Page 1

MOBILE HOUSE The project aimed at designing a portable work and living space for a roadside Mobile House.

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FIRST YEAR


Mobile House

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FIRST YEAR


Mobile House

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FIRST YEAR


URBAN ARTIFACTS AND COMMUNITY NETWORKS - JOGESHWARI CAVES

The project evolved as a reaction to the current mis-use of important artifacts in the city of Mumbai. Ancient cave temples can be found all over the length of the city. Under the jurisdiction of the State these have often fallen into disrepair and new relationships have been formed with the immediate community around. Students were involved in a study of these new relationships and developed spatial strategies to address them.

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

SECOND YEAR


Urban Artifacts and Community Networks - Jogeshwari Caves

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

SECOND YEAR


Urban Artifacts and Community Networks - Jogeshwari Caves

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

SECOND YEAR


Urban Artifacts and Community Networks - Jogeshwari Caves

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

SECOND YEAR


Urban Artifacts and Community Networks - Jogeshwari Caves

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

SECOND YEAR


Urban Artifacts and Community Networks - Jogeshwari Caves

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

SECOND YEAR


WATER AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT CENTER - UZGAON, VAJRESHWARI

Architectural conceptualization is too often rooted within the rigors of site and programme. The rhetoric of ‘form follows function’ reduces architectural ideation to efficiency, beauty and functionalism. All of these concepts have been severely challenged over the past few decades. A search has begun for new ways of imagining architecture that can emerge from other sources- perhaps more personal and more abstract. This project attempts to develop a process that would lead to experiments in form and space to challenge the predetermined rules of architectural production. Thus formal exploration and experimentation is vital to the project. The project began with an exploration of ‘water’ not as a mere element, but as phenomenon; in and of nature, which is gifted with inherent capabilities to transform and undergo several states of transmutation. The intention of the studio is to capture and interpret these properties of water using the concepts that emerge to re-imagine ideas of form and space. For the program - a ‘Water Resource Management Center’ in the urban periphery of Mumbai, close to Vajreshwari with its hot water springs and other unique ecological features is chosen.


Water And Resource Management Center – Uzgaon, Vajreshwari

Demonstrated the phenomenon of ‘water leaving a mark on objects or spaces’ through various operation on paper in the form of origami and through various mechanical apparatuses. Vajreshwari, which is a mountain by a reservoir; had a memory of its own and a potential of its own which would allow only those specific operations to be carried on them which would restore its memory in terms of the topography, farming, various existing routes of the farmers, density of trees, etc. The site was treated as a layer of paper which could be creased and folded to form spaces tracing these memories.

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

THIRD YEAR


Water And Resource Management Center – Uzgaon, Vajreshwari

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

THIRD YEAR


KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

THIRD YEAR


SCHOOL OF PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURE CAMPUS DESIGN : DELHI


Environmental Systems, Infrastructure and Development P-South Ward Study

In the fourth year, we proposed to explore the relationship in between the Development of the city and its relationship to the natural environmental systems present. These especially include the factors of topography and climate. In the course of rapid urbanization these forces have been negated as factors in our frantic search for a particular vision of a global city. Existing infrastructural systems within the administrative unit of the P-Ward were examined. These included land use surveys, understandings of densities, existing waste management systems, drainage and water supply systems along with the relationships of these to the topography and natural features. Current disjunctions in the development that have led to a variety of difficulties were isolated. In the Urban Design studio and the architectural design studio alternative methods of development were proposed. Parallely the particular topographic system chosen in this case was the Oshiwara river system starting in the Borivili National Park that running west through the city past various residential and industrial areas and meets the mangroves to the west. The strategy for the entire river system was developed in the Urban Design class.


Western Express Highway

1

5

3

2

BROAD ZONES IN THE STUDY AREA

Goregaon Railway Station

`

Road S.V.

Link Road

4

RESERVATIO NS

Zone 1 : New Commercial

AS PER D.P.

Zone 3 : Residential in western corridor Zone 4 : Industrial in western corridor

Zone 6 : No-development Zone

Western Railway

Zone 2 : Residential & Slums

Zone 5 : Residential

6

The study area is divided in 6 Zones according to the existing typology and dominance of reserved zones versus the residential, commercial and industrial spread.


LAND USE ANALYSIS

1

3

2

5

ZONE

1

ZONE

2

ZONE 3

SLUMS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL

4

6 ZONE 4

INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTIONAL EDUCATIONAL CIVIC CENTRES

ZONE 5

TABELA PLAY GROUND GREEN AREAS UNDER CONSTRUCTION ZONE 6


BUILDING USE PLAN

3

1

5

2

SLUMS RESIDENTIAL

4

6

ZONE

1

ZONE

2

ZONE 3

ZONE 4

COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTIONAL EDUCATIONAL CIVIC CENTRES

ZONE 5

TABELA PLAY GROUND UNDER CONSTRUCTION ZONE 6


BUILDINGS HEIGHT

PLAN 36%

1 2

3

5

64% ZONE

1 35%

22%

3% 40% ZONE

2 25%

60%

4% 11% ZONE 3

4

6

1%

81%

4% 14% ZONE 4

SLUMS

70%

5%

G AND G+1

25% ZONE 5

G+2 AND G+3 G+4 AND G+6 G+7 AND ABOVE

63% 37% ZONE 6

DENSITY OF BUILDINGS


EXISTING RESERVATIONS

RESERVATIONS EXISTING

PUBLIC STRUCTURES GROUND CIVIC STRUCTURES INDUSTRIAL SHOPPING CENTER,THEATRES,ETC


RESERVATIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

RESERVATIONS OLD

PUBLIC STRUCTURES GROUND CIVIC STRUCTURES INDUSTRIAL SHOPPING CENTER,THEATRES,ETC


TYPOGRAPHY AND

RIVER SYSTEMS

TRANSFORMATIONS IN BUILT-UP VERSUS WETLANDS

TULSI LAKE

SANJAY GANDHI NATIONAL PARK

VIHAR LAKE

1978

CR EE K

`

AAREY MILK COLONY

1926

1992 CREEK BUILT AREA OPEN FOREST

MANGROOVES BUILTL UP AREA CREEK SITE CONTOURS

WET LAND RESERVED AREA SAND


EXISTING NALLAH SYSTEMS AND THEIR CATCHMENT AREAS

PIRAMAL NAGAR CATCHMENT AREA

SHASTRI NAGAR CATCHMENT AREA

OSHIVARA CATCHMENT AREA


SEWERAGE - NETWORK PLAN

230 mm DIA PIPE 2400 mm DIA PIPE 450 mm DIA PIPE MANHOLES NALLAH


SEWERAGE - ZONING PLAN

CENTRALISED SYSTEM (RESIDENTIAL AREAS)

INFORMAL DECENTRALISED SYSTEM (SLUMS)

FORMAL DECENTRALISED (INDUSTRIAL AREAS)

OPEN SPACES PROBLEMATIC ZONES (NEW DEVELOPMENTS)

NALLAHS


Imagination of Waste Management on City Periphery Owing to urban sprawl, that which was once considered the periphery has now become very much a part of the city core. With the city not able to imagine growth as anything other than intense re-densification, the periphery often ends up being the backyard of the city to provide it with nourishment ( industrial / manufacturing units ) and take acre of its waste ( dumping grounds / land fills ). The situation in Mumbai is further hastened as the sea surrounds it. The marshy land between the seven islands was filled and these areas allocated for industrial use, soon became part of city center. Similarly land allocated for solid waste management is now very much a part of the city. The urban dump yards off Goregaon and Gorai are such examples. Today these places are experiencing tremendous pressure due to the intense real estate prices that are claiming the land (as in Goregaon); and also due to vociferous complaints of residents around these areas (as in Gorai). . It would be interesting to explore the possibilities of architecture in such conditions if we (re)imagine them. Can conditions of architectural programs evolve in such (re)imagination ? Specifically, can hitherto unproductive sites be rendered as production sites – our waste lands becoming centers of generation ? What would the architecture of such site be ? Would they be like our historic industrial landscapes ? Or could they also become new educational sites ? Then what would be the form and physical manifestation of such condition ? The site given for design was the Goregaon dumping ground, turned recreational ground, behind Inorbit Mall which would be used to build a garbage recycling plant on a recreational ground.


Imagination of Waste Management on City Periphery

R.K.Laxman frames an everyday act and sees it through a common man’s eyes, a man who is a representative of the masses, a silent spectator. He always has a statement to make whether it’s about bad roads or improper functioning of the government. In the same way I focussed on putting across a message that “garbage is valuable”. In fact it’s as valuable as money! So I planned to make a “Garbage Bank”. This bank would treat garbage in the same way as money so that people know its importance. Functionally one can deposit their garbage and withdraw the recycled products in return depending on the quantity of garbage they deposit. This would basically be an incentive for people to put their garbage in the right place and to good use. I identified certain objects that are specially designed to contain valuables. Objects like a safe, a cupboard, a treasure trunk, a piggy bank, a wallet, etc all of which can be easily identified by the common man, as containing something very valuable. Each such object would handle a recycling program. For example, Vermi-compost would be used in the organic green-house in the geodesic piggy bank.

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FOURTH YEAR


Imagination of Waste Management on City Periphery

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FOURTH YEAR


Imagination of Waste Management on City Periphery

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FOURTH YEAR


Imagination of Waste Management on City Periphery

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FOURTH YEAR


KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUTE FOR ARCHITECTURE

DEEPTI TALPADE

FOURTH YEAR


DHARAVI u m m a r y

LOCATION

S

EXTENDED CITY 1970s

COLONIAL SUBURBS 1950s INDUSTRIAL CORE INDIGENEOUS CORE COLONIAL CORE ORIGINAL LIMITS

DHARAVI


DHARAVI u m m a r y

LOCATION

S

` AVERAGE REAL ESTATE VALUE RS 15000 – RS 25000 per sq.ft

AVERAGE REAL ESTATE VALUE RS 9000 – 12000 per sq.ft.

AVERAGE REAL ESTATE VALUE RS 13000 – RS 20000 per sq.ft.

IT IS SURROUNDED WITH AREAS HAVING HIGH REAL ESTATE VALUE. HENCE TODAY DHARAVI IS UNDER HIGH PRESSURE TO UNDERGO REDEVELOPMENT.

Real Estate values sourced from www.mumbaipropertyexchange.com


DHARAVI u m m a r y

S

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE MODIFICATIONS

DHARAVI WOULD BE DIVIDED INTO 5 SECTORS THAT THE DEVELOPERS WOULD BID FOR

THE DEVELOPER WOULD GET AN ADDITI0ONAL BONUS OF FSI 1.33 FOR REDEVELOPMENT

THE GLOBAL FSI ON SITE WOULD BE RAISED TO 4 .

NOTE: COMPARITIVE FSI’S

4 3 2 1 0


DHARAVI u m m a r y

CONCERNS OF THE EXPERTS

S

SRA IS PUSHING FOR 600 TENEMENTS PER HA. 600

(THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES (UDPFI) LIMTS THIS NUMBER TO MAXIMUM 500 TENEMENTS PER HA.)

TENAMENT DENSITIES

575 550

IF THE DEVELOPES ARE GIVEN 1.33 BONUS THEN THE DENSITIES WILL RISE FROM 425 TENEMENTS TO 548 TENEMENTS PER HA

525 500

THE DHARAVI REDEVELOPMENT PLAN (DRP) WAS EXAMINED BY THE KAMLA RAHEJA DESIGN CELL, IN COLLABORATION WITH SPARC, 475 CEPT AND EMINENT CITIZENS FROM THE FIELD OF PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURE. 450 ALL CONCERNS REGARDING THE DRP WERE PUT DOWN IN A LETTER ADDRESSED TO THE CHIEF MINISTER OF MAHARASHTRA MR. VILASRAO DESHMUKH. 425THESE CONCERNS ARE LISTED BELOW SOME OF PRESENT AVERAGE DENSITY 416 TENEMENTS PER HA

400 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

COURSE OF THE PROJECT

THE RESULTANT DENSITIES IN DHARAVI AFTER REDEVELOPMENT WILL BE UNIMAGINABLY HIGH: THE DCR MODIFICATIONS MAKES IT MANDATORY FOR EVERY DEVELOPER TO HAVE 600 REHAB TENEMENTS PER HECTARE. THIS UNIMAGINABLY HIGH DENSITY SHALL DRASTICALLY INCREASE THE INFRASTRUCTURAL NEEDS IN THE AREA


DHARAVI u m m a r y

CONCERNS OF THE EXPERTS

S

BREAK EVEN 1.333 BONUS Sale Area divided into 1/3 COMMERCIAL SALE 1/3 SUBSIDIZED MIG SALE 1/3 AMENITIES SALE

0.25 BONUS

0.75 BONUS Sale Area divided into 80% RESIDENTIAL SALE 20% COMMERCIAL SALE

Only Area enough to BREAK EVEN to be built

THREE SCENARIOS THE DESIGN CELL CARRIED OUT CALCULATIONS FOR THREE SCENARIOS. FOR A BONUS OF 1.33 , 0.75 , 0.25.


DHARAVI u m m a r y

0.25 BONUS BREAK EVEN

S

KOLIWADA

SALE COMPONENT SALE COMPONENT

AMENETIES ARE PROVIDED ALONG A CENTRAL BELT

KUMBHARWADA

INDUSTRIAL AREA

STRATEGIES: •THE AMENITIES BELT IS PROVIDED IN THE CENTER OF THE PRECINCT. •INDUSTRIAL BELT IS GIVEN NEAR THE RAILWAY TRACK. •REMAINING AREA IS GIVEN FOR REHABILITATION. KOLIWADA AND KUMBHARWADA REMAIN UNTOUCHED.


SURVEYING: EXISTING NAGAR BOUNDARIES (BSES)

DHARAV I

THE 85 + NAGARS OF DHARAVI ARE BASED ON COMMUNITIY BOUNDARIES AND HOUSEHOLD ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES

CAN THESE COMMUNITY BASED NAGAR BOUNDARIES BECOME THE BASIS FOR PLANNING RATHER THAN SECTORS


DHARAV I

SURVEYING: EXISTING LANDUSE

RESIDENTIAL(SRA) RESIDENTIAL(SLUMS) COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL/MANUFACTURING(SMALL SCALE) RESI+COMM. RESI+MANU/IND COMM+MANU/IND INSTITUTIONAL AMENITIES PRIVATE OPEN GROUND CEMETERY/CREMATION GROUND RELIGIOUS OPEN SPACES ROADS BOUNDARIES

AREA UNDER RESIDENTIAL SLUM WITH HOME BASED ACTIVITY

33%

OPEN SPACE

1.90%

INSTITUTIONAL

0.69%

AMENITIES

2.50%

THE GOVERNMENT HAS NOT PUBLISHED A LANDUSE PLAN MAPPING EXISTING PATTERNS IN DHARAVI KRVIA SURVEY


SURVEYING : ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Flood Prone Areas

DHARAV I

1) Kunchi Kurve Nagar, 2) Ambedkar Nagar, 3) Social Nagar, 4) Transit Camp, 5) Muslim Nagar 6) Azad Nagar 7) Matunga Labour Camp Drain Choking Matunga Labour Camp, Kunchikurve Nagar, Shahu Nagar, Transit Camp, Dambar Compound, Kalyan Wadi, Poonawala Chawl, Kumbhar Wada, Subhash Nagar, Muslim Nagar, Anna Nagar.

Key Choking Zones Flooding Zones Existing Nala SEVERAL PARTS OF DHARAVI ARE FLOODING ZONES BECAUSE OF LOW LYING LAND FORM DATA SOURCE: MCGM WEBSITE8


DHARAV I

SURVEY : AMENITIES

Existing Major Educational Institutions = 1.4 HA

Existing Major Health Care Facilities = 2.07 HA

Open Space

Health Facilities

Education Facilities 40.00

Existing Open Spaces = 4.1 HA

40.00

33.81

30.00

30.00

20.00

20.00

10.00

10.00

4.00

3.76

31.40

3 2.00

-40.00

Existing figures in HA

Total area in HA for Dharavi -2.00

HA

-29.33

- 0.76

0.00

Short fall

-32.41

Shortfall HA

-20.00

Total area in HA for Dharavi

-10.00

-30.00

-30.00 - 40.00

2.07

0.00 Shortfall HA

-20.00

Total area in HA for Dharavi

-10.00

Existing figures in HA

1.40

0.00

STANDARDS DATA SOURCED FROM UDPFI GUIDELINES


DHARAV I

ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS: PROJECTIONS

BREAK EVEN 1.333 BONUS Sale Area divided into 1/3 COMMERCIAL SALE 1/3 SUBSIDIZED MIG SALE TOTAL 1/3 AMENITIES SALE UP BUILT

AREA

Sale Area divided into Only Area enough BUILT-UP AREA PERCENTAGE REHABILITATED V/StoSALEABLE TOTAL 80% RESIDENTIAL GLOBAL SALE BREAK EVEN to be80% built 20% COMMERCIAL SALE GLOBAL FSI BUILT UP FSI 4 3,000,000 AREA 80% 3.5 62% 2,500,000

70% THE CELL DREW OUT THREE SENARIOS BASED ON THE ADDITIONAL 3.38 3 BONUS.

(REHAB) 0.25 BONUS 18,57,316 1.33 BONUS 0.75 BONUS

18,57,316 1,857,316

0.25 BONUS

0.75 BONUS

(SALE)

29,70,549

3.38

16,71,351

2.58

464,996

1.88

60% 2,000,000 38%

2.5

50% 1,500,000 2 40% 1,000,000 30% 1.5 500,000 1 20% 10% 0.5 0% 0

53%

47%

2.58 1.88 20%

0

1.333 Bonus

Total BU Rehabilitation Area 0.75 Bonus

1.333 0.75 Area under Rehabilitation Bonus Bonus 1.333 Bonus 0.75 Bonus

Total BU Saleable Area 0.25 Bonus

0.25 Saleable Area Bonus 0.25 Bonus


DHARAV I

ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS: URBAN FORM (BUILDING HEIGHTS)

SENARIO 1: BONUS 1.33

G+7

DP AMENITIES

G+28

G+13

SALE COMMERCIAL SALE AMENITIES

SENARIO 2: BONUS 0.75 G+7 DP AMENITIES

G+21

G+4

SALE

REHAB

SENARIO 3: BONUS 0.25 G+7 DP AMENITIES

G+12

G+3

SALE

REHAB

G+16

G+7

SALE MIG

REHAB


ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS: URBAN FORM (BONUS 0.75)

DHARAV I

FIG1.1

FIG1.3 FIG1.2

FIG1.4

VIEW SHOWING COMMERTIAL AREAS NEAR THE RAILWAY STATION

1.

REHAB G + 4

2.

DP AMENITIES G + 7

3.

SALE (COMMERTIAL) G + 21

4.

EXISTING SRA G + 7


DHARAV I

ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS: URBAN FORM (BONUS 1.33)

FIG1.1

FIG1.3 FIG1.2 REQUIRED DP AMENITES ARE CALCULATED AND PROVIED IN A CENTRAL BELT

FIG1.4

1.

REHAB G + 7

2.

DP AMENITIES G + 7

3.

SALE (COMMERTIAL) G + 28

4.

SALE ( MIG RESIDENTIAL) G + 16

5.

(SALE AMENITES) G + 13


ALTERNATIVE SCENARIOS: URBAN FORM (BONUS 0.25)

DHARAV I

FIG1.1

FIG1.3

FIG1.2

VIEW SHOWING AMENITIES BELT LEADING UP TO THE COMMERTIAL AREAS ALONG THE STATION

FIG1.4

1.

REHAB G + 3

2.

DP AMENITIES

3.

SALE (COMMERTIAL)

4.

EXISTING SRA G+7


TRAFFIC STRATEGIES

PARKING NODES SO THAT ADDITIONAL VEHICULAR TRAFFIC DOESN’T ENTER DHARAVI

DHARAV I


TRAFFIC STRATEGIES

DHARAV I

TWO MORE BUS ROUTES ARE LOOPED TO PASS THROUGH DHARAVI. THESE BUS ROUTES CONNECT THE STATIONS AND THE TWO COMMERCIAL SALE AREAS. BUS ROUTES


TRAFFIC STRATEGIES

ALL INTERNAL AREAS ARE MADE PEDESTRIAN BARRING FEW HOURS IN THE DAY

DHARAV I


TRAFFIC STRATEGIES:

FLYOVER AT SION STATION

DHARAV I


RETHINKING Esplanade Precinct


ASSESSING LOW-INCOME HOUSING REDEVELOPMENT PROJECTS TO DERIVE A FINANCIALLY VIABLE AND SUSTAINABLE MODEL FOR MUMBAI.


PROBLEM STATEMENT DEVELOPER 70%

COMMUNITY 30%

Ineffective redevelopment model •Over densification •Not community inclusive •High Maintenance costs •Forced gentrification

ALTERNATIVE MODEL Community as developer •Community managed •Decision over nature of space •Sell part of development rights to construct and sustain.


FINANCIAL VIABILITY CASH FLOW Land Procurement costs/Land Construction costs Operational funds Temporary rehabilitation Corpus for maintainance Premium to state Municipal taxes Rents to state Subsidy Grants/Funds

COMMUNITY OUTFLOW INFLOW √

PUBLIC SECTOR OUTFLOW INFLOW √

√ √

NGO, ARCHITECTS OUTFLOW INFLOW

√ √ √

Household/Community Savings Loan amount borrowed Rent from new units Repayment of Loan

FINANCIAL OUTFLOW INFLOW

√ √ √ √

PRIVATE OUTFLOW INFLOW

√ √ √

Consultancy fees Technical service

√ √

Sale Amount Surplus

√ √

√ √

INTERNATIONAL OUTFLOW INFLOW


OPERATIONALISATION CHART

SUSTAINABILITY* Economic sustainability

Institutional sustainability

Socio-Economic Sustainability

Physical sustainability

Macroeconomic situation

Political support

Decision power of the community

Quality of Construction

Mainly Financing by Government International Funding

Links with Parliament

Support of Self-help Activities

Non-Peripheral Location

Participation of Private construction sector Participation of Financial Institutions International Co-operation

Improvement of SocioEconomic Situation

Provision of Infrastructure and facilities

Fixed Costs after construction

Quality of living spaces*

Participation of NGOs and professionals Mainly localised implementation

Creation of Local Jobs

Families’ contribution Access to Loans Loan Repayment

Subsidies

Direct Delivery of Subsidies Provision of Technical to community Assistance Construction and Land Amount of Paperwork Costs Process speed Diversity of funding sources* Diversity of institutional Non-financial contribution actors and other after funding ends* stakeholders*

Self-generating finance component of the project

Location close to Jobs

Extent of participation of community group Assurance of continuing to stay there*


NATION AL

NHB

ALTERNATIVE REDEVELOPMENT MODEL UD MINIS.

NHB

STATE

UD MINIS.

STATE

NATION AL

TRADITIONAL REDEVELOPMENT MODEL

STATE HOUSING

STATE HOUSING

MHADA

LOCAL

COMMUNITYBUYER REGULATION

MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL

MUNICIPALITY

INFORMAL FINANCIAL PRIVATE BANK POLITICIAN/NGO AGENCY MFI

MHADA

PROPERTY

SERVICE

FINANCE

REGULATION

Pvt. BANK

g v in Sa

COMMUNITYBUYER

DEVELOPER MANAGEMENT

POLITICIAN/NGO CH BANK

PROPERTY

SERVICE

CONSTRUC TION COMPANY MANAGEMENT

FINANCE


Typical redevelopment model in Mumbai

OUTFLOW INFLOW

SURPLUS

Cost (Rs./sq.ft)

Total (in Rupees)

73720.1

4519.72 333194395

73720.1

5745.03 423524200

73720.1

1225.31

Remarks

OUTFLOW INFLOW

90329805

IRR

Built up- Cost (Rs./sq.ft) Area(sq.ft)

SURPLUS

27%

111552

3872.63 431999467

111552

5240.12 584546100

111552

1367.49 152546633

IRR

Economic

Physical

Institutional

Physical

Remarks

35%

Economic

Socio-Economic

Total (in Rupees)

Institutional

Built upArea(sq.ft)

Alternative redevelopment model in Mumbai

Socio-Economic


LEARNING FROM CASE STUDIES


IMAGINATIONS FOR A COLLABORATIVE MODEL


THE URBAN GAME A BILINEAR RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FORCES OF DEVELOPMENT AND FORMS OF PUBLIC SPACES.

KAMLA RAHEJA VIDYANIDHI INSTITUE FOR ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES


DAHISAR RIVER. EAST-WEST FLYOVER ABOVE RESIDENTIAL COLONY S.V.ROAD NATIONAL PARK ENTRANCE

WESTERN RAILWAY RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX

RAI DONGRI ROAD

DEVIPADA SLUM TATA STEEL INDUSTRY

RAJENDRA NAGAR

MHADA HOUSING

WESTERN EXPRESS HIGHWAY

INFLUENCE AREA


Fo re st bo un d

ar y

Ma rs hy lan d


Year1959 1909 Year Present


DYSTOPIA


GARBAGE BIN

SHOPS

TREE COVER

VENDORS

STREET LIGHT HOARDINGS

G+2 RESIDENTIAL

PAVEMENT


AFTER 10YRS


EVENING TREE COVER HANGOUT RICKSHAW STAND RESTAURANT

PROVISION SHOP

STREET HAWKER LIGHTS

COBBLER


AFTER 10YRS


NODE 1

AFTER AFTER10 50YEARS YEARS


STRATEGIC INTERVENTION


NODE 1

AFTER AFTER 10 50 YEARS YEARS

Sketchy portfolio  

Includes architectural design, urban design and plannig projects

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