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DELL CHILDREN’S MEDICAL CENTER FOUNDATION MAGAZINE

In Support of Little Humans WINTER 2017

6

THE MENTAL HEALTH ISSUE


It’s easier to build up a child than it is to repair an adult.


Co n len l s

4 6 12 14

LEADERS IN GIVING Community leaders supporting the new FORWARD Campaign FROM DARKNESS INTO LIGHT Dell Children’s is lighting the way towards one stop service for childen in need of mental health care TWO LEADING LIGHTS IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE Meet Kevin Stark and Julie Alonzo-Katzowitz THE FORWARD CAMPAIGN: HOW YOU CAN HELP


In 2016 will have a mental health

About 1 in 5 children

or emotional issue during their childhood. My advice to families is to get help sooner, rather than later if you are noticing problems or struggling with your

child. Delaying or avoiding care tends to make problems worse.

— DR. ALONSO-KATZOWITZ, DIRECTOR, PEDIATRIC PSYCHOSOMATIC MEDICINE SERVICE, DELL CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER OF CENTRAL TEXAS.

1,419

children and teens visited the Dell Children’s emergency department with a psychiatric issue.

8,472

mental health appointments at the Texas Child Study Center.

987

children and adolescents admitted to Shoal Creek Hospital.

489

child/teen visits through Dell Children’s emergency department for suicidal thoughts or self-harm. ACC R E D ITAT IO N Dell Children’s Medical Center meets the highest national standards set for medical and nursing staff, hospital personnel, patient care and hospital service, and is committed to providing the finest health care tailored specifically to children and adolescents in the 46 counties it serves. Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas is a member of the Seton Healthcare Family and is accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations; the Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons as a Network Cancer Program; and the American Nurses Association for Magnet Award status of nursing excellence.

145

child/teen visits at Dell Children’s emergency department for attempted suicide.


from the executive director

Shining a Light on Mental Health. When I was a child from the ages of five through 17, I had the unfortunate experience of seeing too many people my family and I cared about dissolve into depression. Ultimately some of them took their own lives. Some were family. Some were friends. And beautifully some were both. Each of those moments still haunts me. I remember where I was each time—eight times to be exact--when I learned the news. My parents never sugar-coated it. They were honest and appropriate. They told me how sadness can sometimes have a grip so strong that people lose hope. Mental illness is something that touches all of us, whether we know it or not. We work, love and commune with family and friends who are suffering, often in painful silence. Many of these people might have shown symptoms as children. I wonder what paths their lives might have taken if they had gotten help sooner or at all. Too often, the stigma attached to mental illness keeps families from seeking care. This is compounded by the fact that access to mental health services is limited in our region and many families find themselves in crisis with nowhere to turn. Today we will change that for our community. Recently we announced that we have launched the FORWARD campaign to raise critical funds for mental health, endowment and our regional heart center. Our first area of focus is mental health. With support from a generous 1:1 challenge grant from the Maxwell Family, Dell Children’s is raising funds to open a unit with the full spectrum of mental health services. This 24-bed unit will be named the Grace Grego Maxwell Mental Health Unit. This new unit would have been tremendously beneficial to Kate Peoples, now a young adult and graduate student who plans to become a therapist. Years ago, Kate and her family had no choice but to travel to three different cities to access the care she needed to recover from a debilitating eating disorder (read more on page16). You can visit www.dellchildrensforward.org to learn more. If you are interested in speaking with someone directly about how you might join us in this campaign, please let us know. We are calling it the FORWARD campaign because it’s time for us to move forward on this issue. With the loving support of our community, we can and will help all of our children and their families emerge from the darkness into the light. Will you join us today and let your light shine?

Kristi Katz, CFRE e x e c u t i v e d i r e c to r

Donate online at dellchildrensforward.org or contact our Foundation at 512.324.0170.

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Leaders in Giving Nyle and Nancy Maxwell

LEFT TO RIGHT:

Greg Maxwell, Lou Ann Maxwell, Athena Maxwell, Trey Maxwell, Nancy Maxwell, Nyle Maxwell, Grace Maxwell, Marcella Maxwell, Toni (Grace) Maxwell, Jeffrey Maxwell, Denise Cochran, Oliver Cochran, Jess Lowrey, Ross Dunagan, Sarah Dunagan, Craig Lenard, Ashley Lenard, Oliver Cochran, William Cochran

“Having an embedded mental

On November 5, 1990, their oldest son’s birthday, Nyle and Nancy Maxwell were home

health unit within Dell Children’s

watching the news. Judy Maggio was reporting on a little boy fighting for his life at

is going to break down so

Brackenridge Hospital, who desperately needed a respirator and transportation to and from Houston for medical care. “The story tugged on my heart,” recalled Nyle. “Since I

many barriers. Once and for

knew Judy, I picked up the phone and told her to look no further. My family wanted to help.”

all, children will have a place for

both their mind and body, all

Nyle soon became involved with the Brackenridge Foundation and served on the board

of Brackenridge Hospital for three years. In 1995, he was asked to serve as chairman of the Children’s Hospital Foundation, which he did until 2002 when he was elected Mayor

encapsulated at Dell Children’s.”

of Round Rock. Nyle continued to serve on the Foundation Board for many years and was

NYLE MAXWELL

a staunch supporter for the campaign to build Dell Children’s. He remains a member of the board and is a leader among his peers.

Nyle and his siblings, Denise Cochran and Greg Maxwell and their familes, including

his mother Toni, a longtime volunteer at Dell Children’s, are passionate about improving access to mental health care. Toni Maxwell made a $1 million challenge grant to the endowment of the Texas Child Study Center, an outpatient mental health clinic that is part of a partnership between Dell Children’s and the University of Texas Educational Psychology Department (see page 11). Nyle’s sister, Denise Cochran, along with her mother, have also raised funds for the Texas Child Study Center endowment through their work with the Northwest Circle of Friends. Following her family’s passion for the issue of mental health, Marcella Maxwell, one of Nancy and Nyle’s four children, became a therapist and currently works with the Dell Children’s Texas Child Study Center team.

“The Texas Child Study Center is one of the jewels we have in our community,” said

Nyle. “Under Dr. Kevin Stark’s direction, we are helping more kids who would otherwise not be helped and are training the mental health providers of the future."

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In January, the Maxwell Family announced a $3 million challenge grant to help raise the funds needed to build the Grace Grego Maxwell Mental Health Unit at Dell Children’s. The Maxwell family wants to inspire and help raise $6 million by the end of 2017 in support of mental health services.

“There are a lot of families not seeking help for their kids because they don’t know how or they are ashamed or they

don’t want to talk about it or they get lost in the system. The simple fact that we are talking about this new mental health unit and raising money for it as a community should go a long way towards raising awareness about mental health and removing the stigma of seeking care,” said Nyle.

John and Debra Gilluly Debra and John Gilluly are strident believers in Dell Children’s, its mission and its people. The couple and their four children recently made a lead gift to Dell Children’s. John, the Managing Partner of DLA Piper in Texas, was introduced to Dell Children’s by a close friend and Dell Children’s board member. He also recently had the opportunity to observe Dell Children’s physicians, nurses and administrators in action and was forever changed by the experience. Debra is a nurse practitioner who works with patients on kidney dialysis. She did clinical hours at Dell Children’s during her training and has first-hand experience of the life-saving work that happens every day.

“Health care is a big part of our lives. We’re a part

of the health care community and understand and value how important it is to have a medical center solely dedicated to children,” said John.

John attended Jesuit High School in New Orleans

The Gilluly Family

which instills in its students to be People in Faith and Service of Others.“ We try to live that vision in our home,” explained John. “We feel that Dell Children’s also lives that vision and shares our family’s values.”

John was initially surprised to learn that mental

health was one of the medical center’s largest undermet health care needs. “Dell Children’s wants to distinguish itself as a leader in mental health, just like it has in areas like epilepsy and trauma. An important first step is to establish an inpatient mental health

“One thing I love at Dell Children’s is how many of the rooms are dedicated by different families. When I visit the medical center, I see a lot of names that I recognize. It really makes you feel like the community has its arms around you and is holding you up.” JOHN GILLULY

unit. Nothing like this exists in Austin, and our community has an obligation to help our children in any way we can,” John said. “Our existing providers are doing a tremendous job, but adding a dedicated inpatient unit to Dell Children’s campus will allow us to do even better."

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FROM DARKNESS

LI GH ‘‘

There is no health without mental health. Co-Director, Texas Child Study Center

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‘‘

DR. KEVIN STARK


INTO

HT

A New Home for Pediatric Mental Health Care in Central Texas An unconscious teen named Emily* is rushed to the Dell Children’s emergency room following a suicide attempt. Emily’s immediate medical needs are addressed by the physicians on call and a psychiatrist is called in for a consult. After conducting a thorough evaluation, the medical team determines that Emily is a risk to herself and needs inpatient care so she can be stabilized and treated for her debilitating depression. A social worker is called in to find a bed for the young teen, but learns that Shoal Creek Hospital is at capacity. So, Emily and her exhausted parents spend the night in the emergency room, waiting until a room is available.

This scenario plays out all too often at Dell Children’s because Central Texas does not have enough beds to provide the mental health care so many children and teens need. In 2016, 1,419 children and teens arrived at Dell Children’s with a psychiatric diagnosis, more than one-third for either attempted suicide or suicidal ideation. With the number of children and teens who commit suicide rising, and at a younger age, we can and must do better. *Emily is a fictional composite of a Dell Children’s patient.

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CHARTING A NEW PATH

THE PLAN

Central Texas is at a crossroads. The momentum has been

With philanthropic support from the community, Dell

building for years to improve access to pediatric mental

Children’s plans to renovate a wing of the third bed tower

health care in our community by creating an integrated

to build the Grace Grego Maxwell Mental Health Unit.

system that is built by and for the families of Central Texas.

Initially, the unit will open with 24 beds of which 18 will

Central to this new system will be a dedicated inpatient

be dedicated to general psychiatric use and six for medical/

mental health unit and the addition of the Texas Child

psychiatric diagnoses, including eating disorder patients.

Study Center to the Dell Children’s campus.

Dell Children's also has plans to establish a Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP) for children and teens who

With support from the community and donors like you,

are ready to go home, but still require close monitoring and

Dell Children’s will chart a new path for pediatric mental

intensive treatment. These patients will receive care eight

health care in Central Texas. Although our community

hours a day, five days a week at Dell Children’s, but will

is blessed with outstanding mental health caregivers, the

spend evenings and weekends at home with their family.

current inpatient facility at Shoal Creek Hospital is often at capacity. Moreover, the facility is aging and cannot provide

This critical investment enables Dell Children’s to relocate

medical treatment on-site. For example, if a child has a heart

inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric services from

or gastrointestinal issue caused by an eating disorder, Shoal

Shoal Creek to Dell Children’s and offers several benefits:

Creek is not equipped to provide needed medical care.

• The full spectrum of mental and general health services, including specialty care, will be provided by Dell Children’s trusted caregivers all under a single roof. • Families will not need to travel outside the city to seek inpatient mental health care. • Children and teens will be treated in a family-friendly unit specifically designed for them. • Children and teens with medical needs, either related or unrelated to their mental condition, can be monitored

20%

Just over (or 1 in 5) children will have a mental health or emotional issue during their childhood.

and treated onsite, eliminating the need for stressful facility transfers. • Children and teens receiving treatment at Dell Children’s for non-psychiatric medical conditions will have increased access to mental health consults. • Children and teens can maintain their relationship with their mental health providers after being discharged from the hospital at the new onsite outpatient clinic.

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It's exhausting to fight a war in your head every single day.

IN 2016

1,419 CHILDREN PRESENTED AT DELL CHILDREN'S WITH MENTAL HEALTH RELATED ISSUES. TOP 5 ISSUES Suicidal Ideation

Suicide Attempt

Agitation and Aggression Substance Use Disorder

Behavioral Issue Source: Dell Children's

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NOW

CHILDREN IN MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS TRAVEL THROUGH A COMPLEX AND FRAGMENTED P

14 BEDS Shoal Creek Hospital is generally able to dedicate 14 beds to children under the age of eighteen. Children sometimes have long waits for a bed. In addition, Shoal Creek is an aging facility that was designed for adults, not children.

k Child in Crisis goes to Dell Children's Emergency Room

(for example, suicide attempt, drug overdose, eating disorder complication, or psychotic episode)

ma.

l Child assessed by Emergency Room team and inpatient care is advised

Shoal Creak bed is available and child is transferred

mb.

Shoal Creek bed is not available

Child remains in a secure room at Dell Children's, while family and social workers seek out-of-town alternative care or wait until a Shoal Creek bed becomes available

SOON (with your help!) CHILDREN IN MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS WILL HAVE A 24 BEDS At capacity, the new Grace Grego Maxwell wing of Dell Children's will include 24 beds. Patients in the new wing will have access to the full spectrum of mental health and medical care together, which is not currently available at Shoal Creek.

k

Child in Crisis goes to Dell Children's Emergency Room (suicide attempt, drug overdose, eating disorder complication, psychotic episode)

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l

Child assessed by Emergency Room team and inpatient care is advised

m

Child remains at Dell Children's receiving comprehensive mental and physical health care, including

ongoing treatment and monitoring for co-existing medical conditions, such as cancer, heart conditions and diabetes.


PROCESS.

n

If a child needs additional medical care

he or she is transferred back to Dell Children's to receive that care and then back to Shoal Creek if needed

oa.

Child discharged to Intensive Outpatient Program

ob.

Child discharged to Outpatient Program

Children who are ready to leave the hospital, but still require intensive care will spend two to three hours a day, several days a week at Shoal Creek participating in individual and group counseling*

Most children who are discharged from Shoal Creek will continue their treatment attending weekly individual or group counseling sessions at Texas Child Study Center

* Intensive Outpatient Programs are also used to prevent hospitalizations.

DEDICATED HOME FOR COMPREHENSIVE CARE.

na. Child discharged to Partial Hospitalization Program

This new program will allow an extra level of care. Children who are ready to go home, but still require close observation and extensive treatment will spend eight hours a day, five days a week at Dell Children’s participating in individual and group counseling*

nb.

Child discharged to Intensive Outpatient Program

Children who are ready to go home, but still require intensive care will spend two to three hours a day, several days a week at the Dell Children’s campus participating in individual and group counseling*

nc.

Child discharged to Outpatient Program

Most children who are discharged from the new inpatient unit at Dell Children’s will continue their treatment by attending weekly individual or group counseling sessions at the Texas Child Study Center, located on the Dell Children’s campus.

THE TEXAS CHILD STUDY CENTER The Texas Child Study Center (TCSC) is a collaboration between Dell Children’s and The University of Texas Educational Psychology Department. Founded in 2008 by psychologist Dr. Kevin Stark and psychiatrist Dr. William Streusand, the TCSC serves thousands of children and families every year. Currently located in an office building near Shoal Creek Hospital, the TCSC will relocate to the Dell Children’s campus when the proposed mental health unit opens. The TCSC team includes four child psychiatrists and 16 psychiatric residents, 12 child psychologists, four doctoral student interns and 14 graduate students. Dr. Kevin Stark (see “Meet Dr. Stark” page 12), is the co-founder of the Center and Director of the Psychology Service. One of the only clinics in the region that accepts insurance, the TCSC treats a wide range of pediatric mental health conditions. The most common being anxiety, depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and oppositional defiant disorder. For more information or to make an appointment for your child or teen at the Texas Child Study Center, call 512-324-3315.

* Intensive Outpatient Programs and Partial Hospitalization Programs are also used to prevent hospitalizations. SUPPORTDELLCHILDRENS.ORG / DELLCHILDRENSFORWARD.ORG

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‘‘

MEET JULIE ALONSO-KATZOWITZ, MD

There are more kids in Central Texas who need inpatient mental health care than there are beds. I have patients who need to travel outside the city to get the care they need, which adds more stress for the family and child. Sometimes patients spend days in the emergency room waiting for a bed to open up. We must do better and with the new mental health inpatient unit at Dell Children’s, we will. DR. KEVIN STARK

Co-Director, Texas Child Study Center

Dr. Julie Alonso-Katzowitz serves as the Director of the Pediatric Psychosomatic Medicine Service at Dell Children’s Medical Center. In this role, she leads the team of psychiatrists who provide mental health consultations at Dell Children’s. Dr. Alonso-Katzowitz is also an assistant professor at Dell Medical School and helps teach medical students,

‘‘

interns and residents at the Texas Child Study Center.

A New York native, Dr. Alonso-Katzowitz completed

her residency at the prestigious Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and a fellowship in forensic psychiatry at Emory University. Attracted to the city’s growing and vibrant medical community, Dr. Alonso moved to Austin in 2011 with her husband. She is both a board certified pediatrician and a board certified child and forensic psychiatrist.

MEET KEVIN STARK, PH.D. Psychologist Dr. Kevin Stark is the co-director of the Texas Child Study Center and a professor at The University of Texas at Austin. He has lived and practiced in Austin for over 31 years. Dr. Stark completed his undergraduate training in Master’s degree in experimental psychology at the University of Richmond and his Ph.D. in school psychology at the University of Wisconsin.

A professor at The University of Texas at Austin, Dr. Stark

is an internationally recognized expert in the treatment of youth depression and teaches graduate level courses on child and adolescent therapy. He co-founded the Texas Child Study Center in 2008 with psychiatrist Dr. William Streusand.

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‘‘

Currently, if a pediatric patient at Shoal Creek needs sutures, or a test like an MRI, we need to transfer the child over to Dell Children’s. The new inpatient mental health unit, besides being more convenient and tailored for children and their families, will hopefully help reduce the stigma of seeking treatment for mental health conditions.

‘‘

psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, his

DR. JULIE ALONSO–KATZOWITZ

Director, Pediatric Psychosomatic Medicine Service at Dell Children's Medical Center of Central Texas


SUICIDE IS A LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH TOP THREE CAUSES OF DEATH AMONG TRAVIS COUNTY YOUTH

  

Ages 5-14

1

  

Ages 15-24

Unintentional Injury

Unintentional Injury

Malignant Neoplasms

Suicide

Suicide

Homicide

2

3

Source: Austin Public Health’s Epidemiology and Disease Surveillance Unit. “Ten Leading Causes of Death by Age Group, 2010-2014

I can’t just snap my fingers and make it go away. SUPPORTDELLCHILDRENS.ORG / DELLCHILDRENSFORWARD.ORG

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Pain is real. But so is hope.

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‘‘

Every day our kids are in crisis and we have to be able to meet them where they are. It breaks my heart, but right now children in Central Texas don’t have a dedicated, pediatricfocused inpatient facility where they can immediately go if they suffer a mental health crisis. Many good minds are coming together to solve this problem and Dell Children’s is taking the lead. NYLE MAXWELL

‘‘

THE FORWARD CAMPAIGN: HOW YOU CAN HELP Longtime supporters of Dell Children’s (see Leaders in Giving on page 4), Nancy and Nyle Maxwell, along with

WITH THIS GENEROUS $3 MILLION CHALLENGE GRANT, YOUR GIFT OF $100 BECOMES $200 OR YOUR GIFT OF $1,000 BECOMES $2,000. YOU GET THE IDEA.

Nyle’s siblings, their spouses and matriarch Toni Maxwell, have issued a $3 million challenge grant offering a 1:1 match for donations supporting the new inpatient mental health unit received through the end of 2017. With this generous 1:1 challenge, your gift in any amount, will go twice as far, helping children and teens connect with the comprehensive mental health care they need to break through from the darkness to light.

For more information or to make a donation, call 512-324-0170 or visit www.dellchildrensforward.org.

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PATIENT STORY

‘‘

You can’t always outwardly tell if someone has an eating disorder and you won’t know in a singular moment if your child is suffering from one. But with good care and treatment, it is possible to recover. Although eating disorders are multi-faceted illnesses that take time to heal, they are not a life-long sentence.

Austin native, Kate Peoples understands the critical importance of Dell Children’s new mental health unit. She spent a good chunk of her high school and college years in treatment for a debilitating eating disorder. Because Austin did not offer the type of care she needed, Kate sought residential treatment in Dallas, New Orleans and Miami.

Kate was in 9th grade the first time she went into

‘‘

KATE PEOPLES

KATE PEOPLES

Congress passed the “21st Century CURES Act,” which includes eating disorder provisions from the Anna Westin Act (named for a young woman who died of suicide after her insurance company denied coverage for residential treatment for her eating disorder).

“Continuity of care and family support are so important

for the treatment of eating disorders. I can only imagine how beneficial it will be to have all levels of care for eating disorders in Austin and at one campus,” said Kate.

residential treatment. The best option for her at that time was a facility in Dallas. “It was a hugely difficult time for our family,” said her mother Karen. “I traveled up once or twice a week, but my husband had to stay home with our two boys even though we wanted and needed to all be together. I

For more information about eating disorders, visit the National Eating Disorders Association website at www.nationaleatingdisorders.org or call the confidential national help line at 1-800-931-2237.

am thrilled that Dell Children’s is establishing an inpatient mental health unit. Our community desperately needs it.”

Kate is now 26 years old and is finishing up her Master of

Social Work degree at The University of Texas at Austin. She plans to put her personal experience to work and become a therapist specializing in eating disorders. Kate and her mom, Karen, are also strong advocates for parity laws that ensure eating disorders receive equal insurance coverage and have travelled to Washington, DC several times. Last year,

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EATING DISORDERS FREQUENTLY APPEAR DURING TEEN OR YOUNG ADULTHOOD YEARS BUT CAN ALSO DEVELOP THROUGHOUT LIFE.

RATES AMONG FEMALES ARE

2½ X GREATER THAN AMONG MALES.


Not every disability is visible.

1 IN 4 TEENS WILL DEVELOP AN ANXIETY DISORDER Source: National Institute of Mental Health

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Sometimes when I say “I’m okay,” I want someone to look me in the eyes and say “I know you’re not.”

3 million (12%)

ADOLESCENTS AGED 12 TO 17 IN THE UNITED STATES HAD AT LEAST ONE MAJOR DEPRESSIVE EPISODE IN 2015. Source: National Institute of Mental Health

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PATIENT STORY

‘‘

‘‘

As a parent of a child with complex health needs, I can only see benefits from having a mental health unit on-site at the hospital. LISA LOE

Christopher's Mom

Christopher’s superhero persona, Kranio Kid, has helped him cope with the anxiety of being in the hospital and undergoing surgery.

CHRISTOPHER LOE Self-proclaimed “Kranio Kid,” Christopher Loe, is a beloved patient at Dell Children’s. His medical team includes no fewer than 25 physicians, including Dell Children’s Physician-inChief, Moise Levy, MD, a renowned pediatric dermatologist.

Born at just 26 weeks, Christopher has multiple complex

medical conditions, including Craniosyntosis, which caused his head to be elongated and required multiple surgeries.

psychologists at the Texas Child Study Center were incredible with Christopher and I know each of them cared deeply for my son,” said Lisa.

The family recently moved from Cedar Park to San

Marcos. “A big part of our decision to stay close to Austin is so Christopher can continue to see his team of physicians at Dell Children’s. “Dell Children’s has been such a blessing in our lives. The doctors and nurses have really taken Christopher into their hearts.”

“From day one Christopher was a fighter,” said his mom, Lisa who works as a special education and anti-bullying advocate. “He has had 26 different surgeries in 16 years, but he cares more about others than he does himself.”

In first grade, Christopher was diagnosed with Asperger’s, a

form of autism. He attended public school through 4th grade where he was severely bullied. Today, Christopher is homeschooled by his mom. Although Christopher is highly verbal, he is legally blind and has a skin condition that keeps him from spending a lot of time outdoors. In April 2015, Christopher began having terrible seizures. He was recently admitted to the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit to learn more about his seizures.

Christopher also has been diagnosed with anxiety and

obsessive-compulsive disorder. For years, he received treatment at the Texas Child Study Center. “The psychiatrists and

Christopher remains indoors much of the time due to one of his medical conditions. Perhaps for this reason, he loves mail more than most kids his age. Here he proudly shows some of the Christmas cards he received from all over the world.

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TEN WARNING SIGNS OF SUICIDE Suicide is a leading, but preventable cause of death in the United States. Although males commit suicide at nearly four times the rate of females, females are more likely to have suicidal thoughts.

  

1. Preoccupation with death and dying 2. Drastic changes in behavior or personality 3. A recent severe loss (such as a relationship) or threat of a loss 4. Unexpected preparations for death such as making out a will 5. Giving away prized possessions 6. A previous suicide attempt 7. Uncharacteristic impulsiveness, recklessness or risk-taking 8. Loss of interest in personal appearance 9. Increased use of alcohol or drugs 10. Sense of hopelessness about the future Source: Mental Health Association of Texas

SUICIDE EMERGENCY CONTACTS:

512-472-4357

Travis County Psychiatric Emergency Services hotline

1-800-273-8255

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

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½

OF ALL MENTAL HEALTH CONDITIONS

BEGIN BY AGE 14

Source: National Alliance on Mental Illness

If it’s hard to watch it, imagine how hard it must be to live it. Our physicians and their patients thrive with your support. Contact us at 512.324.0170 or www.dellchildrensforward.org to see how you can help. SUPPORTDELLCHILDRENS.ORG / DELLCHILDRENSFORWARD.ORG

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NON-PROFIT US Postage PAID Austin, TX 78710 Permit # 526 4900 Mueller Boulevard Austin, Texas 78723

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

www.dellchildrensforward.org

Your gifts bring light to the lives of children fighting for their childhood. To make a donation to the FORWARD campaign, call us at 512-324-0170 or visit www.dellchildrensforward.org

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What mental health needs is more sunlight, more candor, more unashamed conversation about illnesses that affect not only individuals, but their families as well.

Miracles is published four times a year for donors and friends of Dell Children’s Medical Center. It is a publication of Dell Children’s Medical Center Foundation, Kristi Katz, Executive Director.

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G L E N N C LO S E

Miracles is compiled by the production team: Amy Spiro, Mindstorm Consulting; Bucko Design; Jim Lincoln, support photography.

Profile for Dell Children's Medical Center Foundation

Miracles Magazine Spring 2017 Issue  

Miracles Magazine Spring 2017 Issue  

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