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DELISHMAG.COM

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Cherish 7 No.

ISSUE

WINTER 2011


SEASON’S GREETINGS, DEAR READERS!

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I’m sure you, like me, can barely believe that we’re nearing Christmas time again! Surely I can’t be the only one experiencing the acceleration of time as I get older? Wow, that’s a scary phenomenon.

Getting older is on my mind a lot these days as I approach a milestone birthday. On December 21st I turn 40 years old. Now, I don’t share that to get birthday wishes but to elicit sympathy! I’m turning 40 years old! How did that happen?! I’m sure that is also a sentiment that many of our Delish readers can identify with.

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) Editor’s Letter

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This year I have more Christmas spirit than I have had in a very long time. I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we want to make it special for our son, who is just over two years old now, and who is starting to get more involved in such occasions. His enthusiasm over the Christmas lights is infectious. Over the days leading up to the big night, we want to delight him even more, and in turn delight in him. Cynthia and I have had many busy creative nights, putting together our Annual (I can use that title now that this is our second year running!) Gift Guide, and we think it’s a great one. I’ve also written a smaller article about making your own handmade gifts this year, and would encourage you to take my suggestions merely as a starting point, if you have the time to get started on handcrafting now.

Me at Christmas, about age 12 or 13. (I can’t believe I am sharing this!)

I came by the idea of a homemade Christmas present quite early. I am not sure how old I was, but I remember one of the very first did-it-myself gifts I gave to my parents. I don’t remember it well but somewhere a picture exists, of me with a bow tied around my neck and a hand drawn card in my hands — I gave the gift of… myself. It was the ultimate eco-friendly, low budget and thoughtful gift and it was, just like we say, made with love. The stories in this issue with the theme of Cherish are all about family heirlooms – in the form of memories, traditions, ornaments and recipes, all cherished, shared and handed down from generation to generation. May you have and make your own this holiday season.

Live like you mean it,

Tamara


delish* magazine

*Live like you mean it.

Cherish

IN EVERY ISSUE 10 Delish Loves

Lovely things that make us squeal a little.

to Etsy 11 Heavens Haute Handmade. of Mouse 12 Word What's on our current must-click lists.

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WINTER 2011

14 FEATURES Christmas Handed Down Written by: Lori O’Hara Memories and history mingle in a story of how the magic of something handmade captures the spirit of Christmas for a busy working mom.

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MAKE DIY PROJECT: Buttoned Up Wreath Holiday Ornament Written by: Cynthia Frenette The best decorations are those with some history and meaning – with this DIY project, Gran’s buttons take center stage.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE —

THE 2011 DELISh

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GIFT GUIDE

Written by: Tamara Komuniecki and Cynthia Merriman ’Tis the season…to start worrying about finding the perfect gift for all of those people on your list. But hang on! Take a good look at our finds before you brave the mall.

Made With Love By… You! Written by: Tamara Komuniecki Whether it's something big or something small, a specially handmade gift conveys the spirit of the holidays like no other.

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34 TASTE The Taste of Christmas

Written by: Cynthia Merriman I have two prominent Christmas memories from my childhood — my Grandpa’s excitable antics, and these wonderful whipped shortbread cookies.

Relish The Holidays Written by: Amanda Jennings This easy-to-make and versatile relish is delicious on anything and everything.

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COMING UP IN SPRING DELISH BEHIND THE BLOG We’ve not had confirmation yet, but we’ve inquired at the headquarters of one of the most amazing sites that exists on the internet… if they say yes to letting us take a peek at what goes on behind the scenes, it could get very pinteresting…

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GENERATION MAKE Ashley English leads the good life with her husband and son on her farm — she keeps bees, cares for cows, raises chickens and writes books. We’ve got an interview with her and a chance to win a collection of her four titles.

OUR MOST POPULAR POSTS INCLUDE:

WHAT’S NEW

ON THE BLOG...

WORDY WEDNESDAY Teeny Tiny MochiMochi: More Than 40 Itty Bitty Minis to Knit, Wear, and Give and Good Bite Weeknight Meals: Delicious Made Easy. WHERE IN THE WORLD IS… featured Ann Jones, who recently moved from Provo, Utah to Doha, Qatar. This peek into her life in Qatar is incredibly interesting and her great pictures help to tell the story.

CHERISH YOUR YESTERDAYS, DREAM ABOUT TOMORROW BUT LIVE FOR TODAY. ~ UNKNOWN


delish* magazine

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF/CO-FOUNDER Tamara Komuniecki DESIGN DIRECTOR/CO-FOUNDER Cynthia Merriman CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Cynthia Frenette Amanda Jennings Tamara Komuniecki Cynthia Merriman Lori O'Hara

PHOTOGRAPHY Tracey Ayton WEB DESIGN S.Joy Studios

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ADVERTISING 778.99MEDIA ads@delishmag.com E-mail: hello@delishmag.com Web site: delishmag.com Twitter: @DelishMag Facebook: facebook.com/delishmag


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DELISH IS...

Tamara

KOMUNIECKI / EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

A journalist since 1994, Tamara Komuniecki has taken on every kind of story imagineable. Her experiences as a broadcast and print/web journalist include attaching herself to Siberian Huskies while on cross-country skis, covering murders, wars, fires and floods, commandeering a jet, learning to surf, and writing about anti-cellulite running shoes. Media aside, she has also worked as a figure model, a clown at the zoo, a 911 operator, and a production assistant for U2. She considers herself a happy, if imperfect, homemaker and bakes, cooks and quilts with great passion. Her interests include design and architecture, sewing, and her family. Tamara’s personal motto is “Only boring people get bored”, and so she leads her three best guys (husband Konrad, son Finn, and pooch Duane) on all the adventures they can handle.

Cynthia

MERRIMAN / DESIGN DIRECTOR

A lover of all things pretty, Cynthia Merriman is a graphic designer and owner of My Girl Friday Design Company. She has been designing for web and print projects for more than ten years, taking inspiration from the oodles of vintage and retro goodies she loves to surround herself with. When she can squeeze it in, she enjoys baking, reading the occasional novel or sewing an item for a loved one. Mum to three little ones and wife to a wonderful husband, she includes two Rhodesian Ridgebacks and a cat named Zero in the menagerie. She is currently shopping for ‘the’ perfect superpower that will help her combine the pleasures of motherhood and the pressures of owning a flourishing business. For now, however, all she can hope for is that the kids play nicely while Momma gets some work done.


CONTRIBUTORS WE'D LIKE TO INTRODUCE YOU TO THE NEWEST MEMBERS OF TEAM DELISH, AND OFFICIALLY WELCOME THEM TO THE FAMILY.

CYNTHIA FRENETTE Cynthia Frenette is a graphic designer, artist, fabric designer, quilter, knitter, painter, and blogger, living in Mission, BC Canada, with her fabulous husband Norm and her dog and cat. When she’s not designing, illustrating and running Green Couch Designs, her own graphic and web design company with her husband, she can be found in her art studio painting, sewing, quilting, and creating. She’s also a co-founder and leader of the Fraser Valley Modern Quilt Guild, and loves creating her own modern quilt designs. There’s no craft she won’t try at least once! You can find her at her blog cynthiaf.ca and her work website greencouchdesigns.com.

AMANDA JENNINGS Amanda Jennings is a New England native living in sunny Northern California with her husband, Mr. McPorkchop. She co-owns a cross stitch and sewing pattern company with her best friend Ashleigh called The Frosted Pumpkin Stitchery. She loves to sew, knit, cross stitch and can. Currently she’s working on her first winter garden and is sewing a scrappy quilt from her favorite fabrics of all time. Her blog can be found at msmcporkchopquilts.com.

Thank you MEET OUR OTHER FABULOUS CONTRIBUTORS HERE...


DELISH LOVES Lovely things that make us squeal a little

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1. This isn’t a brand new item, but the Trunki is coming soon to our household, and I am hoping it will offer a big solution to a potential problem. We’ve been planning a trip to Europe, which is six months away but already causing me sleepless nights. This suitcase should help to keep our two-year-old’s attention in the airport and on the plane, when it’s filled with a bunch of goodies. We’ll give it to him a week before we leave and get him excited about filling it up.

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2. I’m so excited about this that I meet the mailman at the door every day to see if he’s brought it yet! I’ve just ordered two rolls of Orla Kiely Multi Stem wallpaper for my office, and my handyman husband has promised to put it up during the Christmas break. I’m such a fan of this designer and her iconic stems that I have her wallet and mug, but this will top it all. (Stay tuned to our blog to follow my office update!)

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3. Dress up your kitchen and be functional at the same time! Our very own Cynthia Frenette’s wonderful fabric design, Cuppa Tea Towel is her beautiful spin on the old calendar tea towels that have graced many a stylish home over the years. And it’s got a whole tongue-in-cheek cute thing going on, as in, a tea tea towel! Order it, use it, love it.

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4. To make my kitchen even more kitschy-chic, I’ve got my eyes on this adorable Blueberry Pie Apron by the ever-so-stylish Anna-Maria Horner. (We’re BIG fans of Anna Maria over here — remember when we featured her as our Woman of the Cloth?). Turn on some classic Doris Day, mix up something special for the ones you love and look great doing it!

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HEAVENS TO ETSY Haute Handmade

QUIRKYESSENTIALS If I had to choose between something old and something new, I wouldn’t always go the vintage route… but digging through this shop’s inventory, there’s actually not much I’d say no to! Favorites (though it’s hard to choose) have got to be a lovely Ironstone Pitcher and the set of Industrial Storage Drawers.

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JUNEDESIGNS When on the hunt for right-hand ring ideas for my family (at their behest, for my — gasp — quickly approaching 40th birthday), I found these delicate lovelies. A single extra skinny ring or a stack of them, are exquisitely simple.

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NESTPRETTYTHINGSSHOP Three darling little roses on a delicate gold chain… they look like piped flowers adorning the top of a cake. Pick your colors — my favorite is the apple green, sea foam and chartreuse combo. Or why not put a bird on it? A gorgeous soaring swallow adorning an adjustable chain makes this bracelet the perfect fit.

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SUNNYDAYVINTAGE

With so many wonderful retro items, it’s impossible for me to pick just a couple — but if you’re going to make me choose, then this fabulous Vintage American Family Scale tops the (ha!) scale. Then you can make your kitchen even happier with this vintage set of rainbow paring knives.

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WORD OF MOUSE What’s on our current must-click lists Dana Made It I visit this blog almost daily, just to see what her latest tutorial is. I’ve got fabric piling up to try my hand at her boy’s pants and crib/toddler bed sheet patterns, and have sent links to my mom (the expert sewist!) for the 90 Minute Shirt (she’s already made a few for her grandson, my little guy). Next up, I’m buying the pattern for the Rollie Pollie bean bag chair and mom and I will make it together. This blog’s creator (the Dana) has also authored a book, Fabrics A to Z: The EssenPICKS tial Guide to Choosing and Using Fabric for Sewing, ($14.98 at amazon.com). dana-made-it.com

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Lifehacker It might not tackle life’s most existential questions, like “Why are we here?” and “How can I get my husband to put the cap back on the toothpaste?” but visit this web site with one of life’s big dilemmas in mind, and you might just get an answer. Subjects and solutions range from the biggies like health and finances (What Is a Health Savings Account and Should I Use One?) to travel (How I Pulled Off a 10-Day London Vacation for $700) to the more domestic of dilemmas (Line a Cast Iron Pan with Coffee Filters to Keep it from Rusting). But you’re on your own with the toothpaste cap, honey.

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Crafty Storage An entire web site dedicated to the art of storage for your arts and crafts goodies? Did the creators peek into my office and write based on my needs? No, it just seems like that, and it will likely hit home for you, too. From rubber stamps to scrapbooking paper, from an insane collection of Martha Stewart punches to felt markers galore, each post has great storage ideas from around the web, along with photos of neat and tidy spaces with storage solutions. You might actually ask out loud,“Why didn’t I think of that?”.

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PICKS Home Remedies It’s not the prettiest web site, but it doesn’t have to be… come to think of it, you might not want to look at pictures here, either. This is a huge resource of home remedies for almost all that ails you. If you’re the sort who would rather try to heal yourself than make another mortgage payment for your family doctor, then this is a great place to turn first. Now, I’m not recommending self-treating anything acute or chronic, but dealing with cracked heels and acne scars by yourself? That’s something I am happy to recommend.

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FEATURE

Christmas Handed Down w WRITTEN BY LORI O'HARA

“Christmas Eve or Christmas morning?” So goes the forever question. In my household, it was always, always, Christmas Eve. As for “why?” it comes down, fundamentally, to the light. There is magic in light – in its movement and its shadows, in its sparkle and its contrast. And you simply cannot have the breath-catching wonder of Christmas lights without darkness, and Christmas Eve is when darkness happens. Imagine two children, vibrating with the excitement of the season, counting the minutes to Christmas with Swiss-watch precision, careening off walls and generally being the happy, loud nuisance that children are while awaiting the visit from Santa. There was one moment when those two pint-sized holiday nuclear reactors would be still as statues and silent as snow – the night the tree was decorated. While the floor was still bare of presents, two little bodies would wriggle under the tree and stare up through the branches, transfixed. Drifting in the heady smell of fresh pine, my little brother and I would stare up through the branches, lit with the rainbow glow of the strings of lights, and follow


the iridescent reflections bouncing off our dozens of ornaments. My infatuation with a beautifully decorated Christmas tree started early. Coming as I do from a small family, there is strong orientation towards those few things precious enough to be handed down from one generation to the next. My home was not the place for the large, noisy gatherings of flocks of aunts and uncles and herds of cousins. I watched those gatherings with confused longing. Compelled by the energy and laughter, I was nevertheless easily overwhelmed by noise and chaos when I happened to step close to friends’ holiday parties of great size. Better for me were the smaller, quieter celebrations. And even as a very small child, still moments of wonder where I could gaze immobile at lights and faceted surfaces were among my most treasured holiday experiences. No place were these moments more powerful than at the home of my great-grandparents. A property that later became my own home, their cabin home nestled in the Northern California redwoods was a dark, green, shaded place of Christmas magic. And hanging from their tree was a universe of delicate perfection – hand-made Christmas ornaments. The ornaments have a tragic origin. My great-great-aunt Pauline, bereft over the loss of her husband, desperately sought preoccupation and distraction. Seeking solace in miniature worlds of Christmas beauty, she ransacked her jewelry boxes and sewing kits for any item of shimmer or sparkle. Foam ornaments covered in fine silk thread became blank canvases for a thousand bead-loaded pins and velvet ribbon. Glass jewels became focal pieces destined to be surrounded by concentric circles of pearl-tipped straight pins. The loops in gold bric-a-brac became

Four generations of ladies — from left: Great-Grandma Palma, Grandma Phyllys, Mom Pat and little Lori in the frilly knickers.

nests for bead-capped sequins. And each crystal-laden globe required a crowned head and pendant bottom – royalty was never so well dressed as these holiday treasures. But my favorite – the one I searched for first every year – was a small ornament of floating stars that made me picture micro-galaxies hanging from the tree. That one was “my” ornament, I made sure all the family was clear on that. As a girl having little experience with generational tradition, it never occurred to me that one day those beautiful things might actually be mine. But then, it also never occurred to me at that young age that the members of my family were transient things on this earth. While my grandmother instilled in us a strong sense of history – telling stories of women in covered wagons and treks across the country to California’s central valley – the characters in those tales seemed more like myths than relatives. In my immature head, my family sprang to life organically after an imaginary set of pioneers parked themselves near an olive grove. Perhaps cabbage leaves were involved, I was unclear on the process. But in 1976, when my great-grandma Palma – Pauline’s sister – died from a stroke, most of those ornaments became my grandmother’s, moving from the magic cabin in the woods to her urban apartment. Despite hanging then from hooks on mirrored shelves rather than the branches of evergreen trees, the hand-made ornaments captured my attention and spoke “Christmas” to me louder than any stop-animation special ever could. My grandmother, knowing how much my mother and I loved those ornaments, decided that we should have our share while she was still around to enjoy sharing them with us. And so it was that one year when my own son was just past toddler-age, my grandmother


I could barely separate one small, round Christmas miracle from the next. I could not tell you, now, which one I chose second, only that a half-dozen of them are now delicately wrapped in tissue paper in a box of my very own. Nearly half a century after their creation, they wait patiently eleven months of the year, knowing that I will inhale deeply when I lift the lid and marvel at them again. I will imagine the four generations of women before me who made, then held and treasured them. I will wonder at their intricacy and bemoan my busy life that impedes my own ability to craft anything so fine, so detailed. And then I will hang them, one by one, onto the branches of our tree. I am too large now to fit under it – presents or no – in order to gaze upward through the boughs into a world of rainbow light and green shadows. I remember the girl who did, almost as someone different from me – almost as if the memory is not mine but the telling of a story from someone dear. But if I close my eyes and let the heady smell of pine surround me, the memory springs to sharp relief and I am that girl again. Small, vibrating with excitement, and easily captivated by the reflection of light off a faceted, jewel-covered Christmas ornament.

presented the box of hand-made ornaments and declared that it would circle the room and my mother, brother and I would each pick one on our turn until the box was empty. My first selection was the small starred ornament. For thirty years that piece had been my single favorite holiday decoration of all time. I held it in my hand as the box moved to my brother and back to my mom. When it was my turn again I was stuck. Still in awe that the Christmas ornament I had loved more than any other was now mine, I was paralyzed by choice. Staring at the sea of red, gold, pink, green and blue

Lori O’Hara is a humor writer who is still questing for the perfect mocha. You can read more of her writing at In Pursuit of It All or follow her on Twitter at @InPursuit_Of.


FEATURE

� SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE �

THE 2011 DELISH GIFT GUIDE

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w WRITTEN BY TAMARA KOMUNIECKI AND CYNTHIA MERRIMAN

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� UNDER $1 � 1. Swoosh! The Fruit Ninja has sliced his way onto over ten million devices and is the perfect cheap, easy and fun gift. w $.99 at fruitninja.com � UNDER $10 � 2. What do you give someone who has everything?

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How about the gift of levitation, with this great Magnetic Levitator. $8.83 at amazon.com 3. If he thinks a sachet sounds girly, wait until he smells these fresh Juniper Ridge Sachets from Canoe – he’ll be a convert at the first sniff. $10 at canoeonline.net � $11 to $25 � 4. Stellar Shave Cream says what it does and does what it says — which is to say, offers a stellar shave. $21 at canoeonline.net 5. From the maker of the iconic thermos comes the Stanley Flask, a more discreet way to enjoy a libation. $25 at sundancecatalog.com � $26 to $50 � 6. If Christmas 2010 was all about the Buckyball, 2012 is the year of the Buckycube, their latest offering. $34.95 at getbuckyballs.com 7. “Roughing it” doesn’t have to mean going without espresso, with the brew-me-a-double-shotanywhere Mini Espresso Maker. $39 at restorationhardware.com � $51 to $100 � 8. Handcrafted in Austria of wool and leather, the Dapper iPhone Pouch will protect his phone in style. $75 at curiosityshoppeonline.com 9. Not only is Jonathan Adler’s Brass Muse Bottle Opener a witty design, the actual shape fits comfortably in the hand as well. $98 at jonathanadler.com � $100+ � 10. Help him channel his creative side and wear the results — his own original belt buckle — with this Metalcast Belt Kit, cast in solid bronze. $120 at metalcastkits.com 11. Wood & Faulk’s Northwesterner 20" bag is rugged and stylish — big enough to use as a carry-on, yet perfect for back and forth from the office to gym to home. $209 at woodandfaulk.com.

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as the usefulness of the Steep Up to the Plate Teabag Rest. $6.95 at fishseddy.com 3. Whether she is a Heath Ceramics aficionado, a lover of all things mid-century, or just a cloth shopping bag fan, the House Red Tote will get lots of use (and you lots of love!). $8.75 at heathceramics.com � $11 to $25 � 4. If she is an Orla fan, you’re getting top points with this Orla Kiely mug — and if she’s not, she soon will be. $16 at room6.com 5. With the Embroidered Penguin Classics, the covers of classic titles have gotten an embroidery-inspired makeover, and the result is a work of art on the outside befitting the one found inside. $16 at anthropologie.com � $26 to $50 � 6. Flightpathdesign’s Red bird leather belt buckle has a great, cool and stylish vibe going — perfect for jeans, boots and a t-shirt or sweater. $38 at etsy.com/shop/flightpathdesigns 7. A Glassybaby candle holder is a guaranteed to be her favorite gift of the year, no questions asked. $44 at glassybaby.com � $51 to $100 � 8. Granted’s Three Toned Slippers are warm, cozy and soooo cute — add in hot chocolate and a book and you’ve given all the ingredients for a perfect winter day. $52 at grantedclothing.com 9. The Goucho Leather Watch is a flattering bracelet-style timepiece that will complement almost any outfit. $98 at sundancecatalog.com � $100+ � 10. The breathtaking Astrantia Major Studio Blooms Throw Pillow delivers a vibrant hit of summer even at Christmas. (And folks, these are from Delish Mag’s GROW writer, Stevie Rose!) $100.20 CDN at etsy.com/shop/GardenTherapy 11. Casual meets bespoke and has an Italian wool and cashmere baby, with the The Row’s Hayden Classics from Toms. $140 at toms.com

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checking out all sorts of things, the Rearview Spy Glasses won’t sit on a shelf collecting dust. $3.95 at restorationhardware.com 3. Never let a good bottle (or bad, for that matter) go to waste again with the Wine Bottle Seal. $10 at uncommongoods.com � $11 to $25 � 4. The Ceramic Camp Mug from Old Faithful is just like the great old enamel model it looks like but with a modern revamp. $11.95 at oldfaithfulshop.com 5. The super-useful Chalkboard Door Hanger is great for messages of welcome, warning or anything in between. $18 at restorationhardware.com � $26 to $50 � 6. The Book Judge Tote Bag features a timely and smile-worthy sentiment for the modern day book lover. $29 at zazzle.com 7. A green (as in enviro) gift for someone with a green thumb, the GrowBottle Upcycled Hydrogardens make for a modern herb garden. $35 at branchhome.com � $51 to $100 � 8. The Penny Saved Billfold is a great place to keep money, and maybe attract more of it — after all, the design features a slot for a lucky penny! $58 at sundancecatalog.com 9. Warning: if you try your hand at the addictive (and meditative) Balancing Blocks before you wrap them up, you might never give them away… $85 at curiosityshoppe.com � $100+ � 10. Casseroles and one-pot cooking has come back to the table in style with the beautifully balanced Marmitta Roaster. $110 at aplusrstore.com 11. The Retired Wine Bottle Lazy Susan has a lovely natural patina from years of use as a French or American Oak wine barrel, and will be as beautiful in a household as it is useful. $125 at uncommongoods.com

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they’re bound to make the little ones giddy. $7.50 at unicahome.com 3. Grow a wee one’s Christmas tree trimming collection with West Elm’s Felt Gnome Ornaments. $7 at westelm.com � $11 to $25 � 4. The Bippolo Seed And Other Lost Stories by Seuss will make a nice new addition to even the fullest Dr. Seuss library. $12.92 at indigo.chapters.com 5. Sock monkeys are so 2010… Sock Monkey Slippers, on the other hand, are the hottest thing around! $22 at uncommongoods.com � $26 to $50 � 6. Better these than Papa’s real tools – the toys in this Organic Toolbox are safe for babies to chew, and are quiet for toddlers to use in imaginative play. $34 at uncommongoods.com 7. Moms are sure to appreciate the Bambino Zip for their little one, as much for its cool graphics as its can’t-wriggle-out-of-it functionality. $34.95 at littlebambino.com � $51 to $100 � 8. The PlanetBox will make even the pickiest little eater eager for lunch time. $60 for the Planetbox Complete, at planetbox.com 9. SpiritHoods are a warm hat and mittens, plus a cozy hug, all in one adorable package. $79 at spirithoodskids � $100+ � 10. When a child starts showing interest in helping with cooking and baking, washing dishes and more, it’s time for a Learning Tower, which combines height, stability and safety for the little helper. $199.99 from littlepartners.com 11. If you’re looking for something to wow a little one with, the Dodo Rocking Chair wins top honors. $238 at unicahome.com

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9 � UNDER $1 � 1. A new way to spin tunes, the djay app makes it possible to perform live, record mixes, and more. w $.99 at algoriddim.com � UNDER $10 � 2. Perfect for playing spy or sharing secrets, the Secret Message

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Writing Set makes a fun stocking stuffer. $7.50 at unicahome.com 3. Need a beanie for a boarder? The Alki’i Aviator Helmet is warm, stylish AND on sale. $9.99 at amazon.com � $11 to $25 � 4. Better be prepared with the silliness that Farts Around the World: A Spotter’s Guide will inspire in all who turn its pages! $15.95 at chroniclebooks.com 5. There’s something incredibly cute about this gift, The World’s Smallest Post Service Kit, and we’re betting any teen or tween girl will think so too. $22.95 at curiosityshoppe.com � $26 to $50 � 6. These Crocheted Headphones are a fine example of yarn bombing at its best and are an adorable example of what happens when old school gets funky. $38 at uncommongoods.com 7. For a kid who grew up with Lego and Harry Potter, nothing will be cooler than The Knight Bus! $39.95 at chapters.indigo.com � $51 to $100 � 8. If a youngster in your life is showing an interest in photography, skip the digital camera and give the gift of unique photographic style with a Diana Camera. $52 at uncommongoods.com 9. The Bin Bin Wastebasket‘s delightful design is perfect for a young man or woman’s room $60 at unicahome.com � $100+ � 10. The Lomographic Action Sampler 35MM Camera takes four photos with one snap – perfect for outdoor action, which also makes it perfect for a young sportsman or woman or anyone who just likes to have fun! $149.99 at amazon.com 11. For hours and hours of fun (and potential embarrassment), nothing is better than the i-Karaoke. $223.44 at pbteen.com

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� UNDER $1 � 1. The Puppytime app may not exactly give a real-life sloppy kiss or wagging tail, but a picture of a sweet pooch delivered three times a day is still perfect for any puppy lover.

w $.99 at itspuppytime.com

� UNDER $10 � 2. Satisfy even the most aggressive chewer with a long-lasting, delicious Himalayan Dog Chew

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that originated from Nepal. $10 at unicahome.com 3. A Flint & Lars cat toy that is nicely designed and made of stylish fabric is a present for a kitty and its owner! $10 at canoeonline.net � $11 to $25 � 4. Cats, cats and more cats, and dogs, dogs and more dogs are featured in Chronicle Books’ Meow: I Love Cats and Woof: I Love Dogs. $14.95 at chronicle books.com (Cats) $14.95 at chronicle books.com (Dogs) � $26 to $50 � 5. Simple design and cheery color for a special pet’s kibble, in the Cat Bowl and Dog Bowl from Bauer Pottery. $25 at ancientindustries.com (Cat) $30 at ancientindustries.com (Dog) 6. A sweet and hungry kitty sits mewing atop the Mio Jar by Alessi. $40 at lumens.com � $51 to $100 � 7. Every pooch deserves a comfy, cozy and stylish place to lay his dog-tired bones, and the Winston Dog Bed is all three. $76 at wellappointedhouse.com 8. For the cat who likes to get into small spaces (that’s every cat), The Cat Ball, by JennasRedRhino. $79 at etsy.com/shop/JennasRedRhino � $100+ � 9. It’s difficult to say who will be happier with this gorgeous Ceramic Bird Feeder — the birds who will nibble from it, or the lucky recipient who gets to hang it outside their home. $175+ at nest-living.com 10. The Sak Pet’s Basket will be a hit with the designer canine or feline crowd. $250 at nova68.com

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FEATURE

h l t i o v w e e b d y a ... m YOU!

w WRITTEN BY TAMARA KOMUNIECKI There's gold in them thar hills, my friends, and while I'm not talking about the shiny stuff, I am talking about treasure. It's just of a different sort. The riches of which I speak are... tutorials. If you are ever at a loss for ideas of what to give your loved ones for the holidays, get yourself onto a crafting or sewing blog, and go crazy. Here is a very small sampling of DIY projects found online, that can be given as a simple, small gift, or as a part of a bigger package.

give the gift of relaxation give the gift of a nice treat MAKE: MUG RUG AND COOKIES Mug rugs are all the rage, and they’re super-easy to zip up. One of our favorites is in a post on the awesome blog In Color Order, by the lovely Jeni Baker!

BUY: A fun mug and a bag of coffee, tea or hot chocolate.

w Tie Tea Mug

MAKE: ECO-FRIENDLY SOY CANDLES Even though the candle making tutorial on Ruffled is for wedding favors, this would make the most lovely holiday gift. A good way to keep costs down would be to find the double boiler for melting the wax, and your candle containers (jars, old glasses, etc.) at a secondhand shop. BUY: A nice box of matches, a bottle of bubble bath, a relaxing CD, and a bottle of wine.

w Triangle Matches

from dippylulu

give the gift of food MAKE: OVEN HAND MITTS If you are confident in picking a fabric that you know the recipient will love, use it, but if you’re not quite sure, you can’t go wrong with French ticking or linen. This simple project from The Idea Room makes for a unique and very useable gift.

BUY: If you’re feeling really generous (or can find one at an outlet), this would be the perfect handmade complement to a Le Creuset dish. If that’s a bit rich for your blood, try a few wooden spoons and a cookbook along with the mitts.

w Le Creuset French Oven


DIY

LIVE: MAKE Buttoned Up Wreath Holiday Ornament w WRITTEN BY CYNTHIA FRENETTE

WHEN I

was thinking about the word “Cherish”, the first thing that came to mind was my Gran’s two button jars. I was lucky enough to inherit them after she passed, in fact I couldn’t believe nobody else wanted them! I remember sitting at her dining room table with my brothers when we were very young, and after lunch we’d ask Nanny if we could “Play buttons”. This involved each of us getting one of her cute pink cereal bowls and dumping piles of buttons out of the jar into them. We’d sort them by color or by texture, or by what they were made of, and pass them around between the three of us. I remember the sound of them clinking in the bowls and loved just holding them in my hands and touching them. Since I have been so lucky to have them in my possession, I have been wanting to use some of them for something, so they aren’t just stuck in a jar, but rather out where they can be seen and admired. I came up with the idea of doing a cute little holiday wreath ornament covered in fabric flowers with button centers, kind of as a tribute to my gran who encouraged me to learn to sew and who always loved whatever I made no matter what. I think she’d be happy to see them being used and hung on the tree in an extra special place! This project doesn’t require that you have a bunch of vintage buttons on hand, in fact, you can always start your own new collection and use buttons that are special to you, or even some new ones that you particularly love! You can make this wreath in any size — I made mine to hang on the tree, but a larger one covered in loads of multi-colored flowers would be spectacular to hang on the front door, or an extra small one would be super sweet to top a special gift.


SUPPLIES CHECK-LIST plain cardboard (size will depend on what size you want to make your wreath) a saucer or plate (you'll trace around it for the outer dimension of your wreath) pencil Tacky Glue or regular white glue Exacto knife cutting mat or protected cutting surface neutral fabric for the wreath “background” fabric scraps for the flowers in your chosen colors handsewing needle thread scissors assorted buttons ribbon for hanging and a bow

1 Place your saucer or plate (I used a teacup saucer) face down on the cardboard and trace around it. This is the outer dimension of your wreath. Using your Exacto knife, cut out the circle you just traced – it doesn’t have to be perfect, it will be covered with fabric so don’t worry if the edges are a bit rough!

2 Draw an inner circle inside the large circle you just cut out, this will be the inner dimension of the wreath, don’t worry if it’s not a true circle or not centered, in fact, it looks cuter if it’s a bit wonky.


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Take your knife and cut out this inner circle so you have your wreath “base”. Again, don’t worry about rough edges! Next, take your neutral-colored fabric and tear some 1” wide strips. Depending on how large your wreath is, you may need more or less, but for mine, I used about four 1” x 12” strips.

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Keeping the torn edge to the left (or outside edge), tack down one end of fabric strip on the back of your wreath base with a blob of glue. I like Tacky Glue as it really stays put, but you can use any glue, even a glue gun if you want.

Gift idea

FOR A SEWER Orange Little Gems Scissors $10.00 at theworkroom.ca

5 Flip the wreath over and wrap the fabric strip up over the top and over the front, then back through the center hole to the back.


6 Start wrapping the strip around and around the cardboard base, leaving the torn edge of the fabric exposed for a bit of shabby chic texture! When you get to the end of a strip, trim it if needed and glue the end to the back, then attach a new strip and keep wrapping until the entire base is covered.

7 Your base should look something like this when it’s all covered. See! No worries about the rough cardboard edges, they are all covered up — easy peasy! Now comes the fun part, making the flowers! I made two basic flower types, but feel free to play with the general pattern to make up your own special flowers as well!

8 The first kind of flower is the “Ruffly Flower”. Tear a strip of fabric about 1” wide by roughly 9” long — this can vary too, if you want a bigger, more ruffly flower, you can use a longer strip, if you want a small flower, use a shorter strip. You can also adjust the width of the strips to be narrower or wider for smaller or larger flowers. Using a needle and thread (use a doubled thread to avoid breakage!), run a basting stitch along the length of the strip about 1/8” from the bottom edge, keeping the torn edge free, as it will be the ruffly “petals” of your flower.


9 Once you reach the end, don’t end off, but rather gently pull the thread, gathering the fabric into a flower shape. Tack it together in the center with a couple of small stitches to hold it in its shape, tucking the cut ends of the strip to the back and tack in place.

10 Stitch a button in the center of the flower and it’s done! You can try layering flowers in different color combinations and sizes to add some dimension and interest too.

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The second type of flower is a YoYo Flower! Remember those kooky yoyo quilts from the 70s? Yup, I want to make the yoyo popular again so this fun flower hopefully will help it regain its cool factor.

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Start by cutting a circle of fabric, any size, but the ones I did are about 3”. They don’t have to be perfect circles, just basically circular in shape. Run a basting stitch around the edge about 1/8” from the outer edge.


13 Once you get to the end, don’t end off, but instead, gently pull the thread and gather the yoyo into a tight center. It’ll look something like this. Tack the center closed with a few small stitches, and secure the end of the thread, leaving it attached.

14 Flatten out the yoyo so it becomes more circular and flower-shaped, sew a button to the center, and it’s done!

Try them making them in different sizes and fabrics for your wreath. 15 Make a few of each type of flower, placing them temporarily on your wreath base to determine the layout. When you’re happy with your design, glue the flowers in place.

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16 In any empty spots, you can glue a few loose buttons on to add some texture and button-y fun! (I intentionally left some spots flower-free so I could stick in some more favorite buttons.) Set aside to dry.

17 Once the glue is dry, flip your wreath over. Cut a length of ribbon making a loop to hang your wreath with, and glue both ends side by side onto the back top center of your wreath. Use a good dollop of glue to ensure they stay attached! Let dry.

Add a small ribbon bow on the front to finish it off. And it’s all ready to hang up! Have fun making your wreath and use some of your favorite supplies like buttons, plus special fabrics, ribbons, and any other embellishments you might want to add and make a special ornament you can cherish and remember for years to come. ... For more crafty ideas, plus lots of art, and funky fabric designs, read more from Cynthia at CYNTHIAF.CA


LIVE: TASTE

Christmas THE TASTE OF

w WRITTEN BY CYNTHIA MERRIMAN


My Grandpa had a special fascination with the holidays — I think he was a bigger kid than all of us combined. He could hardly contain himself and would practically stay up all night, waiting for Christmas morning, and wake the house REALLY early. Early, as in anywhere from 3:00 to 5:00am. He’d run into our rooms shouting, “Wake up! Wake up! Me Santa’s been! Santa’s been!”. Over the years, we got used to it and the later wake-ups were huge disappointments, making it feel like Christmas was half over. After the gift opening and stockings we would all end up having a nap, aside from my Grandma and mom, who would then take their positions in the kitchen and start preparing the holiday dinner.

prepared by my Grandma just for our arrival. These delicate little shortbreads were a favorite of my Grandpa's and mine, and were always the first to go on the plates of treats. While I can’t wake you up on Christmas morning the same way my Grandpa did, I can share with you my Grandma’s fabulous recipe so you can make your own memories. They’re simple, they’re awesome, they’re Christmas.

And with the holiday dinner, came the onslaught of goodies — homemade Nanaimo bars, sugar cookies, fruit cake, whipped shortbread and more — all lovingly

Whipped Shortbread Cookies

BORROWED WITH PERMISSION FROM JOANNE SALLOWS

1 cup butter 1/2 cup cornstarch 1/2 cup powdered sugar 1 cup flour Red/green maraschino cherries, cut in half 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. With mixer, beat butter until creamy and gradually add the rest of the ingredients. Continue to beat for 10 minutes. 3. Drop from teaspoon onto cookie sheet. Top with maraschino cherry pieces. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Watch carefully — don’t want them too brown. Serve with a cold glass of milk for an extra yummy treat for Santa. Makes about 2 dozen.

Me and my mom


LIVE: TASTE

RELISH RELISH THE THE HOLIDA HOLIDAYS YS w WRITTEN BY AMANDA JENNINGS


My favorite part of the winter was my grandfather Buono making cranberry orange relish. Its bright color and crisp taste seemed to brighten up the long New England winter. I find myself wanting to capture that feeling year round, especially when we have leftover turkey. My solution was to buy cranberries when they were on sale during the holidays, freeze them and can them into this relish. It goes well with everything from traditional turkey to English muffins with cream cheese.

Cranberry Cranberry Orange Orange Relish Relish ADAPTED FROM CARMINE BUONO’S RECIPE & BALL COMPLETE BOOK OF HOME PRESERVING. 4 cups granulated sugar 4 cups water 8 cups fresh cranberries (about 2 lbs) Grated zest of 1 large orange Juice of 1 large orange 1 tsp vanilla bean paste 4 (16 oz) pint or 8 (8 oz) half pint glass preserving jars with lids and bands 1/2 cup walnuts (optional) 1. Wash jars, lids and bands in hot soapy water. Place the clean jars onto a canning rack and into a water bath canner filled 2 inches above the jars with water. Set on the stove top to boil. Place lids and bands into a small sauce pan on the stove and simmer, not boil. 2. Combine the sugar and water in a large stainless steel saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring to dissolve sugar. Boil for 5 minutes. Add cranberries and allow the mixture to return to boiling. Reduce heat and boil gently, stirring often, until all berries burst. Add vanilla bean paste, orange zest and orange juice. Remove pan from the heat, if using walnuts, stir them into the relish now. 3. Spoon into the relish into hot jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding hot cranberry sauce. Accurate measuring ensures strong and safe seals. Wipe rim. Place lid and band onto the jar, tightening the band lightly.

4. Process the jars in a boiling water canner for 15 minutes, adjusting for altitude. Remove jars and cool. Do not disturb for 24 hours and make sure all the jars have sealed. If jars have not sealed, place in the fridge or freezer, as they are not shelf safe. 5. Enjoy your little bit of cranberry goodness on everything! MORE of AMANDA web: msmcporkchopquilts.com

Gift idea

FOR A FOODIE Mini Beechwood Condiment Spoons $11.99/set of 4 at amazon.com

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Delish Magazine — CHERISH Winter 2011