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PURSUING

the guide to studying fashion in college


Pursuing Chic Š 2013, Deja Turner Self publishing dejamturner@gmail.com ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. This book contains material protected under International and Federal Copyright Laws and Treaties. Any unauthorized reprint or use of this material is prohibited. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system without express written permission from the author / publisher.


PURSUING


chic

written and designed by DEja Turner


For my fellow friends in fashion: We wished for guidance. The guidance was in ourselves.


notes

author’s

Fashion in college

a A

side from the need to be knowledgeable on every designer, brand, model, blogger and famous fashion influence in the industry, not to mention those who are not so influential, I’ve found that studying fashion is really about developing a truly unique style of your own and becoming an expert at what you do best. It requires you to push limits, ask questions, challenge what has been done before and refer to past creations for new and exciting ideas. Obviously, studying fashion before entering the industry is not essential to becoming successful in this industry—there are those who didn’t need the schooling— but it is the key to exploring all the options the industry has to offer. I didn’t realize when I chose to study fashion that I would learn to love it more than I already did…and despise it at times as well. I am always excited to learn of new job options in the industry, new designers, new bloggers, and new brands. I can research for hours because each topic makes me think of something new. Fashion clearly is for those with short attention spans. Fashion is constantly changing. The changes in technology alone have created entirely new markets in fashion. Fashion is challenging. There are obstacles for every fashion student, big and small. And with all the fashion history, merchandising formulas, patternmaking, writing intensive courses and Photoshop—it’s worth it. By reading this guide, I am hoping my fellow peers not only learn to survive in the industry, but succeed in it and love it.


the details CHOOSING THE SCHOOL

Find out the top fashion-focused schools in the nation—and in the world. Learn about schools dedicated to specific fashion professions and determine the school that best fits your goals. Fashion-focused schools, pg. 12 Associate, BA, BFA: Learn the differences, pg. 19

WHAT’S YOUR FASHION PASSION? Learn about the different fashion tracks one can pursue as a student and how to select your major. Popular fashion majors, pg. 24 Conversation with Courtney Cothren Industry Professional, pg. 26

PREPPING TO GO Become an expert on preparation for entering the college fashion world. Read a quick discussion on the types of clothing to bring with you to school—and leave at home— as well as room essentials. What to bring to your room, pg. 31

SETTING UP HOMEBASE Pick up some tips on room decorating and clothing storage for those with large closets and a small dorm space, learn about the different ways to get involved on campus, and read about establishing your public fashion persona. A Sample Space, pg. 35 Getting involved, pg. 37


A WEEK OF COLLEGE FASHION Follow several fashion students through a typical week at school. Learn how to balance your time between school, work and social activities. Things to carry during that busy week, pg. 47

THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ Learn the basics to developing your résumé, for college and beyond. Learn what potential employers are evaluating and what will set you apart from other students and professionals. Sample resumes, pgs. 51, 53

THE FIRST STEP: INTERNSHIPS Learn about how to find an internship, the best fashion cities to intern in, the differences between paid and unpaid internships, interviews, housing, and journaling your experiences. Best fashion cities, pg. 59

GETTING YOUR PROPS What should you expect your senior year? What does your senior Capstone entail? Is graduate school for you? Learn about the top graduate fashion programs in the country. Fashion graduate school, pg. 70 Conversation with Nakisha Williams, Industry Professional, pg. 72


“Be reckless enough to gamble all or nothing to

follow your dreams.� -John Galliano


choosingtheschool


CHOOSING THE SCHOOL

Choosing a fashion school can be difficult, but if you ask yourself the right questions, you can determine the school that best fits you--and your style. Different fashion schools specialize in different industry jobs. To choose the school best for you, you must determine your areas of interest, narrow them down and make a sound decision.

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questions to ?

consider:

What am I interested in? Where is the school located? What is the cost of tuition? What are the programs offered? Is this a reputable school? Do I want to study overseas? Do I want to be close to home? Where do I want to live or study? Can I navigate a big city? Answering these questions can help you narrow that list down, or at least view it more objectively than before.

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CHOOSING THE SCHOOL

fashion

focused schools

Here are 25 of the top 50 fashion-focused schools and programs in the world according to Fashionschools.org:

3. Central Saint Martins—London, England Number of undergraduate students: 1,200 Tuition: right around £10,000

1. Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT)— New York, NY (USA) Number of undergraduate students: over 10,000 Tuition: under $7,000

CSM is an international and world-renowned fashion school offering art and culture all in one. Accepting only 1,200 students per year into the rigorous program, CSM’s partnerships all over the world, as well as its permanent expert teaching staff is the reason why some fashions students wouldn’t have it any other way. CSM costs a little over £10,000 per years, which makes it an Ivy Leaguer with an affordable price tag.

FIT is an international institute recognized for its focuses in fashion, design, art, communications and business. With over 10,000 students enrolling each year and fees for undergraduate out-of-state degrees costing under $7,000, FIT is the number one choice for students with big dreams of wanting to study fashion in the big city. For more information, go the website http://fitnyc.edu/. 2. Parsons, The New School for Design— New York, NY (USA) Number of undergraduate students: 5,000 (graduate students included) Tuition: over $35,000

For more information, go to the website http://www.csm. arts.ac.uk/. 4. Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale— Paris, France Number of undergraduate students: 240 (very exclusive) Tuition: Approximately $13,000

Known for its intensive haute couture programs, Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale’s real focus is on fashion design. Students who are lucky enough to attend this school Parsons is highly recognized for its strong job and intern- have already had minor design training elsewhere before ship placements. Not to mention for its strong influences entering the intensive program. At $13,000 a year, the price tag isn’t high for the select few who make it. in fashion who studied there. With student showcases and partnerships with fashion retailers and corporations all over the nation, Parsons’ ivy league reputation is in balance For more information, go to the website http://www. modeaparis.com/en. with its tuition over $35,000 per year. For more information, go to the website http://www. newschool.edu/parsons/.

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5. Pratt—Brooklyn, NY (USA) Number of undergraduate students: a little under 4,000 (graduate students included) Tuition: $35,000 With a foundation in mostly art, Pratt is grounded in creativity with extensive studio resources for its students’ use. Pratt is one of the few schools that offer fashion publishing and writing courses. Tuition is about $35,000 per year, which means the student must be as passionate about learning as the school is about teaching. For more information, go to the website http://www. pratt.edu/. 6. Polimoda—Florence, Italy Number of undergraduate students: 1,200 Tuition: Between $10,000 and $20,000 (depending on the program) If you are looking for a school that is constantly changing and always enhancing talented students, Polimoda is a good choice. Courses and services are constantly changing, allowing for Polimoda to evolve with the industry. Polimoda is close to the heart of fashion in Florence, which allows students to experience fashion in the real world while still studying in school. For more information, go to the website http://www. polimoda.com/en/home.html. 7. Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM)—Los Angeles, CA (USA) Number of undergraduate students: 7,500 Tuition: Between $27,000 and $36,000 Industry partnerships and establishing internship connections is what makes FIDM students well prepared to enter the fashion industry. FIDM offers Associate of Arts, Associate of Arts professional designation, associate of arts advance study, and Bachelor of Science

degree programs. Students attending FIDM are looking to study for a career in the fashion industry in limited amount of time. With the tuition between $27,000 and $36,000 depending on the area of study, students must be serious about their craft. For more information, go to the website http://fidm.edu/. 8. Instituto Maragoni—Milan, London, Paris Number of undergraduate students: 2,400 Tuition: Between $18,000 and $27,000 (depending on the program) Instituto Maragoni prides itself on teaching fashion in a way that meets the needs of its students. Instituto Maragoni offers choices between a one-year intensive or three-year program. Three-year programs are for students with little to no experience in the industry and one-year intensive is for students with limited time availability. With so many choices, the tuition between $18,000 and $27,000 is not bad for a fashion school that is among the top eight in the world. For more information, go to the website http://www. istitutomarangoni.com/home/eng. 9. Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts— Antwerp, Belgium Number of undergraduate students: 140 Tuition: $8,000 Antwerp Royal Academy of Fine Arts is as royal as it says it is. Antwerp prides itself on training fashion designers who feed off the creativity of the academy’s graphic designers, sculptors, painters, and draftsmen. Fashion designers are allowed to either create a collection of their own or for a brand name or manufacturer. The number of students is in line with tuition of only $8,000. Exclusivity is key. For more information, go to the website http://www. antwerp-fashion.be/.

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10. Bunka Fashion College—Tokyo, Japan Number of undergraduate students: 15,000 Tuition: Between $12,000 and $20,000 (depending on the program) With Bunka placed in the heart of Japanese fashion, students are able to learn and advance within the surrounding fashion industry. Bunka’s focus on globalization through speed and change are what drive this enhanced fashion institution. Combine this with an impressive costume museum of 20,000 articles of clothing and Fashion Resource Center and the tuition between $12,000 and $20,000 sounds about reasonable. For more information, go to the website http://www. bunka-fc.ac.jp/en/about.html. 11. Columbia College—Chicago, Illinois (USA) Number of undergraduate students: 1,800 Tuition: A little over $20,000 While at number 11, on the list, Columbia College Chicago is not just a school for fashion creatives. It is the largest non-profit media and arts college in the nation, with courses in arts, entertainment, writing, dance, cultural studies, and several other creative subjects. With the two prominent fashion concentrations already on campus, Fashion Design and Fashion Business, the combination of the two creating the Fashion Studies program is a natural evolution. Number of undergraduate students: 1,800 Tuition: A little over $20,000 For more information, go to the website http://www. colum.edu/Admissions/Programs/Fashion.php. 12. ESMOD—Headquartered in Paris Number of undergraduate students: 4,000 Tuition: $16,000

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ESMOD has a large fashion institute network, spanning across 14 different countries. If you are attending ESMOD, teachers will adjust their teaching methods to the students’ needs, which means students are able to study programs many different languages. With such a large fashion network and tuition at $16,000, ESMOD is affordable and the practical choice when comparing internship and job connections in the industry. For more information, go to the website http://www. esmod.com/fr/prehome/index.html. 13. Royal College of Art—London, England Number of undergraduate students: 100 Tuition: a little under £30,000 The Royal College of Art is a post-graduate school. Students studying at the Royal College of Art have already obtained their undergraduate degree in and are looking to further their knowledge in their choice of study. The school is very high profile, which means its comes with high profile price of £30,000 ($40,000). For more information, go to the website http://www.rca. ac.uk/. 14. London College of Fashion—London, England Number of undergraduate students: Tuition: $18,000 If you’re looking for a different way of studying fashion, London College of Fashion is a good choice. The school offers courses in Tailoring, Footwear Design and Development, Cosmetic Science, Fashion Contour, Fashion Photography, as well as many other fashion related fashion degrees (seriously, there are tons). Networking is huge here, which means students have (and will have) lots of connections. With six different campuses around the city, you’ll learn London well. For more information, go to the website http://www. fashion.arts.ac.uk/.


CHOOSING THE SCHOOL

15. Virginia Tech—Virginia (USA) Number of undergraduate students: a little under 250 (both graduate and undergraduate) Tuition: Between $5,000 and $13,000 Students looking to study the more technical side of fashion should consider Virginia Tech. The apparel program focuses its students on new technologies and consumer data in the fashion industry, and offers programs that cover product development, computer technology, fashion communications and textiles. The apparel program is small, which means a close-knit community feel and low tuition. For more information, go to the website http://www. ahrm.vt.edu/apparel/index.html. 16. Studio Bercot—Paris, France Number of undergraduate students: A little over 4,000 Tuition: Under $12,000 Studio Bercot is really prestigious with tons of connections (like Isabel Marant). The courses are only given in French, but for the price tag of $12,000, I would learn it quick. For more information, go to the website http://www. studio-bercot.com/. 17.The School of Fashion Design—Massachusetts (USA) Tuition: $12,000 The only fashion design school in the nation, the School of Fashion Design focuses its students on traditional methods of designing before bringing in courses that allow for learning new technological advances in the fashion industry. Tuition is only 12,000, and with exclusivity and affordability comes a great learning environment. For more information, go to the website http://www. schooloffashiondesign.org/sfdv2aboutus.htm.

18. The Fashion School, Kent State University—Kent, Ohio (USA) Number of undergraduate students: 200 Tuition: Between $9,000 and $17,000 (based on in-state or out of state residents) Ohio isn’t the center of fashion, but if you want to study at Kent State’s garment center in NYC or attend a school where the director is a member of the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA), then you mostly want to attend here. Tuition is very affordable. Plus, you can study fashion abroad in Paris and Milan. For more information, go to the website http://www. fashionschool.kent.edu/. 19. Academy of Art University—San Francisco, CA (USA) Number of undergraduate students: Around 3,000 Tuition: $20,000 With tons of fashion program options and a showcasing at NY Fashion Week, students who attend Academy of Art University are very well rounded and will have an experience of a lifetime. Tuition is $20,000, which is acceptable for the number of students who attend. For more information, go to the website http://www. academyart.edu/fashion-school/index.html. 20. Shenkar College of Engineering and Design—Israel Number of undergraduate students: A little under 200 Tuition: $3,000 Tucked away in Israel, Shenkar College of Engineering and Design is a school dedicated to truly innovative design. Most of the courses are taught in English, so no need to be fluent in Hebrew. In order to study here, students must already have one year of fashion school experience. Tuition is a steal at just $3,000. For more information, go to the website http://www.shenkar.ac.il/english/template/default.aspx?maincat=1&catid=1.

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21. Drexel University—Philadelphia (USA) Number of undergraduate students: 350 Tuition: $33,000

For more information, go to the website http:// www.academyofcoutureart.edu/academics/fashiondesign-programs/.

Drexel University’s fashion design program is nationally recognized. Students studying in the program complete a six-month co-op experience, included with regular coursework in design, manufacturing methods, presentation skills, and CAD (Computer Aided Design). Students are also able to enter their designs into national and international competitions. Tuition is $33,000 a.k.a really expensive.

24. Otis College of Art and Design—Los Angeles, CA (USA) Number of undergraduate students: A little over 1,000 Tuition: Over $30,000

For more information, go to the website http://www. drexel.edu/. 22. The Art Institutes—Nationwide campuses and online learning

Fashion design students at Otis College of Art and Design work closely with faculty and guest design mentors, to create clothing that not only challenges the students’ creative abilities, but also requires them to create while mimicking the real design schedule of the fashion industry. Tuition is pricey at $30,000. For more information, go to the website http://www.otis. edu/academics/fashion_design/index.html.

25. Savannah College of Art and Design—Savannah, Georgia (USA) With 45 national locations and online learning at your own speed. The Art Institutes equals a large network with Number of undergraduate students: 9,000 Tuition: $31,000 great connections. For more information, go to the website http://www. inrdx.com/. 23. The Academy of Couture Art—Los Angeles, CA (USA) Number of undergraduate students: 27 Tuition: Between $22,000 and $34,000 The Academy of Couture Art prides itself on going beyond what is usually taught in fashion design to combine both European Haute Couture and American Fashion. There are only 27 students in the program, making the academy very selective. Tuition ranges between $22,000 and $34,000.

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Savannah College of Art and Design is known for its well-known fashion industry professional faculty and industry connections. Students in the fashion program are able to be apart of the school’s Fashion Style Lab mentor program, which allows students to have oneon-one learning interaction with industry professionals (like Zac Posen!). The SCAD garment reference library and Museum of Art are also a plus. With so many great opportunities and tools available, the tuition of $31,000 is reasonably priced. For more information, go to the website http://www. scad.edu/fashion/. For the full list, go to http://www.fashion-schools. org and search ‘Top 50 Fashion Schools and Programs Around the Globe’.


Academy of Art University, San Francisco

Virginia Tech, Virginia

Drexel University, Philadelphia

The Art Institutes, Worldwide

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4

2, or4+ ? years

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THEdifferencesBETWEEN

associate,BA,BFA It’s not a dire subject, but it’s important to know the difference between a Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts and Associate degrees. Knowing the types of degrees will help you determine which level of study, which schools and which degree is best for you and your future career goals. Associates (in the arts)- is mostly awarded by technical and

some bachelor-degree colleges and universities as well. This degree can be obtained in two years. Although you cannot obtain a master’s with this degree, you can be in your career more quickly and with much less student debt.

Bachelor of Arts (BA)- is awarded for an undergraduate study in

liberal arts or sciences or both. A BA degree is study focus in more liberal arts courses. This degree can be obtained in either three or four years.

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)- is awarded for an undergraduate

study in visual or performing arts. A BFA is study focus in intensive art and design courses. A BFA is traditionally considered a four-year degree (and at most fashion schools in the U.S. this is the case), however, depending on the hours of studio coursework required, a BFA can take longer. This is not meant to deter! A BFA is for those who are extremely creative and requires lots of hands-on learning. This just means you will be that much better at your craft.

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THINGStoREMEMBER

whilesearching

With your fashion school search there are a few things to remember: Research schools not just in the nation, but also all over the world. You never know what country or program will appeal to you--or to your pocketbook. Different fashion schools might advertise the same major, but the focus of the majors’ change with the schools and their locations. Make sure to research the objectives of the program you are interested in. Tuition might be high, but the added lab fees can increase the price of your tuition even more. Be aware of the lab fees that will be added if you were to attend the school and sign up for classes, plus the cost of craft supplies. Fashion requires lots of mood boards and magazine clippings, make sure everything is within your budget. Be aware of transferring credits. Sometimes classes can be so specific that transferring credits to a different program

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can be impeding (you definitely don’t want to backpedal). Fashion is a lot about the people you know. Make sure your school has strong alumni connections and career services options. Connections can be the difference between an internship, the job of a lifetime, or both. Don’t settle. How accessible is your school? Make sure you are near fabric and craft stores, maybe a city with heavy fashion influences (i.e. streetstyle fashion). How connected is the school to fashion? Is fashion their entire focus or is it just a small program? Determine what type of focus you are looking for. All the questions and things to remember are not to hinder, they are to make you aware. Attending a school focused in fashion can be expensive, but if you are focused and determined, you can make it work and fit your standards.


CHOOSING THE SCHOOL

Realtalk “When I was applying for schools I wasn’t exactly sure what I wanted to do, I applied to SCAD as well as some other non-art schools. I am originally from Tennessee and liked the idea of going to a school in the south, and was also very interested in pursuing a creative field, I just wasn’t sure what at the time. I went down to Savannah to tour the school and fell absolutely in love with Savannah and what SCAD had to offer.” Lauren Jones, Savannah College of Art and Design

“I chose UGA after attending two other schools and realizing that it would offer me the best degree for the money it would take to attend and graduate there…My sophomore year I did attend Georgia Southern University though, which did have a Fashion Merchandising and Fashion Design program. I left that university though for UGA because while the program was good and I loved my teachers it was located in a very small town which did not offer me much room to do extra fashion related activities outside of school such as internships. Ultimately, I chose UGA because it offered me the atmosphere of a large school, gave me the intimacy of a smaller college and program, gave me great scholarships, was in a thriving area of Georgia with lots of opportunities to work and intern in fashion, and had a great program with lots of opportunities for networking and finding jobs after graduation.”

Words FROM

the author “During my college selection, I was interested in fashion and knew that I wanted to be living in New York City. Due to FIT being within the State University of New York network and giving me an in-state tuition, it was a good fit for all of my college needs.” Augusta Falletta, Fashion Institute of Technology

When I was deciding on college I had no idea what I wanted to do. I liked fashion I liked sewing and I even liked picking out clothes. In the end I chose my school based on the community feel and the institution’s values. I have a BFA in Fashion Communication at Stephens College. With this degree I was able to obtain lots of hands-on experience in the classroom and in the studio. I wasn’t aware of the differences when I chose my major. Because I am naturally a visual person, I ended up studying in the degree that best fit me and my future goals. Deciding on a school requires including not just the institution, but several other factors. Make sure all of the factors are taken into consideration. It will help you make smart choices.

Ayla Habermann, University of Georgia

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“You can never be overdressed or overeducated.” -Oscar Wilde

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What’syourfashionpassion?

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FASHION PASSION

fashiontracks There are many different fashion tracks you can pursue as a fashion student. At most institutions in the U.S., fashion majors fall under three different categories. If you are extremely creative with your hands, are attracted to prints, and have a great imagination and enjoy sketching clothing: Look for programs that offer fashion design, printmaking, or patternmaking as a major or an intensive course. The programs should combine traditional design methods along with new technology (like CAD) and other skills and techniques.

If the focus is on marketing, advertising, math, or managing a store: Look for programs that offer fashion marketing, management, advertising, or public relations as a major. The programs should combine retail math, along with classes focused in Excel, marketing methods (don’t forget some graphic design), public relations and presentation.

If the focus is on writing or blogging: Look for programs that offer fashion journalism or communication as a major.

If the focus is on visual aspects of fashion, maybe you enjoy the pictures or want to style the clothing: Look for programs that offer fashion photography, visual merchandising, and styling as a focus.

Remember there are several types of jobs in the industry that require students to dabble in more than one area of study. Don’t forget about jobs such as set design, costume design, buyer, trend analyst, apparel business owner, brand manager, fashion production manager, product developer and fabric styling.

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FASHION PASSION

Steps to determining

your major There are four steps to selecting your major at a fashion school. 1. Determine your interests. 2. Narrow down the topics. 3. Research the major and all the possible job opportunities you could acquire while attending. 4. Select the major. Sometimes you realize what you set out to do isn’t your passion. If you change your major in fashion, which many do, it’s okay. You might even enjoy more than one. Versatility is the key. Know everything you need to know—and then some—about what you love.

Words FROM

the author All things about fashion really interested me and if I’d had the choice I would have majored in them all. After studying one specific area for a while, I realized knowing the craft you embrace the most and the best is what really shows. Yes, it is good to be multifaceted and have experience in everything. But perfect the craft and become the expert before moving on to additional study (double majors included). Some majors may appear restricting, but some of the classes are exactly what you are looking to learn. Be open to being a fashion design major even if you don’t actually want to design clothes. With the same skills, you can become a patternmaker. It’s okay if you choose the major and you aren’t in love with it. You can change. Part of loving fashion is going on the adventure. You might despise it at first, but as you learn more about it, it becomes a more positive experience.

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FASHION PASSION

conversation professional#1 Courtney Cothren, Stephens College, Assistant Professor, School of Fashion and Design, Retail Consultant Did you study fashion in college? If not, what did you study? What made you want to pursue fashion as a profession? Yes, I majored in Fashion Marketing and Management. I always knew I wanted to work in fashion. There was never really any other field I wanted to enter. That was sort of remarkable as I grew up in a town of 2,000 people and had to teach myself about designers and trends from an early age. I remember subscribing to Seventeen while I was still in elementary school so I had “graduated” to Vogue and W by high school. When I heard about the job of buying, I knew it would combine business and fashion and I loved those two things. It was perfect for me and I never wanted to do anything else. What was it like studying fashion in college? I loved it! I loved Stephens and met the women that are still my best friends today there. It was much like it is today at Stephens except smaller. I worked hard but really enjoyed my classes and found time for fun as well!

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What was a week like in the fashion department? A typical week included going to class, doing homework, working, etc. My friend Jenny would tell you that I worked well ahead on assignments. She still makes fun of me today as she would ask me to go out at night and I’d say I would when I finished a project. She’d then ask me when it was due and it was usually a couple weeks away. As it was fashion though I always loved doing projects because they were things I was passionate about. Did you join fashion organizations? Yes, I was a member of IFA and Pi Phi Rho. Can you describe your experiences with internships? During my junior year I studied abroad at London College of Fashion. While I studied abroad I did an internship at Bryan Morel PR. The firm had a range of clients and handled all PR and event planning for them. Lots of my time was spent steaming samples and doing pulls for magazines. The highlight was working on seating for a show for London Fashion Week and attending the show, being backstage and attending the after party. I also really enjoyed sample sales! I studied abroad with three


FASHION PASSION

withthepro other fashion students from Stephens. Three of us shared a flat with four other people in London. I loved my whole experience studying abroad and I think it is one of the highlights of my life! Describe senior year and your job searching process. What was your first job? How did you get it? My memories of my senior year are really positive. I don’t remember being that stressed though I’m sure I was. My dream was to work at Neiman Marcus. The summer before my senior year I went to New Orleans with my parents and one of my friends from Stephens that lived in Houston met me there. We went out on Bourbon Street and met a bachelor party. While talking to one of the guys, I mentioned that I wanted to work at Neiman Marcus and he told me his wife was a buyer there. He gave me her email and I sent her a message (a little uncomfortable, “Hi, I met your husband on Bourbon Street…). She gave me a name of a person in HR and I sent my resume. They had me come to Dallas for an initial interview and math test. I did really well and they had me visit a buying office on that trip. They brought me back for a second round of interviews and then I got the job. I was so excited. I moved to Dallas a couple weeks after graduation. I actually ended up being in the same division as the buyer that gave me the initial contact.

How did you get your current job? My husband had an opportunity to take a job with his company in Missouri and we knew we wanted to move to be close to my family and start a family of our own. I was a buyer and planner for Harold’s at the time and I gave my notice there. The first thing I did was call Kirsty Buchanan at Stephens [College] to see if she knew of any opportunities for buying in the St. Louis area. The job at Stephens had just come open so she spoke to Monica McMurry and they brought me out to be a jury member and interview at the same time. It worked out perfectly! My [District Merchandising Manager] DMM while at Harold’s was Leon Morrison. He left a few months after me and started his own consulting business. He then hired me to help on jobs with his company and I’ve been doing both jobs since then. I still love fashion! I am so happy I chose this field and I still cannot imagine doing anything else.

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“Fashion is fast-paced, traveling and moving are inevitable.� -Me


go

preppingto


PREPPING TO GO

THINGStoREMEMBER

whilepacking Packing for studying fashion is similar to packing for studying at any other school, but there are some slight differences that any fashion student will need to be prepared for. Attempt to pack light, as you will acquire lots of clothes as your style changes throughout your growth as a fashion student…and you WILL fill your dorm to capacity if you aren’t careful. Bring storage bins. They’ll help organize your life, not mention all those clothes. You are a fashion major, but you are also a college student. Don’t bring your “whole life”. I promise you won’t miss it. (10 white t-shirts means you only need half of those to make it through the week)

Words FROM

the author

Don’t bring everything (cannot stress it enough). A cluttered space does not equal a great relaxing, studying or sleeping space. If you have a roommate, even if you are in a shared apartment, make sure you

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chat with them about specific items you should and should not bring. Having two refrigerators, having two TVs, having two microwaves all adds up in a small dorm or apartment space.


PREPPING TO GO

?

What to bring to your room? Organizational bins (you can never have enough with all the clothes and accessories) Crafting materials (no matter what major, you will create mood boards. Mounting board (colored paper and spray adhesive should always be around) Fashion books and magazines (you can never have enough inspiration) Lots of luggage (for all those clothes!) A camera (if you are a Communication or Fashion Photography major this will come in handy for those photoshoots) Decorating materials (to extend the style from your person to your room) Sewing & Knitting materials

are a must, even if you are not a design major. There is always that one class that you are required to take where they teach you everything you need to know about textiles. You can’t understand fashion if you can’t understand textiles. What clothes should you take? If your school is heavy on presentations, make sure to bring professional, fashionable attire. (Don’t just talk the talk, look the part too) Fashionable lounge clothes (Basic leggings, sweatpants, and cotton shorts for the not-so-dressed-up days) Fashion workout clothes (Lululemons makes the cut) Jackets (The essentials: a leather, a jean, a windbreaker)

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“Fashion is an attempt to realize art in living forms.”

-Sir Frances Bacon

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Settingup

homebase


SETTING UP HOMEBASE

designingtheperfect

dormroom

Going to college brings lots of excitement about being on your own. Although you might be sad you are leaving your perfectly good room at home, get excited. You get to decorate that new dorm room space! Determine how you live. Do you have a desk to do homework? Do you sit on your bed to study? Do you have several lamps or just one large light overhead? Do you have a nightstand? Do you have other boxes and trinkets that you like to set around the room? Determine the amount of space. You may very well be in a bigger space at school or it may be smaller than usual. Do you want your room to look exactly like home? Or do you want it to be completely different? Determine the décor. Are you bringing your decoration from your room at home? Or are you purchasing all new décor? New sheets? New wall hangings? New curtains? Are your clothes your prized possession? Do you focus more on your shoes? Do you enjoy the vases, beauty trays, and bookends you have acquired over the years? Do you have a roommate? If so, then welcome to the world of sharing. You will not just share a space, but you will share items. It will be okay. Breathe. You guys might even like the same sort of décor. Once the basics for the room have been established, create a space that is unique to you (and the individual you are sharing with).

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SETTING UP HOMEBASE

AsampleSPACE My closet houses most of my items because my room isn’t the largest space. All winter shoes are housed in the closet, along with my handbags, and hats. I have four different types of hangers. Chiffons, silks, other satin-y materials and coats go on these types of hangers. Regular cotton materials, jackets, dresses and most cardigans go on these types of hangers. Anything without a sleeve or has a thin strap goes on these types of hangers. These special hangers are for all bottoms. My dresser and my window seal are for my trinkets. I have tons of vases, books, clocks, plants, and picture frames. No nightstand I just use these trunks to hold most of my extra items. It is as tall as a nightstand. A nook for my printer and two trunks with shoes and linens.

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selectingyourfellow

fashionfriends Your friends are whomever you say they are. They don’t have to have the same major, or do the same things. They don’t have to look like you or have the same things as you. Just remember that your friends are people that are lifting you up and helping shape the successful person you are becoming. When your focus and future are compromised, the friendship may be compromised too. Choose wisely and stick with each other. It pays off in the end.

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getinvolved

SETTING UP HOMEBASE

Look at what extracurricular activities or programs your school has to offer. Whether you are at a fashion school or a four-year university or college, there are organizations on campus that can be résumé builders and can give you some experience. Whatever your fashion major is, get involved and consider joining organizations and clubs: -Leadership roles (clubs that offer skills in entrepreneurship, student council, Collegiate DECA, production management) -Marketing, public relations or advertising (AMA (American Marketing Association), PRSSA (Public Relations Student of America) -Accessory design or accessory making (includes jewelry, knitting, crocheting, footwear, anything other than sewing a garment) -Garment design (children’s wear, menswear, womenswear, lingerie, sustainable design) -Art (fashion illustration, illustration, drawing, painting, sculpting, watercolor, even oil pastels) -Graphic design (using programs like Illustrator, Photoshop InDesign, CAD) -Interior design (ASID (American Society of Interior Designers student chapter) -Cosmetics and fragrances -Textiles and surface designs (patternmaking, printmaking, dyeing textiles, -A.A.T.C.C. (American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists), packaging and technical design, tailoring) -Web design -Publications or newspapers (offer skills writing, designing, Ed2010.com, yearbook) -Photography -Styling or merchandising skills (visual merchandising, wardrobe styling, National Retail Federation Student Association, SDSA (Set Decorators Society of America) If the organization or club doesn’t exist at your school, create one. There are national organizations that would be happy to bring a student chapter to your school. You just have to do the research and make the calls to make it happen. Get a group of friends together and start today.

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SETTING UP HOMEBASE

establishingyour

publicpersona Hold your head high. Always carry yourself with the utmost respect and dignity. When you are positive, confident and on top of things, those around you will pick up on it. Be the best you can be all the time. Being in fashion doesn’t mean being bitchy, fake, rude, and impatient. NETWORK. It cannot be emphasized enough. Use your peers, your instructors and professors, as well as your schools administration to network. Network at organizational events or fairs on campus. Network off campus at your job. Make connections with everyone. You never know what you will need that person for or whom they know. They could be your ticket to locating housing in NYC or getting an internship with Theory in LA. Use them!

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SETTING UP HOMEBASE

Realtalk “I’m involved in the Merchandising Society club at FIT, which came about as a way to be active on campus. I work at Fashion Week fashion shows through my school’s placement program. I also work on the advertising team for Fusion Fashion Show, which is a competition fashion show between FIT and Parsons that happens annually, through FIT.” Augusta Falletta, Fashion Institute of Technology

“I am involved in the Fashion Business Association at my school, The University of Central Missouri. It is our on-campus fashion group that meets to discuss what is happening in the industry, and we also arrange events with our group.” Nicole Forte, University of Central Missouri

Words FROM

the author

“I applied to a bunch of internship programs after I decided to go into fashion. I first learned the importance of interning at Teen Vogue Fashion University. I read about the event online and thought it was a good place to start. Then I called and emailed a lot of people. Eventually I found myself at some awesome fashion houses!”

Getting adjusted to a new environment is important. Take the time to learn about all the fashion-related activities and services on campus. Start at home base first, then branch out.

Layla Li, Boston University

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“Fashions fade, style is eternal.”

-Yves Saint Laurent


a week of college

fashion


A WEEK OF COLLEGE FASHION

Fashion is about innovation, adapting to new and different environments, and multitasking. You will always be busy. And with so many different classes, internships, jobs, projects, and personal time taking up a day, there are different ways of handling a busy fashion schedule. Follow some students through a busy week while studying fashion.

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A WEEK OF COLLEGE FASHION

Advertising Design 3:00-3:50 p.m.; Nineteenth-Century Art 5:30-8:30 p.m.; OPEN LAB Tuesdays: 8:30 a.m.; Wake Up! 9:30-10:45 a.m.; Fashion Communication Capstone 11:00-2:00 p.m.; Workstudy (at the library) 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Topics: Fashion Accessories in Fashion 6:00 p.m.; ZUMBA with friends

Student: me University/College/Institute: Stephens College Major: Fashion Communication Year: 4th year

After working two jobs, taking 16 credit hours and working on my senior project, the end of the week is always a celebration. Staying organized, staying fit

and healthy and allowing for time to relax is really important. Mondays: 8:00 a.m.; Wake Up! 9:00-11:50 a.m.;

During the week, it can be insane trying to spend time with my friends. Lunches are taken by work or class or vice versa. Gather your friends and pick an activity that is not only active or fun for you and your friends, but allows you to catch up. Zumba is great. You dance, you laugh, you sing, and you can complain about that homework you don’t want to do or your poster design you are excited about.

Wednesdays: 8:00 a.m.; Wake Up! 9:00-11:50 a.m.; Advertising Design 3:00-3:50 p.m.; Nineteenth-Century Art 5:00-10:00 p.m.; Work (at Yogoluv) Thursdays: 9:30-10:45 a.m.; Fashion Communication Capstone 11:00-2:00 p.m.; Workstudy (at the library) 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Topics: Fashion Accessories in Fashion 6:00 p.m.; Gym workout with friends 7:00 p.m.; Yoga Fridays: 3:00-3:50 p.m.; Nineteenth-Century Art 5:00-10:00 p.m.; Work (at Yogoluv) Saturday and Sunday: WEEKENDS ARE FOR RELAXING!

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A WEEK OF COLLEGE FASHION

Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays:

Wednesdays and Fridays: Same as Mondays

7:30-8:30 a.m.; Wake Up! “I have an hour to eat and get ready. I like to sit down and enjoy my coffee.”

Tuesdays and Thursdays:

8:30-9:30 a.m.; Bus to class 9:00-11:00 a.m.; Textile Testing “Two hours!” 11:00 a.m.; BREAK “I eat lunch on campus or bring it with me.” Student: Ayla Habermann University/College/Institute: University of Georgia Major: Fashion Merchandising, with an emphasis in Global Soft Goods Merchandising Year: 4th year

12:00-1:15 p.m.; Product Development 3:00 or 4:00-7:30 p.m.; Work (at Talbots) “I get off work, go home do a little homework, relax.”

Student: Yiuan “Layla” Li University/College/Institute: Boston University Major: Public Relations Year: 4th year

“After 8:00 p.m. is the time to enjoy some quality time with roomies and friends!”

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9:30-10:30 a.m.; Wake Up! 10:30-11:00 a.m.; Bus to class 11:00-11:50 a.m.; Survey of Apparel M. 12:30-1:20 p.m.; Consumer Economics 3:00 or 4:00-7:30 p.m.; Work (at Talbots)

Mondays through Fridays: 9:00-11:00 a.m.; Class 11:00-12:00 p.m.; Projects “I usually take this time to finish any projects I have due during the week.” 2:00-5:00 p.m.; Class 6:00-8:00 p.m.; Homework time!


A WEEK OF COLLEGE FASHION

Mondays through Fridays: 7:00-11:00 a.m.; Work 11:30 a.m.– 6:00 p.m.; Class, Interning, SG “Either class, interning, or student government meetings depending on the day!”

Student: Augusta Falletta University/College/Institute: Fashion Institute of Technology Major: Advertising and Marketing Communications Year: 4th year

6:00 p.m.-9:00 a.m.; Residential Advisor work “Either RA duty or going to an on-campus event.”

Student: Nicole Forte University/College/ Institute: University of Central Missouri Year: 4th year

“I work on homework for my online class.”

“My day is abnormally busy because I’m an RA, I’m on Student Government, I work and intern and go to school.”

“Unfortunately, it isn’t much different than a week as a non-fashion major. We attend class, and attend our bi-weekly Fashion Business Association meetings, and we will have an occasional project to do.” Mondays through Fridays: 10:00-12:00 p.m.; Class 2:00-5:45 p.m.; Class 5:45 p.m.; Online Class

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A WEEK OF COLLEGE FASHION

Lauren’s schedule is simple. “9:00 a.m. to whenever [I] finish p.m. or a.m. [my] senior project. [I have] classes between throughout the day.” “Senior year I would basically say I lived at the Fashion building. I work better during the day and although all nighters are pretty much unavoidable during senior year. I always found myself making silly mistakes late at night so I would try and be at the building by 8 a.m. during the busiest of times…I would pretty much stay working in the studios all day taking breaks to go to class. Usually grabbing a quick lunch…and eating it there in the building. I would break and go home for dinner and then return to the building to continue working in the studio.” Student: Lauren Jones University/College/Institute: Savannah College of Art and Design Major: Fashion Design Year: Graduated 2011

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A WEEK OF COLLEGE FASHION

thingstocarry I asked several students what are their top essentials that they keep in their handbag for a busy school week.

6. 1.

5.

2. 3.

4.

1. Lipstick (Augusta F. never goes anywhere without it!) and chapstick 2. Headphones (Too keep out the noise on your walk or ride to class, especially in NYC) and wallet 3. Comfortable flats (Layla says essential for a long day in heels!) 4. Bottled water (keep hydrated!) 5. Emergen-C (Too keep yourself healthy when stress levels are high), gum and a protein bar 6. Planner (Helps to keep track of class, work, and appointment times) and iPad

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“Live and breathe fashion wherever you go.” -Me


the fashion

résumé


THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ

Résumés are an integral part of selling and branding yourself, and sometimes it can mean the difference between getting the job or internship and not getting the job or internship. How create a résumé with the essentials: Make sure your first and last names, the school you attend and your email address are on the résumé. Without these, the résumé will look great, but the employer or supervisor will not know your name or how to contact you. Occasionally I have seen résumés with a phone number and a mailing address for further contact. If you feel the company you are applying to is deserving of that information, go ahead and add. Otherwise, it’s not essential. List the school you currently attend, the location of the school, your major and your anticipated graduation date.

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In college, besides internships, organization, clubs, and extracurricular activities are really all you have to show you have experience in your chosen career path. Include the clubs you are involved in along with the number of years of involvement. If you have several, choose the ones that are most important (or most similar to your major) or show extensive involvement.

When you are listing your experience, make sure to list the name of the company, your job at the company and how long you worked there. Create a brief description of your job responsibilities. Occasionally it is necessary to list your experience by category. An example would be “Journalism Experience”. Also, remember to list the newest experience first!

Occasionally I see grade point averages on résumés. If you have over a 3.7 gpa, it is probably a good choice to include it as a qualification. If it is under 3.7 gpa, leave it off.

Make sure to list technical computer skills or other skills you have acquired. With today’s technology driving the way we communicate, it is imperative to know how to use different programs and platforms.


THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ

DEJA TURNER 314.482.5495 dejamturner@gmail.com

education Stephens College; Columbia, MO BFA in Fashion Communication; Anticipated Degree May 2013 Dean’s List 2009-Present | Alpha Lamda Delta Honors Society | Mortar Board National College Senior Honors Society | Innovative Fashion Association (IFA) | Modeling Group | Student Ambassador 20092010 | EPIC Student Executive Board 2011-2012 | The SCene (Stephens College School of Design & Fashion online magazine)

Journalism Experience Dujour Magazine (Print Publication and Online Digital Sales Platform); New York, NY Intern; June 2012- August 2012 • Wrote clothing credits for the first September issue of the magazine, as well as assisted Assistant Fashion/Market Editor Paul Frederick and Senior Fashion/Market Editor Sydney Wasserman. • Attended events for promotion and launch of the new publication. • Fashion closet intern; checking garments and accessories in/out, assisting at photoshoots, organizing fashion closet. Dualshow.com (Online Fashion and Lifesytle Community Magazine); Streetstyle Writer; April 2012-August 2012 • Wrote bi-weekly online articles for the Streetstyle section of the Fashion and Shopping department. • Author of the “10 Best” weekly column, which features the 10 best brands and/or designers for a certain fashion trend. • Ocassionally assisted with social media for promotion and launch of the new online magazine. The SCene (College Fashion Department Magazine); Columbia, MO On-Campus Writer; February 2012May 2012 • Wrote weekly online articles for the fashion department magazine. • Experience in researching trends and styles and interviewing.

Stephens Life (College Paper); Columbia, MO News & Features Writer; August 2010-December 2010 • Created story ideas, report-on, design and paginate a bi-weekly paper. • Experience in researching, interviewing and on-thespot reporting.

styling Experience Missouri Natural History Museum; St. Louis, MO Wardrobe; August 2011 • Worked in wardrobe for the “Rivers of Women” production written by Shirley LeFlore. • Performed usual wardrobe duties; clothing alterations, ironing and steaming as well as stage production duties. BET (Black Entertainment Television); Los Angeles, CA Wardrobe Production Assistant; May 2011 • Interned for the new “8 Days a Week” webseries on BET.com written by Lyah LeFlore. • Experience in Set procedures such as continuity photos, styling, and minor clothing construction.

Other Experience Hugh Stephens Library (Stephens College); Columbia, MO Front Desk Assistant; October 2012-Present • General library support tasks such as checking material in and out, reshelving, answering phones and filing.

technical skills Training and experience in Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint, Excel), Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign; some experience in HTML, CSS, and Final Cut Pro.

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THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ

rules A couple of rules when creating a fashion résumé:

Always check your spelling. There’s nothing worse than an employer coming across a great candidate with great credentials, but then they come to find out the candidate failed to spell “leadership” correctly. Make sure you use spellcheck and then have some one proof read out loud. If you misspell, it appears that you lack attention to detail or just don’t care. Never put a picture on your résumé. It’s tacky and appears self-centered or trying to hard. If the company asks for one, then send a formal picture. Every fashion student should do internships for experience. But if you have just started to

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build your résumé, you will only have one or two internships under your belt. In that case, “other experience” will take up some of that page. Include retail jobs, office related jobs, or other small fashion-related activities that you have worked extensively on. Those jobs and activities will reflect well to potential employers. Keep the résumé to one page. In fashion when you have 300 emails to read, a photo shoot to direct and a meeting on next issue’s cover. The last thing you want is to read a two or three page résumé. Keep it simple and only include the most relevant and up-to-date information.

Show your personality! List your fashion blog, website, your Twitter or Instagram (make sure its not too personal) showing your style, things you are passionate about in fashion, and that you are up-to-date on all fashion news. Having these extra items can set you apart from others. Absolutely DO NOT LIE! The fashion industry is big, but it’s not that big. And the person looking over your résumé will know if you didn’t intern for Vogue. Your experiences should be your own experiences. Lying doesn’t get you any closer to the goal. See bad a résumé next page.


THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ

Deja Marann-Bracey Turner (314) 482-5495 | dejamturner@gmail.com Stephens College; Columbia, MO BFA in Fashion Communication; Anticipated Degree May 2013 • Dean’s List 2009-Present | Alpha Lamda Delta Honors Society | Mortar Board National College Senior Honors Society | Innovative Fashion Association (IFA) | Modeling Group | Student Ambassador 2009-2010 | EPIC Student Executive Board 2011-2012 | The SCene (Stephens College School of Design & Fashion online magazine) Journalism Experience DuJour Magazine (Print Publication and Online Digital Sales Platform); New York, NY Intern; June 2012- August 2012 • Wrote clothing credits for the first September issue of the magazine, as well as assisted Assistant Fashion/Market Editor Paul Frederick and Senior Fashion/Market Editor Sydney Wasserman. • Attended events for promotion and launch of the new publication. • Fashion closet intern; checking garments and accessories in/out, assisting at photoshoots, organizing fashion closet. Dualshow.com (Online Fashion and Lifesytle Community Magazine); Streetstyle Writer; April 2012-August 2012 • Wrote bi-weekly online articles for the Streetstyle section of the Fashion and Shopping department. • Author of the “10 Best” weekly column, which features the 10 best brands and/or designers for a certain fashion trend. • Ocassionally assisted with social media for promotion and launch of the new online magazine. The SCene (College Fashion Department Magazine); Columbia, MO On-Campus Writer; February 2012-May 2012 • Wrote weekly online articles for the fashion department magazine. • Experience in researching trends and styles and interviewing. Stephens Life (College Paper); Columbia, MO News & Features Writer; August 2010-December 2010 • Created story ideas, report-on, design and paginate a bi-weekly paper. • Experience in researching, interviewing and on-the-spot reporting. Styling Experience Missouri Natural History Museum; St. Louis, MO Wardrobe; August 2011 • Worked in wardrobe for the “Rivers of Women” production written by Shirley LeFlore. • Performed usual wardrobe duties; clothing alterations, ironing and steaming as well as stage production duties. BET (Black Entertainment Television); Los Angeles, CA Wardrobe Production Assistant; May 2011 • Interned for the new “8 Days a Week” webseries on BET.com written by Lyah LeFlore. • Experience in Set procedures such as continuity photos, styling, and minor clothing construction. Other Experience Hugh Stephens Library (Stephens College); Columbia, MO Front Desk Assistant; October 2012-Present • General library support tasks such as checking material in and out, reshelving, answering phones and filing. Technical Skills Training and experience in Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint, Excel), Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign; some experience in HTML, CSS, and Final Cut Pro.

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THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ

whatare

theylookingfor? Potential employers are looking to make sure you are a great fit for their company. They want to make sure you are professional, detail oriented and have a passion for fashion. Are you in action? Use action words on your résumé. Past tense makes it appear as if you use to even though it still exists. “Fashion closet intern; assisting the fashion editor at daily photo shoots”, appeals more than “I was a fashion closet intern. I assisted the fashion editor at daily photo shoots”. Don’t use objectives. Objectives can be limiting and may not fit the criteria for the job you are applying to. You want to show you have a variety of skills and can complete a variety of tasks.

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Are you fabricating or exaggerating? Don’t exaggerate the tasks you completed at a previous job. Just tell it like it was. If you only fact checked and researched trends, then say it. Bold job names and important statements. Give the employer places to look to follow your experience list. When you see a posting for an internship or a job, use the words they used in the job listing. “Detailed-oriented”, “professional”, “punctual”.

Words FROM

the author

Your cover letter is what really sells the type of person you are and the skills you can bring to the job. Résumés are a list of things you have achieved. The cover letter tells the story. I always have several copies of my résumé prepared. Print several copies of your résumé off (on résumé paper!) and when you attend an event, a fair, are at school, or are going on informational meetings (we will talk about this next chapter), you will have your resume to give to whomever you are networking with.

Update your résumé in a timely matter. After you finish an internship, a job, or add a new organization or club, update it right away. Go to your school’s career resource center. Have them review your résumé and cover letter. Resource centers such as these can help proofread your materials to send out and give you some pointers on how to improve.

I have a list of people I reference that potential employers can reach out to when determining if I’m a good candidate for a job. My résumé was never updated Create a reference of people at first, but as I started to who know you well and can look into ways to improve my vouch for your work résumé, internships and jobs, abilities. Make sure to list my résumé started to become their name, where they updated more frequently. work, their job, and the best way to contact them.


THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ

conversation

withthepro professional#2

Paul Frederick, Savannah College of Art and Design, Assistant Fashion/Market Editor at DuJour Magazine Did you study fashion in college? I was an Equestrian Studies major with a minor in fashion—though I was only a few credits shy of a double major in fashion. I had been riding professionally for a while and I was getting burned out so I wanted to try something new. What was it like studying fashion in college? Besides learning about the construction of clothing, we were really pushed to think outside of the box design wise while still remembering that the clothes needed to be worn. What was a week like in the fashion department? Being on a quarter schedule we only required to take three classes that would meet twice weekly for 2.5 hours. Most of the day was scheduled with classes or working in the building on upcoming assignments and running around

the city. By midterms or finals week we were usually at the building 24/7 only leaving for trips to the gas station for sweets or home to shower and change. Describe your internship experiences. While in school I was riding professionally so I never really had time to intern during summers or breaks. I did work with the regional magazine “The South” as a fashion assistant on shoots. Describe senior year and your job searching process. What was your first job? How did you get it? During my senior year I was still riding professionally all the while thinking that I might want to try something new. For the Annual Senior Fashion show, SCAD always invites top Fashion editors and journalist to the school to review the senior show. After the show I made a huge effort to go up to journalist and introduce myself. I had made beautifully designed business cards and I only handed them out once I had spent a few minutes talking to each person…That night alone I met such great people – Mickey Boardman from Paper Magazine, Andrew Bevan from Teen Vogue, Eric

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THE FASHION RÉSUMÉ

Wilson from the New York Times, as well as Joe Zee from ELLE.

few weeks later, Joe and Sarah asked me to come back as a Freelance Fashion assistant.

The next week I followed up with everyone via e-mail, crafting a personal letter to each person about our conversation and attaching my resume. Even before I was settled into an apartment I followed up again with these editors to say that I would love to schedule a time to meet if possible. This led to interviews at both GQ and ELLE. Fortunately I was offered an internship at both publications – though decided to commit full time to the ELLE offer instead of working a few days in each office.

I worked on quite a few projects – from helping assisting on set with columns such as “Workbook” and “A to Zee” and well and cover stories. I also worked with Joe on outside projects such as handling the market pulls for a Beyoncé fragrance campaign, personal shopping and market pulls for ABC President Anne Sweeney and GMA host Lara Spencer.

I could not have asked for a better internship. Working as an intern for Joe Zee was very different from most fashion internships. Every day I would work very closely with his assistants Sarah Schussheim and Yashua Simmons. We would work on multiple projects at once - freelance and charity projects, preparing and being on set for Joe’s “A to Zee” column and any other New York based shoots, as well as working on the set of Joe’s Sundance Channel TV Show “All on the Line”. In January 2012 as the Hearst Internship lawsuit was first happening, the HR department did a huge sweep of all interns and quickly getting rid of interns like myself who were not receiving school credit. I was a bit lost – I was still new to the fashion scene and I wasn’t sure how I would ever be able to continue if I wasn’t able to intern. A

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How did you get your current job? When DuJour Magazine started in April 2012 quite a few people from Elle.com followed Keith Pollock over. (He was the editorial director at Elle.com and then became the CoEditor in Chief of DuJour.) When DuJour started hiring, my contacts at ELLE passed along my resume and the rest is history! My current position is the Assistant Fashion/Market Editor at DuJour Magazine. I work under the Senior Market Editor Sydney Wasserman, and the two of us make up the entire fashion department. We handle men and women’s fashion, fine jewelry and watches, accessories, as well as grooming and beauty. We are responsible for calling in all products that will be considered for DuJour print and digital issues. We also handle styling smaller front of book stories and digital stories that come along. It is quite a lot of responsibility for two people but that challenge makes the job.


thefirststep:

internships

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thesearch

INTERNSHIPS

Finding fashion internships can be hard and most of the time as daunting as finding a real job. But don’t be discouraged. If your materials are ready, edited to the best of your abilities, proof, read, and really show how professional and passionate you are, the internship will come. To find an internship: Use your network. Who do you know that knows someone—that knows someone, who works for Marie Claire that knows the fashion editor that works in the fashion closet? Get to know these people. They remember what it was like to find an internship when they were in school. Ask them about how to get in contact with that person. Want to work for a magazine and don’t know anyone or have any connections to the fashion magazine world? Read the masthead. Learn the names of the editors, the photographer, or whomever you want to work for. Look at websites that post fashion jobs and internships daily.

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Fashionista Ed2010 (Great for wanting to work at a magazine!) The Intern Queen Freefashioninternships Style Careers Search on Google. Search “fashion internships summer 2013” or “styling internships in los angeles”. A simple search may unearth things that might not have appeared when you searched on a specific website. Go to your school’s career resource center and ask if they have a job posting database or send out emails for new internships they receive. Most schools have a website that post job and internship postings to. Use that database to apply for an internship.

Real

talk “For my first two internships I just reached out to the company by calling them and asking who to contact about applying for an internship. It’s always beneficial to have a specific contact person. Then I put together some of my strongest pages of my portfolio in a PDF and sent it out along with a well-written cover letter and my resume.” Lauren Jones, Savannah College of Art and Design


INTERNSHIPS

best fashion cities

If you are looking for that fashion internship in the big city, with a well-known company that offers great experience, you need to look at cities like: New York New York is the mecca of all things fashion. Fashion magazines, styling firms, designer firms, and visual merchandising are in abundance there. Los Angeles Los Angeles is known for its styling and public relations market. Styling of all kinds—from magazine styling to film wardrobe styling to celebrity styling—as well as an abundance of publicist jobs are located there. Dallas Dallas is known for its merchandising and showroom marketing. Dream of working in a showroom and attending MAGIC in Las Vegas? Working in Dallas will get you there. London The UK is all about creativity. Among is popular streetstyle scene, you can get a job in fashion in just about anything. Want to write for a fashion magazine? Sure. What to start up a styling firm? Of course? Want to work for Christopher Kane? No problem.

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INTERNSHIPS

paidor

unpaidinternship? The difference is obvious but there are a few important things to know when completing either type of internship:

Paid internships and non-paid internships can both be credit-bearing, so you can get school credit for them.

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Unpaid internships usually allow more flexibility. You can come in whenever works for your schedule.

Unpaid internships allow from you to learn from a survey perspective. Because you are seen as a student worker, you will be able to sample different departments and try more tasks than a student who was hired for an internship and were required to follow certain guidelines.

Paid internships usually require a set amount of days and hours during the week.

In fashion, most internships (especially the most prestigious ones) are not actually paid.

Paid internships give opportunity to extra income while also giving you a sample experience without actually working for the company fully.

Whatever the choice, give 100% no matter if you are paid or not.


INTERNSHIPS

interviews:

howtoprepare Interviewing for internships can be nerve-racking. But if you are prepared, confident and professional, the interview will be successful. Do research on the magazine, designer firm, or styling firm you are interviewing for. Know the company’s strengths, latest info and their current state in the market. Bring your portfolio on your iPad or in a case, along with several copies of your résumé and references Bring a bottle of water. Sometimes your mouth gets dry when you’re nervous. Dress according to the style of the company culture. Make sure you are not too causal. I find wearing a dress or skirt is a great way to go. In fashion it gets tricky.

Grab you mentor or a friend and have them do a practice interview them. Look up mock interview questions on the internet and tailor them to your fashion interview (or what you expect it to be like). Pretend they are the employer and answer how you would answer in the real interviewing process. Create a list of questions to ask the interviewer at the end of the interview. You should have real questions and not just ones because it makes you look prepared. Ask about the company culture, whom who will be working with, and what to expect as far as daily office tasks.

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INTERNSHIPS

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What should you expect from the interviewer? Expect the interviewer to do more of the listening. You will be asked to tell a little bit about yourself and share your hopes and goals as if you were to get the internship. You will also be asked to talk a little bit about your work if you have a portfolio. Expect the interview be quick, but allow time for extras. Interviews are really just for people to get to know you and determine if you are a good fit for their company. Basic questions, along with hypothetical scenarios will be used to determine if you can perform accurately on the job. Expect the interviewer to ask you questions about the company like: What is your favorite product or

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service? What brand do you like the most? What was your favorite part of the current issue?

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Things to avoid Don’t arrive at the exact time of your interview. Be at least 15 minutes early! When you are going for an interview, especially at companies in New York, you have to be early. Many places require you to sign in and go through a security check before going into the firm suite. Avoid dangly jewelry. Yes, show your personality and style with your clothing choice but don’t be noisy. Dangly jewelry is distracting.

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Don’t forget! After an interview, there are a couple of follow-up things you must do. Professional behavior needs

to be apparent always: Thank whomever you interview with for taking time out of their day to interview with you. Don’t forget to ask for their business card or contact information (if you don’t already have it) and ask when they are thinking to have a final answer on the chosen candidates. The same day, make sure to send another thank you note, thanking the interviewer for their time, expressing your gratitude for insight into the company and reiterating how interested you are in the position. Follow up with the contact person on the status of the position in about two weeks.


INTERNSHIPS

finding

housing: Go to your school’s career resource center. Ask them about housing in your internship city. They will suggest some great websites or have housing information for that city. You can also go online and search “summer housing for [insert city here]”. FIT summer housing or Columbia University housing are great ones if you are traveling to New York. What colleges or universities are in the surrounding area of your internship? Most colleges and universities offer summer housing, even for those who do not attend the school. Use your network. Ask your parents’ co-worker if they have friends who live in Brooklyn or as your teacher if she

Finding housing when you are interning in a different city can be challenging. Determining what type of housing, where is it located relative to your internship, and how much it costs will help expedite the search. knows alumnae that have extra space in her Pasadena homes. The power of networking is amazing. Some great websites to look for temporary housing are: www.zumahousing.com/ (Los Angeles) www.92y.org (New York) www.studenthousing.org (New York) www.nycintern.org (New York) www.internhousing.com (Los Angeles)

Real

talk “I interned in SoHo, New York. I checked out housing on craiglist, but I eventually found a place through a friend at NYU. It’s always so busy in the office. A round trip from UES to SoHo in an hour counts as an easy day. It’s so crucial to know how to navigate through the city using subway.” Layla Li, Boston University

There are many others. Just get online and search.

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INTERNSHIPS

Words FROM

the author Keep your expectations in check. When I was interning, I had the idea that I was going to be inside most of the time. And boy was I wrong! I spent lots of time on the train in the big city, picking up and returning samples in the hot sun. It was awesome! But it wasn’t awesome for my feet at the end of the day. Be prepared for anything and don’t expect everything. Face your fears. I went through the entire process of applying for internships, getting several interviews, choosing an internship (I had several choices), and then my internship fell through. I spent about two weeks in limbo, worried about my summer, sad because I was by myself in the big city, and just not enjoying NYC. I had to gather myself, my faith and my courage, re-apply, re-interview and I got the internship of a lifetime. Deal with adversity head on if and when it hits. When you face it, the outcome will always be great.

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Journal your experience and take lots of pictures. When life is happening right in front of you, it’s hard to stop and record it. But try. When you write it down and read it later on, you really see how much you’ve grown, you relive the experience, and you can determine your direction for the future. Have a visual record of your experience. Those pictures later on could be used to write a book on fashion internships or study fashion in college. Don’t forget to use your network. When you are interning by yourself in a new place. Use your family, friends, and people you work with to lean on. Take the metro to visit your great cousin in Burlington, NJ or the R to visit your cousin in Bay Ridge. Take trip downtown to East Village and eat basil chicken and drink bubble tea with another intern. Those are unforgettable moments.

Real

talk “Don’t rule anything out and keep an open mind! You never know what will happen if you aren’t afraid to take risks!” Nicole Forte, University of Central Missouri


INTERNSHIPS

DuJour Magazine Chopra Wells event

Fashion closet log book

DuJour fashion closet branding Senior Market Editor, Sydney Wasserman, me, and Assistant Fashion Market Editor, Paul Frederick, DuJour Magazine

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“Failure is not an option because it doesn’t exist. You can change anything with a new attitude and a new mindset. Winners know it’s the comeback that counts.” -Anthea Paul, Girlosophy


getting your

props


GETTING YOUR PROPS

Senior year is filled with several different kinds of emotions. And while uncertainty and nervousness may be a couple of them, excitement about your life to come is the fiercest. In fashion, senior year is a lot about your all-encompassing senior project. Whether you are designing an entire collection, planning a visual merchandising display for a major store, designing a fashion illustrated book, or planning an entire lingerie concept store, senior year and your senior project are one in the same.

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What should expect you for senior year?

designer, fashion editor, or stylist of your choice!

Expect to feel like time is going really fast. Yes, you are graduating soon. It’s the countdown. Don’t let time slip away from you. Be in the moment.

Expect for you senior project to be an investment. It’s not going to be a cheap college cost that’s for sure. Designing an entire project all to show to potential employers that you have what it takes is something that should be treated with the utmost care and get the best of everything.

Expect to network lots more. Senior year is crunch time. The time to make decisions on where you want to work, who you want to work with and the job you will be completing all in the name of fashion. Network with those people you have made contacts with. Expect excitement about what is to come! You are going to score that dream job, in the dream city, with the dream

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Expect uncertainty. You thought you knew what you wanted and where you wanted to go but all of a sudden it seems as if none of that is the right decision. It will come to you and you don’t have to be sure right away. That’s the game of life.

Real

talk “So far my senior year is off to an exciting start. My boyfriend is moving to Los Angeles and I am going to drive across the country with him. I also have planned to go back to New York in February for fashion week! Neither of these are school related, but they will make for an unforgettable year! I am not looking at graduate school at this time. I feel that experience is more beneficial in the work that I want to go into.” Nicole Forte, University of Central Missouri


GETTING YOUR PROPS

yourcapstone

During your last year of your undergraduate, most schools are required to create an all-compassing (combining everything you’ve learned in your major the years you’ve been in school) senior project. For some it might just be a project that can be completed in two weeks, for others, it lasts the entire year spanning semesters. Whatever the case, make sure you are prepared and think carefully about the project that will become your life. Stick to the deadlines and be creative and out of the box. Make sure if embodies you and your aspirations for after college.

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GETTING YOUR PROPS

fashiongraduateschool In fashion, going to graduate school is usually not a necessity, its actually seen as above and beyond. Do you need that furthered education on wool tailoring or the research on global management? To determine if graduate school is right for you, there are a couple of things to review. Look at the statistics on the percentage of students attending graduate school from your chosen career path. Do most go to graduate school or do they enter into the chosen career path right after school? Look at the most studied fashion majors in master degree programs. Do any of those correlate with your major or career path? It is cost-effective? Is attending graduate school helping you make more money in the future or just the same as if you weren’t attending? If you know that your parents want you to attend graduate school but know that it is not the right choice for you, sit them down, explain to them your plans. You know what’s right for you and in fashion, graduate school is not always the way to go.

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Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles

“Do any of those correlate with your major or career path? You know what’s right for you.”


GETTING YOUR PROPS

applying to grad school

One thing to know: In fashion, most graduate fashion programs require all prospective graduate students to take either the GRE or the GMAT. GRE Stands for Graduate Record Examination. It measures the verbal, quantitative and analytical reasoning of the student. GMAT Stands for Graduate Management Admission Test. This test is to also measure the verbal, quantitative and analytical reasoning of the student, but tailored to the field of business.

So you’re going to graduate school and you are super excited. Making this choice is going to be great for your future career. Applying for graduate school is virtually the same process.

The largest graduate fashion schools by student enrollment in the U.S. according to Education Portal: Michigan State University University of North Texas Eastern Michigan University Drexel University Academy of Art University Texas Woman’s University Savannah College of Art and Design For more information, visit http://educationportal.com/fashion_graduate_schools.html

For information one each test, go online to www.ets.org

Real

talk

“I’m still debating about whether going to grad school or not. I want to get into the industry ASAP and start working. But after a semester at LCF [London College of Fashion], I thought a master in graphic design [might] be helpful in my future career. I’m looking into actual jobs now. Although I’m not applying yet,

I’m checking companies’ websites regularly and go through their recruitment process like I’m actually applying. I think knowing their criteria and process will help me have a better chance at getting my dream job!” Layla Li, Boston University

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GETTING YOUR PROPS

conversation

withthepro professional#3

Nakisha Williams, Howard University, Reporter/Writer at Entertainment Weekly (Style & Design section) Did you study fashion in college? If no, what did you study? What made you pursue fashion as a profession? No. I just studied Journalism. I fell into fashion reporting almost by accident. I wanted to be a beauty writer but there were no beauty jobs. I got a job offer to work at InStyle.com and started getting assignments for fashion and entertainment content. I continued to cover both topics from there. Describe your internship experiences. I interned at the following places in college: The Wall Street Journal online, New York I met a recruiter for the paper at a school newspaper and she encouraged me to apply then ultimately offered me the internship. I didn’t have much experience besides my clips from my college newspaper. As for housing: my mom fronted the costs for me to live in an NYU dorm for the summer.

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People Magazine, Washington DC bureau While at the Wall Street Journal online I met an alumna from my school who worked there. She gave me a contact and I sent over a resume, cover letter and clips (including all my work from that summer) and asked to meet to interview for any possible openings. It was a great lesson to keep my ears open for leads and tap into my network. Lots of jobs get filled by word of mouth. InStyle Magazine, New York I got this internship by applying to the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) internship program, which I heard about from my school. When I found out about it I asked my school for a recommendation and was endorsed by them for one of the few spots. Once I was in the program we had to list five magazines that were associated with the program that we’d want to work for. InStyle was at the top of my list. Unbeknownst to me a program director applied for a minority housing grant so my housing ended up being paid for by that for the summer at a NYU dorm. People Style Watch Magazine, New York I found out that Time Inc, the company that housed People and InStyle had an internship program so I applied and made sure to ask my previous managers for references. They


GETTING YOUR PROPS

accepted the request (a good lesson that sometimes you just have to put yourself out there and ask!). As a part of the program all applicants were offered either a monetary sum to find housing or a housing spot at Columbia University. I lived in the dorms that summer. Describe senior year and your job searching process. What was your first job? How did you get it? Senior year I made sure to email every person I had ever interned with or worked with to tell them I was job hunting. I scoured job postings. I applied for everything I saw and went on many many many interviews (it’s a competitive world out here and like I mentioned a lot of jobs get filled by word of mouth through people [that] the hiring manager already knows: former interns, references, etc). I had the post-grad internship in New York, which gave me a few months to be in the city and job hunt with a roof over my head and something to do. I also did a lot of informational interviews. I simply looked up people who worked in departments I wanted to work in and cold emailed them with a resume and a note explaining who I was and that I was interested in more information about their company and position. An informational interview is not for the purpose of getting a job, it’s simply to learn more, but I did end up cultivating contacts that I’m still in touch with to this day while doing that. People love giving information to college students who are eager to learn. How did you get your current job? I got this job when an editor I had previously worked with at InStyle called and asked me if I wanted it. The whole “who you know” adage is real. It’s very hard to navigate this industry when you don’t know anyone and/or no one knows you. The best way to build those relationships [is through] internships and finding other ways to network.

What is a week like in the fashion department? It really depends on what kind of company and what area you’re working in. Right now my days are filled with a lot of interviewing costume designers, special effect makeup artists and actors for wardrobe notes and other content but I’ve worked in several different types of fashion offices. My first experience was as an intern in People’s Style Watch’s Fashion Department. I was assigned to the fashion closet. It was glamorous to look at the clothes but my days were mostly filled with checking in clothes and returning them. The Market editor in our department always seemed to have a cool job running around on appointments to check out new clothes that might eventually make it into the magazine. Then there’s my most hectic week of fashion: New York Fashion Week. I’ve covered now for 12 seasons. It’s mayhem going from back to back to back fashion shows every day, all day and then reporting at parties and then having to write a bunch of reports before you wake up and do it all over again! No one gets any sleep. Can discuss your experiences in freelancing? After working for InStyle.com for two years I freelanced for three years for a variety of publications including InStyle magazine, Us Weekly magazine, BET.com. What are the strengths in freelancing? What are some weaknesses? Freelancing was great because you are your “own boss” but it takes a lot of work to keep things running smoothly. You become the boss, the intern, the payroll department (and often times the bill collector –that’s one of the biggest cons, some people take awhile to pay you), etc. It’s not for everyone, but I did enjoy being able to create my own schedule and work on the things that I wanted to work on and pass on the things I didn’t. Also I was able to test out a lot of different publications without being locked in if I didn’t want to be.

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“Face the future, the best is yet to come.”

-Anthea Paul, Girlosophy


thanks a

bunch! Special thanks to: Mommy Mike Chechik John Hayes Data Source Kate Gray Paul Frederick Nakisha Williams Courtney Cothren Lauren Jones Layla Li Augusta Falletta Ayla Habermann Hillary McBride Nicole Forte Colondra Smith Mars Howard

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(Book) "The guide to studying fashion in college". Senior Fashion Communication Capstone project.

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