County), Jackie Reeves (Junior League of Boca Raton), Nicole Roman  (KidSafe Foundation), Dr. Judith Garcia (National Society of Arts & Letters East Coast),

Anne Dufour Zuckerman (Office Depot Foundation), Andrea Reid (Place of Hope at the Leighan and David Rinker Campus), Claudia Vidal Fehribach (Rotary Club Boca Raton West), Dr. Heidi Schaeffer (Soroptimist International), Corinne Rea (Spirit of Giving Network), Dionne Boldin (Student ACES), Mary Sol Gonzalez (The Children’s Museum, Inc.), Colleen Schuhmann (The Delray Beach Public Library), Julia Kadel (The Miracle League of Palm Beach County), Nancy Harvey (The Open Door Mentoring For Teen Mothers), Danielle Rosse (The Women’s Executive Club of South Palm Beach), Melissa Burkhardt  (Unicorn Children’s Foundation), Pamela Polani (Women for Excellence),  Beth Johnston  (YMCA of South Palm Beach County). This year’s honorary chair is Barbara Schmidt. Tickets to the event, defined by seating location, are $95, $150 or $250 per person. Tables are also available for purchase. For more information, or to purchase tickets, visit  www.jlbr.org/woman-volunteer-ofthe-year-2  or contact the Junior League office at wvoy@jlbr.org or 561-620-2553.

Boca’s Faulk Center offers support group for families, friends of LGBTQ community Staff report Sometimes the family members and friends of people in the LGBTQ community have questions and concerns, but find it difficult to find a place to talk. The Faulk Center for Counseling of Boca Raton has created a new support group to make it easier for those family members and friends to have a place to talk or listen. Dr. Holly Katz, the Faulk Center for Counseling Clinical & Training Director, said there is a support group called PFLAG, Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, with chapters in Fort Lauderdale and Lake Worth, but nothing in between.

“There is an absence of those kinds of services in the Boca Raton area,” she said. “We know that those who love and care for the LGBTQ community ne­ ed their own Faulk Center for Counseling support and edClinical & Training Director ucation to assist Dr. Holly Katz. Submitted them in the best photo. way in their relationships with their loved ones.” So, the center created a support group for the friends and family members of the LGBTQ community last month. It

already has a support group for LGBTQ adults that began earlier this year. That effort is joint between the Faulk Center and Jewish Federation Services. Dr. Katz said family support is critical to the emotional well-being of the LGBTQ community. Groups are run by volunteers and clinicians-in-training. Marilyn Rosenbaum is one of those volunteers offering to help run the support group. She has been trained by the center and has helped in various support groups for the last 15 years. “I feel it is my responsibility to give something back,” she said. “I have helped many people in the gay community over the years.”

She has gay family members and said she is at a point in her life where she wants to continue to give back. “If I can help others, then I have given something back,” she said. “What I hope to achieve is to help people to build bridges rather than build fences through education.” The support group runs on Mondays from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Faulk Center for Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Road, Boca Raton. It cost $5 per session and drop-ins are welcome. For more information, call 561-483-5300. The joint support group with JFS for LGBTQ+ individuals meets Fridays at the Faulk Center from noon to 1:15 p.m.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

October calendar Old School Square Oct. 6 – PRESS PLAY! Crest Theatre, Creative Arts School and Fieldhouse Friday, 6-7:30 p.m.; free admission The public is invited to a season launch party with a sneak peek of what’s new for the 2017-18 season! Get a glimpse of the shows and lectures in the Crest Theatre; enjoy refreshments in the Producers Lounge and a showcase of works by Creative Arts School students and instructors; upstairs, the Creative Arts School studios and classrooms will be open and instructors will be on hand to talk about the exciting fall offerings. Visit the Fieldhouse, next door, to see one of Palm Beach County’s most unique wedding and event venues, pick up rental information, enjoy entertainment and refreshments. Outside, check out a special Art Walk print-making demo by FAU students in front of the Cornell Art Museum and find out about the Museum’s (post-renovation) Grand Re-Opening! 

10/13     Vertigo – 80’s Dance/Pop/Rock Covers 10/20       G and the Funky Stuff – Funk/ Soul/Jazz 10/27    On the Roxx – 80’s Covers

Sail off on a swashbuckling musical excursion as young Jeremy Jacobs joins Captain Braid Beard’s band of comical pirates and searches for the perfect spot to bury their treasure. This show is a joyful family musical that is sure to leave young mateys singing and dancing in the aisles! Save the date Nov. 2 8 p.m. for Steller Entertainment presents The Everly Brothers Experience Crest Theatre

Evening Star Productions Oleanna Oct.1 –Oct. 8 Oct. 14 – Queen Machine Old School Square Pavilion Saturday, 8 p.m.; tickets $75 (VIP); $25 (general admission) The best Queen cover band in Denmark and one of Europe’s fastest growing shows, QUEEN MACHINE features the charismatic and extremely talented front-man Bjarke Baisner, who embodies Freddy Mercury with every note. Queen Machine is a spectacular live-performance that will deliver a magical experience for all Queen fans!

Sol Theatre 3333 North Federal Highway A seething investigation of “political correctness” in a time when the nation’s morality has been tested by increased incidents of sexual harassment. “Oleanna is likely to provoke more arguments than any play this year.” —NY Times. “One of the ten best plays of 1992…reason enough to cheer for the future of the theatre.” —Time Magazine. By: David Mamet, Directed by: Rosalie Grant, Featuring: Todd Bruno and Sara Grant Tickets: $30 / $20 for students Macbeth Oct. 26 – 28 Sol Theatre 3333 North Federal Highway

Oct. 6 – Jan. 26, 2018 - Free Friday Concerts Old School Square Pavilion Friday, 7:30 p.m.; free admission; weather permitting; bring lawn chairs, and bring the family, but no pets or outside food and beverage. Food and beverages available for purchase.

Oct. 21 – How I Became a Pirate

10/6         Turnstiles – Billy Joel Tribute and Food Truck Expo

Saturday, 2 & 6:30 p.m.; tickets $25 (adult); $15 (student)

Crest Theatre

15% OFF Time to do fall cleaning

Monday – Friday 8am – 5:30pm Saturday 8am to 1pm Closed Sundays

Shakespeare’s shortest tragedy, thought to have first been performed in 1606, “The Scottish Play” explores the damaging physical and psychological effects of political ambition on those who seek power for its own sake. Of all the plays Shakespeare wrote during the reign of James I, who was patron of Shakespeare’s  acting company,  Macbeth  most clearly reflects the playwright’s relationship with his sovereign. 

comes an even more urgent need for romantic dalliances. http://delraybeachplayhouse.com/ performance/the-amorous-ambassador/2017-10-06/

Patch Reef Community Center Trick’Em Treat ‘Em Costume Party Friday, Oct. 27 10 a.m.-noon Calling Mummies, Daddies, creepers, crawlers and little tricksters to a costume party with munchies, mayhem, games and more at the James A. Rutherford Community Center, located inside Patch Reef Park. Cost: $5 per child (Ages 2-5). For more information, contact Patch Reef Park Community Center 561-367-7035.

Boca Ballet Theatre Boca Ballet Theatre’s 26th Annual “A Princely Affair” Luncheon and Performance Sunday, Oct. 29 at noon Boca Raton Resort & Club, 501 E Camino Real, Boca Raton, FL 33432 (561) 447-3000 $95 per adult and $60 for children 13 and under www.bocaballet.org The A Princely Affair will begin with an incredible silent auction and mimosas. It continues with a delicious luncheon and performance by Boca Ballet Theatre performing excerpts from The  Nutcracker, presented by Marleen Forkas, in loving memory of Harold Forkas.

Arts Garage

By: William Shakespeare, Adapted and directed by: Seth Trucks and Sara Grant Tickets: $20

Delray Beach Playhouse The Amorous Ambassador Oct. 6-22

Sunday, Oct. 1, 7 p.m.

If you enjoyed last season’s popular hit The Sensuous Senator, then rejoice, because “Hormone Harry” Douglas is back! However, he is no longer a Senator! He’s now the US Ambassador to Great Britain! Along with his new responsibilities

Robert Ross Band Award Winning Blues Singer general admission $15 | reserved $20 | premium $25 Robert Ross is a two-time winner of the


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

coveted New York Music Award for Best Blues Artist. Ross won his first New York Music Award for Best Blues Artist in 1989 and has been nominated a total of 7 times over the years alongside such stars as Johnny Copeland, Taj Mahal, John Hammond Jr., Roscoe Gordon, Cyndi Lauper and Mose Allison. Robert also won an East Coast Rocker Award for Best Blues Artist in 1991. Ross is a New York Blues Hall of Fame inductee.

With a career that spans more than a decade and multiple nations, she is a powerful force in Latin music. She’s had the honor and privilege to play for President George W. Bush and has been welcomed to perform on radio and television networks around the world. Morales is making a comeback with her most recent album “Lisett Morales La Mulata del Sabor”

Thursday, Oct. 5, 8 p.m.–11 p.m.

Sunday, Oct. 8, 7 p.m.

Feedback

Lavie

Delray’s New Poetry Open Mic

General Admission $30 | Reserved $40 |Premium $45

$10 In Advance | $12 day of event Calling all poets, writers, and lyricists! Join us for a night of linguistic word play at Delray’s New Poetry Open Mic Hosted by Chunky. 1st Thursday of the every month. Let the power of the spoken word transform your Thursday. Friday, Oct. 6, 8 p.m.

From her vivacious stage performances to her infectiously rapturous personality, LaVie is a shining example of living life to the fullest! With such a becoming name, “LaVie,” which in French means “The Life,” she uses her eclectic contemporary sound as a vehicle to encourage and empower all people to seek out and experience “The Life” they are intended to live. Tuesday, Oct. 10, 8 p.m. Shine South Florida’s Premier Open Mic Showcase

Batuke Samba Funk

$10 In Advance | $12 day of event

General Admission $30| Reserved $40 |Premium $45

Step up on the stage and SHINE at this All Arts Open Mic Monthly Showcase. Bring a song, a poem, a rap, or a riff, and jam with our new emcee Chunky and our live house band while your friends cheer you on. Embrace the opportunity to hear the creative process of Delray’s local talent. SHINE takes place in our Main Stage Theatre every 2nd Tuesday of the month.

The Batuke Samba Funk project was created in 2010 by the Brazilian bassist and composer Diogo Brown, who invited the singer Mari Macedo and the musicians Cezar Santana (guitar) and Adriano De Borba (cavaco). Between January and February 2014, Silas Silva Filho (drummer) joined the band, completing the project.

these musicians utilize to reproduce this great music.

General Admission $20| Reserved $30 |Premium $35

Saturday, Oct. 14, 8 p.m.

The dynamic monster vocalist from Houston Texas along with a host of talented musicians continue to shock and amaze many blues lovers who have the opportunity to hear their music. With a variety of soulful, heartwarming and ground stomping tunes, Miss Chambers is sure to rise above and beyond your expectations.

Carlos Quartet

Puig

General Admission $30| Reserved $40 |Premium $45 Award-winning jazz, pop and latin trumpet player, pianist, arranger and composer Carlos Puig and his quartet will perform live at Arts Garage. Carlos Puig has recorded and collaborated with a number of top jazz and pop artists, including Celia Cruz and Willy Chirino.

Sunday, Oct. 15, 7 p.m. Annika Chambers with The Igor Prado Band

QUEEN MACHINE Pavilion | Oct. 14

music @

TANGO BUENOS AIRES Crest Theatre | Dec. 1

Friday, Oct. 13, 8 p.m.

dance @

Lisett Morales General Admission $30| Reserved $40 |Premium $45 Lisett Morales sings with a fiery Latin fervor in any performance. Her deep and potent voice makes her a distinguishable and authentic artist true to her sound.

General Admission $30| Reserved $40 |Premium $45 A Tribute to the Music of Steely Dan is a comprehensive and exhaustively-researched group project dedicated to the faithful reproduction of Steely Dan’s classic albums, including “Aja”, which the band plays in its entirety. Dirty Work is comprised of South Florida’s finest studio musicians and it is this exact ascetic that

Thursday, Oct. 19, 8 p.m. Anastasia Max $10 In Advance | $12 day of event Anastasia Max is a sibling fronted duo from Boca Raton, Florida. Merging genres of alternative indie, rock & roll garage, and blues. 14-year-old Anastasia has been playing at local venues since the age of 9, with her brother Maximillian, now 18. Their 4 piece live set up sound is strong and full with influences such as: Jack white, Billy Holiday, The Kills, Ray Charles, Royal Blood and Nina Simone. Thursday, Oct. 19, 8 p.m.

HOW I BECAME A PIRATE Crest Theatre | Oct. 21

FLEETWOOD MAX Pavilion | Nov. 11

family @

music @

CAROLS BY CANDLELIGHT WILL & ANTHONY HOLIDAY

Pavilion | Dec. 2 Little River Band, Andy Childs, John Ford Coley

Crest Theatre | Dec. 6

music @

music @

45 SHOWS. 5 LECTURES. UNLIMITED FUN!

Dirty Work Saturday, Oct. 7, 8 p.m.

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PAVILION | OCT. 6-JAN. 26 SEASON LAUNCH PARTY Oct. 6 | 6-7:30 pm followed by the ultimate Billy Joel tribute, TURNSTILES at 7:30 pm

2017-18 SEASON

Tickets @ OldSchoolSquare.org

51 N. Swinton Ave | Delray Beach 33444 | 561.243.7922, x1

music @


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

The Commodore in a funky and creative way all their own. The band is led by Florida native Debbie Pierce on Saxophone, Flute and Vocals. Sunday, Oct. 22, 7 p.m. SHAUN MARTIN & DREW TUCKER ROCKET TO ANYWHERE $10 In Advance | $12 day of event

General Admission $30| Reserved $40 |Premium $45

Onyx Art Stroll

Timbalive was created in Miami in August 2008 by Leo Garcia (Director, Timbales), offering the best of Cuban Music with a mix of different rhythms from around the world. Based in Miami, and integrated by highly trained musicians from music schools in Cuba, they are one of the largest and most successful group of Timba in United States and the world.

FREE to walk | $15 for table

Saturday Oct. 21, 8pm

Arts Garage invites local artists and artisans to showcase and sell their art during a night of amazing music from local emerging musicians. This event is free to the public but artists can purchase a table for only $15.

THE PIERCE BAND

Rocket to Anywhere is a local South Florida band that plays a wide variety of genres and has been described as “raw and very rhythmic, a  stark  contrast  to  cookie  cutter  radio  anthems.” Thursday Oct. 19, 7 p.m.

Friday Oct. 20, 8 p.m. Timbalive

High Energy Brass Band General Admission $25| Reserved $30 |Premium $40 The Pierce Band is a High Energy 9-piece Band performing classic music from super groups such as Earth, Wind and Fire-Chicago- Blood, Sweat and Tears-

General Admission $30| Reserved $40 |Premium $45 Shaun Martin and Drew Tucker will take the stage at Arts Garage for an unforgettable night of cool, Contemporary Jazz. Shaun Martin is a multi-Grammy winner who has collaborated with a long list of top 40 artists. Shaun’s willingness and ability to be a subtle part of each band has allowed him to be part of the very foundation. Drew Tucker is a unique combination of talents that place him at the intersection of the arts and activism. Thursday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m. CIRCUIT $10 In Advance | $12 day of event

Arts Garage invites everyone 18 and older to unite through the power of music at CIRCUIT, an evening specially designed for alcohol and drug free folks. CIRCUIT provides a safe, clean, alcohol-free nightclub experience that responds to the changing and eclectic tastes of Delray Beach. Friday, Oct. 27, 8 p.m. Anibal Berraute Tango Fusion Quartet General Admission $30| Reserved $40 |Premium $45 Anibal Berraute, Argentinean piano player, composer, arranger and producer, fuses Tango with Jazz and other musical forms in a new vibrant harmonic approach to a genre that In little over a century has transcended its humble beginnings to reach the whole world and its concert halls to be finally declared “cultural patrimony of humanity” by the United Nations.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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MORE VARIETY FROM THE 80S TO NOW

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Get into the fall spirit South Florida style By: Heather McMechan Contributing Writer Just because we live in South Florida, it doesn’t mean it’s all about vacations and sandy beaches. We want to celebrate the seasons too, even when it’s 85 degree weather. Fall is such a fun time for my family. They can’t wait to carve pumpkins and enjoy hayrides. If you are looking to get into the fall spirit South Florida style, then check out the scoop on these festive spots.

Highway, Deerfield Beach. Call 954895-7613 for more information.

tle Corn, carnival foods, hot dogs, fresh lemonade. Bender’s Farm is located at 10066 Lee Road, Boynton Beach. Call 561-733-5490 for more information. Ever since my kids were little, we’ve been driving up to the Pumpkin Patch at Cason Methodist Church. It might be located in a parking lot, but they have great photo opportunities for you and your kids.  Dress them up in their favorite costumes and pick out your favorite pumpkin to carve.  You’ll find pumpkins from baseball size to monsters along with colorful gourds of every size and description to make the perfect fall display. Cason Methodist Church is located at 342 North Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. Call 561- 276-5302 for more information.

The Boca Pumpkin Patch Festival is a new event bringing the season of fall to life in Boca Raton. On Oct. 14 & 15 at Mizner Park Amphitheater, you can celebrate the season with 2,500 pumpkins, a cornstalk maze, scarecrow dress-up activity, unlimited carnival rides for all ages, live entertainment, a pumpkin food court, pumpkin beer bars (for adults) & more! Go to www. bocapumpkinpatch.com for more information. St. Ambrose Pumpkin Patch will be open from Oct. 16th thru Oct. 31st. Hours are 9 a.m.- 9 p.m. every day. They have a large assortment of pumpkin, gourds, corn stalks, hay etc. The pumpkins are sent from Klickman farms in Ohio. Payment is cash or check. St. Ambrose Church is located at 380 South Federal

Bedner’s Farm located in Boynton Beach, Florida hosts a traditional Pumpkin Patch. You and your family can take a hayride around the 80 acres of working farm. Don’t forget to check out the corn maze, petting zoo, pony rides and more. They also have tasty treats like WinKet-

This year take the whole family to see one of our South Florida Pumpkin Towne location. It’s not just about picking your own pumpkin, it’s about getting in the fall spirit. You can enjoy bounce houses, hay bales for climbing, head cutout photo ops and other fun fall activities Pumpkin Towne is located

at Wellington Green next to the Mall in the Whole Foods parking lot. 2585 State Road 7, Wellington, Florida. Call 561727-4114 for more information. The second location is at the N.W. Corner of Indiantown Rd. and Old Dixie Highway, 14 N. Old Dixie Hwy. (U.S. 1), Jupiter. Call 561-744-5198 for more information.

13th Fear Year of Shriek Week Staff report Celebrating its 13th fear year, Shriek Week is two weekends of Halloween fun and entertainment for the whole family at Sugar Sand Park Community Center. The event takes place on Fridays and Saturdays, Oct. 20, 21, 27, and 28 from 6:00-11:00 p.m. A Lite Nite with a modified, less scary haunted house will be held on Thursday, Oct. 26 from 5:00-9:00 p.m. This event features an indoor haunted house (paid reservations required), outdoor haunted walkthrough, shows, games, train rides and family entertainment. Timed paid reservations are required for the indoor haunted house, which is appropriate for ages 7-12.  The Lite Nite haunted house is for ages 5-12, with brighter lighting, less intense scares and a modified soundtrack.  Reservations are $6 until Oct. 6 and then increase to $9. Paid reservations can be booked in person, online, or by calling the Box Office at 561-347-3948. Reserve early, time slots do sell out. Redesigned each year with a new theme, the indoor haunted house is crafted with professional effects, lighting, sets and actors. The theme for this 13th year is, appropriately, “Superstitions.”  Guests will test their luck when they visit the 13th floor, cross black cats, step on cracks, whistle past graveyards, and even walk under a ladder. Other family activities include:

• haunted walk-through attraction “Granny Grim: Alien Lab” (closed on LITE NITE, Oct 26)) • LED lighted stilt-walking “robots” & DJ show (1st weekend) • Animal Tales “Creature Feature” show (2nd weekend) • Glow-in-the-dark carnival games • Trackless train rides • Trick or treating Entertainment and attractions require activity tickets, which can be purchased onsite the day of event with cash or credit cards. Two new attractions are scheduled - an inflatable Funhouse Maze;  and the “Creature Feature” show by Animal Tales, a hands-on experience introducing kids to some

mysterious animals, such as a boa constrictor, a hedgehog, a chinchilla, and more. A free indoor Trick or Treat Trail will be featured nightly. Local businesses interested in participating as a vendor in the Trick or Treat Trail may visit the website for details. The Kids’ Spooky Film Festival will also be returning for its 6th year. Films will be shown in the queue area while patrons await their turn for the indoor haunted house, and everyone will get a chance to vote on their favorite film online. Entrants have a chance to win prizes and have their film screened in public.  Shriek Week is supported by dozens of volunteers, including actors in the haunted house. Visit www.SugarSandPark.org for complete information, or call the Community Center at 561-347-3900. Sugar Sand Park is located at 300 S. Military Trail in Boca Raton.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Dash around the world: What’s ahead in the new cruise ships By: Joel Dash Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers

it will serve as a boarding platform, restaurant, bar or observation space. Infinite Veranda staterooms will feature a balcony with a glass wall; the top pane will drop to create an open-air balcony or when closed, the enclosed living space becomes more spacious.

There are two more ships left in the Class of 2017. The first, this month, is the 47,800-gross-ton, 930-passenger Viking Sun, Viking Ocean Cruises’ fourth ship. Guests can expect to fund Viking’s signature brand spaces such as the Living Room, Aquavit Terrace, a snow grotto in the Nordic thermal suite and an infinity pool. In December, MSC Cruises’ new 154,000-ton, 4,140-passenger MSC Seaside will begin year-round Caribbean cruises, home porting at Port Miami. Built for warm-weather cruising, its aft design resembles a hotel/ condominium, plus the ship has spacious promenade and lots of outdoor deck activity space. This coming spring, Seaboard Cruise Line’s 40,350-grosstons, 600-passsenger Seabourn Ovation, a sister to Seabourn Encore will set sail. Designed by Adam Tihany, this all-suit, ultra-luxury ship will have 302 suites with private balconies. In April, Royal Caribbean International’s 230,000-gross tons, 5,535-passenger Symphony of the Seas, an Oasis class ship, will begin operating Mediterranean cruises from Barcelona, spain prior to repositioning to Port Miami in November to begin Caribbean sailings. Overall highlights include the Ultimate Abyss, a 10-deck thrill slide. Also in April, Carnival Cruise Line’s 133,500-gross tons,

Carnival Horizon, the 26th Fun Ship in Carnival fleet begins services. This 3,934 passenger ship is a sister to the Carnival Vista, which launched in 2016. Loyal Carnival fans will find the popular Guy’s Burger joint and BlueIguana Canta, plus a Dr. Seuss-themed water park. Built for Alaska cruising, Norwegian Cruise Line’s new 167,800-gross-tons, 4,000-passenger Norwegian Bliss, the third in the line’s Breakaway Plus Class, is slated to be christened in Seattle on May 30. Indoor spaces will allow guests to soak in scenic views of the “The Great Land” from the line’s first Observation Lounge in the Haven, and from a 20,000 square-foot public observation lounge. Celebrity Cruises’ 117,000-gross-tons, 2,900 passenger Celebrity Edge, with some “out of this world” cruise features such as the movable Magic Carpet, which is cantilevered off the ship. Depending on the deck positioning,

Get away… without going away. Crane’s Beach House, a distinctive boutique hotel featuring 28 tropically appointed guest suites and luxurious villas, is nestled within a lush, verdant tropical setting. Please call for special rates & packages.

CRANE’S BEACH HOUSE

BOUTIQUE HOTEL & LUXURY VILLAS 82 Gleason Street, Delray Beach, FL 33483 TF 866-372-7263 W cranesbeachhouse.com

The new 154,000-gross tons, 4,140 passenger MSC Seaside will launch next June and operate western Mediterranean cruises from Genoa, Marseille and Barcelona. In addition, Viking Spirit will launch in summer 2018 and Holland America Line’s 2,666-passenger Nieuw Statendam, a sister to Koningsdam will launch in Dec. 2018. The 228-passenger Scenic Eclipse, the first ocean luxury yacht will be delivered in August. Luxury small ship Ponant will launch Le Laprouse and Le Champlain in 2018. They are the first two of four new 184 passenger expedition vessels. Hurtigruten will launch its new 20,889-gross-tons, Roald Amundsen, with new environmentally sustainable hybrid technology. Star Clipper’s new flagship, the five-masted, fully rigged, 300 passenger Flying Clupper. Capable of global voyages, the five deck sailing ship will have 150 deluxe guest staterooms of 74 crew cabins, a steel hull, teak decks, ice-class rating and more than 68,300-square-feet of canvas sails. In addition to the new builds, many of the older ships have gone in for complete refurbishment. Dash Travel is located at 280 NE 2nd Ave. Cottage B. For more information call, 561 498-8439 or visit dashtravelandcruises.com


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Help stop domestic abuse during AVDA’S 18th annual Race For Hope Staff report Get out your running shoes for Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse’s 18th annual Race for Hope. The race will take place from 7:30 to 9 a.m. on Oct. 15 at Florida Atlantic University. The race, which includes a USATF certified 5K and 10K, is expected to draw over 1,000 runners, walkers, spectators and volunteers. “AVDA provides people in domestic violence situations a safe place to go,” said Scott Miller, Race for Hope Sponsor. Proceeds from the Race for Hope benefit AVDA’s 24-hour hotline, emergency shelter, and Casa Vegso Transitional Housing facility, as well as the outreach, educational and prevention programs offered by AVDA throughout Palm Beach County. AVDA’s Race for Hope is challenging local businesses, schools, and organizations

to form teams. Race participants can set up fundraising pages for themselves or for a team, and those who raise the most money are presented with awards. AVDA is also accepting “No Sweat” donations from individuals who wish to donate or fundraise from the comfort of their homes. Festivities will include music and prizes. Harvest Seasonal Wine and Grill, will be providing attendees with a healthy, delicious breakfast to enjoy before, during and after the race. Alex Price, Director, Government Affairs & Community Investment - Florida Region of Comcast will serve as the official Master of Ceremonies for the event. “Hometown Hero” awards—will once again be given to the fastest male and female police officer and fastest male and female firefighter in the 5k run. All police officers and firefighters on active duty in Palm Beach County are eligible  to compete  to be a “Hometown

Hero.” Registration fees are waived for police officers and firefighters on active duty in Palm Beach County registered as a Hometown Hero.

AVDA’s Race for Hope to register. Race Day registration begins at 6:30 a.m., immediately followed by the 5K and 10K at 7:30 a.m. and Kid’s Dash at 8:30 a.m.

AVDA will also be giving out “Purple Party Awards” to attendees who bring their spirit by wearing purple shoes, socks, tutus, shorts, t-shirts, etc.

Registration prices range from $10-$30 per person and increase to $10-$35 on Race Day. Race for Hope T-Shirts will be given to the first 500 registrants only. For more information visit www.avdaonline. org or call 561-265-3797.

Online registration is underway. To sign up, visit www.runsignup.com  and enter

Surgical Weight Loss: Transform your life • Diabetes

By: Delray Medical Center Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Restore your health and regain confidence with a proven long-term weight-loss solution. The weight loss surgery team at Delray Medical Center is ready to guide you on your journey to a healthier and more active life. If you’re 100 pounds or more overweight, you may be a candidate for medical weight-loss surgery at Delray Medical Center. The reasons are more than cosmetic. People who are more than 30 percent over their ideal weight often experience serious medical problems, such as heart disease and diabetes, and may be at increased risk for certain cancers. Weight-loss surgery can help you successfully reach a healthier weight and give you the opportunity to live a longer, healthier and more active life.

Located on the campus of Delray Medical Center, the Surgical Weight-Loss Program specializes in multi-disciplinary care, and our experienced team offers some of the most effective procedures available for surgical weight loss in South Florida including: adjustable gastric banding, roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. We also offer management of existing bariatric patients to include lap band adjustments and revisional surgery. Criteria for Bariatric Surgery: ■■ BMI of 40 or greater consistent for the past five years  ■■ BMI of 35 or greater with any of the medically treated co-morbidities listed (insurance requirements may vary):

• Hypertension • Sleep apnea ■■ Failure of other measures to lose weight, such as: • Medications • Weight loss programs • Dietary changes ■■ Acceptable surgical risk ■■ Ability to understand lifestyle changes and motivation to comply with program guidelines ■■ Absence of medical/psychological contraindications

resents P t n e m in a rt Stellar Ente

e c n e i r e p x E s er | 8pm h t o r B y l r e v The E Thursday, Nov. 2, 2017 GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY AT OLDSCHOOLSQUARE.ORG Tickets also available for Nightfever, Tribute to The Bee Gees on 1/28/18

Crest Theater at Old School Square 51 N. Swinton Ave. | Delray Beach


HEALTH

OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Be smart, wear sunscreen By: Francesca Lewis, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist Yes, I know many of you may be thinking “I never go to the beach,” or “I always tan and never burn, so what’s the big deal.” Well, I am here to tell you why sunscreen should be your best friend and what to look for in the right sunscreen. We know that the sun causes cumulative damage to our skin, resulting in the weakening and breakdown of our normal collagen and elastin fibers. This leads to laxity of the skin and the dreaded wrinkles that we get with time. In addition, the sun’s UV rays (mostly UVA) cause “sun spots” (called lentigines), “broken blood vessels” (telangiectasias), and general unevenness of the skin tone. All of these problems are just a symptom of a (usually) life-long sunscreen deficiency.

In addition to the cosmetically unappealing consequences of longterm sun exposure, we know that the sun’s UV rays (this time UVB more so than UVA) contribute to free radical formation in the skin and ultimately progression to skin cancer. One in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime, and one person dies from Melanoma every hour. Although more common in fair skinned patients, skin cancer can commonly affect Caucasians that “only tan and don’t burn” and even darker skin types. So how much sun is too much? Unfortunately, there is no such thing as a healthy tan since it is an indicator of UV damage. Experiencing five or more blistering sunburns in adolescence can increase your risk of Melanoma by 80 percent. The use of indoor tanning beds increases your risk of Melanoma by close to 60 percent. Using a broad-spectrum sunscreen daily to all exposed areas cuts the risk of Melanoma in half!

Sunscreen should be the mainstay of our skin care regimen, especially as Floridians. It should be applied every morning before leaving the house and reapplied every two to three hours when outdoors. Even if you are not a beach-goer, it is an important habit to adopt because both chronic tanning and intermittent sun exposure can lead us down the skin cancer pathway. So you may be wondering how to navigate the sunscreen aisle. I always say, “The best sunscreen is the one that you are going to use.” That being said, there are some important criteria to look for when choosing a sunscreen. One thing to keep in mind, is that research has found that we use half as much sunscreen as we should, and thus, we are like-

ly getting about half the SPF listed. For that reason and because higher SPF sunscreens have better UVA protection (remember, the rays that cause photoaging), we recommend choosing an SPF of at least 30. The term “broad-spectrum” indicates both UVA and UVB coverage, and “water-resistant” means reapplica-

tion is needed after 40 minutes of water activities or excessive sweating. One ounce of sunscreen is the amount recommended to cover the entire body of an average sized person for one application. So that means for a five hour trip to the beach you should have used your entire bottle of sunscreen, based on an average 3 oz Neutrogena cream sunscreen. In terms of ingredients, the most “natural” and most broad-spectrum ingredients are zinc and titanium “sunblocks” that physically block the sun. Many other sunscreens on the market contain chemical sunscreens. These absorb UV rays and become inactivated with repeated exposure to UV, which is why reapplication is important. Although some concerns have been raised over various chemical sunscreen ingredients, there have been no concrete demonstrated risks in humans to any of our ingredients on the market. However, be sure to check consumer reports to make sure the sunscreen you choose has an accurate SPF. This being said, do not rely on sunscreen alone to protect you while having fun outdoors. It is still best to “seek shade” during the peak hours of the sun between 10 a.m- 3 p.m. and wear UPF sun protective clothing, hats and sunglasses.

• UVA causes most of our skin aging including brown spots, telangiectasias, and wrinkles • UVB and in part UVA causes skin cancer development • 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer • Sun damage leading to skin cancer can occur from both chronic tanning, intermittent sunburns and chronic low-grade sun exposure • More than 5 blistering sunburns in adolescence increases Melanoma risk by 80% • Indoor tanning increases Melanoma risk by 60% • Choose a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30 • Use 1 oz of sunscreen per application to the whole body and reapply every 2 hours • Daily use of a broad-spectrum sunscreen will decrease the risk of melanoma by 50% Delray Dermatology + Cosmetic Center is holding an open house from 1 to 4 p.m. on Nov. 4. Visit delrayskin.com for more information.

INSIDE

Palm Beach County

R&R after working out [18]

Help for PTSD [21]

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Take time to recover after working out By: Giovanni Roselli Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Many of us plan our summer vacations for months in hopes of a little relaxation. Yet, everyday rest and recovery are the least planned and underutilized ways to enhance performance and quality of life. Let’s understand how sleep and recovery are important to our overall health. Rest and recovery Rest is simply a combination of sleep and time spent not active. How you sleep and spend this time is very critical. Recovery, however, refers to techniques and actions taken to maximize your body’s repair. These include hydration, nutrition, posture, heat, ice, stretching, and foam rolling.

Muscles recover the quickest because they receive direct blood flow. Tendons, ligaments, and bones receive indirect blood flow and therefore can take longer to recover and are more susceptible to injury. Think about how many people we know, or maybe even ourselves, who have torn tendons and ligaments, i.e., rotator cuff in the shoulder and meniscus in the knee.

Relaxing and energizing activities are parasympathetic in nature. Aromatherapy, meditation, Pilates, yoga, and tai chi help to lower stress, improve oxygenation, and stimulate recovery. They’ve been around for thousands of years because they work. Spa treatments, baths, and sauna time can facilitate lymph circulation and recovery. Work it out, then rest

Sympathetic vs. parasympathetic Sympathetic activities— often referred to as “fight or flight”—and parasympathetic activities— often referred to as “rest and digest”—are the two divisions of the autonomic nervous system.

ities dominate our lives.

Depression, craving carbohydrates, a reduced metabolism, poor blood sugar management, and difficulty sleeping are just a few consequences when sympathetic activ-

Exercise will only create results if we recover and rest enough between workouts. When someone doesn’t recover adequately, performance and health suffer. If we looked at their insides, we might see high levels of inflammation and/or their connective tissues aren’t healing. We might see that their happy neurotransmitters are going down and their catabolic hormones, such as cortisol, are going up. You often hear the term “overtraining,” but in reality what could very well be happening is “under-recovering.” Signs you are under-recovering could include: your muscles are always sore, you feel more depressed and anxious overall, you aren’t sleeping well—or can’t stop sleeping, you have no appetite or an insatiable appetite, everything hurts (all the time), and you seemingly catch every virus going around. Sleep matters

Where discomfort, treatment and recovery time may disappear along with the blockage.

Robotic Endovascular Surgery Now at Delray Medical Center. If you need surgery for vascular conditions, robotic endovascular surgery may be a better option. Patients with vascular conditions can suffer from decreased blood flow, leading to disability and amputation, stroke or blood

Benefits may include: ▸ Less pain

proud to be the first to offer the Magellan™ Robotic System for patients requiring endovascular surgery from

▸ Shorter procedural time

Broward to Martin County. Dr. Ricotta was the first surgeon in the southeastern US to perform a procedure utilizing

▸ Fewer complications

the Magellan™ robot. The minimally-invasive system is used to help navigate the custom-shaped catheters and

▸ Faster return to the activities you love

clots, aneurysm rupture and even death. Dr. Joseph Ricotta, vascular surgeon, and Delray Medical Center are

guide wires through your blood vessels to treat the clot or plaque removal with stenting, angioplasty or delivery of embolic or therapeutic agents. The physician-controlled Magellan™ system is a minimally invasive approach designed to allow surgeons to control and manipulate wires and catheters that are inserted through a small puncture in the groin from a remote workstation. It is proven to provide safe navigation through small vessels, allow targeted treatment, reduce radiation exposure and produce superior patient outcomes.

To learn more, or find a physician specializing in robotic surgery and limb salvage, please call 844.372.0975 or visit DelrayMedicalCtr.com

5352 Linton Boulevard | Delray Beach

“People just don’t realize how important sleep is, and what the health consequences are of not getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis . . . Sleep is just as important for overall health as diet and exercise.”— Carl Hunt, MD, director of the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research at the NIH. A 2005 study, with a nationally representative sample of about 10,000 adults, found that people between the ages of 32 and 49 who sleep fewer than seven hours each night and/or stay awake past midnight are significantly more likely to be obese. Studies also suggest that people who sleep fewer than six hours per night gain almost twice as much weight over a 6-year period as people who sleep seven to eight hours per night. In another study, healthy men in their 20s were only allowed four hours of sleep for six straight nights. At the end of this, the young men had the insulin sensitivity of a 70-year-old pre-diabetic. With lack of sleep, daily life function can suffer as well, including mood, cognition, and memory. Going 24 hours without sleep is similar to performing with a blood alcohol level of 0.10 percent. Good luck navigating through your day while “intoxicated” from minimal sleep. In comparison, quality sleep improves memory formation and recall. Take the time Don’t neglect your time-out. Making the time to recover and repair will ensure your physical performance, mental alertness, and overall quality of life are the best they can be. Giovanni Roselli is the Regional Director Of Personal Training for Pur-Life Fitness Center located in Delray Beach. Originally from Westchester, NY, he graduated from Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, CT double majoring in business administration and sports management. He is a certified personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine and holds a nutrition certification with industry leader Precision Nutrition. His television appearances include NBC’s ‘Today Show’ and National Geographic’s ‘Brain Games.’


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Multitasking wellness By: Christine King Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Time is a precious commodity. On the heels of hurricane Irma, the kids returning to school and the busy season and holidays upon us, it’s been more than challenging to “get back to normal” and catch your breath. Many are still feeling the after-effects of the storm and a disrupted fitness and wellness program. To fast track into your happy and balanced self, multitasking is an effective temporary solution. Until life settles down, implementing small efforts throughout your day helps to resume some normalcy until time allows the return to regular exercise, healthy eating, and peace of mind. Here are some simple wellness multitasking hacks: 1. While brushing your teeth in the morning do squats for the two minutes 2. Find the quietest time of the morning and use it to meditate. It could be while in the shower or while making the kids lunch. Turn a regular activity into an opportunity to quiet your mind. 3. With no power, many are cringing as they’re pitching precious freezer contents. Recruit a couple of friends or neighbors and work as a team for food shopping, preparation and storing. Your reserves will build up in a jiffy! 4. Revert to tried and true activity measures like using the stairs and parking the car further away. Every opportunity to

move improves the body and mind!

HEALTHY SKIN & NATURAL BEAUTY

HAVE NEVER BEEN THIS CLOSE…

5. At work implement a one-hour sit limit. Turn on your phone alert and move every hour. Walk the stairs, do squats and chair dips at your desk and try conducting one-on-one walking meetings. 6. Begin taking walks and infusing lunges and pushups along the way. If only for 15 minutes, the activity makes you feel better. Doing something is better than nothing. Make it a family activity so everyone benefits! 7. Rehydrate. Between the perspiration from the heat and less water intake, dehydration is rampant. Drink water every hour (when your one-hour sit limit alarm rings) to replenish water lost during the storm. 8. SLEEP. Whether from stress, heat, or being displaced, many are sleep deprived. Without proper rest, it’s difficult to think straight and work. Make it a priority to get to bed early and catch a little cat nap during the day if possible. These measures will help you feel more healthy and active. Maintain your positivity and sense of community (and humor!) and hurricane season will be gone before you know it! *Note: Due to Hurricane Irma Part Two of “Magic Fat Loss” will be printed in November’s issue Christine King is a Medical Exercise Specialist, Fitness Expert, and Founder & CEO of YourBestFit. The health and wellness company has helped thousands of clients recover from injuries, look and feel better and improve their overall well-being. www.YourBestFit.com

MEDICAL DERMATOLOGY

|

COSMETIC DERMATOLOGY

|

LASER SERVICES

FRANCESCA LEWIS MD, FAAD BOARD CERTIFIED DERMATOLOGIST MEDICAL DIRECTOR

Delray Dermatology + Cosmetic Center, a boutique full-service practice in the heart of East Delray Beach,

West Boca Medical Center delivers baby during Hurricane Irma

combines excellent medical and surgical Dermatologic care with exceptional cosmetic treatments. Specializing in skin cancer diagnosis and treatment and comprehensive medical Dermatology, our compassionate medical team offers cosmetic treatments and personalized treatment regimens within a beautiful, comfortable environment.

Staff report While Hurricane Irma delivered rainy skies and windy conditions, West Boca Medical Center delivered Marina Colombo on Sept. 10th at 7:21pm. Marina weighed in at 6lbs and 5oz. Father Edio, and Mother Caroline, are enjoying their new addition and will certainly never forget this storm.

Join us for an Open House! November 4th, 2017 from 1:00 – 4:00pm most commercial insurances and Medicare accepted

O (561) 440-8020 W delrayskin.com | 550 SE 6th Ave, Ste 100 | Delray Beach | Florida | 33483

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Trigeminal Neuralgia: New advances in non-invasive treatment By: Dr John Conde DC, DACNB Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Trigeminal neuralgia, also known as tic douloureux, is a disabling condition that affects the fifth cranial nerve (trigeminal nerve) located within the skull. It usually occurs most often in people over 50, although it can occur at any age, including infancy. The disorder is more common in women than men and is noted in 12 per 100,000 people per year. The trigeminal nerve is one of 12 pairs of nerves that are attached to the brain within the skull and is the most widely distributed nerve in the face. It is irritation and disturbance of this nerve anywhere from the brain stem in an area called the pons to the face that is the genesis of this condition. The disturbance of the trigeminal nerve can be secondary to physical compression or physiological dysfunction. In the case of physical compression of the nerve, it is noted that blood vessels as well as tumors in the base of the brain can damage the nerve. We sometimes see facial blunt trauma also be a causative agent. Physiological dysfunction is often noted due to erratic and unstable behavior of the cluster of neurons in the brainstem that forms the nerve and can be spontaneous and idiopathic (unknown cause) or from conditions that slow down nerve conduction like multiple sclerosis and stroke. There are two types of trigeminal neuralgia, typical (TN1) and atypical (TN2).

The most common traditional treatments for trigeminal neuralgia include microvascular decompression surgery, cyber knife radiosurgery, and anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine. Unfortunately the outcomes offered by these therapeutic interventions are not great and they provide great risks in regards to surgery and significant side effects in reference to the medication. It would be prudent of the clinician to recommend novel, non-invasive and non-pharmaceutical therapies first which are gaining momentum in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. The most exciting and promising of these treatment options include photobiomodulation (class IV laser therapy), transcutaneous electrical nerve stim-

ulation (TENS), functional neurological intervention, chiropractic manipulative therapy, dietary changes, and supplementation. The goal of these treatments is to stabilize the activity level of the trigeminal nerve and the neuronal pools located in the brainstem so there is less spontaneity. In regards to class IV laser therapyit draws water, oxygen, and nutrients to the tissue to accelerate healing mechanics. The light interacts with tissues at the cell level to increase energy and protein production thereby stabilizing the activity of the cell. Functional neurological intervention includes using targeted environmental sensory stimuli like pneumatic insufflation (blowing air in the ear canal), eye movements, head movements, and or balance activities to make changes in the neurological pathways involved in the genesis of this condition. Dr. John Conde is a Board Certified Chiropractic Neurologist, one of only one thousand in the country. He holds diplomate status through the American Chiropractic Neurology Board. He provides specialized care for difficult cases of back neck pain, numbness-tingling, vertigo-dizziness balance disorders, fibromyalgia, migraines, AD/HD, autism, and dyslexia. His office is located at the Atlantic Grove in Delray Beach, FL and can be reached at 561-3306096, drconde@thecondecenter.com, and at www.thecondecenter.com

NOW OPEN! DEEP TMS PROGRAM at The Delray Center for Brain Science

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OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

A breakthrough in PTSD treatment By: Dr. Raul J. Rodriguez MD, DABPN, DABAM, MRO Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Post-traumatic stress disorder, commonly referred to as PTSD, is a disabling condition that can result from exposure to a traumatic event. Many people think of Vietnam War veterans when discussing PTSD, however many others also suffer from this emotionally painful condition. Sexual assault, physical assault, motor vehicle accidents, and natural catastrophes are other unfortunately common sources of traumatic exposure that can induce post-traumatic stress disorder. The severity of the trauma that can produce this condition is usually life threatening and either happens to or is witnessed by the affected individual. Individuals who are thought to be predisposed in some way could start experiencing intrusive memories and other forms of re-experiencing the trauma when exposed to these types of events. They start suffering from flashbacks, recurrent intrusive thoughts, nightmares, mood disturbances, anxiety, agitation, irritability, hostility, hypervigilance, loss of interest or pleasure in activities, and feelings of guilt. These distressing symptoms can lead to severe disruptions in most facets of daily functioning. PTSD symptoms can cause a major decline in performance in school, at work, and in interpersonal relationships. The emotional distress caused by these

symptoms notoriously trigger substance abuse, self-destructive behavior, and social isolation. The need for better forms of PTSD treatment is apparent, which lead to the development of the Delray Center Trauma Bloc program. The Delray Center Trauma Bloc program was developed by Dr. Rodriguez and the Delray Center clinical team in 2016, in response to the growing need for better PTSD treatment. This program is named after and built around the groundbreaking therapeutic treatment modality known as the Trauma Bloc. This system is a major modification and enhancement of Prolonged Exposure Therapy (PET), which is a well-established treatment for PTSD. Each “Bloc� is a carefully planned and timed therapeutic sequence. A patient will usually undergo a series of 8-10 Trauma Bloc sessions over the course of a 12week outpatient program. The first few weeks of the program emotionally and physically prepare the patient to engage in the Trauma Bloc sequences. Usually between program weeks 2 and 4, patients undergo their first installment. The Trauma Bloc sequence starts with a Prolonged Exposure Therapy session. PET

is an emotionally intense kind of therapy that is physiologically arousing. In the Trauma Bloc, the natural physiologic excitation is further accelerated after the PET session. This is done in a way to maximize the activation of the Amygdala, one of the parts of the brain implicated in PTSD and intentionally activated in Prolonged Exposure Therapy. The Amygdala is generally responsible for the expressing of emotion, which in the case of PTSD will predominantly be fear. The Amygdala hyper-excitation phase is then followed by a rapid physiologic deceleration phase, which helps cool off the Amygdala and promotes activation of the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex (vmPFC). The Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex is a more advanced part of the brain involved in the processing of emotions and decision-making. Activation of the vmPFC is essential to processing emotional traumas in Prolonged Exposure Therapy. This vmPFC activation is enhanced by Trauma Bloc therapy. The net effect is a substantially improved response to PET and greater PTSD symptom resolution. PTSD symptom resolution, both in the short and long term, is the ultimate objective of this program. This is achieved by completion of the prescribed number

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of Trauma Blocs as well as incorporating effective coping skills and emotional processing tools. This is why this program also encompasses the myriad therapeutic elements available at the Delray Center, such as DBT psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, group therapy, acupuncture, meditation, exercise therapy, and vitamin therapy. Effective psychotherapy and optimized coping skills help reduce the recurrence of PTSD symptoms and the need for additional PTSD therapy. The patients that have thus far completed the Delray Center Trauma Bloc program have done exceptionally well. Many of these patients had suffered from PTSD for years and had also failed other treatments previously. The reduction in PTSD symptom intensity for many of the patients was significant after even 4 Trauma Bloc sequences. For most patients the symptoms were in full remission by the time they completed at least 8 trauma Bloc sequences. This is one of the newest Delray Center programs and yet it is already one of the most successful. Dr Rodriguez is the founder, CEO and Medical Director of the Delray Center For Healing, which specializes in comprehensive outpatient treatment of PTSD, Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, & Eating Disorders. The Delray Center proudly offers the Trauma Bloc program for individuals who suffer from PTSD.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

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OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Stephanie Hammer squirts mascarpone cheese to create mini-desserts at one of the food tables at the Boca Chamber’s Wine & All That Jazz event at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. Hammer works at Burton’s Grill & Bar, which is schedule to open early this month in Boca Raton. (Photo by Dale King)

Neil Haynie, behind the steering wheel, husband of Boca Raton Mayor Susan Haynie, gets the feel for one of the Lexus vehicles on display at the Boca Chamber’s Wine & All That Jazz event at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. With him is Jon Carty, a campaign worker for the Mayor Haynie. (Photo by Dale King)

Mayor Susan Haynie, right, is shown with Julia Hebert at the Boca Chamber’s Wine & All That Jazz event held in August at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. (Photo by Dale King)

Boca Chamber entertains 600 with food, wine ‘and all that jazz’ By: Dale King Contributing Writer Another edition of Boca Festival Days sponsored by the Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce has been committed to the history books. This year, the Chamber paired for-profits with nonprofits at more than 20 events held during August, all designed to help charities and other assistance-providing organizations raise extra cash. The Chamber also presented its own signature event – Wine & All That Jazz – Aug. 26 at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. More than 600 guests attended the all-you-can eat and drink food and wine tasting party that featured live

Aiasha Johnson of Boca Raton enjoys the Boca Chamber’s Wine & All That Jazz event. (Photo by Dale King)

entertainment, raffles and an after-party in the Palm Court of the main hotel. From the sold-out VIP room where high-end delicacies

Nurashikin Quesada, left, and Jonathan Walko, serve up sandwiches from Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Boca Raton during the Boca Chamber’s Wine & All That Jazz event. (Photo by Dale King)

INSIDE

Palm Beach County

were was served, to the additions of a 360-video photo booth and a full night of dancing, the program provided something for all. Sponsored by the Boca Chamber and JM Lexus, Wine & All That Jazz featured more than 100 fine wines and food from more than 20 Boca and area restaurants.

Check out this trendy office [26]

“This event gets better and better each year,” said Sarah Pearson, the Boca Chamber’s executive vice president. “We are so pleased with the great turnout and the truly celebratory atmosphere that was felt.”

Manning one of the wine-serving tables at the Boca Chamber’s Wine & All That Jazz event held in August at the Boca Raton Resort & Club are Declan Muldoon, right, who works at Boca Lago Country Club, and his son, Rory Muldoon, who works for a wine distributor. (Photo by Dale King)

A portion of proceeds from Wine and All That Jazz supports the Chamber’s nonprofit Golden Bell Education Foundation, which provides funding and programming support to Boca Raton public schools.

CEOs to build Habitat Home [32]

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Boca’s economic development report By: Jessica Del Vecchio Economic Development Manager Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers pressive statistic that Boca Raton has the ninth-lowest unemployment rate in the country. Being one of the best places to raise a family and having various career opportunities available for these families, shows that Boca Raton really does have it all.

Business briefs: Boca Raton’s low unemployment rate: Last month, analytical firm Smart Asset analyzed Florida’s demographical data to find the best places to raise a family. The analysis methodology considered factors like crime rates, unemployment rates, and graduation rates. Not only did Boca’s demographical data put us in the top ten on the list, it also uncovered the im-

International yacht charter company Yachtico relocated from Germany to the Research Park at FAU, in 2015. Since relocating, Yachtico has raised $2 million in private equity funding. Offering more than 16,000 yachts throughout 40 countries, the Yachtico team was recently named one of GrowFL’s “Companies to Watch.” Operating as a real estate investment

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trust, with 400 Boca based employees and 1,200 employees nationwide – wireless communications tower company SBA Communications has been upgraded to the S&P 500. Headquartered in their 167,000-square-feet office building on Congress Avenue, SBA owns 15,922 sites in the United States and 10,275 towers in Canada, Central America, and South America. Headquartered in The Park at Broken Sound, with 600 corporate employees, occupying 100,000-square-feet of office space, Cross Country Healthcare comes in third place on this year’s largest healthcare staffing firm’s list. With temporary staffing revenue of $820 million, Cross Country encompasses 5 percent of the market share. We recently sat down with their CEO, Bill Grubbs, to get his take on the benefits of being headquartered in Boca Raton. He credited Florida’s tax-friendly environment, access to a qualified workforce and the overall lifestyle offered in our region as some of the highlights.

Last year, Orangetheory Fitness purchased their 77,000-square-foot office building for $14 million and have been working on remodeling and revitalizing the property ever since. Last month, the Orangetheory team hosted a huge party – celebrating the official grand opening of their global headquarters. Boca’s Mayor and Council Members were on hand to officially welcome this vibrant, sophisticated brand to our beautiful City.

Have corporate news to share or looking to relocate/expand your company to Boca Raton? Contact the city’s economic development office at economicdevelopment@ myboca.us or 561-393-7761. Want to see what we are up to? Follow us on Facebook @BocaEconomicDevelopment

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OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Trendy office in town: Orangetheory Fitness HQ Staff report Orangetheory Fitness wants its employees to work hard and play hard. The company debuted its new Boca Raton headquarters recently and the space at Broken Sound Parkway features ways to decompress after a long day of work. The office space includes a wellness center complete with an infrared sauna, for floating, sleeping pods for naps, a

Orangetheory’s multi-purpose room known as the EPOC room has a refreshment Orangetheory Fitness Headquarters in Boca incorporates its signature orange bar, gaming consoles, pool table, shuffleboard, ping pong and other amenities. color into its space. Submitted photo. Submitted photo.

massage room with an onsite masseuse,

micro-market with snacks and a walk/

eory Fitness studio where the company’s

He said the work the employees do is

run track.

technology group and workout design

taxing and the goal was to create spaces

team have the ability to test new equip-

that incorporate wellness into the work-

ment, wearable technology and exercise

day.

Coldtub polar plunge tub, a dreampod

a meditation room, and a physical therapy room with an on-site physiotherapist.

The 36,000-square-foot facility utilizes all

If employees need a quick break, there

conference rooms with air media tech-

is a multi-purpose room known as the EPOC room complete with a hydromassage lounge chair, refreshment bar, gaming consoles, pool table, shuffleboard, ping pong, five TVs with recessed projector and screen, two kitchens, a

the latest technology inkling three video

templates.

Employees will also have access to a full-

nology, an interactive social media wall

Of course, the signature color orange is

time wellness manager who will coordi-

where any posts about the company are

incorporated throughout the building.

nate activities and programs for employ-

linked to screens on the wall, a design lab where new workouts are created, a green room complete with audio and visual filming and a state of the art Orangeth-

“We wanted something lively,” director of

ees that promote healthy lifestyles.

design and construction Rory Ellis said.

Orangetheory Fitness began with one

“We wanted something that jived with

studio in 2010 in Fort Lauderdale. Now,

technology and fitness.”

there are more than 700 studios in 45

Ellis said he first saw the space in May

states and 13 countries.

2016. Since then, he and his team of de-

The company is on pace to have 900 stu-

signers and decorators got to work creat-

dios open by the end of the year. To help

ing what he calls a funky and fun space.

with the rapid expansion, there is a new

“We want people to have fun when they come to work,” he said. “We are fun and quirky. We wanted to make sure we didn’t lose that.”

franchisee training room at the headquarters. The training room provides new franchisees with the tools they need to learn how to own and operate an Orangetheory Fitness.

Orangetheory employees can unwind in a sauna Orangetheory’s headquarters has a meditation room onsite at the Boca-based headquarters Submitted for its employees. Submitted photo. photo.

Orangetheory Fitness will offer employees yoga class- Orangetheory Fitness staff can take a quick nap in es and massages. Submitted photo. the dream pods. Submitted photo.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Be seated at 9PM or after and receive half off wines by the glass, all beers, & all liquor, including premium. Plus $2 validated parking. (Regularly $5)

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Support your favorite charity with life insurance By: John M. Campanola, Agent New York Life Insurance Company Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers As Americans, we can take pride in the fact that we are a nation of givers. And as the economy improves, charitable giving is on the rise. In fact, according to the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, in 2015 total charitable giving from U.S. individuals, corporations, foundations, and bequests exceeded $370 billion.

desired charity. While the charity will be responsible for any remaining premium payments, it will also receive the full death benefit when you die. List the charity as a beneficiary—As the owner, you remain in control of your policy and can leave money to as many

But with money still being tight for many Americans, it’s nice to know that there is a way to support a favorite charity without having to worry about the impact it could have on your budget. How? By giving the gift of life insurance. Here are just a few ways you can use this proven method to contribute money to your favorite causes:   Donate an existing policy—If you already have a policy and no longer need the death benefit, you can irrevocably transfer ownership of the policy to your

beneficiaries as you like: children, grandchildren—even multiple

charities. Or you can name a single charity the sole beneficiary, and it will receive the entire amount. Purchase a separate policy—There are times when it makes sense to have separate policies: one for loved ones, and one for charitable gifts. This technique can prove especially helpful if you would like to retain ownership of one policy, but not the other.  Create a Charitable Remainder Trust—While this planned-giving tool is designed to shelter assets such as stocks and real estate, you can also incorporate life insurance if it’s set up correctly. Be sure to consult a trust attorney before pursuing this approach.  Giving life insurance can be a lasting and recession-proof way to support a worthy cause. Depending on the method you choose, it may also offer a variety of tax benefits.

This educational third-party article is provided as a courtesy by John M Campanola, Agent, New York Life Insurance Company. To learn more about the information or topics discussed, please contact John M. Campanola at 561-642-5180. Neither New York Life Insurance Company nor its agents provide tax, legal, or accounting advice. Please consult your own tax, legal, or accounting professionals before making any decision. Also, state laws vary with respect to charities and insurance. Please consult your legal advisor for details. 

CareerSource Palm Beach County opens in Delray Beach To bring the service to Delray Beach, CareerSource is renting a 1,091-square-foot office from the CRA at a reduced rate of $12 per year.

Staff report Need help finding a new job? CareerSource Palm Beach County may be able to help.

In exchange for the reduced rent, CareerSource must provide quarterly reports on programs, reports and statistics on local workforce, labor market and unemployment rates, host local job hiring and trade fairs, hold a Delray Beach Career Expo, a “How to Hire” employer workshop series and a workforce roundtable with local employers and small business owners.

The job placement center has a new Delray Beach location at 186 NW 5th Ave., thanks to a three-year-lease agreement with the Community Redevelopment Agency. The “Career Cottage” will provide career services and job readiness assistance to help with local unemployment and underemployment rates. The goal is to help Delray residents find Delray-based jobs at a one-stop workforce development shop. CareerSource Palm Beach County is chartered by the state

of Florida to develop and retain a high quality workforce system in Palm Beach County. Career centers help place people in all types of entry-level jobs for free to both the employers and job seekers.

Services will be available five days a week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. A career expo is scheduled for Oct. 12.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Biz Briefs Health Center at Sinai Residences names new director of nursing The Toby & Leon Cooperman Sinai Residences of Boca Raton has hired Linda Nelson as Director of Nursing at its Health Center. Nelson has been a registered nurse since 1983. The Palm Beach Community College graduate has worked in numerous nursing management positions in both skilled nursing and rehabilitation. “We’re excited to announce Linda as a member of our dedicated team,” said Jay Mikosch, Associate Executive Director of the Health Center at Sinai Residences. “Our Health Center is second-to-none, and Linda’s experience as a manager with a record of high quality resident and guest outcomes will only further enhance the services we provide.” Nelson said she is excited for new role and building relationships with local healthcare professionals. “I’m excited to have the chance to lead a truly dedicated team of health care professionals,” she said. “Our residents and guests are our highest priority, and their satisfaction will be how we measure success.” Aside from relationship building, continued emphasis will be placed on shortterm rehabilitation, skilled nursing and occupational and physical therapy, which is provided to guests recovering from an elective surgery or acute illness following hospitalization. Local Greens open in Delray Check out recently opened Local Greens in Delray Beach. Founded in 2017 by Restaurateur Dave Magrogan of Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar (located next door to Local Greens), Local Greens is the fast-casual answer to the health-minded consumer’s busy schedule. Local Greens combines the convenience of fast food with the nutritional benefits of fresh local ingredients, resulting in a new, affordable lunch and dinner destination. Local Greens will feature an innovative, state-of-the-art kiosk ordering system, allowing customers to effortlessly browse a chef-curated menu of nutritionally-dense options including salads, hot and cold noodle bowls, acai bowls and housemade popsicles, with a majority of ingredients delivered directly from local farms.

The fast-casual concept, whose motto is simply “Live Green. Live Well.”, will utilize the same farm-forward approach as its sister concept, with the menu curated by Corporate Executive Chef Josh Short. Local Greens has both indoor and covered outdoor seating and is located in the Delray Place shopping plaza at 1841 S. Federal Highway #400. Hours are 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. daily. For more information, visit www.LiveLocalGreens.com. Boca resident named new senior operations VP for ABB OPTICAL GROUP ABB OPTICAL GROUP, one of the nation’s leading distributors of optical products, has announced that Boca resident Steve Heft has joined the company as senior vice president of operations. In his new position, Heft will provide strategic and tactical direction for Coral-Springs based ABB OPTICAL GROUP’s distribution centers by leveraging his extensive experience and leadership to achieve ABB’s goals. He will streamline operations for enhanced profitability, productivity and efficiency. Focused on a customer-centric approach, Heft will align all aspects of operations to deliver a best-in-class customer experience. “Steve brings strong leadership skills, exceptional strategic vision and an impressive track record of operational excellence to ABB,” said ABB OPTICAL GROUP President Brad Weinbrum. “His focus on customer satisfaction and results-focused methodology aligns with our core values. We are thrilled to have him as part of our executive team.” With more than 20 years of experience in supply chain and operational leadership, Heft began his career in the United States Marine Corps where he led both infantry and logistics organizations, achieving the rank of major. Prior to joining ABB OPTICAL GROUP, Heft directed procurement, distribution, manufacturing, engineering, quality and design organizations in Europe, Latin America and North America. Boca Raton’s SBA Communications added to S&P 500 Boca Raton company SBA Communications, a cell tower operator, was added to the S&P Dow Jones last month.

The company leases antenna space on cell towers to wireless service provides across the world. SBA Communications employs 400 people at its headquarters and 1,500 people nationwide. Its new location will into a renovated Beacon Square building off Congress Avenue near the Interstate 95 exit. SBA paid $22.65 million for the property in 2014. FYZZ receives grant from CRA Delray Beach’s Family Yoga Zen Zone known as FYZZ has received a business development assistance grant from the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency. The family friendly yoga studio, which opened in June, is located at 1201 N. Federal Highway in a 2,405-square-foot building. It has a seven year lease and applied for the rent assistance grant from the CRA. The board approved the year long grant, which will provide the studio $500 per month toward its rent for one year. Total, the business will receive $6,000 toward its rent for the year. FASTSIGNS® of Boca Raton employee receives Executive Sales Certification Gary Gladden from FAST® SIGNS of Boca Raton received the Outside Sales Certification Award at the 2017 FASTSIGNS Outside Sales Summit, recently held in St. Louis, Missouri. This award is presented to sales professionals who complete an extensive certification program including curriculum and activities designed to heighten and expand sales skills. Upon completion of the program, recipients receive the distinction of ‘Certified FASTSIGNS Sales Executive.’ This year, Gladden is one of 27 sales professionals to complete the certification.

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“We are so proud of Gary for his outstanding sales achievements; he always goes above and beyond for our customers to ensure they receive excellent service and quality products,” said Chris Kirby, FASTSIGNS of Boca Raton franchisee. “We look forward to continue helping local businesses and organizations solve their visual communications challenges with innovative ideas and creative solutions.” FASTSIGNS® is a locally and independently owned and operated sign, graphics and visual communications company. To learn more, visit fastsigns.com/2043 or call 561-465-2325. FASTSIGNS of Boca Raton is located at 2401 N. Federal Highway and is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Delray’s Products on the Go donates 1,000 diaper sets to Hurricane Harvey victims Products on the Go sent 1,000 of its specially formulated Diaper Changing Kits to folks affected by Hurricane Harvey. The Delray Beach-based company sells pre-packaged, natural blend diaper sets. In an effort to help those in need, the company’s Little Toes On The Go program is donating signature Diaper Changing Kits, which contain all natural bamboo fiber diapers, natural diaper rash cream, bamboo fiber baby wipes and hand wipes, as well as a changing pad. The benefit of these kits goes beyond that of a clean diaper, as the additional products included will help keep those living in shelters clean and healthy. Bamboo has antimicrobial elements that will also help reduce the spread of infection. For more information about POTG check out, www.products-onthego.com.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Boca ad agency changes name, opens new office, appoints new president Staff report Boca Raton-based Green Integrated Marketing Services has changed is name to Pace to match the name of its parent company in New York, Pace. Pace is a WPP company. Pace’s Florida Division is headquartered at its Boca Raton offices and includes offices in Orlando and Miami. Diana Riser has been named president of Pace’s Florida Division and is based in the new Miami office. The marketing and advertising agency has a client list including, The Bristol Palm Beach, Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Broward College, Florida Atlantic University, and the Boca Raton Airport Authority. Green Advertising was started in Boca Raton in 1986 by Phyllis Green, former V.P. Retail Sales, ABC-TV Network. The agency evolved to Green Integrated Marketing Services to offer creative services, digital services, media planning, video production and website services. The

agency houses a full-service video production studio, web and digital media specialty services, copywriters and creative designers. Green serves clients in all industries and has been agency of record for companies in real-estate, gaming, education, healthcare, and tourism. WPP acquired Green in 1999, under the Pace banner. With the 2017 expansion, the agency is known as Pace, Florida Division. “After an extensive search, we choose Diana Riser, who is poised to grow Pace’s Florida Division into the premier agency of South Florida,” Phyllis Green said of Riser’s appointment. Riser has roots in South Florida and is known in the publishing industry for building magazines and client relationships and for employing savvy sales and marketing service that expanded operations into monetized digital and mobile products. Her most recent role has been publisher of Modern Lux-

Diana Riser has been named president of Pace’s Florida Division and is based in the new Miami office. Submitted photo.

ury in Miami which produces Miami magazine, Interiors South Florida and Modern Luxury’s Weddings, as well as multi-tiered digital and mobile products for Modern Luxury’s magazines. Riser has more than two decades of specialization across every category of luxury business: real estate, lifestyle, tourism, medical/healthcare, arts and culture, and highend brands. Riser is equipped to run a multi-location, multi-service agency, after having managed more than 30 advertising and digital agency relationships as service contractors.

Boca restaurateur a partner of Broward-based firm to be acquired by Arsenal Capital for $45M By: Dale King Contributing Writer The co-owner of Mario’s Osteria, a popular Boca Raton restaurant, is one of three partners in Cyalume Technologies Holdings, Inc., a Broward County-based firm scheduled to be acquired by an affiliate of Arsenal Capital Partners as part of a $45 million merger. The deal was expected to close last month. Cyalume recently announced the signing of a definitive agreement and plan of merger in which the firm will be acquired by an affiliate of Arsenal Capital Partners in an all-cash transaction totaling $45 million. The joining is subject to certain adjustments set forth in the merger agreement, which includes the repayment of Cyalume’s outstanding debt. “We are very excited to have Arsenal as our partner,” said Dale S. Baker, chief operating officer of Cyalume and also co-owner with his wife, Mary, of Mario’s. “We are confident that with their strategic and financial support, we will be able to significantly accelerate our growth in the specialty chemical, pharmaceutical and medical product markets.” Upon completion of the Cyalume-Arsenal affiliate merger, the management team is scheduled to remain in place, officials of both companies said. The firm produces specialty chemicals and pharmaceutical components; designs and manufactures related products and does sub-contract manufacturing of components for use in pharmaceutical, medical, commercial and military markets. “We are very pleased to announce this

transaction with Arsenal, as we believe it affords us the opportunity to both deliver a return to many of our stakeholders that have supported Cyalume over the past several years and positions the company for continued growth and future success,” said Zivi Nedivi, Cyalume president and CEO. Sal Gagliardo, industry and operations partner at Arsenal, said, “Cyalume has a strong brand and long-term relationships with blue chip customers. Given its robust portfolio of technologies, we expect Cyalume will serve as a platform for further acquisitions in the specialty chemicals and performance polymers sector.” During his career, Baker has held senior level positions with various companies. He earned a masters of business administration degree from the Fuqua School of Business of Duke University and a bachelor of science in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic & State University. Global law firm Greenberg Traurig is legal counsel to Cyalume, and Cassel Salpeter & Co., LLC, acts as financial advisor to the Board of Director’s special committee created to handle the transaction. DLA Piper, LLP, serves as legal counsel to Arsenal Capital Partners in connection with the transaction. The company is headquartered in Fort Lauderdale, with manufacturing locations in West Springfield, Mass. and Bound Brook, N.J., as well as a subsidiary, Cyalume Technologies, SAS, in Aix-en-Provence, France. The company sells to the US Military and other militaries and to major pharmaceutical and medical device companies throughout the world. Established in 2000, Arsenal Capital Partners is a New York-based private equity

firm that specializes in investments in middle market specialty industrials and healthcare companies. Investors and security holders will be able

to receive the information statement and other documents free of charge at the Securities and Exchange website, http://www. sec.gov, or from Cyalume at 910 SE 17th St., Suite 300, Fort Lauderdale.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Don’t fall into the scary side of finances Haunted houses, chainsaws and horror movies aren’t the only scary part of October. Looking at your monthly spending and saving habits can sometimes be as frightening as watching a Freddy Kruger marathon. To make sure you aren’t falling into the scary side of your personal finances, we reached out to Tracy Cooper of Merrill Edge for some tips when it comes to spending and saving habits. 1. How can people in their 30s start saving for retirement? It’s never too early to plan for retirement, and the simplest advice — save as much as you can! — holds true at every age. At this stage, you’re probably beginning to face more financial demands. But whether you’re saving for a home or starting a family, your 30s are critical saving years because investments you make now for retirement have 25 or more years to grow. As your income climbs, gradually boost the amount you contribute to your workplace retirement plan or IRA. Put as much as you can toward your workplace plan — the maximum allowed, if possible — and if you don’t have a workplace plan, or if you’ve contributed the maximum amount allowed, try to contribute the maximum amount to your IRA. 2. What happens when people max out their credit cards? What should they do when this happens? Carrying debt with a high interest rate could counteract any growth your savings generate, especially when interest rates on deposits are low. Interest rates on credit cards can be 20 percent per annum or higher, causing you to accumulate debt very quickly. In addition to making the items you purchased cost more in the long run, all that interest is a drain on your ability to save, so

pay down debt and invest. When tackling your debt, begin with the cards that carry the highest interest rates. Then, as soon as you have some financial breathing room, consider setting up an automatic savings plan that regularly deposits funds into a designated savings or retirement account. 3. What are some tips for investing in your 30s? • Put it in writing. This will help you have a clear picture about how you will achieve your desired retirement, making the task of saving and investing much less overwhelming. If you are able to more clearly outline your current priorities and future goals, you will have a better sense of next steps.

at 35. The cost can be dramatic, because time is not something that can be made up. 5. In addition to saving, should millennials keep an emergency fund? A common pitfall that is most likely to derail your financial future is living without a financial cushion. Emergencies – and unexpected circumstances – can happen: your house needs a new roof, you get a divorce, or you welcome a new baby. If you don’t have savings set aside for life’s “what-if” scenarios — ideally, at least six months’ living expenses — you could end up relying on credit cards to get by, a path that could lead you into debt.

Building, or rebuilding, a cash stash can be one of the smartest moves you can make. It can be hard to get started if the goal seems too big or daunting, but you shouldn’t expect yourself to save every penny you need all at once. Start out small. Figure out how much you can spare from each paycheck and perhaps set up automatic transfers into a savings account.

• Pay yourself first. Treat your retirement as a fixed monthly expense, instead of waiting to see what is left at the end of the month. • Enroll in an employer-sponsored plan as soon as you are eligible. Contributions are automatically deducted from your paycheck, making it easier for you to stay on track with your investment goals. • Challenge yourself to increase your contributions as often as you can. Even increasing retirement contributions by just 2 percentage points regularly will add up over time. 4. What is the cost of waiting to save? Due to compound interest, savings can grow exponentially over time – making it very difficult or impossible to catch up if a savings plan isn’t set up early and added to often. For example, by starting to put away money earlier, a 25-year-old investing $200 per month ($2,400/year) accumulates more assets by age 65 than if he or she had started to invest $300 per month ($3,600/year) at age 35 – despite investing less each period. At 65-yearsold, the individual who began saving at age 25 would have an average of nearly $200,000 more than the person who began investing

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

CEOs, top executives to build Habitat for Humanity home

Honorary CEO Build Chair is Jerry Fedele, President and CEO of Boca Raton Regional Hospital. Other builders include Scott Sullivan, First Vice President, Merrill Lynch; Doug Mosley, Executive Director, Boca Raton Bowl; Rick Howard,  CEO, Sklar Furnishings; Mitch Feldman, CEO, Boca West Medical Center; Sal  Saldana, General Manager, Town Center at Boca Raton and more.

Staff report Local executives can learn what it is like to climb a different kind of corporate ladder next month. Habitat for Humanity of South Palm Beach County is inviting Palm Beach County C-Suite and senior executives to participate in the 2017 CEO Build on Nov. 3 and 4.

“It’s a great opportunity to step out of one’s office comfort zone, don a hard hat and learn new home improvement skills or simply add a few to one’s tool belt,” said participant Rick Howard, CEO of Sklar Furnishings. “This is going to be rewarding experience for all involved as together we improve the community that each shares.”

The event takes business leaders away from building their own companies and brings them together to build a home. The nonprofit is seeking 70 empowered, high-ranking senior business leaders to join together to raise “funds and walls” to build a safe and affordable home for a local, hard-working, low income family. The 70 participants will help build the home through both financial sponsorship and hands-on building. The build will cost about $150,000 and all money raised will underwrite the construction materials for the home they are building. Participants will be installing and finishing drywall, painting the interior and exterior and putting other carpentry finishing touches on a new Habitat home. No building experience is necessary. Volunteer C-Suite executive builders and business owners will work

Paul Adkins, Chairman, Florida Peninsula Insurance Company that is the CEO Build Presenting Home Sponsor; Patricia Maczko, Regional Manager and Florida Market President Comerica Bank; Jerry Fedele, Honorary CEO Build Chair and President and CEO, Boca Raton Regional Hospital; Randy Nobles, President and  CEO, Habitat for Humanity of South Palm Beach County; Kari Oeltjen, Chief Development Officer, Habitat for Humanity of South Palm Beach County; Rick Howard, President, Sklar Furnishings. and Board Chair, Habitat for Humanity of South Palm Beach County.

under the guidance of Habitat construction professionals alongside the future Habitat homeowner, the Gevala Antoine Family. “For all of us who have enjoyed dining at Boston’s on the Beach in Delray Beach, you have probably enjoyed a meal cooked by Mrs. An-

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toine without even knowing it, ” said Habitat’s Chief Development Officer Kari Oeltjen. To Antoine, “Food is love” and she has been cooking meals with love at Boston’s for more than a decade. When Antoine was widowed, she still persevered to give her four academically talented children a better life by applying for Habitat’s home ownership program culminating in earning a zero interest mortgage on a Habitat home that she is physically helping to build. “Sustainable community growth begins with a stable home foundation for families and children,” said Habitat’s President and CEO Randy Nobles who will be leading the onsite CEO Builder roster. “We are fortunate to have a business community in South Palm Beach County that understands the need to build communities from the ground up, just as they build their companies.”

To participate, each “CEO Builder” must commit to fundraise or donate $2,500 on the website. Once registered as a CEO Builder by hitting the CEO Build tab at the top of the home page of www.habitatsouthpalmbeach. org, participants can create their own fundraising page. If someone cannot commit to being a CEO Builder, they can support a CEO Builder featured on the dedicated fund site. A “CEO Build” kick-off and orientation reception will be hosted by PNC Bank and Broken Sound Club on Tuesday, Oct. 3 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at The Old Course at Broken Sound Club, 1401 NW 51st St, Boca Raton. In addition to networking with colleagues and enjoying light bites, wine and live music, those who have committed to raising or giving $2,500 and other prospective “CEO Builders” will learn how they can be one of the 70 C-Suite executives who create the “House that CEOs Built” in South Palm Beach County. To learn more about the CEO Build, register as a builder and/or team leader and/or recruit volunteers to help fundraise and build, sponsorship opportunities and the kick-off event, contact Kari Oeltjen, HFHSPBC Chief Development Officer at koeltjen@hfhboca.org or 561-819-6070.

1 Million Cups chapter to start in Delray Beach Staff report Want to learn about new start-up businesses in Delray Beach?

The event will be held monthly in Delray on the first Wednesday of the month.

Head to Capital One Cafe on Oct. 4 at 8 a.m. for the first meeting of the new Delray Beach 1 Million Cups chapter.

Two entrepreneurs will have six minutes to present their businesses to the audience. The presentations will be followed with a 20 minute question and answer session from the audience.

1 Million Cups, a national organization, brings together entrepreneurs and the community to learn from one another for free.

To kick off the first event, Rooster Local will be one of the featured businesses. The other business was not finalized by our print deadline.

Delray chapter organizer Kellie Ames said the program is designed to help the community learn about new businesses and for the new businesses to receive feedback from the locals.

The event will begin and end with time for networking. Visit http://www.1millioncups.com/delraybeach for more information.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Fine dining tucked away in Delray Beach strip mall By: Shaina Wizov Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Experience’ table with the most ornate table setting you’ll ever see, where guests are treated to an extra special, one-of-akind dining experience featuring trendsetting plateware, including The Versace Collection, and the top stemware in the world. This 7-course tasting menu is $135 per person (plus tax and gratuity) and includes a bottle of champagne, tea and coffee, and a parting gift. When you think of top notch fine dining, timeless China dinnerware and elegant chandeliers, a tiny restaurant in the middle of a strip mall doesn’t necessarily come to mind… However, for The Winemaker’s Table, that is just the case. Located off on Congress just before Linton, is a restaurant unlike any other in Delray Beach. The inside is full of oldworld luxury decor, including a ‘Versace

guests can expect a variety of options baked eggplant lavash, chicken milanese, the truffled mac and cheese grilled sandwich and short rib waffle sandwich, just to name a few. Dinner features dishes such as prime veal chop, prime filet mignon, Wagyu short ribs and seared Ahi tuna, among others.

Although their lunch and dinner menus are certainly worth experiencing, what The Winemaker’s Table should be known best for is their private wine dinners and events, where tickets are purchased in ad-

The Winemaker’s Table is the place to break out your best ‘Ladies who Lunch’ attire and enjoy something a little more upscale than usual. The Winemaker’s Table brings a promise of high-quality, fresh and creative fare in a refined and relaxed setting, with attentive service and knowledgeable staff. The Winemaker’s Table is open to the public for lunch and dinner, serving both classic and contemporary dishes. At lunch,

vance to experience unique dishes paired with even more unique wines. At a place with such intricate detail in design, you can only imagine the precision that goes into each and every plate of food coming out of the kitchen. The restaurant also offers catering, as well as a Corporate Menu featuring $10 entrees, such as chicken parmigiana and housemade tuna salad, available for take-out only. Owners Tom and Michele Ferraro promise to make The Winemaker’s Table a Delray Beach dining destination, with plans for a Chef ’s Tasting Table, an upstairs tasting room for private dinners and events, and expanding with happy hour and other specials as time goes on. The Winemaker’s Table is open for lunch Monday through Friday from 11a.m. to 3 p.m., and dinner Wednesday through Saturday from 5-11 p.m. They are open 7 days a week for special events and gatherings upon request.

A sit down with Stephen Chrisanthus: Nayita Recently I sat down with my friend and nationally renowned yoga instructor Naya Rappaport, to get some insight into the mental and physical benefits of yoga, as well as into her own journey to happiness and success. What made you get interested in yoga in the beginning? Why do you think most people do? My mother introduced me to Bikram yoga at the age of 9. After senior year of high school I decided to practice yoga more often because I wanted to shed weight, become flexible and be strong. I believe many people start the practice seeking a physical or emotional change. What benefits does it provide?  • Increased flexibility & muscle strength. • Improved respiration & energy. • Balanced metabolism. • Weight reduction. • Circulatory health. Is it something everyone can do? Yoga is for everyone... every-body.

You seem to have gained notoriety in the yoga world; you have quite the social media following. People that are into yoga speak of you as if you are a yoga star. What do you attribute this success?  What are you doing different from other instructors? I feel very fortunate that I get to share my physical practice online. Some people have been following me since day one and know my journey and progress.  I think my following appreciates my quirky, sensual, crazy self... As I continue to grow and change I always keep it real in my posts and captions.  I try to connect with people worldwide and answer back to all their questions. Collaborating with instructors worldwide has also helped my growth. All teachers are different and unique. As I grow my style will slightly change.... I just want to continue being myself.

Do you have a favorite position? Savasana. It’s been through my 6 year journey of daily asana practice. Never fails. What does yoga mean to you? Yoga is a lifestyle. It’s a life long journey to continue to be the best version of oneself and handle life to the best of our abilities. Through it I have found my purpose and continue to unveil many truths. To share this gift with others is a blessing. How long have you lived in Delray? Around 7 years now. When you are not teaching what do like to do in the City? Eat carbs and drink wine. Favorite place outside in Delray to do yoga? Backyard or beach!

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Economic Development in Delray Beach: Infrastructure By: Christina Morrison Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers plenty of time left to look around and count our blessings. Things could have gone a lot worse for Delray Beach so, first and foremost, we should count our blessings and great luck and give a heartfelt thank you to our city team members who worked tirelessly to keep us all safe and sound and reasonably comfortable.   But now – after the storm - is the time to look forward to what improvements are needed to make our City even stronger and more resilient for the future, and then plan and budget for their implementation.  A few to consider:

As we all recover from the storm and its aftermaths that have impacted our City, the time with minimal power, intermittent communication services, and other 21st century issues did give us all time to consider what is really important. After making sure our family members and friends were all safe and sound, there was

21st Century infrastructure: A past City Manager warned us at least three years ago that our water and sewer systems were outdated, crumbling and needed replacement. The recent storm amplified these situations and found the warnings to be true.  Other cities with far less resources have replaced their water systems with new technology like Reverse Osmosis.  Other technologies and innovations are happening in the water and sewer industries - our City needs to get moving

on this; “Six Pillar” Economy: Having a wide base of economic stability in our city is a proven way to better weather economic storms. The County’s Business Development Board has worked hard over the past decade to prove that bringing corporations and employers to our area that provide stable, good-paying jobs so our children don’t need to leave the area to thrive in the future is a bare necessity for a sustainable city and county.  Business, working in collaboration with government, can get this done; Reliable Power and Communication Sources: Is it time to finally have an intelligent and informed discussion on burying power and communication lines? It is constantly amazing how we insist on having beautiful trees and foliage yet refuse to consider the damage they cause to power and communication with overhead lines still the norm in our city. This discussion, and forward-thinking solutions – are needed now; Government as a Partner: If this storm proved anything, it is that working to-

gether – Government with Businesses with Residents, in synergy – makes us all stronger and more resilient. A storm shouldn’t be needed to get synergy done…it should be the norm. In other news around town: Parking: Parking boxes are now installed throughout the downtown and beach areas, and some of them are in operation now.  In addition, parking regulations (2-hour limits, etc.) are now being more fully enforced.  Please be aware when you park to avoid a costly ticket. Note:  The garages are still free every day and most evenings. There is a $5 fee on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings but all other times they are free and usually have ample spaces available. Construction: Work has started on the 4th & 5th project, which will include the IPIC Theatre, just south of Atlantic on US 1 and on 4th Avenue. A little further south on south-bound Federal, the Aloft Hotel project is also under construction so be careful in these areas since intermittent lane closures and other minor issues are occurring.


REAL

ESTATE

OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Delray Housing Authority provides homes for grandparents raising grandchildren By: Marisa Herman Associate Editor Dorothy Ellington said she receives calls daily from people who need a place to live. As president and CEO of the Delray Beach Housing Authority, the calls are part of her job. Recently, she said the types of calls she noticed coming in were from a different kind of family, one where grandparents were finding themselves raising their grandchildren. To help, the organization, which helps low and moderate income families receive housing, decided to designate the apartments above their new offices to these types of families. To do so, Ellington said the agency created a grandparents raising grandchildren preference. “We analyzed our waiting list and saw there were number of families composed of older residents caring for their minor grandchildren,” she said. Part of the reason for the request for help, she said, is because seniors were not qualifying for senior housing because of the children they were caring for. Senior housing is reserved for seniors. “Historically, it has been unusual for people this age to have children,” she said. “This is an unusual situation, the grandparent raising the grandchildren. We were getting these calls and found out we had quite a few of these families on the

waiting list. We determined there is a need.” It is a growing need not only locally. Nationwide, 2.7 million grandparents  are  raising grandchildren, and about one-fifth of those have incomes that fall below the poverty line, according to census figures. And their ranks are increasing. The number of  grandparents raising grandchildren is up 7 percent from 2009.  Of the grandparents caring for grandchildren, 21 percent live below the poverty line, according to Generations United. About 39 percent are over 60 and 26 percent have a disability. And because many are not licensed in the system, they are not eligible for the same services and financial support as licensed foster parents.  There is currently a bill “Supporting Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Act” making its way through Congress to help address the issue.

She said grandparents are stepping in when their children can’t care for their own children. She said the reasons vary from mental health illness to incarceration to military deployment. They would rather raise their grandchildren than put the child in foster care. “A lot of the time it has to do with parents who are not able to take care about their children for whatever reason and the grandparents having to step in rather than having the children go to foster care,” she said. “They would much rather a family member themselves take care of the children rather than allow a stranger to take care of their grandchildren.”

INSIDE

Palm Beach County

In one unit a grandfather is raising his granddaughter and in the other a grandmother is raising her granddaughter, Ellington said. “They are lovely people,” she said. “I am happy for having the facility to serve them. It makes me really happy. It gives me joy.” In order to qualify for these apartments, grandparents must present documentation that they have legal guardianship or legal custody; that they are the grandparents (birth certificates, or some form of proof linking them to the grandchild) and that their income does not exceed 80 percent of the area median income, adjusted for family size. The median area income for Palm Beach County is $67,900.

Mizner 200 to Boca [38]

Realtors group raises funds [44]

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

What’s up in the real estate market… and Gina Grandinette, Esq., Elderlaw Attorney. Light refreshments will be served. The Phoenix at Delray is located at 5624 Linton Blvd.

Delray Beach’s True Floridian Realty has partnered with A Second Chance Puppies and Kittens Rescue to help its mission of rescuing animals.

The club has also been awarded the prestigious “Distinguished Club” status for the second consecutive year.

For every house a True Floridan client sells or buys, a donation is made to the organization that has rescued over 9,000 animals since it was founded in 2007.

He said at the end of each month they tally up the donations and present a check to the nonprofit. “We see so many pet owners,” he said. “We thought it would be a good way to give back especially to a no-kill shelter that relies on donations.” The donations help with surgeries for animals in need and supplies, he said. “We thought it would be a good way to give back to the community as a whole,” he said. For information on how you can help, go to asecondchancerescue.org or visit True Floridian Realty’s Facebook page. Downsizing, transitioning seminar in Delray

housing

Thinking about downsizing or transitioning into a new housing development? There will be a free seminar on Oct. 24 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Phoenix at Delray Beach for senior citizens and their families. Learn from experts in the field on topics including: Valuing Your House and Possessions, Optimal Time to Sell, Getting Your Papers in Order, Senior Living Options, How to Know When You’re Ready. Experts available for answering questions include: Candy Cohn, Oasis Senior Advisors; Tina and Harvey Segal, The Estate Settlers; Samantha Tenzer-Friedman, Keller Williams Realty Luxury Homes

Besides having his Doctorate in Health Sciences, Miller is a second-degree black belt and on his way to earning his third degree in November of this year. “Striking, boxing, and MMA have become a huge part of the fitness industry,” he said. “We constantly thrive to offer our membership challenging and fun ways to get fit and stay healthy. The Everlast program at Mizner attracts both men and women and it’s one that can be done by beginners or serious fitness buffs.”

True Floridian makes donations to A Second Chance Puppies and Kittens Rescue

Paul Lykins of True Floridian said the initiative to team up began in July.

sessment and technique instruction.

Mizner Country Club offers Mixed Martial Arts group fitness training, receives award Mizner Country Club will be one of the first country clubs to offer Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) group fitness training program through Everlast F.I.T. (functional integrated training). After a nationwide search, Mizner Country Club’s Director of Fitness, Marty Miller, received official notification from Everlast that he was chosen for one of 15 spots to be a master instructor for the program. “With the explosive growth in popularity of Mixed Martial Arts, fitness professionals are incorporating fight sports conditioning into training programs for their clients of all ages and abilities,” Miller said. “In an analysis of the fitness industry, Everlast determined that there was no single authority better than themselves for teaching strike-based training to fitness professionals.” The Everlast F.I.T. Fundamentals Course is an application-based course that focuses on strike-based training. It is facilitated in a “learn by doing” format that allows the participants to practice the techniques in a progressive, supervised and safe environment that is specifically designed for the fitness professional.  Its participants are taught how to properly deliver strikes hold for, and coach strikes as well.  The course includes pre- and post-tests, application based scenarios, a fitness as-

The designation is determined by the annual Distinguished Clubs award program conducted by BoardRoom magazine, one of the most respected trade publications serving private clubs. “We’d like to congratulate Mizner Country Club for maintaining Distinguished Club status,” said John Fornaro, Publisher of BoardRoom magazine. “Special recognition also goes out to Mizner Country Club’s General Manger, Larry Savvides, as well as the Club’s Board of Directors, its department heads, and entire staff for their efforts in providing an excellent member experience.”  As defined by Distinguished Clubs, “Member Experience” is that special combination of “Qualities” that a private club provides its members.  It is not just the quality of service, or of the facilities, or of the product provided, it is also the quality of the staff and of the management, as well as the overall club governance they deliver.  The most important quality, however, is the quality of the intangible.  While difficult to measure, the latter is comprised of those magic moments experienced, the members befriended, the memorable events and famous tournaments attended, as well as the club traditions, history and heritage proudly recognized.   Palm Beach County market stats The real estate market statistics for the month of July reflect a 10.5 percent yearover-year decrease in closings of homes over $1 million, 3.1 percent decrease in those in the $600,000 to $999,999 range and 27.8 percent increase in homes from

$400,000 to $599,999, according to a report from the Realtors® Association of the Palm Beaches and Greater Fort Lauderdale. “The recent statistics indicate signs of a more balanced market which includes a slight increase in inventory. This is something we have not seen in a while.” said Jeffrey Levine, First Vice President, Realtors® of the Palm Beaches and Greater Fort Lauderdale. “Buyers have the benefit of more choices and the opportunity to purchase while interest rates are still low.” Active listings increased 1.9 percent to 7,086 and the months’ supply of inventory remained steady compared to this time last year at 4.8 months. Closed sales decreased 1.6 percent yearover-year to 1,509 with a .6 percent decrease in cash sales. The median sale price of single family homes increased 6 percent to $336,000 and there was no change in the median percentage of original list price received. The median time to contract decreased by 14 percent to 37 days.

Delray’s Dockerty Romer & Co. arrange financing Bob Dockerty and Chris Romer of Dockerty Romer & Co. have arranged permanent mortgage financing in the amount of $4,960,000 for a medical office building located in Hialeah. The property, known as Hialeah Medical Plaza, consists of a five story class B- medical office building totaling 67,957-square-feet located in the heart of Miami-Dade County. Hialeah is the only medical office building located on the grounds of Hialeah Hospital and is currently 96 percent leased with over 40 tenants, most of which are affiliated with the hospital. It is the only multi‐tenant medical office building in a three mile radius Dockerty Romer & Co. arranged the financing with Mercantile Bank on behalf of their client, Virtus Real Estate, LLC.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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How to pick the best neighborhood for you By: Karen Laurence Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers It has been historically true that the housing market helps drive the economy through more jobs and services provided with more dollars spent going into the economy. It has been said that the average homeowner, on their new home, spends about $15,000 in the first month. Some spend far more. The Southeast Florida Market is again on the upswing resulting since 2012, in higher prices. The percentage of homeowners that are “underwater” or owe out more than the value of their home, has been steadily declining from 17 percent to 13 percent. Home values have been rising over 8 percent since 2016. It is still a good time to purchase your home, be it the first or second or a relocation. Instead of running around from city to city, it is good to have an idea of what neighborhood(s) is going to serve you and the needs of your family. The most important thing is the physical location of the property as well as the area services provided for education, recreation, and proximity to your employment if still working. Location comes first. Homebuyers, be it their first or relocating from another city or country, should check

out the neighborhood for all the conveniences. Research the traffic at different times of the day. Listen to the day and night noises. A few good things may temp you to buy or bad things to make you rethink your decision. If you have found a property you like with your realtor, go back and knock on some doors to see who the neighbors are and whether they will add or detract from your new home living experience. You don’t want to get stuck next to that dog that howls at the moon every night. Various things can be checked out on line but there is nothing like breathing the air in the house, in the backyard and in the surrounding area. You can research the City, library activities, special programs that would interest your family, sports, houses of worship, etc. on line. Most neighborhoods now have local websites where people share information and provide referrals for work that has to be done or answer pertinent questions. The websites also help you get a true picture of your new area-to-be. Your standard of living comes first when you buy a house. That is how you should choose your home. You need to check your lifestyle and what activates are important for you to maintain your quality of life and what things you can give up to make this all important purchase. You want to make sure that you do not buy a home that will

decrease your standard of living too much. There are some sacrifices that can be made. If you play golf twice a week or take Zumba classes or have other interests, you want to make sure you still have the option to do so. Look for the playground or State Park or the baseball field that can be priorities for the family if you love to be outdoors. This is one of the most important and costly purchases you will be making in your lifetime. Don’t end up saying “Should have checked into that……” Now that you have the neighborhood(s) worked out, you can look at the available homes in these areas. The three most important words when looking for a home are Location, Location, Location. You can change everything about the house, except the location. Karen Laurence is a sales associate with The Keyes Company. She is a Technical Real Estate Instructor, Real Estate Agent and Certified Luxury Agent. 516-524-3953.

HERO launches in Delray Beach: New financing option for energy, efficiency and hurricane resiliency home improvements Staff report

rates ranging from 3.49 to 7.99 percent. HERO also comes with the highest level of consumer protection in the PACE industry, including safeguards like live telephone calls to confirm financing terms with homeowners and a guarantee that contractors don’t get paid until homeowners certify that a project is done to their satisfaction.

Want to add solar panels or storm shutters to your home, but can’t afford to pay for the upgrades in one lump sum? Property owners no have access to a new form of financing, HERO. The concept allows property owners to make residential energy, efficiency and wind-resistance improvements and pay for the upgrades over time through a voluntary additional assessment on their property tax bill. Eligible improvements include solar panels, energy-efficient HVAC systems, roofing and windows, roof-to-wall connections, storm shutters and other products that can protect against wind damage and meet or exceed state building code requirements. “PACE financing programs are an effective tool for homeowners to make smart energy improvements to their residences,” said Natalie Schneider, Climate Change and Sustainability Coordinator for Palm Beach County. “And in Florida, PACE can also be used to finance wind-resistant upgrades to help homes withstand the brunt of hurricanes. HERO, a public-private partnership be-

tween the Florida Development Finance Corporation (FDFC) and Renovate America is the nation’s largest Property Assessed Clean Energy, or PACE, financing program. The launch of HERO in Delray Beach and most of Palm Beach County is expected to bring multiple benefits to the community and to individual homeowners. For homeowners, the products eligible for PACE financing can lower utility bills or insurance premiums. HERO is also now available to homeowners in unincorporated parts of Palm Beach County as well as dozens of cities and towns including Boca Raton, Greenacres, Jupiter, Lake Clarke Shores, Palm Beach Gardens, West Palm Beach and Wellington. HERO financing offers fixed interest

fer to a new owner if the home is sold. The improvements eligible for PACE financing like HERO may also improve the value of a home. A recent study showed homes with PACE-financed improvements recovered 100 percent or more of the investment at the time of resale.

“With HERO, communities across Florida are giving homeowners access to the lowest interest rates and strongest protections in the PACE industry today,” said Ari Matusiak, Executive Vice President of Market Development and External Affairs at Renovate America. “Floridians not only have a new way to go solar, protect their families from storms, or replace a broken HVAC in the middle of the summer, they are also getting a public-private partnership that is helping to improve the entire home improvement industry.”

“Floridians are looking for ways to save energy and protect their homes, but many lack access to affordable financing to make the improvements they need to get there,” said Bill Spivey, Executive Director of the Florida Development Finance Corporation. “PACE is a financing option that empowers homeowners to invest in hurricane-resiliency, energy-efficiency and sustainability improvements to their properties. It boosts small businesses through increased sales and job creation while providing grass roots economic development for local governments at no cost to local government budgets. It’s a true win-win for Florida.”

HERO funds up to 100 percent of the home improvement, while the term of the financing is based on the useful life of the product, up to 25 years, spreading out the cost over time. The interest on the financing may be tax-deductible, and the HERO assessment may be able to trans-

Homeowners interested in applying for HERO financing or who wish to learn more should visit https://www.renovateamerica.com. Contractors interested in offering HERO financing can register at https://register.renovateamerica. com/.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Mizner 200 approved for downtown Boca Raton Staff report Mizner 200 is on its way to downtown Boca Raton. After another round of revisions, the council members sitting as the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency board, approved the project that will add more luxury high-rises downtown. The more than 1 million-square-foot community will have three nine-story buildings with 384 upscale condominiums and 672 parking spaces. The prop-

erty is located on nearly 9 acres at 200 Southeast Mizner Boulevard near Mizner Park. The existing Mizner on the Green rental town homes will be demolished to make room for the project, which is one of the largest to be built in downtown Boca. In order to gain approval, Coral Springsbased developers El-ad National Properties has made several changes to the project over the past few years. The last round of revisions took place this summer to address concerns the project was too massive.

The most recent modifications include increasing the distance between the high-rises to keep a view of the Intracoastal, add more open space for the public to enjoy and tweak the landscaping plan between Mizner 200 and its neighbors at Townsend Place condominiums.

The development team played an animation for the video that showed what the area would look like after it is built. People can be seen walking on sidewalks shaded by trees and sitting on benches outside the property. “I think we have a big win for the city,”

Councilman Jeremy Rodgers said before the project received unanimous approval. Council members agreed they were ready to move this project forward. Councilwoman Andrea O’Rourke lauded the developer for working with the community to come up with the best project possible. “This was a long process,” CRA chair Scott Singer said. “The tremendous amount of effort of time, energy, effort, angst. The outcome is better for a lot of people. There is reason for celebration.”

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POLO TRACE $425,000 - Bright & airy. Extensively renovated and improved Lexington model has something for everyone in this spacious 4br/2.5ba home in a great all age golf country club community. Feat a huge kit w/large island for breakfast bar, and a downstairs master suite with sliders to large screened patio. ID#10306490

PINE TREE GOLF CLUB $649,000 - NO Mandatory club membership. Thinking of a larger lot - tired of homes that are too close? Come see for yourself a 3/3 home with a large pool with swim out, cabana bath with shower covered patio and outside bar to enjoy your free time in your own tropical paradise oasis. Oversized kitchen with granite, double ovens, fireplace in living room, family room, utility room. ID: 10355376

LATITUDE $449,700 - Beautiful Penthouse located in the trendy city of Delray Beach. 3 Bedroom and 3.5 bathrooms. Lots of extras included -impact glass , wooden floors 10 Ft. ceilings,wet bar,stainless steel appliances, wooden cabinets,large open floor plan. Location Location Location 2.5 miles to Atlantic Ave, about a mile to the the beach. ID#10361256

SEASIDE ENCLAVE $1,299,000 - Coastal inspired 2 bedroom + den townhouse located in charming sea side enclave. Artisan elements throughout including idyllic garden courtyard with heated dipping pool and waterfall, all just a few steps from your private beach. ID#10274066

PRICE REDUCED

BRISTOL POINTE $924,900 - Beautiful Extended Contessa in Bristol Pointe! Fab floor plan with 5000 +sq. ft. including interchangeable rooms on first and second floors. Master Suite boasts sitting area, expanded master bath as well as his/hers ''California'' closets. Enjoy the beautiful gourmet kit w/ top of line stainless steel appliances, as well as an outdoor kitchen with all amenities perfect for entertaining. ID#10322422

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DEER RUN $750,000 - Rare opportunity to own this equestrian property with the feel of an exotic resort in the tropics. Enjoy miles of trails & proximity to competition venues. Main home is built in a zen style reminiscent of asian temples, over looking a koi pond. Four stall barn ready to enjoy or expand. The heart of the home is an atrium affording stunning views of the night sky. ID#10351217


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

39

Condo sales on the rise as home sales decline in county er Fort Lauderdale

Staff report

There was a .1 percent decrease in inventory (active

The monthly market statistics for August show a 7.9 percent year-over-year decrease in closed sales of single family homes in Palm Beach County and a 7.9 percent increase in median sales price to $340,000.

listings) of single family homes to 6,798 and no change in the months’ supply of inventory at 4.6 months. Cash transactions decreased -2.3 percent to 499 and the median percent of original list price decreased -.2 percent.

There was a 4.7 percent year-over-year increase in closings for condominiums and townhomes and 9.4 percent increase in median sale price of this sector to $175,000. “The statistics reflect more activity in the condo and townhome market in Palm Beach County that could be indicative of the affordability of these residences com-

The median time to contract increased 8.9 percent to 49 days. For more information, visit Florida Realtors® Monthly pared to single family homes,” said Jeffrey Levine, First Vice President, Realtors® of the Palm Beaches and Great-

Market Detail – Aug. 2017 www.rapb.com/market-updates

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MIZNER COUNTRY CLUB Luxury estate home with prime location. Sweeping views of golf course, lake and clubhouse. Spacious 5 BR's and 8 bath total features 2 Master BR's and lux spa baths. First fl MBR with his and her bath. Second MBR, and 2 addl BR upstairs. 24' ceilings in LR and DR. Many upgrades include custom blt-in's in Master BR, Study, Family Rm, and Wet Bar w Onyx counters and fridge, Designer Chandeliers, Custom closets, Butler's Pantry, 16 x 40 Lap pool, Outdoor Kitchen, 7 Royal Palm trees, Cabana Bath, Maid's room. $1,299,000 ID#10211822

NORTH LAKE WORTH Masterful design and modern luxury are uniquely embodied in this contemporary Intracoastal 5 bedroom 5 bath home.Waterfront smart home is sheathed in high-performance elements from the inside out with enhanced structural supports and high impact floor to ceiling glass, generous living space and stylish finishes that embodies the perfect setting for relaxing and entertaining. The home is open and airy yet, intimate and private at the same time. $2,200,000 ID#10357324

KNOLLWOOD This 3/2 home offers a large floor plan with an open kitchen. Stainless Steel appliances, Granite countertops, beautiful wood cabinets, fully fenced outdoor space, a two car garage, new disposal and dishwasher, ceiling fans, crown molding throughout and a separate laundry room $339,900 ID#10354978

PARAISO ESTATES Fabulous new custom luxury deep waterfront estates in East Boca Raton on oversized lots! Customize your smart home. With 230 ft on deep waterfront, individual private gate, 3+ car garage, private dock, pool, tropical gardens, long water views & no wake zone. Paraiso Estates is for the exclusive & conscious who see nature & luxury as a lifestyle. $5,950,000 ID# 10276528

VILLA SONRISA What a steal! Lowest priced villa with over $45k in upgrades. Beautiful 2/2 + den corner villa with open floor plan and split bedrooms. Granite bath and kitchen counter tops with glass backsplash & swarovsky glass pendant lights. Fenced in yard great for pets (2 allowed) Paved, covered & screened in porch. Seller Must Sell. $325,000 ID#10354384

RAINBERRY LAKE 2/2 Rainberry Lake home with direct access to Lake Ida. 3 miles from beach and trendy Atlantic Ave. The two bedrooms in this charming home face the water. Walk in closets in both bedrooms. Hurricane shutters. Courtyard is fenced and has a canopy of tropical palms and pavers throughout. $300,000 ID#10364836


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

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OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

41

Two new senior living communities headed to Boca Raton in upcoming years ty, it may not create additional calls for service. Rather the calls will be more centralized.

Staff report Two senior living communities have plans to open in Boca Raton in the next several years. The city council approved two different requests to bring an assisted living facility downtown and an adult congregate living facility to the northwest corridor of the city. Both offer upscale places for the city’s older population to reside. Council members expressed the same concern over both projects— how much the city’s emergency medical services will be used. The city can’t refuse a person transportation to a hospital and it can’t mandate facilities pay a fee for the service. Representatives from the facilities said they have enough medical staff and nurses on staff to be able to reserve hospital transports for emergencies while treating minor ailments on site. Council members agreed to look into the topic during a workshop meeting to determine how to address a possible uptick in calls for emergency transports. City staff said it costs about $1,000 for each emergency medical service call. Councilman Robert Weinroth pointed out that if current Boca residents move from their homes into a communi-

“We shouldn’t lose sight of the real benefit,” he said. “There is a cost for every new person moving into our city.” The council sitting as the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency approved plans for a 193-unit assisted living facility downtown at 375 E. Royal Palm Road.

A rendering of proposed assisted living facility for downtown Boca Raton. Submitted photo.

“We call it the extraordinary senior living community in downtown Boca Raton,” said Richard Bassell, director of planing and development for Penn Florida Companies, which is the developer and owner of the property.

“A lot of our residents will be very pleased once it’s completed,” he said.

If all goes according to plan the goal is to open the community by 2021. The developers said they have been working on the project since 2014. This community will be managed by Watercrest Senior Living. It will have 63 memory care studios, 70 studios, 50 one-bedroom units and 10 two-bedroom units. The ground floor will feature a living room, salon, fitness area, doctor’s office, pool and recreation deck. The second floor will house the dining room, kitchen, social hall and outdoor terrace. Councilman Weinroth said it is a facility he wouldn’t

mind moving into, just not yet.

The second project will bring 151 beds in a combination of studios, one-bedrooms and two-bedroom units as well as a memory care unit to nearly 5 acres of vacant property at 8250 North Congress Ave. The community will also provide accommodations like a lounge bar, bistro, card room, dining room, salon, library, theater and sitting areas. In addition, the project includes a 3,500-square-foot urgent care center that is open to the public. The goal is to keep the center open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. once it is open. “The urgent care facility will be a benefit to the residents and businesses in that area,” Mayor Susan Haynie said.

Senior Living 101

industry experts can help answer your questions. Many services offer a free consultation, so don’t be afraid to ask for help.

By: Candy Cohn, Owner of Oasis Senior Advisors South Florida Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Navigating the waters of senior living can be a bit overwhelming and confusing. Since there are a wide variety of senior housing options available, it’s helpful to learn about the differences before you start looking. Here’s a primer to get you started. Independent Living (IL) – A multi-unit apartment usually available as a rental. Most IL offer social and recreational opportunities, including two meals a day. Some offer services such as housekeeping and home health care services.  Assisted Living (AL) – They provide a special combination of housing, personalized supportive services and health care to meet the needs of those who don’t require full time skilled nursing care but might need help with activities of daily living (ADLs). Like IL, they offer social and recreational opportunities, including three meals a day, housekeeping, laundry and transportation.  Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) – State licensed facility that provides 24-hour

skilled patient care due to hospitalization, complex physical or complex cognitive conditions and assistance with multiple ADLs. Patient must be admitted and followed by a physician. Maximum length of stay is 100 days – first 20 days are paid for by Medicare; days 21-100 require a co-payment. Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRC) - A community that offers several levels of assistance, including IL, AL, and SNF home care so residents have the ability to “age in place.” CCRC usually provides a written agreement or long-term contract between the resident and the community and requires a large buy-in fee.  Personal Care Home (PCH) – A residence providing a watchful environment and personal services to adults who require varying degrees of supervision and protective care. The homes are smaller with 2-8 residents, may offer a private bedroom but shared bathrooms, and lower patient to caregiver ratio. 

About Candy Cohn

Memory Care (MC) – MC offers specialized programs for residents suffering from memory loss. Programs and activities are planned with dementia care in mind. Overall room sizes are smaller because they don’t spend much time in their individual rooms. For resident’s safety, all MC facilities are secured with fences and alarms. Certain criteria should be considered when comparing the services and amenities at each community - the comfort and safety of your loved one; fall prevention; proper nutrition; adequate hydration; medication management and socialization.  Remember, no family has to go through a senior living transition alone. Senior

Originally from Philadelphia, Candy Cohn, Owner of Oasis Senior Advisors South Florida, has lived in Florida since 1985. After living in Martin County for 22 years, she moved to Delray Beach in 2007. Her background in healthcare marketing includes community relations at Martin Memorial Hospital in Stuart, FL; writing for “Psychotherapy Finances;” Marketing Director for Flexsite Diagnostics; and community relations at the Visiting Nurse Association of Florida. After helping her own parents move to a senior living community, Candy realized the complexity and emotional challenges involved in this transition and has since dedicated herself to serving others who needed to make these life changes. Besides serving as President of Elder Services Resource Network (ESRN), she is also active in the Partnership for Aging, Alzheimer’s Association, Arthritis Foundation, the Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce Health Council and the Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce Health Council.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

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Standing out in real estate: Part I By: Jessica Rosato Luxury Broker Associate Nestler Poletto Sotheby’s International Realty Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Standing out is important in real estate. Buyers want their offers to stand out and sellers want their homes to stand out against the competition.  So, how do you effectively do that in today’s marketplace?  There are, of course, tried and true and obvious ways that most of us are privy to, such as using professional photography and video, having solid internet presence, offering cash versus financing, and so forth, but if you look a little bit deeper, you’ll see some of the most important factors are found in the subtle details. Today, we’ll focus on buyers. Stay tuned for sellers next.  If you’re a buyer looking to purchase a home at any price point, you want your offer to be accepted so that you can close on the home of your dreams. Putting yourself in the seller’s position and drafting your contract accordingly with your agent is a good tactic.  

complete. It sounds so simple, but it rarely happens that way. If you’re paying cash, be sure to submit proof of funds either via a bank statement (with account number blacked out of course) or a letter from your financial institution attesting that you have adequate funds to purchase the home.  

If I’m a seller, I’m focusing on main key points, such as purchase price, earnest money deposits, closing date, inspection period, cash or mortgage and any other contingencies that might prohibit a fast close. Purchase price is an important factor, and the closer you are to what sellers are hoping for, the better.

If you are financing, be sure you have a pre-approval that lets a seller know that you have done more than just talked to a lender. Be sure to include all of the necessary addenda so that all can be signed at once without too much going back and forth which can result in loss of interest.  Time is of the essence and you don’t want to give too much time for minds to be changed.  There is so much technology out there today that works in your favor to expedite matters so take advantage of electronic procedures that can put you in front of others who are not. 

When it comes to money down, I’d like to see 10 percent between the two deposits (the initial deposit due at signing or within three days and the second deposit that usually comes with the conclusion of inspection period.) First deposit can be anywhere from $1,000-$5,000 (as you don’t want too much held in escrow if something out of your hands were to go awry,) but definitely bump up the second deposit to make as close to 10 percent as you can as this shows the seller that you are serious and are not walking away at the drop of a hat. Make your inspection period 10 days max, but try for seven. Oftentimes buyers want 15 days (which is what the contract defaults to,)but that usually never flies.  The same goes for a loan approval date if you are getting a mortgage, which should never be longer than 30 days. If you can get an even faster loan approval/commitment, sellers will certainly take note! No seller wants to take their home off the market for any period of time to find it’s a no-go and certainly not more than 30 days!  Closing date is also a factor, and if you’re flexible, be sure to let the listing agent know that. If a seller needs extra time and you have it, that simple piece can be invaluable and tip the odds in your favor. Communication between realtors is key, and keeping that line open and affable can make a huge difference.  When making an offer, be sure your offer is

Sellers want to feel secure about the future and confident that the contract will move to close. The more you and your agent can provide to assure that, the better received your offer will be.  Be mindful, be prompt, be thorough, be accurate and be sure to put yourself in the other parties’ shoes. About Jessica Rosato Jessica Rosato is a Luxury Broker Associate for Nestler Poletto Sotheby’s International Realty of Delray Beach. As a concierge realtor, she utilizes her superb customer service skills, attention to detail, honesty, stellar work ethic, negotiating skills and keen understanding of the luxury real estate market in Palm Beach County to create experiences of a lifetime. Jessica is a Dartmouth graduate and holds a Masters of Fine Arts from Pratt Institute. She is a member of the Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce, the Women’s Council of Realtors and the Institute for Luxury Home Marketing.  She is also involved in local charities, specifically those that benefit the Achievement Centers for Children and Families in Delray Beach and the American Cancer Society. Visit her website at www.bocadelrayluxury.com.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Ask an expert: About your condo, HOA rules By: Ronald E. D’Anna, Esq. Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Q: I am an owner of a condominium unit in a residential community in Boca Raton which is comprised of 10 separate condominiums, all of which are governed by one condominium association.  Recently, the board of directors voted to commence a community wide construction project to repaint all of the condominium buildings, demolish and rebuild the community’s office building, repair balconies and replace the roofs on the condominium buildings.  I objected to some of the planned repairs and replacements. As a unit owner who will be sharing the costs for the work, do I have the right to vote to approve the construction project? J.D., Boca Raton A:  Generally speaking, if the work amounts to the association’s performance of its maintenance, repair and replacement duties, a unit owner vote is not required.  However, in the event the work amounts to a material alteration, modification, or substantial addition to any part of the common elements, then unit owner approval is required. As to your community, you may wish to review the declarations of condominium to determine if there are provisions in place which define alteration, material alteration or modification, or a substantial addition, as compared to routine maintenance.  If the declarations of condominium are silent on the subject matter, then the Florida Condominium Act fills in the proverbial blanks.  Florida Statutes, Chapter 718.113(2)(a) of the act provides that in a single condominium community, the approval of 75 percent of the total voting interests of the association is required; while under Chapter 718.113(2)(b) in a multi-condominium community, the approval of 75 percent of the total voting interests in the affected condominium(s) is required.  As simple as it may sound, please be mindful that the question you ask has been the subject matter of many appellate and arbitration decisions, a detailed discussion of which is beyond the scope of this article. Therefore, you may wish to consult with an attorney of your choice who is experienced in such matters. I will explain the general highlights and give specific examples of decisions relating to your question, subject to the caveat that each case has to be decided on its own facts. What constitutes a material alteration or substantial addition to the common elements has been defined in one of the leading cases on the subject to mean

“…to palpably or perceptively vary or change the form, shape, elements or specifications of a building from its original design or plan, or existing condition, in such a manner as to appreciably affect or influence its function, use, or appearance.” Therefore, as to the scope of the work in your community relating to the common elements at issue, the inquiry is whether the work preserves the existing look and appearance, maintains the same functions, and/or maintains the same or substantially similar use of the existing buildings or other components of the common elements. For example, the division has held that remodeling a clubhouse by adding more windows, installing a new kitchen where none previously existed, and replacing a wood burning fireplace with an electric fireplace were material alterations which required a unit owner vote. Conversely, the division has also found that work done to elevators, sundecks and pool railings, an existing community room kitchen, lobby flooring, existing boat docks and hallway flooring were required to preserve the common elements and did not require the vote of the unit owners. In yet another case, the division found that the association’s demolition of its old maintenance building and replacement of it in a different location less prone to flooding, did not constitute a material alteration which required a unit owner vote, because the replacement was performed pursuant to the association’s duty to maintain, repair and replace the common areas. In regard to preserving the look of a building’s size, shape and exterior appearance, the Florida appellate courts and the division have consistently found that changes in the color of the paint on the exterior of the buildings amount to a material change

to the common elements which requires unit owner approval. The above-described decisions are not without exceptions. The Florida appellate courts have found that if an association can establish that in the performance of its maintenance, repair and replacement duties relating to one component of the common elements, a material alteration or substantial addition to a different component of the common elements was required, then such an alteration or substantial addition will be viewed as a function of the association’s maintenance, repair and replacement duty for which no unit owner approval is required (e.g., in one appellate decision, it was held that the association’s addition to a seawall in an area where one did not previously exist for the purpose of stopping and preventing further damage and erosion of the other abutting common elements amounted to the association’s performance of its duty to maintain the eroding common elements as such and no unit owner approval was required). From the perspective of a condominium association, failing to make the right decision on your question is risky.  In the event that an association fails to secure

43

the requisite unit owner approval for what turns out to be a material alteration or substantial addition, and decides to impose a special assessment to pay for the unapproved work, appellate decisions have invalidated such assessments when unit owners refused to pay and were then sued by the association in special assessment lien foreclosure action. Ronald E. D’Anna, Esq., is Partner of the Law Firm Goede, Adamczyk, DeBoest & Cross. Visit www.gadclaw.com or ask questions about your issues for future columns, send your inquiry to: question@ gadclaw.com.  The information provided herein is for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. The publication of this article does not create an attorney-client relationship between the reader and Goede, Adamczyk, DeBoest & Cross, or any of our attorneys.  Readers should not act or refrain from acting based upon the information contained in this article without first contacting an attorney, if you have questions about any of the issues raised herein. The hiring of an attorney is a decision that should not be based solely on advertisements or this column.


44

YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Realtors Association of the Palm Beaches young professionals group raises $12,000 immediate families in times of need.

Staff report The Realtors® Association of the Palm Beaches Young Professionals Network hosted the 5th Annual White Attire Fundraiser in August that raised more than $12,000 to benefit the Realtors® Helping Realtors® Pay It Forward Foundation and Rebuilding Together.

More than 500 guests dressed in white cocktail attire enjoyed music, a Chinese auction, passed gourmet hors d’oeuvres and an open bar.

Rebuilding Together is a division of the Solid Waste Authority which helps to preserve affordable housing by rehabilitating the homes of low-income homeowners.

The Pay It Forward Foundation is a foundation run by the RAPB to provide financial assistance to Realtors® and their

Sponsors include All My Sons Moving & Storage and Cornerstone Home Lending. Dionna Hall and Ron Lennen, President-elect at the 5th Annual White Attire Fundraiser. Submitted photo.

The Realtors Association of Palm Beach County’s Young Professional Network is geared to professionals under 40 years old to provide leadership opportunities; a forum for members of similar age and interest to network and discuss business-related issues; and plan activities and programs to interest and attract younger members.

Joanna Aiken of Rebuilding Together and guests. Submitted photo.

RAPB + GFLR Leadership and Staff. Submitted photo.

Is investing in real estate a wise decision? By: Christel Silver Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers Investing in real estate is older than investing in the stock market or many other investment types.  When property rights were created and one experienced the ability to sell a property with a gain, this became an investment choice.  Any seasoned investor will tell you how important it is to research before making the commitment. First you need to ask yourself some questions:  * What are your long-term goals? Are you buying a distressed property, investing some money for improvements and selling it for a gain or are you holding onto the property for a longer period of time?  * Is your financial situation right for an investment? Do you want to use your cash or do you want to leverage the purchase?  Talk to an experienced lender to discuss the options you have.  * Are you a conservative investor – or a high risk investor? Maybe the purchase of a new home is your choice. Most come with a warranty and usually have only a few repairs necessary during the first years.  A new home is best purchased in the beginning as you can build up equity quickly because the builders typically increase the price regularly.  * Are you able to do some repairs your-

self, or do you have to hire someone? You have to estimate the cost of the repairs. * Study the market. You may need some help with this. Maybe you want to consult a Realtor in your area. Markets change quickly and you need up to date information. Finding the perfect investment may take some time. Be patient and examine each possibility thoroughly. Investing in real estate is a little more complicated than investing in stocks and bonds, but it has become very popular in the last few years. Many investors used their stocks to invest in real estate after the financial crisis.  If you decide to hold on to the property and rent it out, you have to be prepared for unexpected costs like vacancy, the tenant damaging your property, or the regular maintenance. If you want to hire a management company so you do not have to deal with the maintenance, that is an expense lowering your cash flow.   Investing in real estate is not a liquid investment. You should consult with your financial advisor or CPA before jumping into a real estate investment, whether it is a commercial or residential investment. Find yourself a Realtor in the market area who will listen to your needs. I have

For more information visit www.rapb. com. payments. So your cash flow increases and eventually your loan will be paid off and your cash flow jumps up dramatically. Your investment may allow you to retire early. So the answer is: yes it can be a wise decision to invest in real estate, but it requires research, education, advice, an financial capability. About Christel Silver

helped many investors and it takes a lot of work calculating and doing market research to answer all the questions and to analyze whether the property is right for the investor. This is not an emotional purchase – this is a purely financial decision about which property to purchase.  You need to know about the rentability of the property, what are the vacancy rates in this market, and what is the forecast for this area, as well as any changes in the employment sector? Some people invest in real estate for appreciation, but investing for cash flow is rewarding. Why? You want to have money coming in after paying the expenses for your mortgage. That is considered positive cash flow. The rent will increase over the years – but not your mortgage

Christel Silver is a full time Broker/Owner of Silver International Realty servicing the East Coast of South Florida. In 1985 she was licensed in Maryland and Washington DC as a Realtor and later as a Certified Residential Appraiser and Associate Broker and has been in Florida since 2001. The National Association of Realtor’s (NAR) President appointed her (20102014) as the President’s Liaison to Germany, where she grew up and worked at the Justice Department for 17 years prior to coming to this country. The Germany Real Estate Organization (IVD) has an agreement with the NAR and she is an International member of this organization. Christel is a Certified International Property Specialist (CIPS), and a certified speaker teaching CIPS classes. Ms. Silver served the Florida Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) Chapter as President, as Regional Vice President helping Chapters to grow, and as a member of the Board of Directors for two years. She served previously as an ambassador. Fifty percent of her business is in the International arena. For more information visit www.silverhouses.com.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

SOLD IN 5 DAYS!

AGENT SPOTLIGHT:

THE SUTTON TEAM At Golden Bear, our success is directly attributed to our commitment to employ real estate professionals who represent the qualities of excellence and integrity. Dan and Beverly Sutton represent these ideals. Dan is known for honest business ethics, strong market knowledge and brings a wealth of business knowledge to our team. Beverly is a high-energy Realtor with a warming Southern hospitality, Beverly has been giving her clients personalized residential service since she became licensed in 1983, earning several designations as a top selling agent over the years.

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Flamingo Park, West Palm Beach

Penthouse with stunning, panoramic 360 degree views of Ocean and Intracoastal from this NEWLY Listed 3b/3.5b residence of almost 4000 sq ft in the highly desirable Delray Beach Club Apartments. The Sutton Team, Dan & Beverly Sutton Realtors® 561-271-6429

$429,000 – Impeccably restored c.1924 Spanish Mission House, on the National Register situated on a lushly landscaped lot in the sought after historic district of Flamingo Park minutes from downtown City Walk in West Palm Beach. The Sutton Team, Dan & Beverly Sutton Realtors® 561-271-6429

SOLD!

The Estuary, Delray Beach

Colony Palms, Delray Beach

Located one mile from the Beach and downtown Delray, in the gated Intracoastal neighborhood of The Estuary, with broad ICW and lake views! This exceptionally appointed 3b/3.5b townhome residence welcomes its new owner. The Sutton Team, Dan & Beverly Sutton Realtors® 561-271-6429

$379,000 –A townhome ready to withstand a hurricane equipped with GENERATOR, IMPACT GLASS, and CBS construction! Spacious 4b/3.5b/2 car garage townhome located in an intimate gated community in East Delray Beach! The Sutton Team, Dan & Beverly Sutton Realtors® 561-271-6429

REALTORS, JOIN OUR TEAM! CALL BILL TODAY. 561.573.2701

Delray Dunes

346 Sandpiper Ave. Royal Palm Beach

280 NE 6th Ave, Delray Beach

Atlantic Ave Visibility

$524,000 – Move into this beautiful 3 bedroom 2 bath lake and pool home in Delray Dunes. 24 inch travertine throughout. This home has stainless steel appliances and complete hurricane protection for the house. Make this your new home. Diane Lobkowicz, Realtor® | 561-441-0391

$324,000 – Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage pool home in a wonderful community with no HOA and screened in patio. The property is over 1/4 acre and is completely fenced in. All windows are hurricane proof. You also have fruit trees, plantains and mangoes galore. Diane Lobkowicz, Realtor® | 561-441-0391

$1,199,000 – Beautiful free-standing 2 story Commercial building located on Federal Hwy just 3 blocks north of the eclectic downtown Atlantic Ave. Barry Frette Commercial Specialist , Realtor® 561-880-5587 | www.frettecommercial.com

$599,000 – Own this rare commercial gem and have complete visibility from Atlantic Avenue with “best uses” for Office, Retail or Restaurant. Or, combine 3-parcel Assemblage making it 0.66 acres for Redevelopment. Barry Frette Commercial Specialist, Realtor® 561-880-5587 | www.frettecommercial.com

A NETWORK THAT WORKS.

+17 YEARS

AS A REAL ESTATE BROKER Delray Dunes

515 North Swinton Ave, Delray Beach

$779,000 – Beautiful Golf course lot, Expertly remodeled, Tile floors, Crown molding, formal dining room. Richly appointed Kitchen, Granite, Wood cabinetry, Granite Gas range. Nicest remodel in the Dunes. New roof in 2016. Bill Bathurst, Managing Broker, Realtor® 561-573-2701

$1,3970,000 – Gorgeous Mediterranean Historic restoration and expansion with Coach house and pool. Bill Bathurst, Managing Broker, Realtor® 561-573-2701

KNOWS DELRAY BEACH

FAMILY HAS LIVED HERE SINCE THE EARLY 1930s

WATERFRONT RESIDENCES | LUXURY REAL ESTATE | GOLF COURSE COMMUNITIES | COMMERCIAL & INVESTMENT PROPERTIES “I’m committed to selling your property for maximum value in a minimum timeframe for an experience that will leave you gratified and elated.”

Bill Bathurst Managing Broker - Golden Bear Realty P: 561.573.2701 W: GoldenBearRealty.com E: Bill@BathurstGroup.com

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

VOTED THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY IN TOWN! The Best of Boca Raton and West Boca Raton 2017

AWESOME PANORAMIC SUNSET AND NIGHT VIEWS OF INTRACOASTAL AND CITY. 3,136 SQUARE FEET $1,600,000 VINCENT MOREA 561-212-9933

DIRECT INTRACOASTAL IN A NO WAKE ZONE BOCA RATON - GOLDEN HARBOUR TOTAL SQUARE FEET 8,091 - $5,750,000 FRANK GENTILE 561-441-6722

ONE STORY OFFICE BUILDING WITH 2 INDEPENDENT OFFICE SPACES 1200 SQ FT EACH $795,000 GERRY ANGERS 561-441-1181

EXQUISITE 2BR/2.5BA OASIS WITH OCEAN & INTRACOASTAL VIEWS. ADMIRALS WALK/BOCA RATON. TOTALLY REMODELED PENTHOUSE. DEEDED BEACH ACCESS/PRIVATE FACILITIES $1,195,000 SUE FEIN HOLTZ 561-445-0198

GRAND ESTATE! 8 BEDROOMS, 8.2 BATHS, THEATRE, GYM, GOURMET KITCHEN, MARBLE & WOOD FLOORS THROUGHOUT. OVERSIZED POOL & HOT TUB. AN ENTERTAINER’S DREAM! $3,375,000 RUSTY HANNA 954-444-8686

LOWEST PRICED OCEANFRONT LAND IN S. FLORIDA! 1 ACRE OCEAN TO INTRACOASTAL ESTATE! $6,495,000! BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME! JED WEAVER 954-817-2757

Search the Multiple Listing Service and Find Your Dream Home in South Florida! Celebrating

$

1.75

BILLION in sales

{ THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY IN TOWN }

www.MIZNERGRANDEREALTY.com

ARI ALBINDER – BROKER/OWNER (c) 561.702.0413 (o) 561.393.7000 Ari@MiznerGrandeRealty.com Please visit our new Commercial Division at http://cre.miznergranderealty.com Contact Estate Agent Susan Albinder at 561.445.4787


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

VOTED THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY IN TOWN! The Best of Boca Raton and West Boca Raton 2017

DIRECT INTRACOASTAL ESTATE 177 FEET ON THE INTRACOSTAL WITH WIDE INTRACOASTAL VIEWS. 11,894 TOTAL SQUARE FEET $6,995,000 ARI ALBINDER 561-702-0413

AMAZING NEWER SIGNATURE TROPHY CLASSIC ESTATE ON THE INTRACOASTAL. INCREDIBLE VIEWS EVERYWHERE! 10,198 TOTAL SQUARE FEET $5,975,000 ARI ALBINDER 561-702-0413

ORDERED TO BE SOLD! GULFSTREAM’S FINEST, NEWER MODERN, SLEEK, CHIC, DEEPWATER SHOWPLACE AT THE BEACH 5,926 TOTAL SQUARE FEET $4,495,000 ARI ALBINDER 561-702-0413

SPECTACULAR ESTATE HOME IN OCEAN RIDGE WITH 100’ OF DEEDED BEACH ACCESS AND OVER 7400 TOTAL SQUARE FEET $3,500,000 ARI ALBINDER 561-702-0413

SPECTACULAR GATED PRIVATE ISLAND LAKEFRONT MANSION! 7,106 TOTAL SQUARE FEET ROSIE ANSARA 561-400-5853

SPECTACULAR 2-STORY LAKEFRONT CUSTOM DREAM ESTATE. INCREDIBLE MOVIE THEATRE, LIBRARY, CLUB ROOM, RESORT STYLE POOL AND SPA. 8,456 TOTAL SQ FEET $1,725,000 ARI ALBINDER 561-702-0413

Search the Multiple Listing Service and Find Your Dream Home in South Florida! Celebrating

$

1.75

BILLION in sales

{ THE BEST REAL ESTATE COMPANY IN TOWN }

www.MIZNERGRANDEREALTY.com

ARI ALBINDER – BROKER/OWNER (c) 561.702.0413 (o) 561.393.7000 Ari@MiznerGrandeRealty.com Please visit our new Commercial Division at http://cre.miznergranderealty.com Contact Estate Agent Susan Albinder at 561.445.4787

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

A rendering of the Aloft Hotel headed to downtown Delray Beach. Submitted photo.

236 Fifth Ave. will be home to 35 luxury units downtown. Submitted photo.

A rendering that takes a look inside the Aloft hotel. Submitted photo.

Construction on new downtown Delray condos, hotel underway Staff report

retail space is underway.

Downtown Delray will soon be home to an Aloft Hotel and 35 luxury condos.

Located at 236 Fifth Ave., the new project will feature 35 condos that range from one to three bedroom units, a 122-room Aloft Hotel and shops. Residents and ho-

Construction on the hotel, condos and

Residents and hotel guests will share a pool deck at 236 Fifth Ave. Submitted photo.

tel guests will share covered parking, a club room, pool gym, hotel services and concierge. Project officials estimate completion Nov. 2018. The developer is Samar 202 Flori-

da, LLC, the builder Kaufman Lynn Construction, architect Slattery & Associates Architects, interior designer ID & Design International.

An aerial view of where 236 Fifth Ave. will be located in downtown Delray. Submitted photo.

Bye, bye Hurricane Irma-Tips on buying and selling your home By: Ari Albinder, Founder and Broker with Mizner Grande Realty Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers When you live in the paradise called South Florida, you have to be prepared to deal with the occasional nuisance of Hurricanes. Many people think the real estate world stops after a Hurricane, but it’s a great time to buy and sell a home in South Florida. Here are some tips to help you through the process. Tip #1: Once you find your dream home… make sure you get a top-notch inspection.  Check for mold, roof leaks, structural damage, seawall cracks, pool equipment and AC units.  These are all expensive items that need to be thoroughly and expertly examined.  Tip #2: Examine the positioning of the home. Every home exposure can drastically change how the elements can affect your life. Maybe you’d prefer to wake up to sunrises, or you’d like to sit in your backyard in the evening for the sunset.

It truly is an important lifestyle decision. Tip #3: Bigger is not always better. We find that the floor plan is so much more important than square feet. Quality over quantity truly makes sense in real estate. Tip #4: Make sure you check all the permits on the home and verify all the square footage inside and outside the home. If you are looking at waterfront, then it’s important to check the length of a seawall.  Tip #5: Make sure you look at the last 6 months of comparable homes sold. Trophy properties in great locations come at a premium.  Remember that appraisals are only a guideline and not concrete. Price can be a psychological mind barrier. Be smart and do the research to come up with your own realistic value of a house. That’s the best way to get a deal.

Tip #6: The first impression. Don’t put your house on the market until your home is perfect inside and outside. You want it to be shining, so the prospective buyer is immediately wowed. Tip #7: Another key tip is to keep your garage spotless. If the potential buyer can envision their cars being parked there is a great first step to them making you a serious offer.  Tip #8:  The Smell Factor. Nothing kills a deal than a bad smelling house. Eliminate pet odors, smoking odors and make sure that your home smells like a rose garden. Make sure your AC filters are clean so the flow of clean air is noticeable.  Tip #9: Landscaping is often over looked but so important. Talk about first impressions… the outside of your home will be the first thing seen.  Make the potential

buyer excited to go into your home by impressing them with the landscape. Tip #10: Properly pricing your home is the biggest key to the whole process.Using a trusted agent/broker will allow you to get top dollar in less time.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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A peek inside the soon-to-open Arts Warehouse Check out the inside of the Community Redevelopment Agency’s newest project, the Arts Warehouse.

Sea level rise and property damage By: George Gann Chief Conservation Strategist for the Institute for Regional Conservation Special to the Boca and Delray newspapers We’ve all heard it before, the terrifying predictions that come along with climate change and sea level rise, and how polar bears in the arctic will surely become extinct. Floridians, however, face a different reality that is becoming both more prevalent and more obvious—property damage—property damage that occurs when large storm surges cause massive flooding, as we have seen recently with both tropical storms and King Tides. As reported by the Florida Oceans and Coastal Council, Florida is especially vulnerable to sea level rise as it has more than 1,200 miles of coastline, 4,500 square miles of estuaries and bays and more than 6,700 miles of coastal waters. Basically, we have a lot of water around us at any given moment, so just as water in a glass overflows with added ice cubes, so the same occurs with increased ice melting in arctic and mountain regions. The state of Florida has a maximum elevation of less than 400 feet above sea level, with most of Florida’s 18 million residents liv-

ing less than 50 miles from the Atlantic Ocean or the Gulf of Mexico. As reported by The New York Times, the BBC, Zillow, and numerous technical reports and scientific papers, sea level rise effects are not something to expect in the distant future. We can already see the damages today. The sea level in South Florida has risen about 12 inches since 1846, and is rising today at a rate of about 8 to 16 inches per century. This rise in sea level is 6 to 10 times the rate of average sea level rise 3,000 years ago. In the next 25 years the sea could be expected to rise at least another 5 inches, and by 2100 South Florida seas may be two feet higher than they were in 1990; some estimates suggest as much as six feet. What does this all mean? Well this means that Florida, and especially South Florida, has a lot to lose.  By 2100, nearly 1 million Florida properties (or one in eight) worth a combined amount of over $400 billion would be

at risk of being submerged if the higher estimates are reached. But even now, the effects of sea level rise cause a massive economic burden for property owners, especially for those in low-income communities that do not have the necessary resources to repair damages, or, even better, move away from threatened lowlands. With so much at stake, it is important to consider ways to help the environment and minimize our personal contribution to climate change. You can volunteer with local organizations working to mitigate and adapt to sea level rise, such as The Institute for Regional Conservation, which holds regular beach restoration events aimed at making the native dune system more resilient while combating effects of erosion. You can also encourage communities and governments to thoughtfully consider the consequences of inaction, and take serious steps to face this problem head on. About The Institute for Regional Conservation A private non-profit organization, The

Institute for Regional Conservation (IRC) is dedicated to the protection, restoration, and long-term management of biodiversity on a regional basis, and to the prevention of regional extinctions of rare plants, animals and ecosystems. Based in Florida, USA, IRC works on conservation research and action throughout South Florida, the Caribbean and beyond. Their work is premised on an innovative idea of conservation that seeks to protect and restore viable populations of all plant and animal species within a region, rather than simply focusing on charismatic animals or plants with narrow global ranges. For more information visit www.regionalconservation.org.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Then Jack Happened

Dear Jack,

When my husband and I got married four years ago we decided that we didn’t want kids. A couple of years later I decided that I wanted a child and after a lot of talk he decided to go along with it, begrudgingly at first but excitedly later. He’s been great with the baby and really loves her. I have lately been getting the feeling I want another child, a little boy would be perfect. I told him that I wanted another baby and he flatly said ‘No.’ I didn’t think this was fair because we didn’t even really discuss it. It was more like, “Honey I was thinking, maybe we could....” “No.” So I started talking to him a lot more about it and eventually he threatened to get a vasectomy. I didn’t believe him and persisted, but now he went and

got an appointment. I think this is unbelievably unfair. We are partners. He’s great with our little girl, what can I do to at least get him talking about the possibility of a second child? (Obviously I’m on the clock here.) I don’t get the impression you want to talk with hubby about having a second child; you want him to agree to have a second child. That isn’t talking. Talking is identifying your different feelings on an issue and finding solutions that make the two of you as happy as possible given your disagreements. Your goal: another baby. His goal: not another baby. Although his curtness with you isn’t the greatest strategy for happy communication, at least he is being up front about what he wants. For whatever that’s worth to you. You understandably believe you can change his mind because in the past you and he were both clear that you didn’t want a baby, but now here you are. You have a little girl, you’re a good mother and he’s a good father, so why won’t things change again? I’m no sociologist, but at some point I think most people say, “Never going to have kids, I’m going to go to Bonaroo every year just like we did in ‘06 and live happy and free in a ditch somewhere, a kid would only slow me down,” and then, suddenly, that music festival is too crowded and expensive, and you are tired on the weekend, and then you can’t imagine going out on a Tuesday, and god it’s only Monday but I wish it was Sunday because THRONES!!! and boom child. That change of mind doesn’t seem ab-

normal. And you had a child. Even better, together you and your husband decided to have a child. This go around seems different. Given his surgical appointment, I think it’s safe to assume that he genuinely doesn’t want another child. So, what to do? First, I think it is an awful idea to have a child with someone that emphatically does not want one. The first time that kid is crying at 4 a.m. and you’re tired he’s going to say, “You wanted this,” roll over, and now welcome to your World of Hate. Or he’ll get up, take care of the baby, seethe, and now welcome to your World of Hate. You have to accept he doesn’t want a baby. Second, you have to decide: do you want him or another baby more? If the answer is another baby, then you have to separate and find a different way. If you can accept the family as it is presently configured, then it will be important for you to positively work through the sadness of your sacrifice of only having one child so that you don’t grow resentful either. It’s a crummy situation. Understand that both of your feelings are legitimate and no one is wrong or right. You and your husband’s compatibility is an arch rather than a single decision, and you must decide if you and he are still compatible given your disagreement. Dear South Florida, here’s the deal, I’ll give you the second child you are desirous for on the condition that you keep sending your problems to thenjackhappened@gmail.com, including the problems that child will definitely have.

Helping kids cope when you’re trying to cope, too By: Ali Kaufman, founder & CEO, Space of Mind With so many pressing issues on our minds lately - hurricanes, nuclear bombs, healthcare, global climate change and

Second, remember that they want (and need) to view the world through optimism. They don’t know all of the background information that you know, so be careful to filter your conversation through two very important skills that are key to processing (and tackling) scary and unfamiliar situations: resilience and gratitude. Social and televised media are building audiences that are seeking calm for their fears. However, it’s our fears that tend to create our belief systems. Once a belief becomes concrete, it’s hard to differentiate fear-based reality from a reality rooted in optimism and creating solutions.

racism - kids are paying a lot more attention to stressful situations. (And no doubt the adults in their lives are worrying more, too!) It’s important for parents and educators to remember that a child’s worldview isn’t really contextually prepared to digest such heavy duty topics. Yet, we can’t ignore them, either. Talking to kids about topics that are hard for even adults to understand is tricky. First, remember that they are KIDS.

So, what do you do when your kids are anxious about life and you need to both be busy keeping everyone’s lives together and also explaining to them that sometimes life hands us unexpected challenges? When times get tough, here are a few tips: Acknowledge that something important is happening or has happened. You can’t hide the facts, so stick to them. Explain what is going on in the simplest terms.

Don’t avoid the scary part, but don’t make it so scary. This is a balancing act, to be sure, as you want to prepare a child that they may experience discomfort, but remind them that you are taking precautions to keep them safe. Talk about pre and post-event procedures. Involve your kids in the preparations and give them roles in your family’s resilience plan. Stay in touch with your own inner child. Keep it fun! Kids love games (and so do adults) so try to infuse some novelty into your preparations and discussions of serious matters. Most importantly, remember your child’s age and be sure to scale your conversations accordingly. Keep your sense of humor. Rough times are the best times to create funny memories that can mark a milestone challenge better than a negative memory. Look for opportunities to share an inside joke with the ones you love. Instead of looking back later and remembering the scary or negative memories associated with a challenging moment, you’ll have some positive memories, too. Debrief. Don’t just move on when the difficult moment passes. Kids (and adults)

need some time to process life-changing events before getting back to regularly-scheduled routines. Keep checking in until you are sure that everyone has found their ease again. Once we have moved beyond the challenge, it’s incredibly important to also show gratitude for those who provided support along the way. Involve your kids in thanking and contributing alongside others for the gifts and good fortune that we are given. Doing so creates connection between children and their community members; it also helps create meaning for our lives and positive memories from a difficult moment. Leadership is rooted in one’s ability to channel resilience and gratitude into the community, and it’s a community’s responsibility to rebuild itself when knocked down by weather or current affairs. This starts with a child learning to rely on these skills as strengths within themselves. Though all adults wish they could protect children from life’s horrors, the best protection is really just providing them with the resilience to prepare for and then rise above the tough times and the gratitude to properly celebrate the good times.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Addison Mizner Elementary School: Rebuild and possible relocation By: Diane Emeott Korzen Contributing Writer Speaking as a resident, and not in his official capacity as City Council Member/ CRA Chair, Scott Singer stopped by the Greater Boca Raton Beach & Park District meeting on Aug. 30 to see if the Board was open to the idea of using Sugar Sand Park as a possible alternative location for the soon-to-be renovated Addison Mizner Elementary School. The 51-year-old school is due to be rebuilt, according to Assistant Principal Joe Boone. The main part was built in 1967; with an office building and D-wing built in 1995, and a kitchen renovation around 2000, he said. One option is to rebuild the elementary school at its existing site at 199 SW 12 Ave., Boca Raton, FL 33486 – temporarily sending students toVerde Elementary. “Once they [at Verde Elementary] have their new school built, which they are building right now, we would move into their old site. With that plan, we would be at the [old] Addison Mizner location for 3 more years, including this year — the 2018 school year. School year 2021 is when this proposed option would take place,” explained Boone. A potential second option would be to rebuild the elementary school in the southeast corner of nearby Sugar Sand Park, which borders both Camino Real and Military Trail.

Option 1, Addison Mizner School could be rebuilt at its current location on 12 Avenue. Photo by: Diane Emeott Korzen.

Boone said the Sugar Sand option, if chosen, would take place much sooner. “Once they finalize the plans, they would plan this year and build next year. It’s an18-month building project,” he said. At the Beach & Park District meeting, Singer said he was coming at this rather late, adding that he was picking up on a conversation that had started a month earlier regarding a potential land swap. “The pros are: 1) Right now you’re not doing anything with the southeast corner of Sugar Sand Park. 2) Sugar Sand Park has much better transportation access. The school’s existing site on 12 Avenue has traffic backing up around the block in a traffic night-

Option 2, School could be relocated to southeast corner of Sugar Sand Park, which currently contains Maintenance building and scrubland. Photo by: Diane Emeott Korzen.

mare for parents through neighborhood streets laid out in the 1950s and ‘60s. 3) The better-preserved southeast corner of Sugar Sand Park has a lot of scrubland. “The pitfalls? I have no idea if the residents would support this, and haven’t spoken about it yet with members of the City Council. “However, the time is not long before the [Palm Beach County] School Board is ready to move forward with their plans,” Singer concluded. Commissioner Robert Rollins, Jr. asked Beach & Park District Executive Director/Legal Counsel Arthur Koski to take a look at the areas in the 132-acre Sugar Sand Park where a school might fit — adding that Mr. Koski could get back to the board by their next meeting. (The Sept. 7 meeting was cancelled due to approaching Hurricane Irma.) “We could probably find 15 acres [for a school],” Koski replied. Commissioner Susan Vogelsang asked, “If something is environmentally sensitive today, how do we make it non-environmentally sensitive [regarding the natural scrub area].

Boca City Council Member Scott Boca City Council Member Scott Singer (right) greets Beach & Park Singer speaks as a resident at Aug 30 Dist. Commissioners Erin Wright and Craig Ehrnst. Photo by: Di- Beach & Park District Meeting Photo by: Diane Emeott Korzen. ane Emeott Korzen.

Koski said they would be taking the opposite approach; and look at whether what was environmentally sensitive in 1998 [when the Sugar Sand Park Community Center and field house first opened] is still environmentally sensitive

today. Commissioner Erin Wright wanted to know more about Blazing Star Environmental Preserve, a long, narrow, oblong property southeast of Sugar Sand Park with proximity to the railroad tracks and the I-95 overpass. (According to the sign posted at Blazing Star, this City of Boca environmental preserve was acquired with funds from the Florida Communities Trust Preservation 2000 Program.) Wright also referenced a school in West Palm Beach that she said was built on scrubland, saying it could be a model if the local school is to be relocated to Sugar Sand Park. Commissioner Craig Ehrnst wondered what is currently located in the southeast corner of Sugar Sand Park. “Is there a maintenance building there? Is there a lighting restriction around the 200 ft.parameter of the park?” Assistant Director Briann Harms said later that the southeast corner of Sugar Sand Park currently contains a maintenance building and scrubland. She said that while the Beach & Park District owns the land, “it is up to the city for part of that, as it’s zoned a conservation area.” She added that the nearby Blazing Star Environmental Preserve is considered a separate area. After the discussion, Singer thanked the Board for their willingness to explore ideas.

West Boca Medical Center offers new 3D mammography Staff report West Boca Medical Center is now offering 3D mammography for breast cancer screening. Breast tomosynthesis produces a three-dimensional view of the breast tissue that helps radiologists identify and characterize individual breast structures without the confusion of overlapping tissue.

The center’s Selenia® Dimensions® breast tomosynthesis system is made by Hologic, a world leader in digital mammography. The Selenia Dimensions system offers sharp breast images and an ergonomic design providing more patient comfort. Breast cancer screening with tomosynthesis when combined with a conventional 2D mammography has a 41 percent higher invasive cancer detection rate than conventional 2D mammography alone. Tomosynthesis tech-

nology gives radiologists increased confidence with up to a 40 percent reduction in recall rates. The tomosynthesis screening experience is similar to a traditional mammogram. During a tomosynthesis exam, multiple, low-dose images of the breast are acquired at different angles. These images are then used to produce a series of one-millimeter thick slices that can be viewed as a 3D reconstruction of the breast.


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

FAU Owls Fly High in thrashing of Bethune Cookman Wildcats 45-0 By: David DiPino Contributing Writer Head coach Lane Kiffin said the excitement in his team’s locker room was like just winning the Super Bowl after the Florida Atlantic University football team thrashed the Bethune Cookman Wildcats 45-0 for their first win in 2017 at Howard Schnellenberger Field on the grounds of FAU Stadium. “I’m proud of our guys getting their first win. It was good to see the guys have fun – you would’ve thought they won the Super Bowl in there. I joked with them – I guess you guys haven’t won for a while. It was cool to see because this FAU football team has been working really hard. We got to play a lot of players because we pulled our starters very early and got our backups in the game,” Coach Kiffin said. Coming into the game the Owls had won only nine times in the previous 29 games, a dismal 31 percent winning percentage over that span. Thanks to a monumental effort by a dedicated FAU offensive line, the Owls amassed a team record 439 yards rushing on 58 carries against the Wildcats. Gregory “Buddy” Howell Jr. led FAU with 13 rushes for 175 yards (a 13.5 per carry avg.) and a rushing touchdown, and Devin Singletary rushed 11 times for 109 yards (a 9.9 per carry average) and a 19-yard touchdown run. Singletary, a sophomore at FAU, attended high school at American Heritage – Delray. “At the end of the game we had 439 yards rushing and they (Bethune Cookman) had just 61. I commend the coaches and players for that because that’s pretty cool you can run the ball like that and stop the run while having the most rushing yards in a game in school history and the first shutout in over ten years. I’m very pleased,” said Coach Kiffin. Coach Kiffin and his staff set the tone early with an onside kick after quarter-

Gregory “Buddy” Howell Jr. rushed for 179 yards and a touchdown to help the FAU Owls soar over the Bethune Cookman Wildcats 45-0. Photo by: David DiPino

back Daniel Parr’s rushing touchdown gave FAU an 7-0 early mid-first quarter lead. The Owls recovered the often fumbled onside kick, touched by Wildcats and Owls alike, at their own 28-yard line and drove 72 yards in just two minutes in 56 seconds for their second touchdown and blast the game out of reach at 14-0. “I’m very proud of our guys. At the end of the game I could finally say we played really good football. We ran the ball really well. Our offensive line moved guys. Our tight ends, wide receivers and running backs didn’t run out of bounds - they finished runs and ran hard. We stopped the run and offensively ran the ball well. We played great on special teams.” The FAU defense held Larry Brihm Jr., Bethune Cookman’s starting quarterback to just 56 yards passing. Brihm Jr. starred at Village Academy playing football and growing up in Delray Beach. FAU’s defense forced the Wildcats to punt 11 times in the ball game. Owls defense was led by cornerback Chris Tooley’s 14-yard

Palm Beach County’s own, quarterback Daniel Parr led the FAU Owls to a 45-0 win over Bethune Cookman Wildcats. Parr had two touchdowns (one rush- FAU head coach Lane Kiffin was happy wiith the way ing, one passing) to give FAU (1-2) their first win in his team played in a 45-0 win over Bethune Cook2017. Photo By: David DiPino. man. Photo by: David DiPino

fumble return for a touchdown to give FAU a commanding 45-0 lead. Tooley also had an interception for the defense in the game. Owls kicker Greg Joseph, a graduatesenior from Boca Raton who played at American Heritage-Delray, booted a 46yard field goal midway through the third quarter to give the Owls a 31-0 lead. Joseph was also six-for-six on extra point attempts and along with the field goal scored nine of FAU’s 45 points, all courtesy of his right foot. FAU quarterback Daniel Parr ran nineyards for the Owls first touchdown and later on in the first quarter connected on a five-yard passing touchdown with tight end Harrison Bryant to help build the early 14-0 lead. “Harry’s (Harrison Bryant) a great player and he doesn’t make a lot of mistakes. He makes my job easier,” said Parr. The touchdown catch was the first of Bryant’s career at FAU. Bryant wears uniform

no. 40 for the Owls and is a 6’5’’ 225 lbs. sophomore, tight end out of Gray, GA, John Milledge Academy. “The onside kick was a huge momentum swing. That was a great play call. On my touchdown catch, John Franklin III ran a great route. He got the dude that was covering me up under him and I was wide open,” said Bryant. Attendance was 16,743 against Bethune Cookman on Howard Schenllenberger Field at FAU Stadium. FAU Owls football host the University of Texas Mean Green for Homecoming on Oct. 21, TBD., the Marshall Thundering Herd for Military Appreciation Day on Nov. 3, at 6 p.m., and Florida International University (FIU) for Senior Day on Nov. 18 at 7 p.m. For more information call 1-866-FAUOWLS, visit FAUsports.com or visit the FAU Athletics Ticket Office at 777 Glades Road, Wally Sanger Bldg. TC-67B, Boca Raton, FL 33431.

Save the date, purchase tickets for Great Chefs Tailgate Staff report

and cocktail entries from local eateries.

Boca Raton Bowl’s Great Chefs Tailgate Showcase & College Football Spirit Night is back next month at a new location.

Ticket sales and winning silent auction bids benefit the Boca Raton Bowl’s charity partner Spirit of Giving.

Tickets are on sale for the third annual lead in to the Bowl event on Thursday, Nov. 9 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Renaissance Boca Raton Hotel, 2000 N.W. 19th St.

“We can’t wait to see what this year’s chefs cook up and breweries serve up!” said Doug Mosley, executive director of the Boca Raton Bowl. “We look forward to the most attended, most spirited showcase night yet to benefit our charity partner Spirit of Giving. The event is perfectly timed for both raising awareness of the

Guests are encouraged to come out wearing their own alma mater colors and jerseys, team up for tailgate gaming, mingle with ESPN on-air personalities and cast their own “People’s Choice” votes for their favorite chef, brew

Boca Raton Bowl and much needed funds for our charity partner’s annual holiday gift drive.” Tickets to the Great Chefs Tailgate Showcase event are $50 per person in advance and $60 at the door; price includes all chef and brewery tastings, entertainment and beer, wine and soft drinks. To purchase tickets visit www.spiritofgivingnetwork/chefstailgateshowcase or via Spirit of Giving at www.spiritofgivingnetwork.org or call 561-385-0144.


OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

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Boca snapshots

Julie Mallamo from Heritage Elementary School in Greenacres and Kayla Barbas from Verde Elementary School in Boca Raton discuss sheet music during Teacher Development Days at the Kravis Center. More than 400 public school dance, drama, music and visual art teachers gathered at the Kravis Center earlier this month to participate in the program, a partnership with the School District of Palm Beach County that allows teachers of the arts to experience professional development training, as well as learn about programs available at the Kravis Center for student arts enrichment. The teachers took dance classes, learned the latest in music education theory and were able to browse a vendor market for arts education supplies, among other activities. Photo by Mary Stucchi.

World-renowned photographer Michael Serota will speak on Oct. 3 at 8 a.m. at the Jewish Federation of South Palm Beach County. Five time Olympic photographer, Serota’s active career has covered Hurricane Katrina, the Super Bowl and World Series, the Academy Awards and MTV Awards. Most recently his contributions have been to Corbis, AP and Getty Images in the sport and entertainment arena. The event, and Carlos De Antonis, a recent contestant on Ameri- Industry Icon breakfast, includes breakfast and costs ca’s Got Talent performed during a dinner at Artu- $36 to attend. For more information, contact Sonni ro’s Ristorante Boca Raton. He is sitting with Frank Simon at 561-852-3128 or SonniS@bocafed.org. SubLoRe. Submitted photo. mitted photo.

On Sept. 10, Hurricane Irma brings heavy wind and rain to Boca Raton. Photo by Diane Emeott Korzen.

It is a picture perfect beach day in Boca Raton one day after Hurricane Irma hits South Florida. Staff photo.

After Hurricane Irma, the sun illuminates downed tree limbs outside Patch Reef Park tennis courts. Photo by Diane Emeott Korzen.

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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

Council Corner

check your generator? These are many of the questions that people were asking with only a few hours before the outer bands were hitting. Please take the time now to make a list of what you found you needed and get them now. Getting supplies like a few extra wing nuts, for example, now can save a lot of lastminute stress later.

Kudos to Other Governments: The City worked hand in hand with our county, state, and federal officials. Governor Rick Scott and the entire administration were very proactive and accessible, and the Governor responded personally to questions from me and other elected officials on daily calls. The federal government was quick to declare our area a disaster zone to make relief available, and the County coordinated a range of responses on public safety and other matters. We have learned some valuable lessons to make these joint efforts even stronger.

Huge Thanks to City Staff: All of the dedicated 1,800+ employees of the City of Boca Raton deserve commendation for their efforts before, during, and after Irma. All departments worked very hard, in every unit of government. Fire rescue crews were dealing with emergencies during the storm, and within a few hours of the storm’s passing on Monday, we had every major roadway open. One day later, police and municipal services had every major intersection running on generators or with stop signs. Our sanitation workers dealt with incredibly heavy loads of trash pre-Irma (next time, neighbors, please don’t clean out your garage right before the storm) and then the tons of landscaping debris. Even without power, the city staffed our emergency operations center for more than a week, and employees worked to open our libraries two days after the storm, adding

FPL: Hard Work But Poor Information: As I write this more than a week post-Irma, the biggest issue remaining is restoration of power. Florida Power & Light (FPL) is solely responsible for the power lines, a fact I had to point out to scores of residents, including my neighbors, all of us who were without power for more than a week. The City could not control when they turned on the juice; it’s not a city utility. FPL deserves credit for their work in getting 99% of Boca Raton up and running in less than six days; however, their communications need much, much improvement! Their website not only crashed, but offered very little information. Their operators couldn’t share information that dispatchers had, if they even answered the phone. Many residents were told tickets were closed, when the problems remained (our house had this twice). I stressed to their

Reflections on Irma By: Councilman Scott Singer Special to the Boca Newspaper

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Share Your Comments at Oct. 3 Town Hall: My town hall series, Coffee & Conversation, will return on Monday, October 2, from 6:30 to 8:30pm at the Downtown Boca Library. We’ll spend quite a bit of time on the lessons from this experience. Please attend, share your thoughts, and invite your neighbors. We’ll also review whatever else is on your mind. Until then, thanks for letting me serve you.

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Be Prepared: It’s easy, especially if you’re a native Floridian like me, to become complacent about hurricane prep. Yet how many of us had hurricane kits, supplies, and water and food prepared anew this June 1? Don’t worry – you’re probably not alone if you didn’t. Those, however, are just the basics. Are you sure your shutters are working? Do you have all of your wing nuts? Do you have enough and the right sizes of plywood? Case Do youStudy have flood insurance? Do you have copies of your policies? When did you last

Proactive Policy Changes: I’ve already begun work on a range of policy changes to help us better weather future storms. One concept is to strengthen requirements and monitoring of landscaping near utility lines and easements, to prevent more downed lines. Another would encourage or require plantings that are better suited to strong winds, and with millions of dollars of landscaping to be replaced, this idea is ripe. With potentially millions of dollars of sand washed away, we will have to review our beach renourishment plans. Statewide, there will be discussions about undergrounding more lines, which has plusses and minuses. Finally, we have many lessons on ensuring better flow of information and better preparedness and reaction. Again, we can be grateful that we had no fatalities in a city of nearly 100,000 people – a key fact to remember.

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With Hurricane Irma, all of us in Boca Raton have great reason to be very grateful. What was forecast for days as a catastrophic Category 5 storm centered on Boca turned out to be far less than that. For sure, we’ve experienced inconveniences and hardships, but they pale in comparison to the deaths and destruction we might have endured. This column focuses on some post-hurricane lessons for all of us.

local and statewide reps the need and benefit to being more transparent. We as customers have come to expect it, and frankly deserve it. I’m working on inspiring more changes on FPL’s part for next time.

other services the following day. The City of Boca Raton was on it for you, right away.

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OCTOBER 2017 | YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Council Corner Planning Boca’s budget By: Councilman Robert Weinroth Special to the Boca Newspaper As the saying goes, it never rains, it pours. After a dozen years without a major hurricane making landfall in the United States, the country received a one-two punch with Harvey bringing over 50” of rain to the greater Houston area, followed in short order by Irma which remained a Category 5 hurricane for several days and, but for its westward track, could have inflicted very heavy damage on our piece of paradise. As people are piecing together their lives in the Caribbean and the Keys, we dodged a bullet and have resumed our regular routines. However, as I am writing this column, the Caribbean islands are, again, bracing for a major hurricane. Maria is taking aim on many of the islands already devastated by Irma. September is when the counties, municipalities and taxing districts are required by the Florida department of Revenue to prepare, review, hold two public hearings and approve their budgets for the upcoming fiscal year (which begins on Oct. 1). However, with no part of Florida left untouched by the wind, rain and storm surge generated by Irma, Governor Rick Scott extended the deadline for this process. In Boca Raton, our first public hearing on the proposed budget was to have been held just as Irma was passing through our city. As a result, our first hearing was delayed until September 25th. The public hearing on the final budget will likely be held the first or second week of October. For FY 2017-18, the proposed citywide combined use of funds, including operations, transfers and fund balance/ reserves totals $732.4 million. The proposed citywide total operating budget is

$443.2 million with the proposed General Fund operating portion of the budget totals $168.4 million. The City Manager’s proposed budget takes into account the goals and priorities established by the City Council during its strategic planning session. This year, the council established 17 items as its priorities for FY 2017-18. They are: • Business Retention/Expansion: Strategy & Actions; • Economic Development Plan: Strategy & Implementation; • Smart City/Tech Business Development Strategy; • Culture of Innovation; • Development Process Streamlining; • Human Resource Planning: Succession & Development; • City Campus Master Plan; • City Services & Staffing Levels; • Beach & Parks District; • FAU: Campus Agreement; Town & Gown: Workshop & Direction; Student Housing; • University District Conceptual Master Plan; • Complete Streets Policy; • Comprehensive Waterfront Master Plan; • Downtown Traffic Alternatives Study; • Midtown Development; • Land Development Code Update; and • Art in Public Places The priorities cover a broad range of issues. However, notwithstanding the enunciation of these priorities, the City Manager strives to keep the cost of delivering services under control. The proposed budget includes fifty new positions to support expanded opera-

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tions of all City departments to preserve the level of services demanded by our residents. Due to the 7 percent increase in property values within the city (just over 5 percent of the increase due to increased property assessments and the remainder from new construction), the total millage rate will be virtually unchanged at 3.6788, with a home with a taxable value of $300,000 will pay 41,103.64 in ad valorem taxes. Boca Raton will continue to provide quality services to its residents, expanding and upgrading police, fire and municipal services.

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The ability to hold tax rates constant is due, in large part, to an aggressive economic development program and redevelopment within the downtown and beyond.

Boca Raton’s universities and colleges are, likewise, providing superior educational opportunities. Coupled with Lynn University and Palm Beach State College, our workforce is well educated and ready to work.

Leading Fortune 500 companies continue to make Boca Raton their home resulting in a prosperous and upscale community. Of the 67 corporate headquarters in Palm Beach County, 25 are situated in Boca Raton.

Boca Raton can also boast a quality college of medicine. In partnership with FAU, the Boca Raton Regional Hospital has been transformed into a teaching and research hospital.

In 2010, the City Council created an economic development fund to provide incentives for companies seeking to relocate to or expand within the city. In the seven years since the fund was established, Boca Raton has created or retained over 10,000 high paying jobs. While the economic incentives, offered in partnership with the state and county are an indispensible ingredient as Boca Raton competes against other venues, it is ultimately the quality of life enjoyed by our residents that closes the deal. Public safety is of paramount importance to a CEO during site selection. Boca Raton is clearly in the upper quartile in this respect as it is compared to communities throughout South Florida. Our community can boast also boast an educated workforce. Our A rated public schools; coupled quality private schools, offer a challenging and varied curricu-

The FAU Tech Runway and Research Park at FAU continue to provide a supportive environment where companies are nurtured with the essential resources necessary for their success. Boca Raton is clearly the place to work, live, play, raise a family and, ultimately retire. This didn’t happen by accident. Boca Raton recognizes the importance of facilitating economic development to create and maintain economic sustainability. The millennials are coming and Boca Raton is making plans for them to take their place within the fabric of our community.

Meet the team Reach us at: BocaNewspaper.com 561-299-1430 info@bocanewspaper.com

Free admission at Boca Raton Museum of Art this month Staff report After the stressful days brought on by the stormy weather and its aftermath, the Boca Raton Museum of Art has waived admission charges through October. Visitors are welcome to relax and enjoy the galleries and Sculpture Garden. An updated schedule of programs and activities for adults and families is available online at www.bocamuseum.org/events. “Fortunately the Museum and its Art School sustained no damage. But we know that others in our community did

not fare as well. The power of the arts as a healing, creative, and shared activity in people’s lives is as important as ever,” said Executive Director Irvin Lippman. “We are grateful for the corporate support of PNC Bank, who is helping to make this service to our community possible.” Currently on view: Shirin Neshat: Fervor and Turbulent Two films by Iranian artist Shirin Neshat explore gender roles, relationships, and equality in her home country.

Ryan Boylston, Co-founder and Publisher

Enjoy free entry to the Boca Raton Museum of Art and Sculpture Garden this month. Photo credit Eduardo Chacon.

Patricia Nix: American Baroque Continuing the tradition of women Surrealists, Patricia Nix’s fantastic constructions and paintings are elaborate and boldly colored, drawing on both lightly whimsical and darkly psychological interpretations of the materials she employs.

Jeff Perlman, Editor-in-Chief and Principal Scott Porten, Chief-Financial-Officer and Principal Craig Agranoff, Content Director and Principal Fran Marincola, Adviser and Principal Marisa Herman, Associate Editor Kelly McCabe, Account Manager


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YOUR COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER | OCTOBER 2017

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