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de Ferrers

Specialist Technology College

SIXTH FORM PROSPECTUS PROSPECTUS

2010-11


Through reading our Prospectus, we hope that you will want to come and join our very successful Sixth Form which was given a Grade 1 ‘Outstanding’ in our recent Ofsted inspection. There are many opportunities available and facilities to enjoy, as well as your chosen course of study. There are lots of experienced, caring, well qualified staff, and friendly students who will always be ready to listen, advise and help you. Ofsted said ‘Students receive excellent guidance and support from the College to ensure that they make informed choices.’ We are always seeking to improve the opportunities we provide for our students. From September 2008 we were able to offer the highly acclaimed International Baccalaureate Diploma, in addition to the well-established AS/A2 and Applied provision. The curriculum is constantly being improved so that we can ‘personalise’ the learning for all our students. Our aim is to provide a pathway that meets your individual needs. Choose from the International Baccalaureate Diploma, AS/A2, Applied or BTEC courses to match your plan for the future. Whichever course you choose the workload will be challenging but being in the Sixth Form brings with it additional responsibilities. There will be a range of other activities to encourage involvement in the college, designed to promote community and personal enhancement. Aim high and your efforts will be rewarded whatever your course at de Ferrers, but, above all, come and enjoy learning at de Ferrers. Ofsted said 'Students in the Sixth Form make a significant, positive contribution to both the college and wider community.' Best wishes and good luck with your GCSE examinations. M A York Principal

OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOU  specialist staff and facilities

 academic and vocational courses of the highest quality

 all books and equipment provided

 examination results well above the local and national averages

 very low drop-out rate

 individual care, support and guidance

 work experience locally and in Europe

 strong business and community links

 gateway to Higher Education and Employment

 musical, dramatic and sporting excellence

 a wide range of extracurricular activities

 a friendly and informal atmosphere


Sixth Form 2010-11 Introduction This Specialist Technology College comprises two campuses: Dove accommodates Years 7, 8 and 9 (about 1,050 students aged 1114) and Trent provides for years 10-13 (about 920 students aged 15-19). Its size gives the College considerable advantages in terms of staffing and resources. It is able to employ a wide range of subject specialists who, in turn, give excellent academic guidance in all areas. Each campus is well equipped with laboratories, a Learning Centre, a gymnasium, workshops and other specialist facilities, including ‘high spec’ computer and language rooms. Both Dove and Trent campuses are situated within extensive playing fields, creating a very pleasant environment. The Sixth Form is privileged to occupy a very pleasant new suite of rooms that are set apart from the main body of the College. In addition to this the Sixth Form makes good use of our new Sports Hall AS/A2 Levels  Art  Biology  Business and Economics  Chemistry  Critical Thinking  Design and Technology – Product Design  Design and Technology – Textiles  English  French  General Studies  Geography  German  History  ICT  Mathematics (Pure and Applied, Statistics, Further)  Music  Physical Education  Physics  Psychology  Religious Studies  Sociology  Theatre Studies Applied A Levels Business Health and Social Care Information Communication Technology Science

   

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme  English SL/HL  French SL/HL  German SL/HL  Ab Initio Spanish SL  History SL/HL  Geography SL/HL  Psychology SL/HL  Business Management SL/HL  Chemistry SL/HL  Biology SL/HL  Physics SL/HL  Design and Technology SL/HL  Maths Studies SL Maths SL Maths HL  Visual Arts SL/HL  Theatre Arts SL/HL  Music SL/HL

BTEC Nationals Level 3  BTEC Art  BTEC Media Leisure In addition, students have the option of gaining leadership and national governing body qualifications which demonstrate different attributes and skills to employers and higher education establishments.

Teaching time in the Sixth Form Each subject taught in the Sixth Form receives 5 hours of teaching a week apart from the IBDP which will be taught for, either 4 hours (HL) or 3 hours (SL) per week. BTEC and Applied A-Levels will receive between five and ten hours of teaching per week. Subjects like Critical Thinking and General Studies will receive between one and two hours per week. What we offer you:  a personal tutor to guide you through your decision making  a dedicated Sixth Form area including a common room  a large Sixth Form study area with soft seating, computers and university information opportunities to build up your CV  a Sixth Form Ball  a Sixth Form year book  a dedicated team of senior students to help you settle in and organise events  field trips in Geography and Biology  work placement in Limoges, France and staying with a French Family in Year 12  Young Enterprise  Opportunity to engage in e-mailing a twinned parallel group in a French Technology College  a Sixth Form committee representing all student views at both Sixth Form and whole College level  district Sixth Form competitions such as ‘Superstars’, ‘Superbrain’ and the World Trade Game  university visits  wind band, brass band, jazz orchestra and choirs  Christmas pantomime performed to years 7, 8 and 9  debating competitions  rigorous support and guidance for higher education and employment  weekly access to a Sixth Form Connexions advisor  mock university interviews  help and support around results days  opportunities to work with younger students in the college  enrichment opportunities What do we expect from you?  that you serve as an example to younger students in the college  that your attendance is excellent  that you set high standards of behaviour for yourself  that you are respectful to all those with whom you are working  that you do all work set and meet deadlines  that you participate in Sixth Form life  that you adhere to the Sixth Form college contract at all times Please Note - Where there is a lack of sufficient interest in a particular course, we will reserve the right to withdraw the course

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Attitude and Aptitude On your application to the Sixth Form we will also take into consideration your previous record of behaviour, effort and attitude. In all cases, as this is a non-compulsory element of your education, we reserve the right to discuss your suitability to enter the Sixth Form.

Results We are very proud of all our students’ achievements across the ability range. We consistently achieve average points scores well above the local and national averages. University is the single biggest destination for our students post-18. A full directory of the destinations of our Year 13 students is to be found on page 31.

Post-16 Pathways 2010-11 A guide to entry onto our courses POST–16 PATHWAYS All Level 3

International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme: English, French, German, Ab Initio Spanish, Psychology, Business Management, History, Geography, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Design and Technology,Maths HL, Maths SL or Maths Studies, Visual Arts, Theatre Arts, Music. Plus the core: Theory of Knowledge (TOK), Creativity Action Service (CAS) and the Extended Essay (EE). AS/A2: Art, Biology, Business and Economics, Chemistry, Critical Thinking, Design and Technology – Product Design or Textiles, English Literature, French, Geography, German, History, ICT, Maths – (Pure, Mechanics, Statistics, Further), Music, PE, Physics, Psychology, RS, Sociology, Theatre Studies. Applied AS/A2: Science (Single worth 1 A-Level). ICT (Single worth 1 A-Level, Double – worth 2 A-Levels). Business (Single worth 1 A-Level ,Double – worth 2 A-Levels). Health and Social Care (Single worth 1 ALevel Double, – worth 2 A-Levels) BTec: Media (worth 1 A-Level) Art (Double – worth 2 A-Levels )

At least 5 A* - C at GCSE including English Literature, Maths, a Science and MFL.



At least 5 A* - C at GCSE including English Language and Maths.

BTec and/or OCR BTec and/or OCR National at a Merit National qualifior Distinction plus cation at a Pass, at least 2 other plus other GCSE GCSE subjects at subjects at A*-C A* - C level to level to include include English English Language Language and and Maths. Maths.

 

    

If appropriate BTec Course taken

Please Note - Only those students who gain an A*- C in English Language and Maths will be guaranteed a place in the Sixth Form 2


Contents Art

4

Music SL/HL IBDP

21

BTEC National Certificate in Art

4

Physical Education

22

Visual Arts SL/HL IBDP

5

Physics

22

Applied Science

5

Physics SL/HL IBDP

23

Biology

6

Psychology SL/HL IBDP

23

Biology SL/HL IBDP

6

Psychology

24

Applied Business

7

Religious Studies

24

Business Management SL/HL IBDP

7

Sociology

25

Chemistry SL/HL IBDP

8

Ab Initio Spanish SL

25

Chemistry

8

Theatre Arts SL/HL IBDP

26

Critical Thinking

9

Theatre Studies

26

Design & Technology SL/HL IBDP

9

TOK (Theory of Knowledge)

27

Design and Technology - Textiles

10

Sixth Form Dress Code

27

Design and Technology - 3D

10

Other Opportunities

28

Economics and Business

11

IBDP - A Level - BTEC - Career/University Choice

29

English Literature

11

Year 13 Destinations - 2009

31

English SL/HL IBDP

12

French SL/HL IBDP

12

French

13

General Studies

13

Geography SL/HL IBDP

14

Geography

14

German SL/HL IBDP

15

German

15

Applied Health and Social Care

16

History SL/HL IBDP

17

History

17

GCE Applied Information Communication Technology 17 Information Communication Technology

18

Mathematics

18

Mathematics Studies SL IBDP

19

Mathematics SL IBDP

19

Mathematics HL IBDP

20

BTEC National Award in Media Production (Television and Film)

20

Music

21

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Art

BTEC National Certificate in Art

E xa m in ati on Board AQA GCE AS/A2

R eas ons f or ch oosi ng thi s cou rse : You wish to specialise in the art and design field and are passionate about your study; You wish to follow careers in the Art and Design disciplines; You wish to prepare for courses in further and higher education; You wish to have opportunities to develop work in drawing and painting, textiles, fashion, photography, interior, graphics, 3D design, craft and ceramics and sculpture.

R ea sons f or ch oosi ng th is cou rs e: If you wish to follow a creative course which combines practical and intellectual skills; If you wish to follow careers in the Arts in further and higher education; If you wish to prepare for courses in the visual arts in further and higher education.

This course is equivalent to two A levels. W h at w i l l I s t u d y ? AS There are opportunities to work in a wide range of materials and techniques including drawing and painting, collage, photography, textiles, printmaking and 3D work. Though most students choose to take the fine art option there is opportunity for selecting pathways in art, craft, design, textiles and 3D. Underpinning all work is the study of relevant artists and designers. The course comprises of Unit 1, a portfolio unit that is developed over the course of the year through a range of experimental work and major project. The course’s second unit is Unit 2, which is a Controlled assignment. A2 The course builds upon AS and is designed to extend and challenge students in the development of intellectual and practical skills. Students will be expected to exercise a greater degree of independence and decision making in their approach to study. Unit 3 is a personal investigation unit which is practical supported by a written investigation of 1000-3000 words. Students will be expected to choose a suitable topic in consultation with their tutor. The final unit of work is Unit 4 and the A2 controlled assignment. Othe r Requ irem en ts Students will be encouraged, and offered opportunities, to visit galleries and exhibitions in order to study original works of art. W h at do I n eed? To achieve at least grade A* - C at GCSE level or BTEC pass. Staff Contact: Mrs C Keary

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W h at w i l l I s t u d y ? The course is comprised of a series of 12 units. Five core units and then a selection of optional units that will allow you to either specialise or keep your learning varied. The course is all coursework led through a series of assignments. Othe r requi re m ent s Students will be encouraged and offered opportunities to visit galleries and exhibitions in order to study original works of art. W h at d o I ne ed ? To achieve at least A*-C GCSE or BTEC pass. Staff Contact: Mrs C Keary


Visual Arts SL/HL IBDP

Applied Science

Course Outline

E xam i na ti on Board OCR G C E A S /A 2

In IBDP Art in both Higher and Standard level the philosophy of the course dictates that  All work should be produced through research based assignments.  All work should be personal, well documented and should take into account the students individual interests and ambitions.  It should also include research of both a primary and secondary nature, whilst documenting a progression of skill levels showing experimentation and a sound knowledge of basic art skills. Through the first year the students will be given a series of briefs to work to. They are then introduced to a series of new techniques throughout the year and it is up to the student to decide the processes in which to create their development outcomes for each project brief. This process lends itself to a natural reinforcement of strengths by selection of media and the approach undertaken. Workshops are offered in several areas e.g. Photography, Printing, Sculpture, Painting, Drawing, Ceramics etc… In this way the students are provided with the new means of expression, which can be employed, to future works. Students will be asked to draw on theirs and other cultural influences to influence their work. A multicultural approach to the research of other artists will be expected. As the student’s confidence and skill levels increase they are encouraged to become involved in the further use of media, techniques and method. Responses to the briefs are expected to be:        

Individual Emotional Expressive Dynamic Questioning Direct Exciting Varied

IBDP art is exciting and demanding, allowing for personal development in every aspect of their studies. The students are expected to have a personal commitment to the course enabling them to participate fully and extract the maximum benefits from the range of media available to them. This therefore calls for a large degree of independent time management in the use of studio and teacher time. No two groups of students are going to have the same preferences of media or methodology or means of expression. Therefore no IBDP courses are ever going to be the same.

Reasons for choosing this course  This is a new broad-based qualification in Applied Science which may be used to give a general vocational introduction to science, or units may be selected to provide an introduction to more specialised areas.  The flexible structure allows for a variety of vocational pathways, for example in: analysis and detection; the environment; manufacturing; health; communications.  There are many opportunities to actively experience the scientific environment through work experience, links with local employers, case studies and research.

 The qualification provides appropriate progression from OCR National Science and from GCSE Science for students wishing to follow a vocational pathway.  The Advanced Subsidiary qualifications may be used to complement other vocational courses or provide a work-related experience for students taking non-vocational subjects.  The Advanced qualifications provide progression to science-related courses in further or higher education. It could cover Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Forensic Science, Sports Science and Materials Science – depending on the course (single/double) and the options taken. The Single course is worth one AS or A2. What will I study? For the AS course you will need to complete 3 Units of work. There will be two portfolios of coursework – Science at Work AND Analysis at work. There will also be one external exam – Monitoring the Activity of the Human Body. To continue on to the A2 course there is more choice in courses, but how much free choice we can give you may be affected by time table and staffing issues. For the A2 course you will need to complete 3 Units of work. One is a mandatory portfolio of coursework – Investigating the Scientist’s Work

Topics: In Year 12 the students will be given projects to follow on a termly basis, the students are encouraged to complete a minimum of 3 final outcomes and a detailed workbook for each project. As the year progresses the projects become more open ended/self directed and in Year 13 the students complete a further 3/4 outcomes for their personal project. The projects are created to allow the students a pathway to self-directed outcomes and a sound knowledge of the creative process. Areas of study such as still life, Landscape, figures, Architectural forms, cultural references will be used as starting points for work. Students will be encourages to work in all fields, Art, craft and Design and employ a range of media across their two year study. Staff Contact: Mrs C Keary

You must complete one of a choice of two external exam units – Sampling, Testing and Processing (based on pre-released material) OR Working with Waves You must also complete one of a choice of six portfolio units – Synthesising Organic Chemicals, Materials for a Purpose, Electrons in Action, The Mind and the Brain, Ecology and Managing the Environment OR Applications of Biotechnology Is this course right for me? You can see that experimental work is the biggest factor over the two years, but in the AS facts and recall of knowledge are also important. You need to consider carefully your commitment to a course which is 2/3 portfolios of coursework and where experimental skills make around 40% of your final mark. Those of you who have studied the GCSE Applied Science know the demands of this style of course in terms of organisation and dedication. If you have not studied an Applied subject before (not necessarily Science) you may want to discuss it with friends who have taken an Applied course at GCSE or ask the advice of the Science Staff. Staff Contact: Mr S J Griffiths

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Biology

Biology SL/HL IBDP

E xa m in ati on Board Edexce l GCE AS/A2

Course Outline

R ea sons f or ch oosi ng th is cou rs e: If you have an interest in living organisms; If you enjoy carrying out investigations both in the laboratory and in the field; If you are keen to learn about the ‘new’ biology topics such as genetic engineering and the impact on society. W h at w i l l I s t u d y ? AS Work builds upon the material at GCSE to develop a deeper understanding of basic life processes and how our activities are influencing our health and the wider environment. An essential theme throughout is ‘How Science Works’. The assessment comprises two x 1.15 hour 80 mark examinations and one piece of coursework, 40 marks. Unit 1:

Topic 1: Lifestyle, health and risk Topic 2: Genes and health Unit 2: Topic 3: The voice of the Genome Topic 4: Biodiversity and Natural Resources Unit 3: Practical Biology and Research skills – a written report of 1500-2000 words of a visit to a site of biological interest or report of biological topic.

Biology students will acquire a limited body of facts and at the same time, develop a broad general understanding of the principles of the subject. There are four basic biological concepts running through the work both at SL and HL namely: Structure and function. - The most important relationship within biology. Students need to appreciate that structures permit some functions whilst limiting others.  Universality versus diversity. - Universal features exist in a biological world of enormous diversity. Students are taught the idea of a living world in which universality means that a diverse range of organisms are connected and interdependent.  Equilibrium within systems. - Checks and balances exist within living organisms and within ecosystems. Students will appreciate that the state of dynamic equilibrium is essential for the continuity of life.  Evolution. - The concept of evolution draws together the other themes of diversity within constraints leading to adaptations of structure and function. Whilst developing their understanding students will learn to appreciate the contribution made to the advancement of Biological thinking and processes by scientists of all nationalities both in the past and in the present time. Students will develop an ability to analyze and evaluate their own investigations through a rigorous approach to scientific thinking. Topics covered

A2 A2 develops and extends work at AS especially ‘How Science Works’ giving more relevance to Science in society. The assessment comprises two x 1.30 hour 90 marks examinations and one piece of coursework, 45 marks. Unit 4:

Topic 5: On the wild side Topic 6: Infection, immunity and forensics Unit 5: Topic 7: Run for your life Topic 8: Grey matter Unit 6: Practical Biology and Investigative skills – a written report (max. 3300 words) of an experimental investigation devised and carried out by the students. Othe r Requ irem en ts Visit to an area of biological interest in AS and fieldwork element at A2. W h at do I n eed? Students can only take this course if they have previously followed either the separate Science course or the Core plus Additional Science. A minimum grade C is needed. Staff Contact: Miss J Norman

SL Core:  Statistical analysis  Cells - cell theory, prokaryotic cells, eukaryotic cells, membranes and cell division  Chemistry of life - chemical elements, water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, DNA  Genetics – chromosomes, genes, alleles, mutations, meiosis, theoretical genetics, genetic engineering and biotechnology.  Ecology and evolution – communities, ecosystems, the greenhouse effect, populations, evolution and classification  Human health and physiology – digestion, the transport system, infectious disease, gas exchange, nerves, hormones, homeostasis and reproduction. HL (core plus the following topics)  Nucleic acids and proteins.  Cell respiration and photosynthesis.  Plant science – plant structure, growth, transport and reproduction.  Genetics – meiosis, dihybrid crosses, gene linkage and polygenic inheritance.  Human health and physiology – disease, muscles, the kidney and reproduction. The following options would be offered depending on the interests of students:Options SL only  Human nutrition and health – components, energy and issues in human nutrition.  Physiology of exercise.  Cells and energy – Proteins, enzymes, cell respiration and photosynthesis. Options SL and HL  Origin of life on Earth, species and speciation and human evolution.  Neurobiology and behaviour.  Microbes and biotechnology.  Ecology and conservation. Options HL only  Further human physiology - hormones, digestion, the liver, the transport system and gas exchange Staff Contact: Mr C Allen

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Applied Business

Business Management SL/HL IBDP

Exam i nat ion Boa rd AQA

Course Outline

Re ason s f or s tudyi ng th is cou rs e: If you wish to pursue a career in business; If you want to build and capitalise on your knowledge of business; If you want to study a course which provides a strong foundation for either academic or vocational progression; If you prefer a bias towards assessment via coursework rather than examination.

The Business and Management course aims to help students understand the implications of business activity in a global market. It is designed to give students an international perspective of business and to promote their appreciation of cultural diversity through the study of topics like international marketing, human resource management, growth and business strategy.

W hat w i ll I stu dy? AS – 3 Un it Aw ard This is a 3 Unit award which provides an introduction to the world of business. The three compulsory units studied are: Unit 1 – Investigating business Unit 2 – People in business Unit 3 – Financial planning and monitoring* Students studying this option may then choose to continue for a second year to build up to the AS 6 Unit Award as shown below or the A2 6 Unit Award. AS – 6 Un it Aw ard This is a 6 Unit award which provides a more in depth study of the world of business and is equivalent to 2 AS subjects. The 6 units studied are: Unit 1 – Investigating business Unit 2 – People in business Unit 3 – Financial planning and monitoring* Unit 4 – Meeting customer needs* Unit 5 – Business communication* Unit 6 – Developing a product A2 – 6 Un it Aw ard This is a 6 Unit award which builds on the 3 Unit AS award and leads to a qualification in one A2 subject. The additional units chosen will come from the list of potential units for the 12 Unit Award, but will be decided by teaching staff, not students. Unit 1 – Investigating business Unit 2 – People in business Unit 3 – Financial planning and monitoring* plus Unit 8 – Business planning (compulsory) 2 units from Units 9-14

The ideals of international cooperation and responsible citizenship are at the heart of the course which encourages the appreciation of ethical concerns and issues of social responsibility in the global business environment. Students will be able to make sense of the forces and circumstances that drive and restrain change in an interdependent and multicultural world. The course will contribute to students’ development as critical and effective participants in local and world affairs and will enhance their ability to make informed business decisions. The Business and Management course will promote the importance of exploring business issues from different cultural perspectives and enable students to appreciate the nature and significance of change in local, national and global contexts. It will encourage a holistic view of the world of business and enable students to think critically about individual and organizational behaviour. The course will promote awareness of social, cultural and ethical factors in the actions of organizations and individuals and enable students to appreciate the social and ethical responsibilities associated with businesses operating in international markets. Topics HL and SL Core  Topic 1: Business organization and environment  Topic 2: Human resources  Topic 3: Accounts and finance  Topic 4: Marketing  Topic 5: Operations management HL only  Topic 6: Business strategy Staff Contact: Mrs E L Dolman

A2 – 12 Un it Aw ard The 12 Unit award will build on the 6 Unit AS award and lead to the equivalent of two A2 subjects. Unit 1 – Investigating business Unit 2 – People in business Unit 3 – Financial planning and monitoring* Unit 4 – Meeting customer needs* Unit 5 – Business communication* Unit 6 – Developing a product plus Unit 8 – Business planning (compulsory) Unit 9 – Marketing strategy Unit 10 – Promotional activities Unit 11 – The marketing environment* Unit 12 – Managing people* Unit 14 – Managing change or Unit 16 Managing resources * indica tes a unit a ssessed via a n externa lly set test ra t her tha n through coursework . W hat do I nee d? Either at least a GCSE Grade C in Business Studies or a good overall GCSE performance of A* to C. An interest in current affairs demonstrated by reading quality newspapers, watching news programmes or regularly accessing news websites. An enquiring mind and a willingness to investigate issues relating to the world of business. Staff Contact: Mrs E L Dolman

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Chemistry SL/HL IBDP

Chemistry

Course Outline

Exa m in ati on Boa rd – Ede xcel GCE AS/A2

The course comprises a study of chemical principles which underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. Students will be expected to develop an ability to use the thinking processes associated with the practice of science for understanding and explaining natural phenomena, problem solving and decision-making. Students will learn to appreciate the contribution made to the advancement of chemical thinking and processes made by scientists of all nationalities both in the past and at the present time. Students will be encouraged at all levels to develop a rigorous approach to scientific thinking. This will be underpinned by valid experimental data which can be used in a mathematical context to produce quantitative conclusions, and in a qualitative manner which can, through discussion, lead to enhanced understanding. The process of researching the derivation of experimental data and the limitations of that data using current scientific periodicals will lead students to gain an understanding of a consistent approach to scientific study across all types of educational establishments and across all scientific communities. Topics: Core –  Quantitative Chemistry  Atomic Structure  Periodicity  Bonding  Energetics  Kinetics  Equilibrium  Acids and Bases  Oxidation and Reduction  Organic Chemistry  Measurement And Data Processing AHL –  Atomic Structure  Periodicity  Bonding  Energetics  Kinetics  Equilibrium  Acids and Bases  Oxidation and Reduction  Organic Chemistry Options –  Modern Analytical Chemistry  Human Biochemistry  Chemistry in Industry and Technology  Medicines and Drugs  Environmental Chemistry  Food Chemistry  Further Organic Chemistry Staff Contact: Mrs J Burton

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Rea sons f or choosi ng th is cours e: If you have an interest in and enjoy Chemistry; If you wish to understand the way in which Chemistry affects your life by looking at topics such as: – climate change green chemistry pharmaceuticals; If you enjoy problem solving both on paper and by practical work; If you wish to progress onto further studies or enter Chemistry - based employment. W hat w ill I s tu dy? AS Unit 1 – The Core Principles of Chemistry Formulae, equations and amounts of substance Energetics Atomic structure and the periodic table Bonding Introductory organic chemistry – alkanes and alkenes Unit 2 – Application of core principles Shapes of molecules and ions Intermolecular forces Redox Groups 2 and 7 Kinetics and equilibria Further organic chemistry A2 – AS topics are extended with increased mathematical content. Unit 4 – General principles of chemistry 1 Rates Equilibria Entropy Further organic compounds Unit 5 – General principles of chemistry 2 Transition metal chemistry Redox reactions Yet more organic chemistry. Units 3 and 6 test laboratory skills by internal assessment. Units 1,2,4 and 5 are assessed by external exam. W hat do I n eed? Students will be expected to have achieved a grade B in Chemistry GCSE together with C grades in English and Maths. Staff Contact: Mrs J Burton


Critical Thinking

Design & Technology SL/HL IBDP

E xa m in ati on Board – OCR GCE AS/A2

Course Outline

Critical Thinking teaches practical thinking skills. It is not a knowledge based subject rather it seeks to bring together the skills involved in thinking and arguing in a critical and logical way. The aim is to provide the students with a framework which can be applied in a practical manner to a range of materials, situations, problems and issues. The skills learnt in Critical Thinking are easily applied to your other AS/A2 courses. Candidates studying this course should learn to:

The Design and Technology course aims to help students develop a keen understanding of the technological world from an international perspective which contributes to the well being and efficiency of the planet. The design cycle is at the core of the course and students will gain a detailed understanding of each element of this cycle and its importance in designing ecologically sensitive products. The uniqueness of Design and Technology can be encompassed within the aims and objectives of the course. The Diploma Programme will help students to acquire the skills necessary for independent and life long learning, appreciating the positive impact that responsible design strategies can have on international communities and the environment.

understand and apply the language of reasoning; understand and apply different patterns of reasoning; recognise and evaluate special kinds of reasoning; judge the credibility of sources; assess arguments; develop and present relevant arguments;

The course will be delivered through a range of investigations in which students will work towards independent initiatives which encompass the design cycle to gain in-depth materials knowledge and a high level of practical skills. This will ensure they achieve the goal of developing technological knowledge which can positively contribute to the improvement of a range of societies and their environments.

The qualification is split into 4 units. Each Unit is worth 25% of the overall A2. Each Unit is examined by 1.5 hour exams.

Through the exploration of concepts within the core part of the course and the chosen option, students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills, understand the correlation between responsibility and accountability and develop empathy, compassion and respect for communities with differing needs and aspirations.

Unit 1 and 3 examined in January. Unit 2 and 4 examined in May.

The qualification will consist of three examination papers and a portfolio which is based on investigations, group 4 projects and a design project.

Two units are studied at AS Level: Unit 1 Introduction to Critical Thinking Unit 2 Assessing and Developing Argument

Topics

recognise and apply basic logical ideas;

A further two units are studied at A2: Unit 3 Ethical Reasoning and Decision Making Unit 4 Critical Reasoning All assessment is examination based. Critical Thinking is designed to stretch students. Therefore high levels of literacy are needed. It is the best preparation for aptitude tests for Oxbridge, Law and Medicine. It is a must for those students considering a career in Law, Media or anybody who likes to argue! Staff Contact: Mr P Galloway

SL Core & HL  Topic 1: Design Process  Topic 2: Product Innovation  Topic 3: Green Design  Topic 4: Materials  Topic 5: Product Development  Topic 6: Product Design  Topic 7: Evaluation AHL  Topic 8: Energy  Topic 9: Structures  Topic 10: Mechanical Design  Topic 11: Advanced Manufacturing Techniques  Topic 12: Sustainable Development Option A: Food Science & Technology SL Core & HL  A1 Development of the food industry  A2 Designing new food products  A3 Nutrition, balanced diet and health  A4 Food spoilage and food preservation  A5 Food science  A6 Food processing  A7 Food packaging and distribution  A8 People and foods – lifestyles  A9 Issues and responsibilities AHL  A10 Food poisoning  A11 Genetically modified organisms and food production  A12 Food security Staff Contact: Miss T Shenton/Mrs G Wildman/L Eagland

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Design and Technology

Design and Technology

PRODUCT DESIGN: TEXTILES Examination Board AQA GCE AS/A2

PRODUCT DESIGN: 3D Examination Board AQA GCE AS/A2

Everything in the man-made environment that surrounds you has been designed for someone or a specific use at some point in time. From the toothbrush you use to clean your teeth, to the jet airliner that takes you on holiday and the clothes you wear, designers have created the world in which we live today.

Everything in the man-made environment that surrounds you has been designed for someone or a specific use at some point in time. From the toothbrush you use to clean your teeth, to the jet airliner that takes you on holiday and the clothes you wear, designers have created the world in which we live today.

We offer two Product Design courses which will help students appreciate the past, understand the present and ultimately provide them with the opportunity to contribute to the future. Both courses follow the same format but each focuses on a particular subject specialism as follows:

We offer two Product Design courses which will help students appreciate the past, understand the present and ultimately provide them with the opportunity to contribute to the future. Both courses follow the same format but each focuses on a particular subject specialism as follows:

What do I need for this course? To have achieved a minimum of at least Grade C at GCSE in a relevant technology subject.

What do I need for this course? To have achieved a minimum of at least Grade C at GCSE in a relevant technology subject.

AS Students will work with a wide variety of fabrics and components used in the design and making of textile products, gaining an understanding of industrial and commercial practices within the area of design and manufacture.

AS Unit 1: Materials, Components & Application

Unit 1 will cover:  classification of the main fibre groups  yarn types and properties  source and fabric manufacture  fabric finishes and surface decoration  product components  industrial and commercial practice  development of design & design in practice Unit 2 - Coursework Candidates produce a portfolio of work which will demonstrate evidence of their creative, technical and practical skills.

A2 Students will further develop the knowledge and practical skills from AS as they continue to design and manufacture exciting textile products alongside an understanding of the processes of commercial textile manufacture. Unit 3 will cover:  testing fabrics in relation to their intended use  manipulating and combining fabrics  major developments in textiles technology  product life cycle and fashion cycles  design in the human context  industrial and commercial practice Unit 4 – Coursework Candidates submit evidence of a single, substantial designing and making activity.

Students will develop a knowledge and understanding of a wide range of materials and processes used in the field of design and technology. They will also learn about industrial and commercial practices and the importance of quality checks and the health and safety issues that have to be considered at all times. Unit 2: Design & Technology in Practice Students will produce a portfolio which will demonstrate evidence of their creative, technical and practical skills through a series of product investigation, design and manufacturing activities. This section will cover:  product investigation  product design  product manufacture A2 Unit 3 – Design & Manufacture Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of a range of modern design and manufacturing practices and contemporary design issues. They will develop a good knowledge of the use of ICT and systems and control technology in the design and manufacture of products but also the importance of the contributions of designers from the past which may provide inspiration for future design. Unit 4 – Design & Making Practice Students identify a client for which they must design and make a 3 dimensional model for a single major coursework project. Students will need to regularly liaise with their client to develop a commercial product. Relevant GCSE qualifications: RM, Graphics, Product Design Staff contact: Miss T Shenton/Mrs G Wildman

Relevant GCSE qualifications: Textiles, Graphics Staff contact: Mrs M Speed/Mrs G Wildman

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Economics and Business

English Literature

Examination Board Edexcel GCE AS/A2

E xam i na ti on Board AQA G C E A S /A 2

Reasons for choosing this course If you wish to pursue a career in business or as an economist; If you want to build and capitalise on your knowledge of business and/or economics; If you want to study a course which provides a strong foundation for either academic or vocational progression; If you prefer assessment by examination.

R eas ons f or ch oosi ng thi s cou rse : If you have an interest in reading a wide variety of English; If you enjoy expressing your opinions and justifying them; If you want to enjoy studying a subject which is relevant to your own lives; If you want to acquire skills, which will keep your options open for further study.

What will I study?

W h at w i l l I s t u d y ?

AS Unit 1 Developing New Business Ideas – covers the characteristics students would need in order to be successful in business and how new or existing businesses generate their product or service ideas and test them through market research. Students will consider the competition in the market; the economic climate; how the business might be financed and how much revenue the idea might generate.

AS Unit 1: Aspects of Narrative 4 texts 2 hour open book exam Unit 2: Dramatic Genre 2 texts (one Shakespeare) Coursework portfolio of 2 responses (1200-1500 words each)

Unit 2b Business Economics – considers the market that the business may be operating in; how competition in the market and macroeconomic change is likely to affect it and how businesses can seek to minimise uncertainty through their actions.

A2 Unit 3: Elements of the Gothic 3 texts 2 hour closed book exam Unit 4: Further and Independent Reading Pre released anthology of critical writing to assist with coursework portfolio of 2 responses, covering 3 texts (1200-1500 words each).

A2 Unit 3 International Business – an introduction to the world of international business and issues which a company trading internationally would have to consider. Unit 4b The Wider Economic Environment and Business – students will consider why certain markets fail; how government decision making affects the economy and markets in which companies operate, and the income and welfare of private individuals. Students should be able to assess why government economic policy can succeed or fail and why regulation of some markets is necessary.

W h at d o I ne ed ? To have already demonstrated your success at GCSE by acquiring a Grade ‘C’ at least on the Higher Examination Tier paper, preferably a B. Preference will be given to students who have already completed GCSE Literature. It is very desirable to have this qualification before beginning an AS in English Literature. Staff Contact: Mrs J Botten

What do I need? Either a GCSE Grade C in Business Studies or overall GCSE performance of A* to C. An interest in current affairs demonstrated by reading quality newspapers, watching news programmes or regularly accessing news websites. An enquiring mind and a willingness to investigate issues relating to the world of business. Staff Contact: Mrs E Dolman

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English SL/HL IBDP

French SL/HL IBDP

Course Outline

Course Ou tli ne  The purpose of the course is to offer students who have studied French up to GCSE the opportunity to become very competent in the use of the target language and understand the relevance of French in the world.  Their knowledge of language and culture should enable them to become effective and sensitive communicators.  The focus will be on the understanding of the language at a deeper level through a comprehensive study of grammar and acquisition of vocabulary.  Study of literature will support the acquisition of language and also help students to gain a more sensitive insight into French culture. They will have the opportunity to approach the values and traditions of French speaking countries with an open mind.  The interactive methodology will enable students to develop their interpersonal skills and become more confident in a foreign context within an ethos which promotes collaborative team working.  Current affairs will form an important part of the course and through this students will be given the opportunity to develop their sense of citizenship and foster an empathy and respect for others.  Formative assessment will be an integral part of the course delivery.  There will be regular summative assessments to coincide with each unit of learning.

English A1 at de Ferrers, whether studied at HL or SL, will require students to develop their powers of expression both orally and on paper thereby creating more effective and articulate citizens on the world stage. Through their study of literature they will be encouraged to make strong personal responses to texts which will open them up to the myriad possibilities beyond our quotidian lives .Obviously writing responses and discussion work in class will help them to interpret the world around them. Also, they will be explicitly taught to recognize and appreciate the craftsmanship involved in literary study and criticism. Finally, we aim to promote an international perspective through an independent comparative study of works from their own and other cultures. It is imperative that we produce students who are, indeed, independent thinkers and writers if they are to contribute fully to a global society. In addition, students will be able to make a confident contribution to their understanding of TOK as their English studies will enable them to understand the extent to which people who speak different languages live in different worlds: there are limits to how we can express our thoughts in any language! Also, they will be considering to what extent we should be challenging the inherent authority of perceived ‘good’ literature and the value of the Arts. The programme we have designed we feel reflects a rich and varied diet of texts which will appeal to our students! Topics Part 1: World Literature  The Outsider: Camus HL/SL  Perfume: Suskind HL/SL  One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich : Solzhenitsyn HL/SL Part 2: Texts for Detailed Study  Othello: Shakespeare HL/SL  Songs of Innocence and Experience:Blake HL  The Scarlet Letter : Hawthorne HL  The Heart of a Woman : Maya Angelou Hl/SL(autobiographical work) Part 3 Genre based works(Drama)  The Crucible: Miller HL/SL  A Streetcar Named Desire: Williams HL  The History Boys : Bennett HL/SL  A Doll’s House : Ibsen HL/SL (World Lit) Part 4 Schools’ Own Choice- theme: Treatment of / Attitudes to women  The Handmaid’s Tale : Atwood HL/SL  Purple Hibiscus : Adichie HL/SL( World Lit)  The World’s Wife : Duffy HL/SL Local interest  A Thousand Splendid Suns : Hosseini HL Staff Contact: Mrs J Botten

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Students will also complete a week’s work experience in Limoges in the first term of the second Year. Topics It is anticipated that theses topics will be covered in the course of the two years of study:  La famille traditionnelle et son évolution; les rapports personnels.  La santé et les différents modes de vie  Les vacances et les loisirs  L’éducation et le monde du travail  L’environnement et la pollution  L’Europe  Le monde francophone Each topic will give the opportunity to relate to CAS and TOK; many aspects of the studies will give an international dimension to the course. Standard and Higher students will follow a common core. Higher students will be expected to produce more detailed work and analysis; they will also study French literature linked to topics and genres. Staff Contact: Mrs S O’Hagen


French

General Studies

Examination Board AQA GCE AS/A2

Exa m in ati on Boa rd AQA GCE AS/A2

Reasons for choosing this course: If you want to further develop the language skills you have acquired so far, this is the course for you.

Con tent This is a compulsory part of the Sixth Form Curriculum (there are a few exceptions due to timetable constraints and for those on one-year courses). Students will cover 2 units of work in the first year with the opportunity to continue in Year 13 with an additional 2 units.

You will have the opportunity to study French language and culture to a level that is of value in today's globalised world. As we become part of a global market, more and more employers are looking to take on personnel with good communication skills in French. Studying French to A-level is a highly valued qualification which could serve you well both in higher Education and in the job market. If you so wish, you can take part in our well established work experience programme in Limoges; you would be able to spend a week working in a placement of your choice and organise your day to day needs under the guidance of your teacher.

The areas of study are: AS Unit 1: Culture and Society Unit 2: Science and Society A2 Unit 3: Culture and Society Unit 4: Science and Society

What will I study? AS

 Media: TV, advertising and communication technology  Popular culture: cinema, music and fashion/trends  Healthy living/lifestyle: sport/exercise, health and well-being and holidays  Family/relationships: relationships within the family, friendships and marriage/partnerships. A2  Environment: pollution, energy and protecting the planet  The multi-cultural society: immigration, integration and racism  Contemporary social issues: wealth and poverty, law and order and the impact of scientific and technological progress  Cultural topic: the study of a target language speaking region/community or the study of a period of 20th century history from a target language – speaking country/community or the study of a novelists/dramatist/poet from a target language-speaking country /community or the study of a director/architect/musician/painter from a target language-speaking country/community.

Developm ent of Sk i lls In addition, students will have the opportunity, through a varied programme of delivery, to develop their Key Skills of Communication, Application of Number, Information Technology, Improving Own Learning and Performance, Working with Others and Problem Solving. General Studies enables students to develop a breadth and balance of study. It is well recognised by universities and improves students’ points total when applying for a university place. General Studies develops the transferable skills of analytical thinking, research, debate and presentation of argument. It teaches students the context of many issues and develops their understanding of the interrelationships of areas of knowledge and behaviour. Staff Contact: Miss H B Roberts

What do I need? To have achieved at least a Grade C but preferably a B at GCSE. A typical A Level student:  will have an open-minded and sensitive approach to social and cultural differences.  will be prepared to choose and research independently a range of relevant topics.  will have a willingness to understand grammatical concepts and apply them in the acquisition of the language. Staff Contact: Mrs S Key

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Geography SL/HL IBDP

Geography

Course Outline

Exa m in ati on Boa rd AQA GCE AS/A2

Through this course students will develop a global perspective of geography. They will explore the patterns of human distribution, the complex interrelationships between human society and the environment and how global differences are related to culture and economy. Within the wider diploma course, students in geography will study a range of human and physical geography themes, within the framework of geography as a social science. At the core of the course lie population, resources and development. Accompanying the core, a series of physical and human geography options will be studied. In addition, a Fieldwork (HL) or Coursework (SL) assignment relating to the syllabus forms a substantial part of the course. Assessment takes the form of both externally set examinations and internally assessed fieldwork/coursework. The aim of which will be to assess students’ knowledge and understanding of the core and optional themes as well as geographical methodology and techniques. Topics Geographical Skills are essential to the subject and will be covered throughout the course, as the application of these skills reflects the subject’s distinctive methodology and approach. Skills taught will include;  Locate and differentiate elements of the Earth’s surface  Reading, interpretation, analysis and production of maps  Interpretation of topographic maps  Interpretation, analysis and construction of graphs  Statistical calculations to show pattern and change  Manipulation of data using quantitative analysis  Undertaking geographical investigation  Production of written material; essays, reports & investigations Part 1: Core Theme – Patterns and Change (SL/HL)  Populations in transition  Disparities in wealth and development  Patterns in environmental quality and sustainability  Patterns in resource consumption Part 2: Optional Themes (2 at SL, 3 at HL)  Freshwater – issues and conflict  Oceans and their coastal margins  Extreme environments  Hazards and disasters – risk assessment and response  Leisure, sport and tourism  The geography of food and health  Urban environments Part 3: HL extension – global interactions (HL only) – There are seven compulsory topics  Measuring global interactions  Changing space – the shrinking world  Economic interactions and flow  Environmental change  Sociocultural exchanges  Political outcomes  Global interactions at the local level Fieldwork HL/ Coursework SL Leads to the production of a written report (2,500 words HL/1,500 words SL) and is internally assessed and externally moderated. Staff Contact: Mrs V L Longmore

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Rea sons f or choosi ng th is cours e: If you have an interest in, and concern for, the environment; If you are interested in current affairs; If you enjoy studying a subject that is relevant to your own life and experiences; If you want the opportunity to carry out practical work outdoors as well as classwork; If you enjoy finding out your own answers – not just being taught; If you want to broaden your AS or ‘A’ level studies to cover both ‘sciences’ and ‘humanities’; If you enjoy finding out about new people, places, landscapes and events; If you want to keep your options open – Geography AS or ‘A’ level is an appropriate qualification for a very wide range of Higher Education or career choices – it does not force you to make an early commitment. W hat w ill I s tu dy? AS Unit 1 – Core physical Geography, including rivers and floods, climatic hazards and coastal environments. Core human Geography, including population change and one of: energy, food, health, issues. Unit 2 – Geographical Skills, e.g. map and photographic interpretations, satellite images. A2 Unit 3 – Contemporary Geographical Issues Physical topics include: plate tectonics and hazards, weather and climate, ecosystems. Human topics include: world cities, development and globalisation and contemporary conflicts and challenges. Unit 4A – Geography Fieldwork Investigation. The opportunity to extend an area of the subject content into more detailed fieldwork study. This research is then used in the later exam. Unit 4B – Geographical Issue Evaluation The opportunity to use skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation in preparation for the exam question that extends the specification content. W hat do I n eed? GCSE grade C or above would be preferred, but we will consider students who have not studied Geography at GCSE on merit. Staff Contact: Mrs V L Longmore


German SL/HL IBDP

German

Course Outline

Examination Board AQA GCE AS/A2

 The purpose of the course is to offer students who have studied German up to GCSE the opportunity to become very competent in the use of the target language and understand the relevance of German in the world.  The focus will be on the understanding of the language at a deeper level through a comprehensive study of grammar and vocabulary.

 Study of literature will support the acquisition of language and also help students to gain a more sensitive insight into German culture.  The interactive methodology will enable students to develop their interpersonal skills and become more confident in a foreign context.  Current affairs will form an important part of the course and therefore students will be given to develop their sense of citizenship.  Formative assessment will be an integral part of the course delivery.

 There will be regular summative assessments to coincide with each unit of learning. Students will also have the opportunity during the course to visit Germany and spend time attending our partner school, to develop cultural awareness and improve speaking skills. Topics        

Die Familie Gesundes Leben Freizeit Ausbildung und die Arbeitswelt Die Umwelt Die Zukunft Europas Rassismus und Rechtsextremisten in Deutschland Der Staat und das Individuum

Reasons for choosing this course: If you want to explore in more depth and to learn to communicate at a higher level than in the work covered at GCSE; If you want to learn more about the culture and way of life in Germany. There is a trip to Germany to experience the culture at first hand; It is a course that will be of interest to those wishing to enter the worlds of business, travel and tourism, journalism and media. What will I study? AS  Media: TV, advertising and communication technology  Popular culture: cinema, music and fashion/trends  Healthy living/lifestyle: sport/exercise, health and well-being and holidays  Family/relationships: relationships within the family, friendships and marriage/partnerships. A2  Environment: pollution, energy and protecting the planet  The multi-cultural society: immigration, integration and racism  Contemporary social issues: wealth and poverty, law and order and the impact of scientific and technological progress  Cultural topic: the study of a target language speaking region/community or the study of a period of 20th century history from a target language – speaking country/community or the study of a novelists/dramatist/poet from a target language-speaking country /community or the study of a director/architect/musician/painter from a target language-speaking country/community.

Each topic will give the opportunity to relate to CAS and TOK; many aspects of the studies will give an international dimension to the course.

What do I need?

Standard and Higher students will follow a common core. Higher students will be expected to produce more detailed work and analysis; they will also study German literature linked to topics and genres.

T o have achieved at least a Grade C but preferably a B at GCSE. A willingness to take part in conversation, study other cultures and complete private research is essential.

Staff Contact: Mr M Hewitt

Staff Contact: Mrs J L Baker/Mr M Hewitt

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Applied Health and Social Care

History SL/HL IBDP

E xa m in ati on Board OCR

Course Outline

R ea sons f or st udyin g thi s course : If you want to build on the knowledge you may already have concerning topical health and social care issues relating to society, then this is a course you will enjoy. It could lead you to consider a career in this very wide field or it may help to support some of your other choice subjects, for example, Sociology. You may prefer to choose this subject simply as a new challenge – a subject that you have not previously studied at GCSE. W h at w i l l I s t u d y ? At AS level, 3 Units will be assessed; one will be through an externally assessed end of unit test. The remaining 2 Units will be through portfolio work. Each Unit carries equal weighting. The qualification is graded A – E in the same way as other A2’s. Unit 1 – Promoting Quality Care Unit 2 – Communication in Care Settings Unit 3 – Promoting Good Health

W h at do I n eed? A good GCSE background of A* - C. An interest in topical issues in society related to the core units. An enquiring mind to investigate and research independently in order to fulfil the portfolio criteria for Units 2 and 3. A positive and committed attitude. A willingness to be prepared to visit care settings and participate in ‘hands-on’ activities.

Our History course aims to develop an international perspective of the past amongst our students so that they can understand their position in their community and the world community. It will foster a breadth and depth of historical knowledge from cultures very different to their own. History as a subject will be appreciated by the students, the skills , the interpretations and the methods. Our students will be able see how Historical knowledge has a role to play in TOK. As in line with our other post 16 provision our IBDP Historians should be able to comprehend, analyse, evaluate and integrate source material critically as historical evidence. They should be able to demonstrate historical understanding of history through the acquisition, selection, effective use and synthesis of knowledge. They will be able to explain different approaches to, and interpretations of, historical events and topics. To place events in their historical context. To be able to explain the causes and effects of historical continuity and change. To be able to present arguments that are clear, coherent relevant and well substantiated. Our students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth historical understanding of approximately 100 years of history, through the acquisition, selection, effective use and synthesis of knowledge. W h at w i l l I s t u d y ? Paper 1 – Communism in Crises 1976 – 89 – source based questions China/USSR. SL/HL Paper 2 – Causes, practices and effects of war. The Cold War 1945 – 1990’s. SL/HL HL only – aspects of the History of the Americas  Cold War  Civil Rights  Into the 21st Century

A2

All students complete a historical investigation between 1,500 – 2,000 words

A further three Units will be studied during Year 13 to make a full A Level in this subject. The Unit titles (as yet to be chosen by the college) will be from the prescribed list set by OCR but will follow the same pattern of assessment.

Staff Contact: Mr D E Staples

Current options are: Unit 10 – Care Practice and Provision Unit 11 - Understanding Human behaviour Unit 12 – Anatomy and Physiology in practice Unit 13 – Child Development Staff Contact: Mrs J R Burton

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History E xa m in ati on Board OCR GCE AS/A2 R ea sons f or ch oosi ng th is cou rs e: If you have an interest in the way the world has developed through the ages; If you enjoy investigation and discovery; If you enjoy debate and like putting forward a well-argued case; If you want to improve your analytical skills; If you want to study a subject which encourages you to consider evidence and make up your own mind; If you want to broaden your science AS or GCE Advanced studies to include a humanities subject; If you want to keep your options open. History is widely regarded as a useful qualification for a wide range of Higher Education or career choices.

GCE Applied Information Communication Technology Exa m in ati on Boa rd: OCR Rea sons f or s tudyi ng thi s cou rse : If you enjoy or are interested in ICT. If you wish to acquire skills, knowledge and understanding in a variety of different areas of ICT, with a particular focus on developing practical skills for real life situations. The course is designed primarily to offer students the flexibility of either a 10 hour/week course to achieve 2 A Level passes at the end of a two year course or a 5 hour/week course to achieve 1 A Level pass. During the course you will have the opportunity to: Gain a broad understanding of ICT and be able to study selected areas in more depth. Develop ICT skills that are highly desirable to employers and universities. Apply learning in a practical and realistic way. Gain confidence by developing independent learning skills.

W h at w i l l I s t u d y ? AS British History 1951–94 The unit looks at post-war Britain under Conservative and Labour governments. The course covers the role of key individuals such as Wilson and Thatcher, together with key issues ranging from the trade unions to conflict in Ireland. E uropea n Hi stor y 1815 -1870 This looks at the obstacles to Italy becoming one country in the nineteenth century and how such characters as Garibaldi and Napoleon III of France forced it into becoming one unified country. A2 Hi stor i cal Inte rpreta ti ons a nd Inve sti gati ons This topic looks at the career of Napoleon I, his background and his seizure of power. Then, his policies in France are examined as well as his conquests and achievements in Europe up to his eventual downfall at Waterloo. Historical Themes This topic looks at Civil Rights in the USA from 1865 to 1992. The course focuses on the struggle of American citizens to gain equality before the law. W h at do I n eed? GCSE Grade C or above would be preferred, but we will consider students who have not studied History at GCSE on merit. Staff Contact: Mr D E Staples

W hat w ill I s tu dy? In Year 12, if you study and pass 3 units, you will achieve 1 AS level. Students who choose this option can then study a further 3 units in Year 13. At the end of Year 13, if you complete and pass these units, you will achieve 1 A Level. The units you will undertake in Year 12 are: Unit 1: Using ICT to communicate. Unit 2: How organisations use ICT. Unit 3: ICT solutions for individuals and society. For students who wish to undertake 2 A levels, you will study 6 units in Year 12, for which you will be awarded 2 AS levels. Students who choose this option can then study a further 6 units in Year 13. At the end of Year 13, if you complete and pass these units you will achieve 2 A levels. In addition to Units 1-3 (see above), in order to achieve 2 AS Levels you will also undertake the following 3 units in Year 12: Unit 4: System specification and configuration. Unit 6: Software design and development. Unit 7: Communicating using computers. During Year 13 students will have the opportunity to expand their skills into new topic areas. Many of these units are optional rather than mandatory and therefore may vary year upon year but example topics include; Working to a brief Desktop Publishing Designing and creating websites Database design and development ICT solutions for people with individual needs Software development W hat do I n eed? Grade C in GCSE ICT plus 4 other GCSEs (or equivalent) at Grade C and above or Pass in OCR Nationals ICT Level 2 and 1 other GCSE (or equivalent) at Grade C and above. Staff Contact: Mrs C Desideri

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Information Communication Technology

Mathematics

Examination Board AQA GCE AS/A2

Examination Board Edexcel GCE AS/A2

This qualification is suitable for students who: Enjoy and are interested in ICT; Wish to acquire ICT skills and knowledge, which would be useful in higher education or business; If you want to learn how ICT is used in the wider world. Content The specification looks at the nature of information and the use of information and communication technology in business organisations. This involves looking at information systems, making critical judgments about the use of ICT and raising awareness of its economic, social and ethical implications. AS The two units are complementary and are concerned with applying ICT to solve problems and the study of the opportunities for and affects of using ICT in the world today. Candidates will have the opportunity to put into practice a wide range of software and hardware to create solutions to solve problems. The topics covered include:  Practical use of ICT, identifying, designing, producing, testing, documenting and evaluating solutions  Data entry, storage, output of information, use of software, current health and safety legislation.  ICT systems, their components, uses, users, safety and security  Data and information, data transfer, backup and recovery. In addition to the acquisition of theoretical understanding, students will also undertake a practical element through which they will learn how to solve an ICT problem using a spreadsheet solution (Microsoft Excel software will be used to implement the solution). This work will be taken into the examination where they will be asked questions on the work they have done. A2 Students will study the concepts associated with the use of ICT in the 21st century. They will also have opportunities for acquiring skills needed in the IT profession such as co-operative working and project management. These practical skills can be developed in areas of ICT that are of interest to them. Students can also use these newly acquired skills as a springboard into other qualifications and working environments. The structure for A2 will be an examination unit based on theoretical knowledge and a case study and a coursework unit that will require the students to design and implement a software solution. The topics covered include:  Developments in technology, information needs of organisations, ICT systems, management of ICT  Developing ICT systems, introducing large ICT systems into organisations  Training and supporting users of ICT systems.  Practical issues involved in managing the use of ICT in organisations  Investigating, analysing, defining requirements  Selecting and using appropriate technologies, designing solutions, methods for testing and installation, documenting and evaluating. What do I need? 5 GCSE grades A* - C or OCR Nationals ICT Level 2 Staff Contact: Mr J Rivers

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Reasons for choosing this course? If you are interested and enjoy Mathematics; If you are interested in explanations about the world about you; If you want to acquire skills and knowledge which will be useful in higher education and business; If you want to enhance your employability; Mathematics complements many other subjects. What will I study? AS A one year course containing two Pure Mathematics modules along with an Application of Mathematics module, which could be Statistics or Mechanics. The first Pure Mathematics module will be taken in January. A2 A further two Pure Mathematics modules are studied along with a second Application of Mathematics module. W ha t do I nee d? GCSE Grade C, or above, at higher level. Staff Contact: Mr C Wheeldon/Mr C Orchard

Mathematics (Further) Examination Board Edexcel GCE AS/A2 Reasons for studying this course To enhance your understanding of the Single Mathematics course; If you are considering studying Mathematics in higher education; If you want two Mathematics qualifications; If you enjoy Mathematics for its own sake. Students taking a single Mathematics may consider studying Further Mathematics to AS level. What will I study? AS One Pure Mathematics module and two Applications of Mathematics modules. A2 Two Pure Mathematics modules and one Application of Mathematics module. What do I need ? Grade B or above at GCSE. Staff Contact: Mr C Wheeldon/Mr C Orchard


Mathematics Studies SL IBDP

Mathematics SL IBDP

Course Outline

Course Outline

The course caters for students with a good background in GCSE Mathematics Higher Tier, achieving a grade C or above. The course will enable the students to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics. The students will not anticipate using mathematics in Further Education.

The course caters for students with a good background in GCSE Mathematics Higher Tier, achieving a grade C or above. Many of these students will expect to have a sound mathematical background in order to facilitate entry to Further Education courses.

The main aims of the course are seen as:  To develop logical, critical and creative thinking  To appreciate the multicultural and historical perspective of mathematics  To employ and refine powers of abstraction and generalization  To develop patience and persistence in problem solving  To transfer skills to different circumstances  To communicate clearly and confidently  To appreciate the universality of mathematics as a means of communication At the end of the course students will be expected to know and use mathematical principles, including:  Reading, interpreting and solving problems using appropriate mathematical terms  Organising and presenting information in a variety of different ways  Knowing and using appropriate notation and terminology  Formulating a mathematical argument  Selecting and using appropriate mathematical strategies and techniques  Recognising patterns and structures in a variety of situations  Recognising and demonstrating an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics  Using appropriate technology as mathematical tools  Demonstrating an understanding of and the appropriate use of mathematical modelling.

The main aims of the course are seen as:  To develop logical, critical and creative thinking  To appreciate the multicultural and historical perspective of mathematics  To employ and refine powers of abstraction and generalization  To develop patience and persistence in problem solving  To transfer skills to different circumstances  To communicate clearly and confidently  To appreciate the universality of mathematics as a means of communication At the end of the course students will be expected to know and use mathematical principles, including:  Reading, interpreting and solving problems using appropriate mathematical terms  Organising and presenting information in a variety of different ways  Knowing and using appropriate notation and terminology  Formulating a mathematical argument  Selecting and using appropriate mathematical strategies and techniques  Recognising patterns and structures in a variety of situations  Recognising and demonstrating an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics  Using appropriate technology as mathematical tools  Demonstrating an understanding of and the appropriate use of mathematical modelling. Topics:

Topics: Number Types of number, including rational, irrational; indices and standard form; rounding numbers and errors; ratio and percentage; finding compound and simple interest problems; time and average speed. Functions and Algebra Solving linear algebra functions; straight line graphs (y=mc+c); Solving simultaneous equations by use of algebra, graphs and a GDC; quadratic equations, solving, graphing, completing the square, using the quadratic formula; graphing cubes, reciprocals, points of intersection and vertexes of curves; functions, inverses and graphs; exponential curves, growth and decay; arithmetic and geometric series.

Functions and Algebra Quadratics equations and completing the square; graphing functions; domains and range; binomial expansions; combinations; logarithms and e; progressions (series); transformations of curves Trigonometry The sine and cosine rule; area of a triangle; angles from 0 to 360 degrees; radian measure, including arc length and sector area; the unit circle; transformations of sine and cosine curves; applications of trig curves; trigonometric identities. Matrices Definition; matrices and algebra; determinants and inverses of 2x2 and 3x3 matrices; finding 3 unknowns using matrices.

Trigonometry and Geometry Straight lines; trigonometry in the right-angled triangle; trigonometry in the non right-angled triangle; area and volume of 3-d shapes; trigonometry within 3-d shapes.

Vectors Concepts; unit vectors; position vectors; addition, subtraction, multiplication by a scalar; magnitude; 3-d vectors; scalar product of 2 vectors; vector equation of a line; coincident and parallel lines.

Logic and Probability Simple probabilities; combined events; conditional probability; sets and Venn diagrams, notation, drawing and use with probability; independent and mutually exclusive events; using logic and truth tables.

Calculus Simple differentiation; graphs of derivatives; gradient function, tangents and normals; chain rule; product and quotient rules; kinetics (movement); turning points, maximum and minimum, points of inflexion; simple integration; definite integration; volumes of revolution.

Statistics Finding averages and range; drawing and interpreting cumulative frequency curves; box and whisker plots; using and understanding mean and standard deviation; correlation and regression; the chi-squared test of independence. Differential Calculus Simple differentiation; tangents and normal; using the chain rule; graphing derivatives; turning points, including maximum and minimum problems.

Statistics and Probability Data, concept of populations and sample; means and range, including standard deviation; cumulative frequency curves; box and whisker plots; simple probability and complementary events; combined events; conditional probability; Venn diagrams; independent and mutually exclusive events; discrete probability distributions; binomial distributions; normal distributions. Staff Contact: Mr C Wheeldon

Staff Contact: Mr C Wheeldon

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Mathematics HL IBDP

BTEC National Award in Media Production (Television and Film)

Course Outline The course caters for students with a good background in GCSE Mathematics Higher Tier, achieving a grade B or above. Many of these students will expect to include mathematics as a component of their Further Education courses i.e Physics, engineering and technology. The main aims of the course are seen as:  To develop logical, critical and creative thinking  To appreciate the multicultural and historical perspective of mathematics  To employ and refine powers of abstraction and generalization  To develop patience and persistence in problem solving  To transfer skills to different circumstances  To communicate clearly and confidently  To appreciate the universality of mathematics as a means of communication At the end of the course students will be expected to know and use mathematical principles, including:  Reading, interpreting and solving problems using appropriate mathematical terms  Organising and presenting information in a variety of different ways  Knowing and using appropriate notation and terminology  Formulating a mathematical argument  Selecting and using appropriate mathematical strategies and techniques  Recognising patterns and structures in a variety of situations  Recognising and demonstrating an understanding of the practical applications of mathematics  Using appropriate technology as mathematical tools  Demonstrating an understanding of and the appropriate use of mathematical modelling. Core Topics      

Functions and Algebra Trigonometry Matrices Vectors Calculus Statistics and Probability

Optional Topics (one only to be studied)    

Statistics and Probability Series and Differential Equations Sets, Relations and Groups Discrete Mathematics

Staff Contact: Mr C Wheeldon

General Information The BTEC National Award in Media Production (Television and Film) is designed to give students the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to prepare them for employment. It gives students the opportunity to achieve a nationally recognised Level 3 vocationally specific qualification which will allow them to either enter employment in the media industry or to progress to a higher education vocational qualification such as the Edexcel Level 5 Higher National in Media. Key features of the National Award are as follows:  It consists of six units  It consists of 360 GLH (Guided Learning Hours) over the two years (5 hours of lessons per week).  It attracts UCAS points Course Outline The course consists of two core units, one mandatory unit and three optional specialist units. The optional specialist units have been specifically chosen to complement the core units and develop students’ appreciation and understanding of the production process as a whole (from pre-production, to production to post-production). Core Units Unit 1: Research Techniques for the Media Industries Unit 2: Pre-Production Techniques for the Media Industries Mandatory Unit Unit 7: Understanding the Television and Film Industries Specialist Units Unit 15: Film and Video Editing Techniques Unit 21: Single Camera Techniques Unit 23: Writing for Television and the Media Rationale Behind the Units  At the beginning of the course, in consultation with the teacher, students will decide on a specific media product (film or TV programme) that they will produce by the end of the course.  The core and specialist units (whilst still being individually assessed) will allow students to work through the various stages of production (pre-production, production and post-production) towards the realisation of their completed media product.

 This approach will allow students to truly appreciate the holistic nature of the production process.

 The mandatory unit Understanding the Television and Film Industries will provide students with the understanding of these industries which must underpin all their production work.

 The flow diagram below demonstrates how each unit would fit into the overall production process: Staff Contact: Mrs D Kyriacou-Moyes PRE-PRODUCTION Unit 1: Research Techniques for the Media Industries Student decides on media product (film or TV programme) to be produced.

Unit 2: Pre-Production Techniques for the Media Industries Unit 23: Writing for Television and Video (students write own script for planned film or television media product).

KNOWLEDGE BASE Understanding the Television and Film Industries: Students will develop the knowledge that will underpin their production work.

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PRODUCTION Unit 21: Single Camera Techniques: (students film their planned media product, making use of the script produced for Unit 23)

POST-PRODUCTION Unit 15: Film and Video Editing Techniques: Students will edit the moving image footage produced in Unit 21 to finally create their planned media product.


Music

Music SL/HL IBDP

E xa m in ati on Board OCR GCE AS/A2

Course Outline

R ea sons f or ch oosi ng th is cou rs e: To broaden your musical horizons and understanding; If you are considering studying Music in higher education it is essential, however many universities look at it favourably when applying for other subjects as it demonstrates motivation, commitment and your ability to work both independently and with others; If you enjoy music for its own sake. W h at w i l l I l e ar n? AS Students will study orchestral works from the 18th/19th century, popular instrumental music from 1900 onwards and Jazz in order to answer aural and essay questions in the exam. One composition or arrangement is required along with 7 composition exercises that are completed throughout the course. Students will prepare and perform a programme of solo music and must also perform, either on a second instrument, as part of an ensemble or demonstrate their improvisatory skills. A2 Students will perform a programme of music on one instrument and will then discuss their performance with the examiner. One composition will need to be submitted, along with 8 composition exercises completed during the course. Students will study various topics of music to answer aural and essay questions in the final exam.

Throughout the course students will be encouraged to keep a journal of all musical experiences they undergo in order to write written statements when necessary. Students at both HL and SL are required to study Musical Perception and Analysis. In this area one work is set by the IBO and then students are asked to study a wide range of music, including works from different areas of the world, different genres and different styles. This will intrinsically contain a large International element as students will experience music from Gamelan to the inclusion of Russian Folk Music in orchestral works of the Western Classical Tradition. Students also complete an individual investigation into the relationship between two identifiable and distinct musical genres. Again here students can work to their strengths and interests, choosing to study music from any world region or culture. The international nature of the Music course is apparent through the music studied as it would cover many cultures and different countries. Also through comparison and analysis students would also see how composers have been inspired by the music of different countries or cultures and often fuse together aspects of different styles within their own music. This is externally assessed, but obviously monitored internally. Internal assessment comprises of solo recital(s) and composition work at HL and a choice of solo performance, group performance or composition at SL. Students have free choice of the style(s) in which they wish to compose and may well link aspects of their work to music they listen to, perform, or come across in the Musical Perception and Analysis area. For group performing students are encouraged to attend regular rehearsals at established bands and choirs both in and outside of College who perform in public in order to widen their musical experiences and all areas. Topics

W h at do I n eed? A – C or above at GCSE. The ability to perform to a minimum standard of Grade 5 (Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music). The ability to read traditional music notation will be beneficial. Staff Contact: Mrs S Glover/Mr O Goldstein/Mr S Aston

The course will begin by informing students of the main historical musical periods, from Renaissance music to the present day. This will cover the work of many countries, composers and styles, e.g., African drumming and Gamelan influencing Minimalist works, Music Concrete, the influence of Italy, Germany and France on Music of the Baroque and Classical periods, the use of folk music in Nationalistic works etc. Any world music not covered can then be analysed. Throughout this study listening work will be undertaken in preparation for final exam (in both essay form and with scores). Alongside, individual conversations and monitoring will take place with students on the areas in which they will be working more independently. College choirs and musical groups will also form part of the IBDP for those wishing to undertake group performing. Concerts and recitals will be staged and recorded with the IBDP students in mind. Staff Contact: Mrs S Glover/Mr O Goldstein

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Physical Education

Physics

Exam i nat ion Boa rd OCR GCE AS/A2

E xam i na ti on Board – Edexcel G C E A S /A 2

Re ason s f or s tudyi ng th is cou rs e: If you have a keen interest in sport and recreation; If you want to follow a course that develops the theoretical aspects through practical involvement; If you have an enquiring mind and are interested in sport throughout the world; If you want to know more about how the body functions and the effects of exercise; If you want to evaluate and improve your own sporting performance; If you enjoy discovering about yourself in practical situations; If you want to study a course that is active and enjoyable; If you want to move onto a related career or higher education.

R eas ons f or st udyin g thi s course: If you have an interest in and enjoy physical science; If you want to find out how things in the physical world work; If you enjoy applying your mind to solving problems; If you are studying other Science subjects and/or Mathematics and you want to take another course that will supplement and support your studies.

W hat w i ll I stu dy? AS Unit 1: An introduction to Physical Education - Anatomy and physiology, acquiring movement skills, socio-cultural studies. Unit 2: Acquiring, developing and evaluating practical skills in PE. - Practical performance is assessed in two sports and one of these sports is used to produce a coursework performance portfolio. A2 Unit 3: Principles and concepts across different areas of PE. - Historical studies, comparative studies, sports psychology, biomechanics and exercise and sport physiology. Unit 4: The importance of effective performance and the critical evaluation of practical activities in PE. - Practical performance is assessed in one sport and candidates continue to evaluate performance and plan for improvement in this activity. W hat do I nee d? GCSE Grade C would be preferred; however we will consider students who have not studied PE on merit. Staff Contact: Mr D Lovell

W h at w i l l I s t u d y ? AS Uni t 1: P hysi cs on the go Mechanics - Speed, velocity and acceleration Forces and equilibrium Work, energy and power Materials - Fluid flow Elastic and plastic deformation Mechanical properties U ni t 2 : P hysi cs at work Waves - Wave characteristics, reflection, refraction, diffraction and polarisation Stationary waves and their properties. Electricity - Series and parallel circuits Ohms’ Law Resistivity The potential divider Emf and internal resistance Nature of light –Photons Einstein’s photoelectric equation Uni t 3 : Explor i ng physi cs This unit requires students to undertake either a Case study involving an application of physics along with a related practical, or a physics basedvisit and a related practical. A2 Uni t 4 : P hysi cs on the m ove Further mechanics – Momentum Circular motion Fields - Electric field strength Potential and capacitance, RC circuits Magnetic field strength and flux linkage Faraday’s Law and Lenz’s Law Particle physics - The nuclear atom Thermionic emission Particle accelerators Quark-lepton model De Broglie’s equation Uni t 5 : Phys ics f rom Creat ion to Collapse Thermal physics - Specific heat capacity, Ideal gas equation Internal energy Nuclear physics - Types of radiation Ionising ability Half life Oscillations - Simple harmonic motion Free, damped and forced oscillations Astrophysics and cosmology - Gravitational fields Hertsprung-Russell diagram Stefan-Boltzmann Law The fate of the Universe Uni t 6 : Expe r im e nta l phys ics This unit requires students to plan an experiment, carry it out, record measurements, analyse their own results and draw conclusions. W h at d o I ne ed ? Students will be expected to have achieved at least a grade B in GCSE Physics together with C grades in English and Mathematics. Numeracy and mathematical skills are an important tool of physics, and students will be expected to be able to communicate effectively and be able to research and analyse problems. Staff Contact: Mr R Smith

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Physics SL/HL IBDP Course Outline Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences as it seeks to explain the universe itself, from the very smallest particles to the vast distances between galaxies. Students need to be aware of the context in which physicists work. The course allows students to develop traditional practical skills and techniques, and to efficiently make use of mathematics, which is the language of physics. It allows students to develop interpersonal skills, and information and communication technology skills which are essential in modern scientific endeavour. Students will learn to understand and appreciate the contribution made to the advancement of physical understanding made by scientists of all nationalities both in the past and at the present time. They will develop an ability to use the thinking and deductive processes associated with science in order to understand and explain physical phenomena by problem solving and decision making. Students will be provided with opportunities for scientific study within a global context and will be provided with a body of knowledge, methods and techniques which characterise science and technology. They will develop an ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise scientific information. They will have their awareness raised of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology. Students will demonstrate the personal skills appropriate for effective scientific investigation and problem solving, along with the manipulative skills needed to carry out scientific investigations with precision and safety. They will make full use of ICT. Topics Core topics (SL and HL) Topi c 1: P hysi cs and physi ca l m ea surem en t Topi c 2: Me cha ni cs Topic 3: Thermal physics Topic 4: Oscillations and waves Topic 5: Electric currents Topic 6: Fields and Forces Topic 7: Atomic and nuclear physics Topic 8: Energy, power and climate change Higher level topics (HL only) Topic 9: Motion in fields Topic 10: Thermal physics Topic 11: Wave phenomena Topic 12: Electromagnetic induction Topic 13: Quantum physics and nuclear physics Topic 14: Digital technology Options A: Sight and wave phenomena B: Quantum physics and nuclear physics C: Digital technology D: Relativity and particle physics E: Astrophysics F: Communications G: Electromagnetic waves H: Relativity I: Medical physics J: Particle Students at SL study 2 options Students at HL study 2 options Staff Contact: Mr G Hughes

Psychology SL/HL IBDP  Are you interested in human behaviour?  Do you think you would be able to evaluate research studies by ‘thinking outside of the box?’  Would you like a course where you can consider, evaluate, criticise, and discuss aspects of human behaviour? If so, then you need to consider studying the Psychology IBDP at de Ferrers. The programme will focus on the main approaches in Psychology. You will also have the opportunity to work pro-actively by conducting your own psychological research. Psychology IBDP is a demanding yet exciting programme which will benefit students in most chosen career paths. Topics

 Biological Approach The biological approach looks at how our brain works and how the brain affects behaviour. We will investigate the use of drugs and surgical procedures on the brain and how these may impair behaviour. This will include studies on people with brain injuries and Alzheimer’s. We will also investigate the sleep-wake cycle and look at why some of us might have problems sleeping.  Cognitive Approach In the cognitive approach we will look at how humans process information. We will focus on attention, perception and memory. Attention refers to how humans selectively use their listening and visual skills. Perception relates to human sensations through sight and sound and memory focuses on short-term and long-term memory and the impact of certain events on memories such as the Second World War.  Learning Approach The learning approach will focus on how conditioning works in everyday life, for example, how people can be conditioned through rewards in order for them to change their behaviour. We will also look at how humans learn certain behaviours through imitation; one example being aggression.  Humanistic Approach Whilst studying the humanistic approach we will look at the needs of the individual in order to achieve their maximum potential in life. The understanding of relationships will also be explored which will include relationships in groups and as individuals and how to resolve conflicts which may exist. In addition to the above approaches students will study Comparative Psychology, Psychology of Dysfunctional Behaviour, Research Methods and Experimental Study. Comparative Psychology In this option students will research evolutionary explanations of behaviour such as the survival of the fittest, the selfish gene theory and altruism. Altruism (carrying out a good deed without wanting anything in return) will look at such behaviour shown by vampire bats and baboons. We will also look at courtship behaviour in animals and whether it is possible to teach human language to animals. Psychology of Dysfunctional Behaviour This element of the course looks a defining normality and abnormality and focuses mainly on mental illness. Disorders such as phobias and schizophrenia will be researched and discussed. Additionally, we will look at the treatments of such disorders and also look at the ethics of treating such individuals. Research Methodology A common theme throughout the course will look at how psychologists research certain areas. In research methodology we will look at how research takes place in psychology and how ethical these research studies are. There will be many opportunities in this section for you to carryout your own psychological research in preparation for your experimental study. Experimental Study This is the equivalent to coursework. You will carryout your own piece of research which will involve finding participants, carrying out an experimental study, collecting and analysing data. You will research your chosen area then justify your own results in the form of a report. This is always an exciting opportunity for students to independently research a particular psychological interest of theirs. Staff Contact: Mrs V Isaacs

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Psychology

Religious Studies

E xa m in ati on Board AQA GCE AS/A2

Exam i nat ion Board E de xcel GCE AS/A2

R ea sons f or st udyin g thi s course :  If you enjoy exploring issues dealing with how and why people behave in certain ways;  If you enjoy finding out more about the link between people’s behaviour and their environment;  If you enjoy planning and carrying out investigations to look for any patterns and explanation in the behaviour of people.

Re ason s f or stu dyi ng th is cours e? If you are considering further education or working in ‘caring professions’, such as teaching, police work, nursing and social work; If you are interested in professions such as law, journalism and advertising; If you are a scientist, particularly one who wants a career in medicine, or who wishes to broaden your education.

Then, Psychology may appeal to you.

W ha t w i l l I s t u d y ?

W h at w i l l I s t u d y ?

AS

AS Unit 1: Cognitive Psychology – includes memory and eye witness testimony and how the police get reliable information from the public to carry out their investigations. Developmental Psychology – includes Early Social Development. How we attach to our parents and what happens if no attachment is formed. Research Methods - Includes looking at the ways psychologists investigate behaviour (learning will include organising and carrying out experiments).

Foun da ti ons ( M odu le 1 ) Religious Ethics – theories and application. Christianity – key concepts and church developments.

Unit 2: Biological Psychology – includes how the body responds to stress and stress in everyday life. Social Psychology – includes why people conform and obey others, for example why some people will do as they are told and why some people will not. Individual Differences – includes definitions of abnormality (Schizophrenia, depression and eating disorders). A2 Unit 3: Topics in Psychology Relationships – includes how relationships are formed and how they break down. Aggression – includes aggression at sports events (football hooligans) and lynch mobs. Intelligence and Learning – includes how we learn and how animals learn. Unit 4: Psychopathology – includes looking at phobias and obsessive compulsive disorders. Psychology in action – includes Anomalistic Psychology which will look at research into Extra Sensory Perception, the paranormal, psychic healing, out of body and near death experiences and psychic mediumship. Staff Contact: Mrs V Isaacs

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Investigation (Module 2) Research into a particular topic which will lead to a piece of controlled conditions coursework. A2 Developments (Module 3) Religious Ethics – theories and their application. Christianity – key concepts and church developments. Implications (Module 4) Analysis of ethical arguments bases on textural services. W ha t do I nee d? Grade A* - C at GCSE. Staff Contact: Miss S Andjelkovic


Sociology

Ab Initio Spanish SL IBDP

Examination Board AQA GCE AS/A2

Course Outline

What will you learn on this course?

    

To understand sociological theories and ideas; How to carry out sociological research; How to make judgements on issues based on sociological evidence; To communicate your ideas in both the written and verbal form; To research issues.

The course is suitable for students with:

 An interest in people and society;  Questioning minds;  An interest in researching information;  A desire to gain a job that involves working and communicating with people. No previous experience of the subject is necessary, but a grade A – C in English is desirable. If you have studied Sociology at GCSE again a grade A* - C is desirable.

 The purpose of the course is to offer students who have studied French or German up to GCSE the opportunity to extend and enrich their knowledge of languages by beginning the study of Spanish.  The focus will be on the understanding of the language through a comprehensive study of grammar and vocabulary.  Study of the culture of Spain will support the acquisition of language and also help students to gain a more sensitive insight into the Spanishspeaking world.  The interactive methodology will enable students to develop their interpersonal skills and become more confident in a foreign context.  An introduction to current affairs will form an important part of the course and therefore students will be given to develop their sense of citizenship.  Formative assessment will be an integral part of the course delivery.

 There will be regular summative assessments to coincide with each unit of learning.

What will I study? AS Unit 1: Families and Households. Unit 2: Education, Sociological Methods. A2 Unit 3: Mass Media. Unit 4: Crime and deviance, theory and methods. Subjects that complement include: English, Psychology and Health and Social Care. Staff Contact: Mrs J R Burton

Topics  El individuo  EducaciĂłn y trabajo  La ciudad y sus servicios  Comida y bebida  Ocio y viajes  El medio ambiente  La salud y situaciones de emergencia Each topic will give the opportunity to relate to CAS and TOK; many aspects of the studies will give an international dimension to the course. Staff Contact: Mrs S Key

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Theatre Arts SL/HL IBDP

Theatre Studies

Course Outline

Examination Board Edexcel GCE AS/A2

The course aims to promote an enjoyment of and interest in drama and theatre both as a participant and as an informed member of an audience and a global community. It will encourage the appreciation of the significance of social, cultural and historical influences on theatre practice both past and present. The course covers five main areas:  The study of two contrasting texts from different times and cultures  A performance of an existing script  The development of a devised piece  The study of Greek theatre from the point of view of a director  The study of Shakespeare in terms of theatrical traditions and the modern context. Each of these areas will require the student to research, explore practically and observe the work of others. Students will use the work to experience the full range of roles available within the theatre. Assessment will be based on the students journals, assignments set on the work they are undertaking and projects based around the various areas studied. Topics The course content will be covered by more than one area of study:  Theatre in the making:  Study of two contrasting texts  Performance of a scripted piece  Development of a devised piece  Theatre in performance:  Study of two contrasting texts  Performance of a scripted piece  Performance of a devised piece  Study of Greek theatre  Theatre in the world  Study of two contrasting texts  Study of Greek theatre  Study of Shakespeare  Devised work ( Non text based theatrical tradition)

The course aims to promote the enjoyment of and an interest in drama and theatre both as a participant and as an informed member of the audience. In the AS units students will show knowledge and understanding of:  The use of theatrical forms and genre in relation to the exploration and performance of plays  How plays relate to the contexts in which they are created and/or performed  The different ways plays are interpreted  A minimum of three plays, two of which must be by different playwrights  The importance of social, cultural and/or historical influences on plays  The use of drama and theatre terms and concepts In addition, the A2 units require students to show knowledge and understanding of:  The significance of theatrical forms and genre and performance theory in relation to devised work  The ways in which plays have been interpreted through history  A further three plays from those studied in the AS units  The use and evaluation of higher order drama and theatre terms and concepts These are assessed in the following ways: As units: Unit 1: Exploration of Drama and theatre: Internal assessment: practical drama activities with supporting exploration notes; evaluation of live theatre Unit 2:Theatre text in performance: External assessment:  Monologue/duologue performance/ design realisation  Group performance/ design realisation A2 Units:

Staff Contact: Mr S Hackett Unit 3: Exploration of dramatic performance Internal assessment: creation and performance or design of original piece of drama. Unit 4: Theatre text in context External assessment: 2½ hour written examination on a set text and historical performance conditions Staff Contact: Mr S Hackett

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TOK (Theory of Knowledge) Course Outline As part of the core element of the IBDP the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course at de Ferrers will require the students to consider the nature of knowledge in general, to critically think about knowledge itself, to try to help our students make sense of the knowledge issues that arise in the study of the natural sciences, the arts, mathematics, human sciences, history and ethics. At its core are questions like these: What counts as knowledge? How does it grow? What are its limits? Who owns knowledge? What is the value of knowledge? What are the implications of having, or not having, knowledge? In doing so our students will encounter the roles played by reasoning, sense perception, language and emotion.

Sixth Form Dress Code Being a member of de Ferrers Sixth Form does require you to wear the following uniform: MALE Trousers

Black/plain style (Leisure trousers and Cords are not acceptable)

Sweater

Black plain V-necked (optional) (Sixth Form tie must be visible)

Shirt

White/plain style

Jacket

Black

Tie

Grey with red motif - available from college

(not suede or leather),

with lapels

FEMALE Skirt

Black (of reasonable length)

Sweater

Black plain V-necked (optional) (Sixth Form tie must be visible)

Blouse Jacket Tie Trousers

White - plain shirt style Black (not suede or leather), with lapels Grey with red motif - available from college Black/plain style (Leisure trousers and Cords are not acceptable)

Shalwar and Kameez (optional)

Black - worn with blouse, tie and jacket

Protective Clothing Protective clothing is essential where appropriate

Outside Visits/Trips Smart casual wear is required DENIM or SIMILAR MATERIAL SHOULD NOT BE WORN.

Which central dot is bigger? Can we trust our senses?

Staff Contact: Mrs J Botten/Mr P A Galloway

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Other Opportunities YOUNG ENTERPRISE

LEISURE

In 2009 de Ferrers won through to the UK National Finals as one of the top twelve teams out of an original 3000. The seven members of QWERTY presented their product at the Park Lane Hilton in London. The transferrable life skills acquired during their journey to this point will stand them in good stead for the future.

The Sixth Form Leisure programme offers a comprehensive range of practical activities and accredited courses for all students in the sixth form. A range of timetabled and extra-curricular sessions run throughout the week to allow students to participate in sport and physical activity, contributing towards the leading of a healthy lifestyle.

COMMUNITY SERVICE Students may have the opportunity to participate in Community Service. This provides a chance to visit regularly a place of work and really become involved in its operation. You don’t just sit and watch! Students are placed in a wide variety of environments, including Queen’s Hospital, infant and junior schools, riding stables, old people’s homes and so on. Community Service is timetabled for Wednesday afternoons but arrangements can sometimes be made to enable students to visit their placement when they have a study period, if this is felt to be beneficial. After six months, if you decide that your placement is not for you, then do not worry, there is opportunity to change and pursue something else. Apart from this timetabled opportunity, other activities in the community include raising money for local and national charities, via a variety of sponsored events, and distributing Harvest and Christmas parcels.

SIXTH FORM PANTOMIME The Sixth Form pantomime has been running for several years, with Sixth Form students taking a major role in writing, casting and producing this annual event. The pantomime is shown before the Christmas break to all students on Dove Campus. Various members of staff help and advise the Sixth Form on the best ways to produce a show in time for the scheduled performances. The set, costumes and props are made or acquired by the students and all the sound and lights for the shows are set up and controlled by members of the Sixth Form, with the help of staff. The pantomime is an eagerly anticipated extravaganza and last year’s seasonal offering rejoiced in the name of “Aladdin”.

INTER-SIXTH FORM EVENTS The “Superbrain” competition offers the chance to pit your wits against the collective might of other Sixth Forms. If you can gather together four fiendishly fantastic folks who are all at the peak of their intellectual powers, then you too may win. If not, however, simply assemble a group of friends, and going to the quiz guarantees you a good night out. So, massage your mental muscles, tone up your trivial tendencies and good luck in the competition. “Superstars”, on the other hand, will appeal to those who thrive on playing outrageously silly games and having lots of swashbuckling fun, which will bring you into close contact with other Sixth Formers of like mind and kind!

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Students have the opportunity to participate in the following sports: Aerobics and weight-training  Athletics  Badminton  Basketball  Cricket  Football  Golf  Hockey  Netball  Rounders  Squash  Swimming  Tennis  Volleyball

DEBATING SOCIETY In addition to organising fortnightly debates, urging students, staff and outside speakers to take part, the Debating Society involves as many Sixth Formers as possible in the skills of debating, be it to actually deliver a speech or to ask questions from the floor, by holding an interform competition for Year 12. To extend their experience, our stronger speakers have entered the “Midlands” and “The Observer Mace” Debating Competitions and have met with considerable success. In addition to the debates, the Society has organised visits to the Houses of Parliament to see the professionals at work!


IB - A LEVEL - BTEC - CAREER/ UNIVERSITY CHOICE ART

MATHS

Some careers relevant to Art:Three Dimensional Design; Fashion Design; Graphic Design/Visual Communications; Textile and Fashion Design; Arts Administration; Photography and Film; Art and Design History; Fine Art; Environmental Design; Architecture; Landscape Design; Town and Country Planning; Community Arts; Desktop Publisher; Stage/Theatre Design; Teaching; Computer Games Design

Some careers that might involve maths:-

Some local universities offering degrees/foundation degrees/HND’s in Art and associated subjects:Bi rm in gham ; Bi rm in gham Ci ty; Bur ton College; Cove ntr y; D eMon tf or t ; L ei ce ste r; Lou ghborou gh; New Colle ge N ot ti ngha m ; New m a n College of Hi gher Educat ion ; Nor th ampton; The N orw i ch School of Ar t a nd D esi gn; N otti ngh am ; N otti ngh am Trent ; Solih ull College; Sta f f ordsh ire; W ar w i ck ; W olve rh am pton ; W orcest er. P oin ts of f ers 80 – 340 ( Note : of te n re qui res a por tf oli o of w ork )

Engineering, Accountancy, Financial Services, Actuary, Construction/Surveying, Computing, Business Administration, Medicine, Veterinary Science, Para Medical Careers, Teaching, Architecture Some local universities offering degrees in Maths:Aston; Birmingham; Bishop Grosseteste University College; Chester; Coventry; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton Points score ranges from 160 – 360 (AAAA – Warwick)

MEDIA Some careers that might be relevant to the BTEC National Award in Media: Film, television or media research

BIOLOGY Some examples of careers involving Biology:Para Medical Careers/Nursing; Medicine; Genetics; Brewing; Agriculture; Food Science/Technology; Pharmacy/Pharmacology; Environmental Science/Forestry; Ecology and Conservation; Zoology; Marine Biology/Oceanography; Forensic Science; Teaching

Some local universities offering degree and higher vocational courses in Media: Derby University; Wolverhampton University; Staffordshire University; De Montfort University; Coventry University

PE Some local Universities offering Degrees/Foundation Degrees/HND’s:Aston; Birmingham; Chester; Coventry; De Montfort; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; Loughborough College; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton; Worcester Points score – 60 – 300 points

BUSINESS STUDIES Some Careers which may be relevant to business studies:Business Administration Management; Accountancy; Banking/Finance Sector; Retail Management; Marketing; Events Management; Civil Service Some local universities offering Degrees/Foundation Degrees/HND’s in Business Studies:Aston; Birmingham; Birmingham city; Chester; Coventry; De Montfort; Derby; Leicester; Loughborough; Northampton; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton; Worcester. Points score 60 - 340

CHEMISTRY Some examples of careers involving Chemistry:Chemist; Medicine; Pharmacy/Pharmacology; Chemical Engineering; Para Medical Careers/Nursing; Veterinary Science; Forensic Science; Food Technology; Polymer Technology; Teaching; Research

Some careers that may be relevant to PE:Professional sport; Recreation & Leisure Management; Personal Trainer/Instructor; Sports leader/instructor; Outdoor Pursuits Instructor/Teacher; Teaching; Coaching; Sport/fitness therapies; Armed Forces Some local Universities offering degrees/foundation degrees/HND in sports science/sports studies:Birmingham; Birmingham College of Food, Tourism and Creative Studies; Chester; Coventry; Derby; Loughborough College; Loughborough; Mid Cheshire College; Newman College of Higher Education; Northampton; North East Worcestershire College; Nottingham Trent; Solihull College; Staffordshire; Wolverhampton; Worcester. Points range from 100 – 360 (Loughborough)

PHYSICS Some careers which may involve physics:Engineering; Accountancy; Financial Services; Medicine; Veterinary Science; Para Medical Careers; Astronomy; Particle Technology; Environmental Science; Research; Teaching Some Local universities offering degrees in Physics:Birmingham; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Warwick Points score 240 - 340

Local universities offering degrees/foundation degrees/HND’s in Chemistry:Aston; Birmingham; Coventry; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Warwick Points score 60 - 350

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ENGLISH

PSYCHOLOGY

Some careers that might be relevant to English:Journalism; Librarian; Teaching; Advertising; Law; Banking; Administration/Business.

Some careers that may involve psychology Psychologist (Educational/Clinical/Occupational); Social Worker; Administration; Counselling; Business Management; Human Resource Management; Personal Adviser; Careers in the Care Sector (e.g.childcare/children; mental health; elderly; disabilities; youth work etc.)

Local universities offering degrees in English:Aston; Birmingham; Burton College; Cambridge; Birmingham City University (formally UCE); Coventry; DeMontfort; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Lincoln; Loughborough; Newman College of HE; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton; Worcester

GEOGRAPHY

Some local universities offering degrees in Psychology:Aston; Birmingham; Burton College; Birmingham City University; Chester; Coventry; DeMontfort; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; Newman College of HE; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton; Worcester Points/grades 140 - AAB

Some careers which may involve Geography:Land/Estate Management; Town Planning; Surveying; Geologist; Environmental Science; Business Management; Banking; Construction Professions; Computing; Teaching Some local universities offering degrees/foundation degrees/HND’s in Geography Birmingham; Chester; Coventry; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; Newman College of Higher Education; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Wolverhampton; Worcester Points score – 60 – 320 points

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE Health and Social Care can lead into a wide range of career choices such as:Nursing; Para-Medical Careers; Ambulance/paramedic; Dietician/nutritionist; Dental Hygienist/Nurse; Audiologist; Social Work; Community Work; Youth Work; Prison Officer; Speech Therapy; Occupational Therapy; Administration; Retail Management; Leisure Management; Teaching Assistant;

HISTORY Some careers involving History:Museum work; archivist; journalism; administration; teaching; archaeology; Some local universities offering degrees in History:Birmingham; Chester; Coventry; De Montfort; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Newman College of Higher Education; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton; Worcester Points offers 160 - 340

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Some careers involving Information Technology/Computers:Business Administration/Management; Banking/Financial Services; Computer Aided Design; Computer Aided Engineering; Computer Systems Engineering; Computer Programming; Computer Games Programming; Computer Information Systems; Computer Networks/Networking Local universities offering degrees/foundation degrees/HND’s in Information Technology/Computing:Aston; Birmingham; Birmingham City; Burton College; Coventry; De Montfort; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; New College Nottingham; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Solihull College; Stephenson College (Coalville); Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton; Worcester. Points score ranges 60 – 340 Note: Some Computer Science/Engineering courses require maths/physics at A level/IB in addition

30

SOCIOLOGY Some Careers where sociology might be relevant:Social work; Counselling; Public Sector Administration/Management; Youth and Community Work; Community Development; Public Services; Voluntary Sector Management Some local universities offering degrees in Sociology:Aston; Birmingham; Burton College; Birmingham City; Chester; Coventry; Derby; Keele; Leicester; Loughborough; Northampton; Nottingham; Nottingham Trent; Staffordshire; Warwick; Wolverhampton; Worcester Points score 140 - 300


YEAR 13 DESTINATIONS - 2009 NAME

DESTINATION

COURSE

Bilal Ahmed

de Ferrers

Taima Aldridge

Burton College

Art Foundation Course

Josh Andrews

Millennium Performing Arts School - Woolwich

Musical Theatre

NAME

DESTINATION

COURSE

Laura Horobin

University of Birmingham

Joint Honors History and Geography

Charlotte Howell

University of Derby

Marketing Management

Joseph Hubbard

Gap Year

Art Technology

Nottingham Trent University Civil Engineering

Jessica Arthur

Employment

Gareth Huckerby

William Atherton

Nottingham Trent University Planning & Property Development

Jessie Hunt

Chloe Barker

University of Lincoln

Erica Bawden Lara Bawde Andrew Bettridge

Staffordshire University

Hafza Iqbal

University of Wolverhampton Religious Studies and Politics

Gap Year

Emily Jay

University of Cardiff

French & German

Gap Year

Lydia Jilantikiri

University of Bradford

Medical Engineering

Cori Jordan

Gap Year

Mohammed Junaid

de Ferrers

Rebecca Kinnear

Burton College

Sociology

Sophie Lane

University of Derby

Early Childhood Studies

Sam Lawton

Gap Year

Grace Lenton

The University of Derby

Psychology

Journalism and Sports Studies

Harjyot Billen

Newcastle University

Michael Birkin

Employment

Anthony Bishop

Employment

Daniel Boast

University of Nottingham

Mechanical Engineering

Zakk Borton

University of Southampton

Medicine

Charlotte Bowley

Employment

Elizabeth Broadhurst

Nottingham Trent

English

Joshua Lovatt

Gap Year

Robert Brough

University of Lincoln

Business Management

Amy Lowe

University of Derby

Sport & Exercise Studies

Katie Carthy

University of Northampton

Policing and Criminal Justice

Christopher Lycett

University of Derby

Joint Course History and ICT

Rebekah Chandler

University of Wolverhampton Nursing

Bijal Manek

New College Nottingham

Charlotte Clarke

Burton College

Art Foundation Course

Art and Design Foundation Studies

Joseph Davies

University of Derby

Primary Education

Sam Manning

University of Nottingham

Mechanical Engineering

Lauren Marshall

Gap Year

George Martin

University of Cardiff

Nathan Deacon

Gap Year

Sunny Diep

Derby

Lewis Dolman

de Ferrers

Charlotte Doxey

Sheffield Hallam University

Mathematics and Statistics

Laura Knight

Business Management

Computing and Educational Studies

Electronics and Computer Engineering

Andrew Menzies

Gap Year

Criminology and Psychology

Christopher Mills

Gap Year

Chemistry

Faye Morrall

University of Derby

Accounting and Finance

Law and Photography

Charlotte Mowforth

University of Manchester

Dentistry

Raheel Fayyaz

Emily Mulenga

Derby College

Art Foundation Course

Emma Firth

de Ferrers

Darren Naylor

University of Derby

Primary School Education

Louisa Fisher

The Arts University College Bournemouth

Costume Design for Performance

Paul Nicholls

University of Derby

Business Studies

William Oades

Sheffield Hallam University

Journalism

Charlotte Oakes

Burton College

Child Care Course

Jordan Ford

University of Derby

Marketing Management

Jodie Pelech

Loughborough University

Psychology

Jessica Freitas

York St John

Music

Caroline Pidsley

Nottingham Trent

Product Design

Ben Garton

Gap Year

Laura Prince

de Ferrers

Hyeriju Gashau

Palacky University Czech Republic

Charlotte Pyatt

University of Loughborough Product Design

Kaainat Raheel

Birmingham University

William Duesbury Perry Evans

University of Birmingham Burton College

Emma Ford

Kirsty Gaskin

Unknown

Rebecca Goldsbury

Employment

Sabeena Hanif

Burton College

Amy Harding

Aston University

Katie Harman

Employment

Joanne Hodson

Medicine and Dentistry

Aimmen Ratyal

Economics & Business

Open University Degree

Danielle Holme Felicity Horner

University of Birmingham

Law

Archaeology and Ancient History

James Riddell

Employment

Thomas Roberts

De Montfort University

Drama Studies

Jessica Robinson

Sheffield Hallam

Sociology and Criminology

Charlie Sarson

Derby College

Art Foundation Course

Sahira Shaheen Bethany Shardlow

Employment

Nausheen Sharif

Burton College

Catherine Sharp

Employment

31


YEAR 13 DESTINATIONS - 2009 NAME

DESTINATION

COURSE

Alex Sharratt

University of Derby

History and Criminology

Ricky Shilvock

RAF

Kieran Slaney Samuel Slater

Sheffield Hallam University

OTP

Ben Smart

Derby University

Sport Science

Laura Stafford

Employment

Liam Staley

Staffordshire University

Paul Stanyon

Downing College, Cambridge Natural Sciences

Natalie Starkey

University of Lincoln

Sport and Exercise Science

Emily Stevens

Burton College

NVQ Teaching

Julia Stretton

University of Lincoln

Criminology and English

Thomas Swann

University of Derby

Computer Forensics and Security

Daniel Tanser

University of Derby

Business Enterprise

Kieron Taylor

Army

Edward Thorpe

Employment

Lewis Tivey

Burton College

Danielle Underwood

University of Derby

Joshua Ward

de Ferrers

Rachel Wheat

Nottingham Trent University English and International Relations

Eleanor Willey

Unknown

Gemma Williams

University of Bath Spa

Music

Alice Wilson

Sheffield Hallam University

Accountancy and Financial Management

Samuel Wood

University of Manchester

Physics with Astrophysics

Rebecca Woodhall

Burton College

NVQ3

Sarah Woolley

Sheffield Hallam University

Psychology

Stephanie Woolliscroft Gap Year Kieran Wragg

Burton College

Louis Yelland

Employment

32

Sports Journalism

History


de Ferrers

Specialist Technology College

SIXTH FORM PROSPECTUS

2010-11 Trent Campus St Mary’s Drive Burton upon Trent DE13 0LL Telephone: 01283 239936 Fax: 01283 239950 Dove Campus Harehedge Lane Burton upon Trent DE13 0AS Telephone: 01283 239961 Fax: 01283 239971 e-mail: office@deferrers.staffs.sch.uk

www.deferrers.com

Sixth Form Prospectus 2010  

Sixth Form Prospectus 2010