Page 1

STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010 NATIONAL ART SCHOOL

SYDNEY • AUSTRALIA CRICOS Provider Code 01605G

Photography by Oliver Strewe/Wave Productions

NATIONAL ART SCHOOL

STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010 NATIONAL ART SCHOOL

SYDNEY • AUSTRALIA Forbes Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 Australia t [61 2] 9339 8744 www.nas.edu.au

NAS_HBook2010COVfinal.indd 1

9/2/10 9:36:59 AM


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 1

STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010 NATIONAL ART SCHOOL

CRICOS Provider Code 01605G


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

CONTENTS FOREWORD 4 MISSION 7 IMPORTANT DATES 8 STAFF 9 NAS Directorate 9 Postgraduate Studies 9 Student Academic Services 9 Public Programs 9 NAS Library 10 NAS Administration 10 HANDBOOK INFORMATION 11 NAS INFORMATION 12 Student Information and Assistance 12 Department Timetables 12 Orientation Days 13 Advanced Standing 13 Building and After Hours Access 13 Re-enrolment Procedures 14 Fees 15 Progression 15 Changes to Enrolment 16 Computing 16 Library Facilities 16 Student Representatives 17 Central Workshop 18 Textbooks 18 Students with Disabilities 18 Release of Student Information 18 Student Equity 19 Complaints/Disputes 19 Advocacy and Support 19 BACHELOR OF FINE ART REQUIREMENTS 20 First Year Program 20 Second and Third Year Program 21 Second Year Studio Elective program 21

Page 2


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor

of of of of

Fine Fine Fine Fine

Art Art Art Art

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 3

Degree Structure 22 Result Grades 23 Honours Requirements 24 Honours Result Grades 27

BFA SUBJECT DESCRIPTIONS 28 Art history and theory 28 Ceramics 41 Drawing 73 Painting 77 Photography 94 Printmaking 106 Sculpture 125 Studio seminar (honours) 135 BACHELOR OF FINE ART RULES 136 Standard Enrolment 136 Prerequisite/s and Corequisite/s Requirements 136 Progression 136 Subject Exemptions 136 Modification Of Requirements 136 UNDERGRADUATE STUDY 137 Conditions for the Award of Degree 138 Bachelor of Fine Art * 137 Bachelor of Fine Art Honours* 137 STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT 138 Student Responsibilities 138 Occupational Health and Safety 139 1. Academic Misconduct 140 2. Non Academic Misconduct 140 Penalties for Misconduct 143


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 4

FOREWORD Welcome to the National Art School, and to what I trust will be an exciting and fulfilling academic year for you as a student, whether you are joining the School for the first time or returning for further study. 2010 represents an exciting year for the National Art School as it realises the transition from the NSW Department of Education and Training to become a fully independent higher education provider. The National Art School offers accredited courses that lead to the award of the degrees of Bachelor of Fine Art (BFA), Bachelor of Fine Art Honours (BFA Hons) and Master of Fine Art by Research (MFA). The vision and focus of the National Art School is committed to the traditions of specialist studio practice, with majors in the fields of Ceramics, Drawing (at Honours and MFA), Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture along with the study of Drawing and Art History & Theory throughout its courses. Since its earliest inception, the National Art School has maintained a steadfast commitment to developing in each and every student the capacity for meaningful practice as an artist, by guiding them through the various histories and methodologies of the specialist studio disciplines. The lecturers at the National Art School are all distinguished in their achievements and contributions to their respective fields, and we can ensure the necessary breadth of knowledge and experience required to accommodate the development of each individual student. All of the courses have a focus on this individual guidance and mentoring of students through the creative process as an important element of our approach and ethos. There are many additional activities that contribute to the experience of being a student at the National Art School. These include the NAS Gallery and its changing program of exhibitions, research publications and public programs focused on visual art practices relevant to the academic programs, which features group and solo projects by Australian and International artists that support the philosophy of the School in being profoundly aware of the past whilst recognising and engaging with the present. The new Study Centre for Drawing will also have a changing program of exhibitions and projects dedicated to the role of drawing in visual arts practice; and the weekly Forum lectures and the interstate and international Artist-in-Residence Scheme will enable you to get to see, meet and discuss the working practices of a range of Australian and international artists. The National Art School attracts quality applicants from a range of differing backgrounds, and all of you have been selected for your individual ability to succeed within our programs. The School prides itself on the professional successes achieved by its students and staff, which include many major awards for emerging and established artists, major exhibitions and publications. For many of you, this period of intensive study and reflection will establish a template for your future endeavours as practising artists, and for others this period will act as a springboard into further study or related careers. Whatever your future direction,

4


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 5

I am sure that your time at the School will prove to be a defining period in your life. As a graduate, you will be joining the long and continuing history of our illustrious alumni who include some of the most esteemed and distinguished artists in Australia. This Student Handbook provides a full description of degree courses and the academic requirements and conduct expected of you while you study at the National Art School. I am sure you will find this degree in fine art both stimulating and challenging as you work in and among the wonderful, historic sandstone buildings that make up our campus, and house the dedicated studio accommodation, lecture theatres, project spaces, gallery, library, theatre, special collections and archives, all in the centre of the vibrant arts community of Sydney. On behalf of the National Art School, I wish you well for the creative journey ahead. ANITA TAYLOR Director National Art School

5


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

6

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 6


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 7

MISSION i.

ii.

The principal mission of the National Art School is to be a centre of excellence for the provision of higher education and research, scholarship and professional practice in the visual arts and related fields. The National Art School utilises its independent identity and distinctive teaching & learning methods to realise this mission through the development of creativity and visual and cultural awareness in an international context.

CALENDAR OF DATES The academic calendar is divided into two semesters, with 27 weeks for teaching. (Please note the Honours program is 26 weeks). Between the two semesters there is a break of approximately two weeks. There is also a short recess of one week within each semester. Dates are correct at printing but may be subject to change.

2010 ACADEMIC YEAR

BEGINS

ENDS

Semester 1 Mid Semester Recess

Monday 1 March Friday 2 April

Friday 2 July Friday 16 Aprily

Mid Year Recess

Monday 5 July

Friday 23 July

Semester 2 Mid Semester Recess

Monday 26 July Monday 27 September

Friday 19 November Friday 8 October

7


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 8

IMPORTANT DATES FOR 2010 DATE

EVENT

JANUARY

DATE

EVENT

JULY

Friday 1

New Years Day

Mon 5 – Fri 23

Student Vacation

Friday 22

Deadline for enrolment forms and fee payments

Monday 26

Semester 2 commences First year studio elective 1 commences

Tuesday 26

Australia Day Public Holiday AUGUST

FEBRUARY Tuesday 23

Wednesday 24

Friday 6 10.00am Second Year orientation. 2pm Third Year orientation

Deadline for variation to Semester 2 subjects

Monday 23

First Year studio elective 2 commences

National Art School MFA Graduates Show 2002-2009

SEPTEMBER

MARCH Mon 1 – Wed 3

10.00am First Year orientation

Mon 1 – Fri 5

Second and Third year Drawing Week

Monday 8

Academic year commences Master of Fine Art commences

Monday 1

Honours program commences

Friday 19

Census Date Last day for variation of subjects

Monday 20

First year studio elective 3 commences

Friday 22

Honours classes end

Mon 27 – Fri 8 Oct

Student Vacation

OCTOBER Wednesday 21

Postgraduate 2010 Show

Friday 29

All classes end

NOVEMBER Tuesday 2

Melbourne Cup

Mon 1 – Fri 5

First Year assessment week

Mon 8 – Fri 12

Second Year assessment week

Mon 15 – Fri 19

Third Year assessment week

APRIL Friday 2

Good Friday

Monday 5

Easter Monday

Mon 5 - Fri 16

Student Vacation

Sunday 25

Anzac Day

Monday 26

Anzac Day Public Holdiay

DECEMBER Thursday 2

Graduand Show

Saturday 25

Christmas Day

Sunday 26

Boxing Day

MAY Thursday 20

NAS Graduation

Mon 31 – Fri 4

Honours midyear reviews

JUNE Mon 14

8

Queens Birthday


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 9

STAFF The National Art School comprises Departments of Art History and Theory, Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture, NAS Directorate, Postgraduate Studies, Student Academic Services and NAS Administration.

NAS DIRECTORATE Director Anita Taylor RWA, MA RCA, BA(Hons) Gloucestershire Head of Academic Studies Simon Cooper, BA (Fine Arts) VIC College, Prahran, GradDip Fine Arts VCA Promotions and Development Manager Heather Knights Gallery Manager/Curator Katie Dyer Senior Project Officer Vacant Executive Assistant to the Director Joseph Hawkins Academic Support Officer Vacant

POSTGRADUATE STUDIES Acting Postgraduate Coordinator Dr Ian Greig, BVA (Hons), PhD SASA Lecturers Charles Cooper, GradDip Prof Art Stud CAI, MA VisArt UNSW HSC Coordinator Lorraine Kypiotis, BA MA Syd

STUDENT ACADEMIC SERVICES Registrar Amalea Manifis, BFA BArtEd UNSW Student Services Officer Ira Kowalski, Dip Business & Management RMIT

PUBLIC PROGRAMS Acting Manager Public Programs Ella Dreyfus, BA VisArt CAI SCAE, GradDip VisArt SCA Public Programs Officer Stephanie Tucker

9


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 10

NAS LIBRARY Library Manager Kelly McKeon, B. Arts (Hons) ACU, Grad. Dip. Inf. UTS Librarian Elizabeth Little, B. App. Sci (Inf) KCAE, B. Art Th. (Hons) COFA UNSW, M. Art Admin COFA UNSW Library Technician Lea Simpson, Dip. LIS (Sydney Institute) Library Technician Naomi Rickersey, Dip. LIS (Sydney Institute)

NAS ADMINISTRATION Business and Corporate Services Manager Malcolm Bell Facilities and Operations Manager Anthony Williams Human Resources Officer and Acting Finance Manager Ravella Irving Finance Officer Clare Sullivan IT Support Donovan Kentwell Customer Services Officer Julie O’Reilly Cashier Gary Robinson Counsellor Raji Munro Security Staff Jean-Claude Imbert Marcel Delgado Audio Visual and Computer Lab Technicians John Daly Damian Dillon General Assistance Jaroslav Prochazka Tarron Ruiz-Avila

10


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 11

HANDBOOK INFORMATION The Handbook is divided into three main sections comprising undergraduate study, Departments and subject descriptions at the National Art School. The full listing of subject descriptions in each department also includes full details of subject content, contacts and semester/Prerequisite/s details. Abbreviations CP credit points Fr Friday FT full time HPW hours per week Maj major Mo Monday NAS National Art School PT part time SEM semester S1 Semester 1 S2 Semester 2 S3 Semester 3 SS Summer School SUB subject Tu Tuesday Th Thursday We Wednesday WS Winter School WKS weeks Prefixes The identifying alphabetical prefixes for each Department offering subjects in the Bachelor of Fine Art follow. AHT Art History and Theory CER Ceramics DRA Drawing PAI Painting PHO Photography PRI Printmaking SCU Sculpture STS Studio Seminar

11


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 12

CRICOS The Australian Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS) lists all providers registered to offer courses to people studying in Australia on student visas and the courses offered. The National Art School Provider Code:

01605G

The Bachelor of Fine Art Course Code:

065879G

Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor Bachelor

050913M 030033J 062913A 062914M 062915K 062916J

Master Master Master Master Master Master

of of of of of of

of of of of of of

Fine Fine Fine Fine Fine Fine

Fine Fine Fine Fine Fine Fine

Art Art Art Art Art Art

Art Art Art Art Art Art

Honours Honours Honours Honours Honours Honours

Ceramics Code: Drawing Code: Painting Code: Photography Code: Printmaking Code: Sculpture Code:

Ceramics Code: Drawing Code: Painting Code: Photography Code: Printmaking Code: Sculpture Code:

050914K 062917G 062918G 062919F 062920B 062921A

NAS INFORMATION STUDENT INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE Enquiries about degree requirements, enrolment, progression, assessment, advanced standing, subject changes, studio major transfers, grievances and disputes or any other academic matters should be made to the staff in Student Academic Services Building 28 or students may consult their Student Guide which outlines the National Art School’s policies and procedures. The Student Guide is distributed on Orientation day at the commencement of the academic year, copies are also held in Student Academic Services or for reference in the NAS Library and Department offices.

DEPARTMENT TIMETABLES The timetables for NAS classes are located at the back of this Student Handbook. Timetables will also be located on the noticeboard at Student Academic Services at the commencement of the academic year.

12


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 13

ORIENTATION DAYS Orientation days are compulsory for all students at the National Art School. Important information regarding timetabling, Drawing Week and courses is provided on this day. Students not attending will be marked as absent in class roll books. 2010 ORIENTATION DAYS Year 1 Monday 1 March – Wednesday 3 March 2010 10.00am – 4.00pm Year 2 Tuesday 23 February 2010 10.00am – 11.00am Year 3 Tuesday 23 February 2010 2.00pm – 3.00pm

ADVANCED STANDING Credit transfer at undergraduate level is recognition of prior study in a university or TAFE. Students admitted with advanced standing are given credit towards the degree for all appropriate subjects completed at another institution up to a maximum of two thirds of the total credit points required for the degree. Specified credit will be given for subjects closely related to a subject offered within the degree program. Advanced standing is only given for study completed in the last 10 years and is subject to places being available. The educational qualifications required for admission with advanced standing into the BFA for second year are: • successful completion of first year of a degree in fine art at an equivalent institution, or • successful completion of a three year Advanced Diploma in Fine Art at TAFE or equivalent institution

The educational qualification required for admission with advanced standing into the BFA for third year is: • successful completion of first and second year of a degree in fine art at an equivalent institution

All applications must include certified copies of academic transcripts and copies of all subject descriptions from a relevant handbook. Advanced Standing is only given to study completed within the last ten years. Applicants will be assessed via interview and portfolio presentation by designated staff, including the relevant Subject Leader where applicable. For courses delivered by Australian private providers, only those courses accredited under the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF), or by the relevant state/territory accreditation authority, will be taken into account. Qualifications undertaken with private providers will not be assessed without proof of accreditation for the particular course.

BUILDING AND AFTER HOURS ACCESS Students requiring access to buildings and studio areas after-hours must sign the Access Book at the Security Office when entering and leaving the campus during after hours and Saturdays. Students who do not sign in on arrival and departure will be asked to leave the campus by Security. Students requesting to work in studios after hours must always work in pairs. No student is allowed solitary access to NAS buildings after hours. No tools or equipment that are designated as hazardous may be used after hours.

13


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 14

For building access on Saturdays students must register their names in the Access Book no later than Friday before 4.00pm to inform Security as to which buildings must be opened in the morning. Students requesting after hours access during the week must register their names no later than 5 hours prior to the time requested for access. Students who do not register will not be given clearance to access buildings on Saturday or after hours during the week. All NAS rules and procedures must be adhered to at all times whilst on Campus. All instructions and requests directed to students by security must be abided by. Any breaches of discipline will be dealt with accordingly by the Registrar. Student Complaint reports will be completed by security staff and submitted to the Registrar to assess the complaint. After hours access: DAYS Monday - Thursday Friday Saturday

During Semester 8.30am – 9.00pm 8.30am – 4.00pm 8.30am – 2.00pm

During Vacation 9.00am – 4.00pm 9.00am – 4.00pm No access

No access is available on Sundays or Public Holidays or Saturdays after 12.00pm. Please ensure that you have confirmed Campus access hours with the timetable available at the Security office building 2

RE-ENROLMENT PROCEDURES Students enrolling in second and third year must collect a Provisional Enrolment pack from SAS in late October each year. This will ensure that you are correctly enrolled for the following year in February. Students who submit incorrect or incomplete forms will not be enrolled. Students who do not submit their re-enrolment forms by the due date will incur a late fee of $200 for late provisional enrolments. Payment of fees must be made by post, information regarding approved subjects and academic results will be forwarded to students in early January. ENROLMENT consists of: • completion of a Provisional Enrolment form • receipt of approved subjects for the following year and academic results in early January • completion of enrolment form and full payment of fees to secure enrolment for 2010 by Friday 22 January 2010 • enrolment forms and fee payments not received by 22 January 2010 will incur a late fee of $200. Your enrolment is not complete until the subjects selected on the Provisional Enrolment form have been approved. Subjects are approved when you receive a Confirmation of Enrolment form in the mail in early January. The Enrolment form must be signed and the Fees Payment form with full payment completed and returned to Student Academic Services Building 28 no later than 22 January 2010. Once payment has been processed enrolment is complete.

14


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 15

FEES Fees must be paid by Mastercard, Visa, cheque or money order made payable to the National Art School. The full fee must be paid by Friday 22 January 2010 by post. Fee payments must be received by the above date or a late fee of $200 will be incurred. Please note you are not enrolled if fees have not been received by 22 January 2010 and are not guaranteed original subject choices.

PROGRESSION In order to qualify for the degree, it is the responsibility of the student to complete all requirements of the program in which the student is enrolled. To be awarded the Bachelor of Fine Art, students must successfully complete a total of 180 credit points comprising: • AHT100, DRA100, CER100, PAI100, PHO100, PRI100, SCU100 (45 credit points) • Three first year studio electives (15 credit points) • AHT200, DRA200 (18 credit points) • Second year studio major (26 credit points) • Studio seminar (4 credit points) • Two studio electives (6 credit points) • AHT300, DRA300 (18 credit points) • Third year studio major (30 credit points) • Professional studies (6 credit points) • Four Art History and Theory electives (12 credit points) Students must complete one studio major to fulfil the requirements of their course. The available major options are listed below: • Ceramics • Painting • Photography • Printmaking • Sculpture Please note: Studio Introduction subject results in semester 1 of Year 1 are averaged, therefore should a student fail one Studio Introduction subject and yet their average for all studio subjects is a Pass the student will not be required to Show Cause and may progress to Year 2 but may not be permitted to major in the studio discipline failed. Students must pass all three Studio Elective subjects in semester 2 to enrol in second year and must select an elective in the intended studio major for Year 2. All students who fail subjects (other than stated as above) must show cause as to why they should be permitted to continue the course. Students with exceptional circumstances may be given permission to continue with their studies as decided by the Show Cause Committee and may be given the opportunity to repeat failed subjects the following year. Students enrolled in second and third year of the BFA who fail any subjects will be required to repeat those subjects failed the following year on the approval of the Show

15


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 16

Cause Committee, excluding Art History/Theory electives and Studio Electives. Should a student fail Art History/Theory electives or Studio Electives permission may be given to enrol in 6 credit points in Art History/Theory electives or Studio Electives concurrently with third year subjects (timetable permitting). Students must complete all first year subjects to progress to second year 60 credit points). Students must complete a total of 114 credit points to progress to third year. A total of 180 credit points to apply for the Bachelor of Fine Art Honours (See Admission requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Art Honours). Show cause applications should be made in writing to the Registrar. Students will be notified by mail of the outcome of their submission. Please note: Students with second attempt failures will be excluded from the course without automatic re-admission.

CHANGES TO ENROLMENT Changes to enrolment may be made for studio majors/electives and Art History & Theory electives. Approval must be given by the appropriate Head of Department prior to the submission of the Variation Form. Students must be aware of the following dates for discontinuation and variation of subjects: Deadline for adding and withdrawing subjects without failure: Semester 1 subjects: Semester 2 subjects: Whole Year subjects:

Friday 19 March 2010 Friday 6 August 2010 Friday 19 March 2010

Withdrawing from a subject after the dates above can be made with failure.

COMPUTING The National Art School maintains its own website at www.nas.edu.au which provides information to prospective students as well as subject outlines and course materials for current students. Digital Imaging is recognised as a research tool for students and staff. Desktop publishing software (using Macintosh/IBM PageMaker, Photoshop, Illustrator and Painter) and digital imaging facilities are all available for student use. Two computer laboratories are available for formal class use and general student and staff access. Enquiries regarding the Digital Lab ( 9339 8637 Digital Lab Officer, John Daly.

LIBRARY FACILITIES The National Art School Library has a specialist collection of materials relating to the theory and practice of visual arts. The library’s holdings comprise a range of materials available for loan including books, journals, videos, and DVDs. The journal collection includes an extensive selection of national and international titles specialising in the fine arts and related areas.

16


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 17

The Library is housed in Building 14 where the facilities include study carrels and tables, reading rooms, a seminar room, a computer room, and an exhibition space where student work is shown. The library is a member of Arlis/ANZ (The Arts Libraries Society of Australia and New Zealand), an organisation holding regular meetings regarding issues for arts libraries and arts library professionals. ART BOOKS AND RELATED MATERIALS The art reference and lending collection of the library includes: • 23,800 books • 48 journal subscriptions from Australia and overseas • audio-visual resources including videos and DVDs • online databases for access to journal material • Daily newspaper subscriptions COMPUTING, PHOTOCOPYING, AND PRINTING FACILITIES The library offers students access to 6 PCs with internet access, word processing and other office applications. Both colour and black and white photocopying is available in the library. The photocopiers only operate on a copy card system. Students can purchase and recharge copy cards in the library. If intending to use this equipment, please bring coins as library staff cannot issue change. Black and white laser printing is available in the student computer room and operates on the same copy card system as the photocopiers. BORROWING RIGHTS NAS students are entitled to borrow up to 15 items. Most items are available for a loan period of 2 weeks. Borrowing privileges will be suspended as soon as an item is overdue and until the item is returned, paid for or replaced. Overdue charges and penalties will be incurred for overdue library items. RECIPROCAL BORROWING RIGHTS WITH OTHER LIBRARIES

The library has reciprocal borrowing rights with all TAFE NSW libraries. Students are encouraged to consult material available at non-lending libraries such as the State Library of NSW, the Shaeffer Fine Art Library (formerly Power Research Library) of the University of Sydney, and the Art Gallery of NSW Research Library. CATALOGUE ACCESS

Access to the library catalogue is available on the Internet via the NAS website at: http://www.nas.edu.au/Dept_Library.htm There are two student use terminals located at the entrance to the library dedicated to the catalogue. Library staff are also available to assist students and academic staff with locating materials

STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE COUNCIL Each year a number of student members are elected to the Student Council to represent all students studying at the NAS. These students have direct input with staff in making decisions affecting NAS students. nasstudentcouncil@det.nsw.edu.au

17


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 18

CENTRAL WORKSHOP The Central Workshop in each department provides tools and materials for hire to students during semester. Students must provide their student id card for the borrowing of all equipment, which is returned upon the replacement of all undamaged tools and materials. Students will not receive results and may be prevented from graduating should they not return tools by the end of semester.

TEXTBOOKS Prescribed texts and recommended texts are listed under subject descriptions in this Handbook. Other reading lists are available from the relevant Departments.

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES The National Art School seeks wherever possible to ensure maximum participation of student’s with disabilities. The NAS offers a range of assistance: examination; educational support; parking provisions and library assistance. It is advisable to make contact with the relevant Head of Department or Counsellor prior to, or immediately following enrolment, to discuss your support needs.

RELEASE OF STUDENT INFORMATION The Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 was passed by NSW Parliament in 1998 with the intention of providing safeguards relating to the release of personal information held by government agencies. The National Art School in the course of achieving its principal function of providing high quality education, accumulates information about students including personal information and academic records and is committed to ensuring effective control and management of student information in accordance with the Information Protection Principles (IPP) in the Act. The following is a representative sample of the types of personal information about students which is received and stored by NAS: • Names, addresses and telephone numbers • Other personal information/General statistics e.g. date of birth, photographs, ethnicity, sex, residency status • Academic records including awards, prizes, grades and marks, mutual recognition • Attendances (either collected manually, roll books, or electronically) • Discipline matters • Disability support • Financial details eg. credit card information, debtor information, bank details collected as part of payment process. A student’s personal information is not released to a third party without the student’s written consent. Assessment marks are confidential and may only be released to authorised NAS staff. Assessment marks may not be given to students (Grades only). There are certain exceptions to the general rule that information will not be released without the consent of a student: These are:

18


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 19

• Where disclosure of the information is for the purpose for which it is collected; for example, Centrelink checks • disclosure of the information is necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to the life or health of the student concerned or to another person In the context of NAS, a student’s personal information can be disclosed in the following situations: • Court orders or subpoenas Where a government agency has specific statutory authority to request information, (e.g. Commonwealth Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs) and the agency specifically advises in writing the reason for its request; • Procedures established under the Freedom of Information Act (FOI)

STUDENT EQUITY The National Art School is committed to providing an educational environment that is free from discrimination and harassment. The state anti-discrimination law requires the NAS not to discriminate against students or prospective students on the following grounds: sex, race/ethnicity, age disability, sexual harassment, racial harassment, disability harassment, marital status, pregnancy, sexual preference, HIV/AIDS.

COMPLAINTS/DISPUTES The National Art School has internal dispute handling procedures to deal with complaints against staff and other students. The discrimination and harassment grievance procedures are handled by the Grievance Officer located on campus who is specially trained to provide confidential support and assistance to individuals confronting harassment. Complaints that largely concern academic matters are usually handled through the Head of Department, Registrar and Discipline Committee.

ADVOCACY AND SUPPORT Students can seek assistance getting disputes resolved, either in relation to discrimination or academic matters. Assistance can be sought from various areas in the NAS including: Grievance Officer; Student Counselling; Registrar; Course Co-ordinators; Senior Academic Staff and the Discipline Committee. Students may be confident that their interests will be protected by the NAS if a complaint is lodged. This means that students should not be disadvantaged or victimised because they have sought to assert their rights to equal opportunity in education. For more information consult the 2010 Student Guide.

19


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 20

BACHELOR OF FINE ART REQUIREMENTS Bachelor of Fine Art 9856 The basic requirements for the degree are: 1. a total of 180 credit points. Each subject offered by the school has a credit point rating, depending on the number of hours taught, total workload and subject type. 2. 60credit points obtained in First Year subjects. Of these, 12 are obtained in AHT100 Art History/Theory, 18 in DRA100 Drawing I and 15 in Studio Introduction and 15 in Studio Electives. 3. 60 credit points obtained in Second Year subjects. Of these, 6 are obtained in AHT200 Art History/Theory core, 6 in Art History/Theory electives, 12 in DRA200 Drawing, 26 in a Studio Major and 6 in Studio Electives and 4 in Studio Seminar. Details of subjects and electives can be found under the relevant entry in Subject Descriptions. 4. a Studio Major in one of the following: CER Ceramics PAI Painting PHO Photography PRI Printmaking SCU Sculpture 5. 60 credit points in Third Year subjects. 6 in AHT300 Art History/Theory core, 6 in Art History/Theory electives, 12 in DRA300 Drawing, 6 in Professional Studies and 30 in the Studio Major.

FIRST YEAR PROGRAM The first year of the program includes core and electives; students must complete Art History/Theory 1, Drawing I, Studio Introduction and three Studio Electives. The first year of the course is conceived as an introduction to a broad range of disciplines which provide a basis upon which students develop their interests. Students work across all the disciplines in Semester 1, learning via set projects which introduce them to the traditions of practice through the processes, techniques and knowledge of art making. In Semester 2 students elect three studio electives from the five major studio disciplines. Students are encouraged to select Semester 2 studio electives in the disciplines which they may consider as a Studio Major in second year. When Studio Major preferences are allocated, priority will be given to students who have completed a studio elective in Year 1 in the discipline chosen as a preference for a Studio Major in Year 2. Students are also given a thorough introduction to the core subjects of Art History/Theory and Drawing.

20


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 21

SECOND AND THIRD YEAR PROGRAM In the second year students select a Studio Major and two Studio Electives. The program is staff directed and structured to consolidate and develop skills introduced in Year 1. The year is project based, also providing opportunities for students to engage in individual work practice. Students complete core subjects Drawing and Art History/Theory and two electives in Art History/Theory. During Year 3 more emphasis is placed on supervised studio practice and some self directed learning. The program is organised to teach by example, under the guidance of individual lecturers where students work more autonomously in their studios. In structuring a program for second and third year, it is essential that students fulfil the requirements for a Studio Major in the studio discipline in which they are specialising. If students have any doubts, a member of staff from the relevant Department should be consulted before enrolling in second year. Students should try to complement their Studio Major and Studio electives and Art History/Theory electives to provide skills and perspectives, which will contribute to a broader and more critical approach to their special areas of interest. Members of staff may be able to recommend particular subjects, which will help in the direction students wish to take.

SECOND YEAR STUDIO ELECTIVE PROGRAM The Studio Elective Program offers a broad range of studio based subjects across the five studio disciplines of Ceramics, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture. The program responds to the increasingly broad range of student interests at a time in the BFA course when students are establishing studio discipline specialisation through the Studio Major program. The program provides learning opportunities for students seeking further specialisation in the field of their chosen Studio Major discipline, yet offers a flexibility that supports interdisciplinary study within the overall BFA program. The Studio Elective Program utilises the substantial professional and academic experience of National Art School staff, allowing them to teach specialised subject areas informed by their professional activity and research expertise.

21


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 22

BACHELOR OF FINE ART DEGREE STRUCTURE BFA DEGREE STRUCTURE CORE DRAWING Year 1 S1

DRA100 Drawing I (18CP) Life Drawing 3hpw General Drawing 3hpw Objective Drawing 3hpw

CORE ART HISTORY/THEORY AHT100 Art History and Theory I (12CP) 4hpw

S2

Year 2 S1

60 CP Studio Introduction Ceramics Studio Introduction Painting Studio Introduction Photography Studio Introduction Printmaking Studio Introduction Sculpture (3CP each) 12hpw for 3 weeks each Studio Elective 1A (5CP) Studio Elective 1B (5CP) Studio Elective 1C (5CP) 12hpw for 4 weeks each

Total 18CP

Total 12CP

Total 30CP

DRA200 Drawing II (12CP) Life Drawing 3hpw General Drawing 3hpw

AHT200 Art Elective 1 History and (3CP) Theory II 2hpw (6CP) 2hpw

Studio Major (26CP) 12hpw

60CP

Studio Seminar 1hpw (4CP)

Studio Elective 2A (3CP) 6hpw

Studio Elective 2B (3CP) 6hpw

Elective 2 (3CP) 2hpw

S2

Year 3 S1

STUDIO

Total 12CP

Total 12CP

Total 36CP

DRA300 Drawing III (12CP) Two Elective Drawing Strands 3hpw each

AHT300 Art History and Elective 3 (3CP) Theory III 2hpw (6CP) 2hpw

Studio Major (30CP) 12hpw

60CP

Elective 4 (3CP) 2hpw

S2

Total 12CP

Total 12CP

Professional Studies 2hpw

Professional Studies (6CP) 1hpw

Total 36CP Total Degree 180CP

22


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 23

BACHELOR OF FINE ART RESULT GRADES GRADE High Distinction

Distinction

Credit

Pass

Fail

Satisfactory

DESCRIPTION NOTATION An outstanding level of investigation of the visual/conceptual/technical ideas which inform the student’s folio, and a demonstrated ability to identify and develop strategies in HD the production of art works in imaginative and inventive ways which extend the parameters of the project or study program. The highest grade given only in exceptional circumstances. Demonstrated a very strong interest and commitment in the discipline and work has progressed to a very high DN standard in all aspects of the program of study. A high level of performance demonstrating a sustained level of investigation of the visual, technical and conceptual ideas which inform CR the student’s work. Good attendance and timely completion of all set tasks.

PERCENTAGE

85 – 100

75 – 84

65 – 74

A satisfactory level work with sufficient progress to justify a move to the next level of study. Satisfactory attendance PS and completion of all tasks in studio and assignments as requested.

50 – 64

Failure to demonstrate satisfactory achievement in a number of the FL essential criteria for passing the program.

0 – 49

Student has met defined criteria at an appropriate level within a specified SY time. Only used at mid year review.

23


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

Borderline

Unsatisfactory

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 24

Student has met some criteria at a satisfactory level within a specified time. Only used at mid year review. Has not met defined criteria at an appropriate level within a specified time. Only used at mid year review.

Deferred Result

Student has been given an extension to submit work for assessment due to exceptional circumstances

Withdrawn NoPenalty

Late withdrawal from subject

BL

UF

DR

WN

BACHELOR OF FINE ART HONOURS REQUIREMENTS BACHELOR OF FINE ART (HONOURS) 9857 The basic requirements for the year are: 1. 60 credit points obtained in Fourth Year subjects. Of these, 5 are obtained in AHT400 Honours Art History/Theory, 5 in STS400 Honours Studio Seminar and 50 in Honours Studio Major. 2. an Honours Studio Major in one of the following: CER Ceramics DRA Drawing (only available at Honours level) PAI Painting PHO Photography PRI Printmaking SCU Sculpture BACHELOR OF FINE ART HONOURS The Bachelor of Fine Art Honours program is a full time studio-based course, delivered by course work and comprising three interrelated subjects: a Studio Major component supported by the Studio Seminar and Art History and Theory subjects conducted over one academic year of 26 weeks divided into two semesters of 13 weeks each. The program is delivered on campus, where students are provided with individual studio facilities. The Bachelor of Fine Art Honours broad aim is to develop in students the level of ability and autonomy expected of a professional practitioner in the relevant field. This is achieved by providing opportunities to extend students abilities in the following areas: • Technical and conceptual skills • Aesthetic and critical judgement • Historical, contemporary and theoretical contexts relevant to their art practice • Studio practice and management of materials The program will qualify students to undertake postgraduate studies.

24


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 25

BACHELOR OF FINE ART (HONOURS) EDUCATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Local and International Applicants Admission to the National Art School is based on academic merit, portfolio and interview. Applicants are considered for admission on the basis of: • Australian and New Zealand tertiary qualifications in Fine Art, or • overseas tertiary qualifications in Fine Art considered equivalent to Australian studies, and • completion of a major in the intended Honours specialisation, and • a credit average in a fine art degree with a distinction or better in the third year of a studio major, or • an alternative entry scheme Applicants considering a Drawing Major must have either: • credit average in undergraduate studies in Drawing with a distinction in the third year of Drawing, or • credit average with a distinction in the third year of the studio major and a substantial portfolio of drawings where a separate Drawing mark was not awarded All applicants are evaluated on their ability in the visual arts and potential as professional artists. These qualities are evaluated by means of application, portfolio and interview. It is assumed that students are competent at communicating in both written and spoken English. ALTERNATIVE ENTRY In exceptional cases where applicants do not possess any of the qualifications outlined above they may apply for admission to the Bachelor of Fine Art Honours with: • completion of an undergraduate degree in another discipline, and • extensive professional experience in the arts APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS The Bachelor of Fine Art Honours application must include the following: 1. certified copies of academic transcripts 2. Statement of Intention for Student Initiated Studio Project 3. minimum of twelve recently completed works demonstrating applicant’s level of proficiency (CD in jpeg format, photographs, slides, sketchbooks and/or visual diaries) Applications are initially assessed by the Head of Department or nominee. Applications recommended for interview are selected on the basis of the Studio Project proposal and quality of portfolio. PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS Selection for the Bachelor of Fine Art Honours is competitive and based on a two stage selection process. All applicants selected for interview must bring a portfolio of work which should include: • minimum of twelve recently completed works (minimum of six original art works) • drawings, maquettes, sketches and visual diary • supporting material in the form of slides or CD in jpeg format • work relevant to the proposed studio major 25


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 26

International applicants located overseas at the time of interview must submit a folio of approximately 10 – 15 examples of their work in CD, slide or photographic format and must include a letter officially certified by the Registrar of the institution attended or a Justice of the Peace verifying the work of the applicant. INTERVIEW REQUIREMENTS At interview applicants will be assessed by the Admissions Panel including the Postgraduate Coordinator, relevant Head of Department and a specialist lecturer within the relevant studio major discipline. The applicant will be assessed on the following: • technical and conceptual skills as evidenced in the portfolio presented • aesthetic and critical judgement • historical, contemporary and theoretical understanding and relevancy to their art practice • proficiency in academic writing • ability to work autonomously using safe working practices

BACHELOR OF FINE ART HONOURS STRUCTURE BFA (HONS) DEGREE STRUCTURE CORE STUDIO SEMINAR

CORE ART HISTORY/THEORY

STUDIO

STS400 Studio Seminar (5CP) 2hpw

AHT400 Art History and Theory Honours (5CP) 2hpw

Honours Ceramics Major Honours Drawing Major Honours Painting Major Honours Photography Major Honours Printmaking Major Honours Sculpture Major (50CP each) 4hpw contact/self direction

Year 4

Total Degree 60CP

26


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 27

BACHELOR OF FINE ART HONOURS RESULT GRADES Grade Honours Class I

Honours Class II Division I

Honours Class II Division II

Honours Class III

Fail

Description An outstanding level of investigation of the visual, conceptual, technical ideas which inform the student’s folio, and a demonstrated ability to identify and develop strategies in the production of art works in imaginative and inventive ways which extend the parameters of the project or study program. The highest grade given only in exceptional circumstances. Demonstrated a very strong interest and commitment in the discipline and work has progressed to a very high standard in all aspects of the program of study. A high level of performance demonstrating a sustained level of investigation of the visual, technical and conceptual ideas which inform the student’s work. Good attendance and timely completion of all set tasks. A satisfactory level work with sufficient progress. Satisfactory attendance and completion of all tasks in studio and assignments as requested.

Notation

Percentage

HD

85 – 100

DN

75 – 84

CR

65 – 74

PS

50 – 64

Failure to demonstrate satisfactory FL achievement in a number of the essential criteria for passing the program.

0 – 49

27


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 28

BFA SUBJECT DESCRIPTIONS ART HISTORY AND THEORY As a core subject Art History and Theory is concerned with the teaching of Art History with relation to artistic practice in contemporary culture. This focus is maintained throughout the Department’s teaching. YEAR 1 AHT100 Art History and Theory I 12CP HPW4 S3 SUBJECT DESCRIPTION This foundation subject in art history provides students with an introduction to the history of art in the West from early Antiquity to the dawn of Modernism. Lectures and tutorials endeavour to explain the intellectual and aesthetic substance of successive styles by stressing the links between art, society and ideas in each period, and the complex play of influence, borrowing and criticism in the history of art. Learning Outcomes The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the essential concepts, skills and methodologies of the discipline of art history. Through the investigation and development of specific tutorial tasks and in preparation for their examinations, students are expected to develop the conceptual and critical skills required to support further study in the visual arts. Foundation lectures will include: • Antiquity: orientation and methodology, Mediterranean origins, Classical Greece, from the Hellenistic World to the Roman Empire, Greek and Roman architecture, early Christian & Byzantine, origins of Western Europe. • Middle Ages to Renaissance: Romanesque, Gothic, Trecento, Quattrocento Painting, the Flemish fifteenth century, Renaissance sculpture and architecture, High Renaissance, Venetian Renaissance, Northern Renaissance. • Early Modern Europe: Mannerism, printing & printmaking, women of the sixteenth century, the Counter-Renaissance, Carravaggio, the Carracci and their pupils, French seventeenth century, Baroque sculpture and architecture, Flemish and Spanish seventeenth century, Dutch seventeenth century, Enlightenment to French Revolution, Grand Tour, archaeology and Neoclassicism. • Romanticism: British Romanticism, German Romanticism, French Romanticism, Landscape Tradition and Romantic Landscape. Delivery Methods The first year subject is delivered as a 2 hour mass lecture and 2 hour group tutorials.

28


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 29

ASSESSMENT ASSESSMENT TYPE

WHEN ASSESSED

WEIGHTING

Tutorial paper

Throughout the year

20%

Class mark / participation in class discussions

Throughout the year

10%

Mid-year exam (slide test 20% diagram 5% and glossary 5%)

Week 15

30%

Final exam (slide test 20%, two short essays comparing pairs of images 20%)

Week 27

40%

Textbooks Honour H. & Fleming J. World History of Art (6th ed.), Laurence King, London, 2002 Note: the textbook is supplemented by numerous readings and documents supplied by lecturers in tutorials. YEAR 2 AHT200 Art History and Theory II 6CP HPW2 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description This subject forms the second part of the core Art History and Theory strand and constitutes a thorough introduction to the history of Modernism, providing second year students with an introduction to the history of art from the dawn of Modernism to Pop and Post-Modernist art. Lectures and tutorials seek to explain the intellectual and aesthetic substance of successive styles by stressing the links between art and society in each period, and the complex play of influence, critical ideas and borrowing from other cultures throughout the history of Modernism. Topics include: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Realism (Courbet Millet, Daumier and Manet) Barbizon and Impressionism Post-impressionism (Monet & Degas) Post Impressionism (Van Gogh, Gauguin, Toulouse-Lautrec, Seurat) The Symbolists and the Nabis Paul Cézanne and Auguste Rodin The Fauves and Henri Matisse Analytical Cubism (Picasso, Braque, Gris, Léger and Gleize). Futurism and Pittura metafisica Vienna & Early Expressionism Dada & Surrealism Abstraction (Kandinsky, Malevich and Klee)

29


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

• • • • • • • • • • • •

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 30

Synthetic cubism, Suprematism, Constructivism The Bauhaus: art, architecture & design The Moving Image (the emergence of cinema) German Expressionism and anti-fascist art European post-war art, Surrealism American post-war painting Jasper Johns and Robert Raushenberg Pop art Postwar sculpture Environmental art, installation & performance Conceptualism and minimalism Postmodernism: the end of art history?

Learning Outcomes The subject is intended to introduce students to a more discursive presentation of art historical topics through critical investigation of specific topics and interpretation of works of art. Students are expected to develop a conceptual grasp of Modernism as a movement and the critical skills required for further study of the visual arts. Delivery Methods The second year subject is delivered as a 2 hour class lecture. Assessment ASSESSMENT TYPE Class mark, based on tutorial paper Class examination including an essay on a short list of prescribed topics + slide test (two from a shortlist of twenty-five plus three others)

WHEN ASSESSED

WEIGHTING

Throughout the year

50%

Week 27

50%

Textbooks Honour, Hugh and John Fleming. A World History of Art. 7th Edition. London: Laurence King, 2005. A reader and recommended reading list is available from the Department.

30


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 31

YEAR 3 AHT300 Art History and Theory III S1 (Contemporary Art ) S2 (Australian Art) 6CP HPW2 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 2 Semester 1: Contemporary Art Subject Description Forming the first part of the third year core Art History and Theory program, this subject is geared towards enabling students to acquire a general familiarity with the concepts, terminology, debates and works that are shaping contemporary art and culture. It introduces students to the cultural environment within which contemporary art is made, promoted, sold, collected and discussed. Topics may include: • Pop Art • The development of Minimalism • The development of Conceptualism • Communication and the Net: the changing status of the image • Globalisation as a socio-political reality and its consequences for the visual arts • Regionalism/Internationalism of the art world • The Art Market: art and money • Audiences for Art: the politics of the museum • Magazine culture and art criticism today • Hybridity as a Post-Modern Canon: art across traditional boundaries and genres • Contemporary relevance of traditional media in mass-media bound society • Towards an ecology of practice Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: • Effectively identify, describe and analyse the intellectual, aesthetic and socio-political elements of the environment of ‘contemporary art’, using appropriate terminology • Demonstrate knowledge of the most significant works and individual movements during the last thirty years • Think analytically and historically about their socio-cultural environment, and articulate the rationale of their own work with reference to this broader context • Demonstrate highly developed skills in presenting a coherent argument, evaluating and organising information and ideas from a variety of sources and referencing sources where applicable

31


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 32

Delivery Methods 2 hours per week consisting of: • 1 hour formal lecture • 1 hour tutorial • 4 gallery visits over the course of the year Readings Harrison, Charles and Paul Wood, eds. Art in theory, 1900-2000: an Anthology of Changing Ideas. Malden: Blackwell, 2003. A full list of recommended texts is available from the Department. Semester 2: Australian art Subject Description Forming the second part of the third year core Art History and Theory program, the aim of this subject is to provide students with an introduction to the history of European art in Australia, from the beginning of colonisation to the contemporary period. It reviews the successive phases of Australian art in relation to the evolution of colonial and post-colonial society, with particular reference to the challenges of adapting to the new (and, to Europeans, foreign) environment of the Australian continent. Topics may include : • Conceptions of Australia before Cook • The art of discovery and exploration • Images of the Aborigines • Early Colonial Art: the Port Jackson painter • Colonial Art: John Glover, Conrad Martens • High Colonial: Von Guerard, Chevalier • Transition to Heidelberg: Louis Buvelot • Heidelberg: Tom Roberts • Heidelberg: Arthur Streeton, Charles Conder • Late Heidelberg and its successors • Early Modernism: Grace Cossington Smith • Australian Academy, Contemporary Art Society • Angry Penguins: Sidney Nolan, Albert Tucker • Arthur Boyd • Russell Drysdale • The Antipodeans and abstraction • Ian Fairweather • Fred Williams • Australian variants of pop art • Conceptualism and Minimalism • Post-Modernism

32


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 33

Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: • Describe the main periods and themes of Australian art history using appropriate terminology • Evaluate relevant works from critical and historical perspectives and effectively articulate their understandings • Explain why certain works of art and artistic movements have acquired their particular significance and how they have influenced the development of Australian selfconsciousness • Explain the play of influences within the Australian tradition, demonstrating highly developed skills in presenting a coherent argument, evaluating and organising information and ideas from a variety of sources and referencing sources where applicable Delivery Methods 2 hours per week consisting of: • 1 hour formal lecture • 1 hour tutorial • 4 gallery visits over the course of the year Readings Allen, Christopher. Art in Australia from Colonization to Post-Modernism. London: Thames and Hudson, 1997. Smith, Bernard. Australian Painting, 1788-2000. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press, 2001. A full list of recommended texts is available from the Department. Assessment ASSESSMENT TYPE Semester 1: Class mark, based on tutorial paper Semester 1: Class examination including an essay on a short list of prescribed topics + slide test (two from a shortlist of fifteen plus three others) Semester 2: Class mark, based on tutorial paper Semester 2: Class examination including an essay on a short list of prescribed topics + slide test (two from a shortlist of fifteen plus three others)

WHEN ASSESSED

WEIGHTING

Throughout the year

25%

Week 15

25%

Throughout the semester

25%

Week 27

25%

33


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 34

HONOURS AHT400 Honours Art History and Theory 5CP HPW2 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of BFA with a credit average and enrolment in the Bachelor of Fine Art Honours program. Corequisite/s: STS400 and an Honours Studio Major Subject Description The aim of this subject is to present the foundational theories and critical debates informing contemporary art practices. The Art History and Theory core will deal with the following: • The criticism of modernism: post-modernism and contemporary art • aspects of the Enlightenment project of modernity through discussion of the following: • the autonomous subject as a source of meaning, authenticity, and authority (the artist as hero) • the teleological approach to history • universalising grand narratives • the distinction between high and low culture • the depth model and its binary oppositions i.e. essence versus appearance, latent versus manifest content and authenticity versus bad faith • the dependency of thought, reason and observation on language as a structural, mediating system and not as the acts of a pure, non-material consciousness with direct access to reality • the alienation of the subject being replaced by a sense of free-floating and impersonal fragmentation often interpreted as signifying a death of the subject and the end of individualism • art practices reflecting the disappearance of creative subjects, • the recycling of images and forms, pastiches and palimpsest. • the description of culture as an endless play of simulacra (simulation) which signal the end of authenticity, originality or even reality and the emergence of a hyper-reality • the critique of Modernism also taking the form of a challenge to the norms and values of western culture as a whole [Feminism and Postcolonialism] • the challenge of the new media and the changing status of the image in the Contemporary world Learning Outcomes Students will be expected to: • To understand the shift from Modernist to the Post-Modernist (Post Internet) art practices and values.

34


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:37 PM

Page 35

• To acquire a general familiarity with the conceptual frameworks and debates that shape contemporary art. • To understand artistic practices as cultural activities: social forces never fail to inform the practice of art. • To increase one’s ability to engage critically and imaginatively with cultural discourse and objects. Delivery Methods The Honours subject is delivered as a 2 hour class lecture. Assessment Dates Week 26 Assessment Requirements Assessment will be based on: • A short essay (2000 - 3000 words) written in response to a list of topics - 50% • Class presentation and tutorial papers - 50% Textbooks Harrison & Wood. Art in Theory 1900-2000, Blackwell Publishers Oxford, 2001.

35


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 36

Electives offered in 2010 Semester 1 SUBJECT CODE

SUBJECT NAME

DAY/TIME

LOCATION

Thurs 6 – 8 pm

Seminar Rm

AHT210

Aesthetics I

AHT212

Renaissance Art

Tues 6 – 8 pm

Red Theatre

AHT213

The Golden Age of Painting

Thurs 6 – 8 pm

Black Theatre

AHT217

Indigenous Art

Tues 6 – 8 pm

Black Theatre

AHT219

Asian Art I

Wed 6 – 8pm

Red Theatre

AHT254

History of Portraiture

Tues 6 – 8 pm

Seminar Rm

AHT229

The Mechanical Image

Wed 6 -8 pm

Black Theatre

AHT253

Theories of Colour

Th 6 -8pm

Red Theatre

AHT256

Art, Music and Text

Th 6 - 8pm

Seminar Room

Semester 2 SUBJECT CODE

36

DAY/TIME

LOCATION

AHT218

SUBJECT NAME Aboriginal Art

Tues 6 – 8 pm

Black Theatre

AHT220

Asian Art II

Thurs 6 – 8 pm

Seminar Rm

AHT221

Architecture

Thurs 6 – 8 pm

Black Theatre

AHT223

Gender & Sexuality

Tues 6 -8 pm

Red Theatre

AHT226

Sculpture: from Figure to Assemblage

Wed 6 – 8 pm

Red Theatre

AHT249

Art in Society

Wed 6 -8 pm

Black Theatre

AHT255

Craft and Art

Tu 6 - 8pm

Seminar Rm

AHT257

Material Cultures

Th 6 -8pm

Red Theatre

AHT211

Aesthetics II

Wed 6-8pm

Seminar Rm


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 37

Second and Third Year Electives Assessment Method for all electives: A 2000 word essay or equivalent (e.g., slide exams, + 1500 words essay) Delivery Method 2 hour class lectures The course will consist of formal lectures, seminars and class discussions. Invited lecturers will speak on specialist topics

SEMESTER 1 2010 AHT210 Aesthetics I 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (We. 6-8 pm, S1, Seminar Rm) Introduction to the philosophy of art part one from Plato to Kant. AHT212 Renaissance Art 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Tues. 6-8 pm, S1, Red Theatre) A study of the images, objects and architecture of the Renaissance and how they function within their historical, social, philosophical and political contexts. AHT213 The Golden Age of Painting 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Th. 6-8 pm, S1, Black Theatre) The great masters of painting in seventeenth-century individually considered. AHT 217 Indigenous Art 3CP HPW S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Tues. 6-8 pm, S1, Black Theatre) Introduction to tribal cultures around the world and the Pre-Columbian civilizations of America.

37


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 38

AHT 219 Asian Art I 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (AP, Wed. 6-8 pm, S1, Red Theatre) Introduction to the arts of India and the Islamic world. AHT 229 The Mechanical Image 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Wed. 6-8 pm, S1, Black Theatre) An introduction to the history of photographic, cinematic and digital images. AHT252 History of Portraiture 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Tues. 6-8 pm, S1, Seminar Rm) Looking at the conventions of portraiture and studying the transformation of the genre over the centuries up to the present. AHT253 Theories of Colour 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Staff Contact: Dr David Briggs (Th. 6-8 pm, S1, Red Theatre) The theory and practice of colour from antiquity to the present day. AHT256 Art, Music and Text 3CP HPW2 S1 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Th. 6-8 pm, S1, Seminar Rm) The relationship of art, music and text.

38


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 39

SEMESTER II 2010 AHT211 Aesthetics II 3CP HPW2 S2 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (We. 6-8 pm, S2, Seminar Rm) Introduction to the philosophy of art part two, Kant, Hegel and modern aesthetics. AHT 218 Aboriginal Art 3CP HPW2 S2 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Tues. 6-8 pm, S2, Black Theatre) Introduction to the culture and art of the Aboriginal peoples of Australia. AHT 220 Asian Art II Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Th. 6-8 pm, S2, Seminar Rm) An introduction to the arts of China and Japan. AHT 221 Architecture 3C HPW2 S2 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Thurs. 6-8 pm, S2, Black Theatre) The art of building and urbanism from antiquity to the present. AHT 223 Gender and Sexuality in Art 3CP HPW2 S2 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Tues. 6-8, S2, Red Theatre) Sexuality and sexual identity in the history of art and in the contemporary world. AHT 226 Sculpture: from Figure to Assemblage 3CP HPW S2 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Wed. 6-8 pm, S2, Red Theatre) Introduction to history and techniques of sculpture.

39


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 40

AHT 249 Art in Society 3CP HPW S2 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Wed. 6-8 pm, S2, Black Theatre) Introduction to sociological perspectives on art and culture. AHT255 Craft and Art Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year (Tu. 6-8 pm, S2, Seminar Room) The role of craft in the creation of the contemporary art object. AHT257 Material Cultures Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 (Th. 6-8 pm, S2, Red Theatre) This elective explores structures of art production and display from the Renaissance to the 20th Century to establish aesthetic and ideological links between traditional objects of art historical inquiry (painting, architecture and sculpture) and various neglected but historically significant forms of material culture, including tapestry and weaving, ceramics (earthenware, stoneware, and porcelain), furniture and furnishings, interior design, industrial and functional objects, jewellery, and the more indefinite object d’art, to suggest that we must take a comprehensive view of the objects produced in any single epoch, to truly understand the visual culture of a given period.

40


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 41

CERAMICS To work creatively with clay is to combine the human experience with the elements of earth, fire and water. The hands on emphasis in the course provides students an opportunity to develop and express their individual creativity through a wide range of individual studio skills and related technologies. The course is project based and investigates the history of ceramics and its traditions, and is underpinned by an essential engagement with drawing that ensures the development of critical dialogue with contemporary relevance. The Ceramics Department is one of he best equipped in Australia providing an excellent environment in which to develop an engagement with the ceramic arts. The Practical nature of the course extends beyond the campus with field trips, gallery and museum visits, and is intended to enrich the students understanding of the ceramic medium. Please see the end of the Ceramics entry for OH&S policy and manual for all subjects YEAR 1 CER100 Studio Introduction Ceramics 3CP HPW12 for 3 weeks S1 Subject Objectives and Criteria for assessment identify and translate the historical use of hand built construction techniques into contemporary studio practice • investigate the conceptual relevance of surface qualities inherent in low temperature glaze and firing technology • construct, assemble and alter coils to articulate complex form and volume • engage in discussion of their art work and that of their peers • undertake technical and performance tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice in accordance with acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to ceramics studio Submit for assessment: all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed • a brief oral presentation that describes the history and conventions of the practices studied • support work including relevant working proofs sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials • a journal that evidences relevant aspects of related research into the ceramic processes and conceptual development of projects undertaken throughout the academic year Pass Requirements: Completion of all projects, attendance and participation in class critiques and tutorials.

41


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 42

CER120 Studio Elective Ceramics 5CP HPW12 for 4 weeks S2 Prerequisite/s: CER100, PAI100, PHO100, PRI100, SCU100 Corequisite/s: AHT100, DRA100 Subject Objectives and Criteria for assessment • develop and realise a series of related objects using pinch, coil, slab and wheel thrown components that explore structure and scale to articulate complex form and surfaces • describe and compare the historical and contemporary perspectives that underscore wheel thrown ceramics • identify the techniques that underscore the formation of wheel thrown ceramics • identify the plastic qualities of clay prepared for use on the wheel • investigate the creative potential of surface and form, tension, colour etc resulting from high temperature techniques and technology • engage in the critical analysis of their artwork and that of their peers to consolidate the conceptual and technical developments encountered in the projects • undertake all technical and performance tasks to contemporary standards of professional practice in accordance with acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the Ceramics studio Submit for assessment: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed • a brief oral presentation that describes the history and conventions of the practices studied • support work including relevant working proofs sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials • a journal that evidences relevant aspects of related research into the ceramic processes and conceptual development of projects undertaken throughout the academic year Pass Requirements: Completion of all projects, attendance and participation in class critiques and tutorials. . Tools required A basic tool kit is essential. All students must have their own pottery tools. Tools are available from a variety of pottery suppliers (see list in the Ceramics Department for addresses) It is suggested students have an apron and a towel or overalls. Recommended Reading List Andrews, Tim. Raku: A Review of Contemporary Work. London: A. & C. Black, 1994. Blackie, Sebastian. Dear Mr Leach: Some Thoughts on Ceramics. London: A. & C. Black, 2004.

42


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 43

Charleston, Robert J., ed. World Ceramics: an Illustrated History. London: Hamlyn, 1968. Clark, Garth. The Mad Potter of Biloxi: the Art & Life of George E. Ohr. NewYork: Abbeville Press 1989. Clark, Garth. The Potter’s Art: a complete history of pottery in Britain. London: Phaidon, 2003. Cosentino Peter. The Encyclopedia of Pottery Techniques. East Roseville, N.S.W.: Simon & Schuster, 1996. De Waal, Edmund. Ceramics. London: New Holland, 2003. Del Vecchio, Mark. Post-Modern Ceramics. London: Thames and Hudson, 2001. Hamer, Frank and Janet Hamer. The Potter’s Dictionary of Materials and Techniques. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1997. Ostermann, Matthias. The Ceramic Surface. London: A. & C. Black, 2002. Reijnders, Anton. The Ceramic Process: a Manual and Source of Inspiration for Ceramic Art and Design. London: A. & C. Black, 2005. Rogers, Phil. Throwing Pots. London: A. & C. Black, 2007. Journals Ceramics Art and Perception Ceramics Review The Journal of Australian ceramics Ceramics Monthly CER200 Ceramics Major II 26CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1, CER120 Corequisite/s: DRA200 Subject Objectives and Criteria for assessment • identify and describe the historical and contemporary industrial perspectives that underscore an individual ceramic practice • identify, describe and record technical research methodologies relevant to project development • develop and realise a series of related objects using hand built and wheel thrown components that explore large scale form and structure to articulate complex form and surfaces • engage in the analysis of individual work and that of peers • undertake all contemporary standards of professional studio practice and Occupational Health and Safety relevant to the ceramics studio Assessment (Mid year review) At mid year a formal review of all work undertaken in Semester 1 is conducted. Students are advised of their progress, through the use of progress indicators, ‘satisfactory’, ’unsatisfactory’. Students are provided the opportunity to gain feedback from the Review Panel at the completion of the review. Panel comments are recorded on a Mid Year

43


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 44

Evaluation form. Students are provided with a copy of the form and acknowledge their mid year evaluation by reading and signing the form. End of Year Assessment Students are required to submit: • a comprehensive selection of finished fired work produced for each project including any self-directed work completed throughout the year. In the case of large works, a comprehensive visual record documenting the development and realisation of the work is acceptable • a journal that evidences all aspects of related research into the ceramic processes and conceptual development of projects undertaken throughout the academic year. Recommended Reading Blandino, Betty. Coiled Pottery: Traditional and Contemporary Ways. Krause Publications, 2004. Clark, Garth. Shards: Garth Clark on Ceramic Art. New York: Ceramic Arts Foundation, 2003. Clark, Garth. The Potter’s Art: a complete history of pottery in Britain. London: Phaidon, 2003. Colclough, John. Mould Making. London: G+B Arts International Ltd. by arrangement with A. & C. Black, 1999. Currie, Ian. Revealing Glazes: using the grid method. Maryvale Qld: Bootstrap Press, 2000. Currie, Ian. Stoneware Glazes: a systematic approach. Maryvale Qld: Bootstrap Press, 1985. Daly, Greg. Glazes and Glazing Techniques: a Glaze Journey. Kenthurst, NSW: Kangaroo Press, 1995. Dormer, Peter. The Art of the Maker. London: Thames and Hudson, 1994. Eden, Michael and Victoria Eden. Slipware: Contemporary Approaches. London: A. & C. Black, 1999. Freyberg, Annabel. Ceramics for the Home. London: Laurence King, 1999. Hanaor, Ziggy, ed. Breaking the Mould: new approaches to ceramics. London: Black Dog, 2007. Gregory, Ian. Kiln Building. Tortola: G+B Arts International, 1995. Lou, Nils. The Art of Firing. London: G+B International, 1998. McMeekin, Ivan. Notes for Potters in Australia: raw materials and clay bodies. Kensington, N.S.W : New South Wales University Press, 1985. Ostermann, Matthias. The Ceramic Surface. London: A. & C. Black, 2002. Peterson, Susan. The Craft and Art of Clay: a Complete Potter's Handbook. London: Laurence King, 2003. Peterson, Susan. Pottery by American Indian Women: the legacy of generations. New York: Abbeville Press, 1998. Peterson, Susan. Working With Clay. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2002. Rogers, Phil. Throwing Pots. London: A. & C. Black, 2007. . Journals Ceramics Art and Perception (Aust) Ceramics Technical (Aust)

44


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 45

Ceramic Review (UK) Australian Ceramics: the Journal of Pottery in Australia (Aust) Ceramics Monthly (USA) Craft Arts International (Aust) Crafts (UK) Studio Potter (USA) SECOND YEAR STUDIO ELECTIVES CER218 Art on the Table: The Mad Hatters Tea Party 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 1 - 9) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Objectives and Criteria for assessment • develop and realise visual ideas that engage with the aesthetics of ceramics as part of celebration • demonstrate awareness of the history and traditions associated with food, function and ceremony • demonstrate technical skill in creating works • engage in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers • undertake all work to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the ceramics studio Assessment (Monitoring of Progress) Student progress is monitored through sequenced and regular individual and group critiques, organised and directed by studio lecturers throughout the duration of the subject. (Final assessment) Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal that evidences relevant aspects of related research into the ceramic processes and conceptual development of projects undertaken throughout the academic yearr Learning resources Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts, for every process area and thematic project studied. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data..

45


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 46

Recommended Reading Bruce, Susan. The Art of Handbuilt Ceramics. Marlborough: Crowood Press, 2000. Del Vecchio, Mark. Post-Modern Ceramics. London: Thames and Hudson, 2001. Freyberg, Annabel: Ceramics for the Home. Laurence King Publishing, 1999. Hamer, Frank and Janet Hamer. The Potter’s Dictionary of Materials and Techniques. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1997. Hanaor, Ziggy, ed. Breaking the Mould: new approaches to ceramics. London: Black Dog, 2007. Margetts, M & Britton A. The Raw and the Cooked: New Work in Clay in Britain. Hyperion Books. 1993 Malone, Kate and Lesley Jackson. Kate Malone: a Book of Pots. Woodstock, NY: Overlook Press, 2003. Reijnders, Anton. The Ceramic Process: a Manual and Source of Inspiration for Ceramic Art and Design. London: A. & C. Black, 2005. Journals Ceramics Art and Perception (Aust) Ceramics Technical (Aust) Ceramic Review (UK) The Journal of Australian Ceramics: Pottery in Australia (Aust) Object Magazine (Aust) Ceramics Monthly (USA) American Ceramics (USA) Craft Arts International (Aust) Crafts (UK) Studio Potter (USA) CER 213 Pots with Purpose: Wheel Thrown Ceramics 3CP HPW6 S2 (Weeks 10 - 17) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Objectives and Criteria for assessment • describe and compare the historical origin, function and principle characteristics of thrown ceramics • demonstrate technical competence in wheel forming and finishing techniques • develop and realise visual ideas through the use of the wheel forming process • engage in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers • undertake all work to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to ceramics. Assessment (Monitoring of Progress) Student progress is monitored through sequenced and regular individual and group critiques, organised and directed by studio lecturers throughout the duration of the subject.

46


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 47

(Final assessment) Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal that evidences relevant aspects of related research into the ceramic processes and conceptual development of projects undertaken throughout the academic year Learning resources Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts, for every process area and thematic project studied. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data. Recommended Reading Clark, Garth. The Mad Potter of Biloxi: the Art & Life of George E. Ohr. NewYork: Abbeville Press 1989. Daly, Greg. Glazes and Glazing Techniques: a Glaze Journey. Kenthurst, NSW: Kangaroo Press, 1995. Freyberg, Annabel. Ceramics for the Home. London: Laurence King, 1999. Hamer, Frank and Janet Hamer. The Potter’s Dictionary of Materials and Techniques. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1997. Hanaor, Ziggy, ed. Breaking the Mould: new approaches to ceramics. London: Black Dog, 2007. Ostermann, Matthias. The Ceramic Surface. London: A. & C. Black, 2002. Reijnders, Anton. The Ceramic Process: a Manual and Source of Inspiration for Ceramic Art and Design. London: A. & C. Black, 2005. Rogers, Phil. Throwing Pots. London: A. & C. Black, 2007. Journals Ceramics Art and Perception (Aust) Ceramics Technical (Aust) Ceramic Review (UK) The Journal of Australian Ceramics: Pottery in Australia (Aust) Object Magazine (Aust) Ceramics Monthly (USA) American Ceramics (USA) Craft Arts International (Aust) Crafts (UK) Studio Potter (USA)

47


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 48

CER 214 Raku: Low Temperature Ceramics 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 18 - 27) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Objectives and Criteria for assessment • demonstrate technical competence in forming, construction techniques specific to the Raku process • describe and compare the historical origin, function and principle characteristics of the Raku process. • develop and realise visual ideas through the use of Raku firing techniques • engage in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers • undertake all work to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to ceramics. Assessment (Monitoring of Progress) Student progress is monitored through sequenced and regular individual and group critiques, organized and directed by studio lecturers throughout the duration of the subject. (Final assessment) Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal that evidences relevant aspects of related research into the ceramic processes and conceptual development of projects undertaken throughout the academic year Learning Resources Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts, for every process area and thematic project studied. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data. Recommended Reading Andrews, Tim. Raku: A Review of Contemporary Work. London: A. & C. Black, 1994. Jones, David. Raku: Investigations into Fire. Marlborough: Crowood Press, 2003. Ostermann, Matthias. The Ceramic Surface. London: A. & C. Black, 2002. Perryman, Jane. Naked Clay: Ceramics Without Glaze. London: A. & C. Black, 2004. Perryman, Jane. Smoke-fired Pottery. Tortola, BVI : Gordon and Breach International, 1995. Reijnders, Anton. The Ceramic Process: a Manual and Source of Inspiration for Ceramic Art and Design. London: A. & C. Black, 2005.

48


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 49

Journals Ceramics Art and Perception (Aust) Ceramics Technical (Aust) Ceramic Review (UK) The Journal of Australian Ceramics: Pottery in Australia (Aust) Object Magazine (Aust) Ceramics Monthly (USA) American Ceramics (USA) Craft Arts International (Aust) Crafts (UK) Studio Potter (USA) CER300 Ceramics Major III 30CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: AHT200, CER200, DRA200, 6CP in electives Corequisite/s: DRA300 Subject Objectives and Criteria for assessment • conceive, develop and realise visual ideas using a variety of ceramic processes in response to individual enquiry • demonstrate technical and conceptual accomplishment using the ceramic process • identify and describe the history, conventions, ethics, materials, and processes of the ceramic discipline • locate and evaluate their work within a broader historical and cultural framework • locate their individual practice within the studio conventions and protocols of the ceramics discipline • document the technical, conceptual and aesthetic development of the chosen area of individual investigation • undertake all prescribed technical and performance tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice in accordance with acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the ceramic studio Assessment (Mid year review) At mid year a formal review of all work undertaken in Semester 1 is conducted. Students are advised of their progress, through the use of progress indicators, ‘satisfactory’, ’unsatisfactory’. Students are provided the opportunity to gain feedback from the Review Panel at the completion of the review and Panel comments are recorded on a Mid Year Evaluation form. Students are provided with a copy of the form and acknowledge their mid year evaluation by reading and signing the form.

49


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 50

(Final assessment) Students are required to submit: • a comprehensive selection of finished fired work produced for each project including any self-directed work completed throughout the year. In the case of large works, a comprehensive visual record documenting the development and realisation of the work is acceptable • an associated written paper that will serve to discuss and contextualise the work presented in the final assessment • a journal that evidences relevant aspects of related research into the ceramic processes and conceptual development of projects undertaken throughout the academic year • any set writing tasks from the Professional Studies component • visual documentation of major works produced as part of the Studio Major Project Recommended Reading Charleston, Robert J., ed. World Ceramics: an Illustrated History. London: Hamlyn, 1968. Clark, Garth, ed. Ceramic Millennium: Critical Writings on Ceramic History, Theory, and Art. Hallifax: Press of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 2006. Clark, Garth. Shards: Garth Clark on Ceramic Art. New York: Ceramic Arts Foundation, 2003. Clark, Garth. The Potter’s Art: a complete history of pottery in Britain. London: Phaidon, 2003. Currie, Ian. Revealing Glazes: using the grid method. Maryvale Qld: Bootstrap Press, 2000. Currie, Ian. Stoneware Glazes: a systematic approach. Maryvale Qld: Bootstrap Press, 1985. Del Vecchio, Mark. Post-Modern Ceramics. London: Thames and Hudson, 2001. Dormer, Peter. The Art of the Maker. London: Thames and Hudson, 1994. Freyberg, Annabel. Ceramics for the Home. London: Laurence King, 1999. Hamer, Frank and Janet Hamer. The Potter’s Dictionary of Materials and Techniques. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, 1997. Hanaor, Ziggy, ed. Breaking the Mould: new approaches to ceramics. London: Black Dog, 2007. Gregory, Ian. Kiln Building. Tortola: G+B Arts International, 1995. Lou, Nils. The Art of Firing. London: G+B International, 1998. Malone, Kate and Lesley Jackson. Kate Malone: a Book of Pots. Woodstock, NY: Overlook Press, 2003. McMeekin, Ivan. Notes for Potters in Australia: raw materials and clay bodies. Kensington, N.S.W : New South Wales University Press, 1985. Olsen, Frederick L. The Kiln Book: Materials, Specifications, and Construction. Iola, WI: Krause Publications, 2001. Ostermann, Matthias. The New Maiolica: Contemporary Approaches to Colour and Technique. North Ryde, NSW: G + B Arts International, by arrangement with A. & C. Black, 1999. Ostermann, Matthias. The Ceramic Surface. London: A. & C. Black, 2002. Ostermann, Matthias. The Ceramic Narrative. London: A. & C. Black, 2006. Perryman, Jane. Naked Clay: Ceramics Without Glaze. London: A. & C. Black, 2004.

50


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 51

Perryman, Jane. Smoke-fired Pottery. Tortola, BVI : Gordon and Breach International, 1995. Perryman, Jane. Traditional Pottery of India. London: A. & C. Black, 2000. Peterson, Susan. Jun Kaneko. London: Laurence King, 2001. Peterson, Susan. The Craft and Art of Clay: a Complete Potter's Handbook. London: Laurence King, 2003. Peterson, Susan. Working With Clay. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2002. Reijnders, Anton. The Ceramic Process: a Manual and Source of Inspiration for Ceramic Art and Design. London: A. & C. Black, 2005. Rogers, Phil. Throwing Pots. London: A. & C. Black, 2007. Waller, Jane. Colour in Clay. Marlborough, Wilt.: Crowood Press, 1998..

51


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 52

HONOURS LEVEL Students considering studying for Honours in the Department of Ceramics should, if possible, consult the Subject Leader by the end of third year of study to discuss the possibility of a fourth year. It is, however, possible to move to Honours at a later stage (maximum of 4 years after the completion of the BFA), and students wishing to do so should contact the School and submit an application. CER400 Honours Ceramics Major 50CP HPW4 S3 Prerequisite/s/s: Completion of BFA with a credit average and a Distinction grade in the final year of Ceramics Studio Major Corequisite/s: STS400, AHT400 This Course provides students with the opportunity to further their creative and speculative capacities, and establish the skills necessary for autonomous practice and postgraduate study. Individual Student Project Proposals form the basis for self-directed study with staff guidance. LECTURING STAFF Merran Esson HOD Bldg 24 merran.esson@det.nsw.edu.au Sessional Staff Stephen Bird Kwi Rak Choung Don Court Simone Fraser Won Soek Kim Bronwyn Kemp Sandy Lockwood Tania Rollond Linda Seiffert CERAMICS DEPARTMENT ENVIRONMENT POLICY

The Ceramics Department is committed to a safe, healthy environment. The department has a plan that will encourage the active participation of staff, students, contractors and service providers to respond and be aware of environmental issues within the department. Thus, in a spirit of partnership with students and staff, the department will oversee and commit to the: • Reduction of airborne pollution (noxious fumes and dust) • Responsible care of hazardous materials • Responsible general waste disposal • Reduction of water and energy wastage • Maintenance and care of equipment

52


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 53

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE POLICY Reduction of airborne pollution: • Exhaust fans to be used at all times when kilns are in use. • Exhaust fan must be switched on when spray booth is in use. • Exhaust fans must be switched on when the glaze laboratory is in use. • No heavy or extended reduction of gas or wood kilns. • No foreign matter to be inserted into the kilns for reduction. • No salt to be used in firings, glazes or clay bodies (toxic fumes) • No soda ash to be used (foul-smelling fumes) • Regular maintenance of dust prone areas with water: • Students must wash all workbenches after use. • Glaze room must be hosed down each day. • Individual student studios and general studios (wheel room and handbuilding room) to be kept clean at all times. (See workshop manual, OH&S section, on dust prevention) Care of hazardous materials • Store all ingredients in airtight containers. • Label all containers with specific ingredient and level of hazard • Proper disposal and handling (see EPA and OH&S guidelines) of glaze materials. Should not be placed in general rubbish. • Use sinks with properly rated traps General waste disposal • Skips used for disposal of non hazardous materials Reduction of energy and water wastage: • Fire kilns efficiently using a minimum of fuel /energy. • Report any gas leakage or fumes. • Proper water management. Report leaking taps. Maintenance and care of equipment: • Regular maintenance and checks, by authorized personnel, of exhaust fans, kilns and equipment will help to keep the ceramic environment clean and healthy. • Regular cleaning and maintenance of traps. What impact will these implementations have on the Ceramics Department? • A clean environment both inside and outside the campus will encourage a positive attitude from staff and students. • More savings on fuel/energy with efficient firings • Safer environment as students to take an active role in reporting problems re inefficient kilns and generally caring for the department • Being aware of their environment is important for student education. • A good, sound and effective environmental policy will not only create healthy environs but will be cost effective over time.

53


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 54

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (O H & S) GUIDELINES Ceramics Department All students within the NAS Ceramics Department are required to observe safe studio and workshop practice and acknowledge the principles of Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S): • If you have an existing medical condition or a disability or you are taking prescribed medication that may effect your ability to use studio equipment/materials please notify the lecturer in charge or Head of Public Programs. • Appropriate clothing must be worn at all times in the studio area including sturdy closed footwear, no loose clothing, long hair tied back. • Appropriate protective clothing must be worn in the studio including protective apron, solvent proof gloves, dust mask/respirator, protective eyewear, ear protection. • Accidents, injuries and near misses must be reported immediately to the lecturer in charge or the Head of Public Programs. • Do not use the studio equipment/materials if you are under the effect of alcohol or any illegal drugs. • Familiarise yourself with the studio in case of emergency, eg location of first aid kits, exits, fire extinguisher, fire blankets, safety shower etc. • The consumption of food, beverages and cigarettes is prohibited in the studio area. • The use of mobile phones and personal stereos is prohibited in the studio area. • Please comply with any staff request regarding health and safety. • Do not use tools or equipment that you have not been instructed to use. Do not help yourself to tools, equipment or materials unless instructed by lecturer. • Do not interfere with other students kilns without permission. • Remove all dust at source, prevent dust from becoming airborne, avoid draughts in working area . • All works areas are to be kept clean and tidy, spray with a light film of water then wipe over with a damp cloth to prevent dust particles becoming airborne. • When using glaze lab extractor fans must be switched on and dust mask to be worn. • If you feel any adverse effect, immediately notify your lecturer, Head of Public Programs (Jayne Dyer) or the Head of Ceramics(Bill Samuels) to review your situation and devise an appropriate personal strategy. If necessary you may refer questions in writing to the NAS OH&S Committee. • All staff, students and visitors are required to observe the OH&S guidelines. Failure to comply may result in you being asked to leave the studio. Recommended Reading Beware – Artist at work, Australia Council CERAMIC WORKSHOP MANUAL This manual has been prepared by the Ceramics Department as a way of introducing you to some of the terms and processes that you will need to understand. It attempts to explain about the materials, the equipment and the processes that are in common use in this ceramic workshop.

54


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 55

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES The college situation is by its nature an intimate one as you will be spending most of your time in a close group situation and as in any such environment a degree of tolerance and respect for others becomes very important in maintaining a vibrant and harmonious working dynamic. 1. Respect the working space of fellow students. 2. Maintain a tidy workspace clear of obstructions. 3. When working in other areas than your studio, i.e. the kiln room, throwing room etc. it is important that you make sure to clean up when finished. 4. Do not interfere with or unpack other student’s kilns without permission. Studio Access General studio access, Monday to Thursday is from 8.00 am to 9.00 pm. Friday 8.00am5.00pm Weekend and Holiday access is available to 2nd and 3rd year BFA students and Postgraduate students. Weekend and Holiday access is by prior arrangement with the Subject Leader. There MUST be a minimum of 2 [ two ] students that MUST sign in on arrival AND on Leaving. The sign on book is kept in the office of Campus Security at the main entrance, Forbes Street. Care of Clay and Care of Health The Ceramics Department is committed to a safe, healthy environment. Dust Dust is a major concern for potters. Its control is essential. Invisible super-fine silica particles, which float in the air, cause the most damage. When inhaled they penetrate the air sacs in the lungs which re-oxygenate the blood. Courser particles are filtered out through the nose or can be coughed out. Prolonged exposure to fine free silica can result in silicosis - an incurable lung disease. If you allow clay scraps to dry and fall on the floor, they are trodden on, powdered into dust, that circulates in the air and we breathe these fine dust particles into our lungs, eventually causing illness. Prevention of dust inhalation This is very important in a studio situation in a college or school. Remember that if YOU are the teacher your students will visit your classroom on an irregular basis and may not be in too much danger from over exposure to dust, however, you are there everyday and are at much more risk. • If possible, remove all dust at the source. • Prevent dust from becoming airborne. • Avoid draughts in the working area. • Wipe all spillages before they dry. • Do not dust or sweep, use a damp cloth or spray with a light film of water. • Use the correct type of respirator when mixing dry ingredients for making up glazes or clay. • Wear clean clothing.

55


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 56

NB: When using the glaze lab to mix glazes the extractor fans MUST be turned on at all times, and WEAR a dust mask. Care of Clay When clay dries out or is too hard to use it can be made reusable, however, this takes more effort than keeping it plastic. There are a few things that you can do while you are working:• Always keep the block of clay wrapped. • Any small pieces of clay that gather on the bench during the making process, just roll them together to retard the drying process and put into a plastic bag. • Always use a water spray when working and lightly spray your working area before clearing away, this will dampen fine particles, which can then be wiped away with a sponge. Try to avoid using a brush and pan. • Take all the stiff scraps and wrap these together in a damp piece of old towelling or material and place in a plastic bag. At the end of the work session or whenever ready, wedge these pieces into a block, rewrap and they will be as good as new for the next session. • Collect all bone-dry pieces and allow any nearly dry pieces to totally dry out before reconstituting. To reconstitute clay:• Break up any dry pieces of clay into small pieces and add to a bucket to which water has been added. • Do not disturb until the clay has absorbed the water, often overnight • Stir the clay and add more water if necessary. • Allow the clay to stand a day or two until the clay particles settle and then pour off any excess water. • The thickish sludge can be spread out on a porous surface e.g. plaster bats and turned and wedged often as it stiffens -or- it can be poured into calico bags or old jeans legs and hung out to evaporate the excess water. The clay should be checked often and wedged when at a plastic consistency. • After processing the clay is wrapped in plastic. To process natural clay:The procedure is the same as above except that the clay should be sieved to separate out any foreign matter e.g. leaves, stones, twigs etc. This can be done when the clay is at a liquid state. (See additional information in the section on types of clay.) Clay Clay is a deceptively simple material. It is cheap and abundant. Often it may be found in the earth already softened with moisture and ready to be worked. It keeps forever and improves with age. It is a heavy damp plastic material that ‘sets’ upon drying and can be changed by heat into a hard, waterproof ceramic material.

56


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 57

Your first introduction to clay will be understanding different terminology. For example in this department we have various clays available for use:Earthenware Hand building Clay. This is a brown clay (it contains iron oxide) which has a grogged, grog is a ground, fired clay body added to a plastic or long clay body to give it both strength and texture to the finished work. It has a firing temperature up to 1120C. Earthenware Throwing Clay. This is also a brown clay but with much finer body and is better suited to throwing on the wheel. It also is fired up to 1120oC. White Raku Clay. This is a white clay, which has a grogged body and is suitable for all hand building, especially for the raku process. It can be fired up to 1300oC. Although Raku firings usually fire to 1000oC. White Stoneware Clay. This is a white clay but is fine with no grog added. It is used for throwing stoneware pots and has a top firing temperature of 1300oC. Some students add varied amounts of ‘grog’ or sand to give added strength if making larger ware. (3-10%) Porcelain Clay. The department makes up a porcelain clay body for specific exercises and is designed to fire between 1300oC and 1400oC. Porcelain clays are difficult to work with in the plastic state and are prone to warping during firing. Generally the failure rate is high but successful results are rewarding.

57


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 58

Clay Reclaim System Reclaiming clay is intended to reduce wastage and to ensure that each clay is reprocessed in usable condition. The system can deal with all normal scrap waste, but cannot cope with complete blocks or large solid lumps of clay allowed to go hard. Do not let large lumps of clay dry out!!!! Bins: for 1st year classes, there is a large bin provided for the clay being used on a particular project - the bin should be labelled. Dave (ceramics TA) provides labelled bins in the wheel room for clay reclaim, both as slops or as turnings or dry clay. It is the student’s responsibility to pug the college clay at the end of a throwing session. Do not leave it for someone else, or it will end up a dry lump which is harder to deal with. Clay Classification Heat - The amount of heat a clay can withstand before warping and slumping. Earthenware Clay - when fired it is porous. Clay is softer and more breakable and is less useable for functional use. The common firing range is 1040 oC - 1160 oC. The glaze is bonded to the surface of the clay which is necessary to prevent seepage. The big advantage with this clay is that one can get very bright colours and the clay is used when making decorative and sculptural pieces. Stoneware Clay - when fired it is vitrified (very dense). The glaze fuses with the clay and the colours are limited to softer, muted tones. Good for functional and domestic ware. The standard firing range is (1260 oC- 1300 oC) Porcelain Clay - is a very strong, hard, white clay which is translucent. It is an expensive manufactured prepared clay mixture that is fired between 1300 oC - 1400 oC. It is made from china clay, silica and alumina. Wedging and Kneading

It is important before starting any of the making processes to prepare the clay so that it is smooth, plastic and without any lumps or air pockets. Basically there are 2 methods of doing this, wedging and kneading, wedging is a homogenising process, kneading is an aligning process. To wedge the clay, knock it into a brick shaped lump, cut it in half with a cutting wire, pick up the nearer half and turn it over so the cut side is now facing you and the top surface now points down. Bring it sharply down on the first half. Turn the whole piece through 90o slightly raising the end nearest you. Repeat this, turning the clay in the same direction until the clay is thoroughly mixed and free from lumps. There are two forms of kneading, “ram’s head” and “spiral” methods. The ram’s head method is used mainly for small quantities of clay, whereas the spiral can be used for almost any amount. Both these methods need to be demonstrated. However, a brief synopsis of these processes is as follows:

58


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 59

Ram’s head: knock the clay into the shape of a small round loaf. Grip the clay with both hands. Push the heels of your hands down and away from you. Withdraw your hands allowing the fingers to roll the far side of the clay up and towards you. Push down again with the heels of your hands. Again withdraw pulling up clay from the far side. The effect of this after repeated operations is to move the clay in a double spiral movement and to give it the rough shape of an animal’s head. Spiral: Knock the clay into the shape of a flattened round loaf. Place right hand palm down gripping the far side of the clay slightly to left of centre. As with the ram’s head method push down and away from you, but this time with the heel of the right hand only. Withdraw the hand pulling the clay up and rolling it slightly towards you. The left hand is held with the palm facing inwards and guiding the clay as it is drawn towards you. As with the ram’s head method the pushing away and rolling towards you movement is repeated for several minutes. The effect is to move the clay within itself in a single spiral movement. This is difficult to do (and to describe) you may find the clay roaming uncontrollably all over the table before you achieve any measure of control. Persistence, however, will reward you with a skill that is beautiful and satisfying in its own right, quite apart from its effectiveness as a way of preparing clay. Some general terminology BURNISHING The technique of burnishing the surface of pottery as a means of partially sealing it when fired at low temperatures can be traced back to ancient civilizations, and is still used in many undeveloped societies. Arising from practical necessity, it has gained recent popularity as a decorative technique. Burnishing involves no more than rubbing the clay surface with a smooth tool to produce a mirror smooth surface. It is done when the clay is leather hard, and has a compressing effect on the particles. Most clays are suitable for burnishing, although the finer the clay the smoother the burnished surface. Suitable tools for burnishing include smooth rounded pebbles, small glass bottles etc. The use of metal burnishing tools should be avoided, particularly with white clays as metal particles rub off onto the clay surface thus staining it, stainless steel contains chrome which will leave a green stain on the surface. Once dry the burnished pot can be fired in a bisque firing which should not exceed 950oC or the shine will diminish. Sawdust firing gives excellent results to burnished pots. Once the pot has been fired it can either be left without further treatment or polished with oils or a thin coating of wax to enhance the shine. Recommended: Durosil silicon floor wax or clear shoe polish COLOUR – always test When exploring colour in clay or glazes be sure to do some research before you start, there are many different commercial ceramic colouring materials available to potters today and all are coded. They will have different firing temperatures and some will burn out at higher

59


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 60

temperatures. On glaze colours are formulated to fire to very low temperatures (700-800oC) and are used when printing with ceramic decals. These are usually coded as series 11. Always check out the code number. • 11 series = onglaze enamels • 13 series = underglaze colours • 14 series = glaze stains • 15 series = body stains

720-800oC recommended temp 730oC most will go to 1300oC most will go over 1250oC intensity of colour obtained is dependent upon the firing temp.

CONES Pyrometric cones are used as a reliable check on the progress of a firing. They are designed to bend (melt) at specific temperatures, and should be arranged from the lowest temperature (to melt first) to the highest. It is suggested that you choose the cone for the temperature just below the one required, the centre cone should be the required temperature and the last cone to the temperature above that. This will give an accurate indication of the heat and temperature work achieved in each firing. Cones are much more accurate than the thermocouple and pyrometer. Cones should be place in a small mound of wadding at a very slight angle so they will fall when melting. They must be clearly visible as seen through the spyhole and should be approx 5-8 cms inside the kiln. GLAZE A glaze is basically a glass or glass like coating covering a pot. It may occur in a variety of colours and surface textures. For application to a pot, the glaze consists of a number of powdered components, suspended in water. When this is applied to the pot (generally by dipping or pouring) water is absorbed and a coating of powder is left to adhere to the surface. The powdered glaze consists of these main components. 1.

Glassformer: This is the substance which combines to form a good durable glass. Silica is the common glass former and is derived from Quartz. Feldspar also contains a large proportion of Silica. The melting point of Silica is 1700oC so fluxes are added to lower this melting point.

2.

Flux: This is the melting agent in the glaze. Elements used as fluxes include Sodium, Potassium, Calcium, Magnesium, Lithium, Barium, and sometimes Iron. These are used in the forms of oxides or carbonates and commonly come as part of a natural rock. e.g. Feldspar, Potassium, Sodium, Whiting.

60


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 61

3.

Stabiliser : This controls the fluidity of the melting glaze (stops the glaze from falling off the pot.) The element is Alumina. China clay is a good pure source of alumina; some ball clays are also suitable. These three components are the basis for any glaze. These would be e i t h e r clear, frosty or white.

4.

Colour: Clear glazes do not have an oxide added for colouring, they contain the 3 main ingredients listed above and the colour of the clay determines the final result, eg clear over white clay give a white effect and clear over terracotta give a warm toasty brown finish. Underglaze colours and coloured slips can show through a clear glaze to give a wide variety of colours. (see Colour on page 6 & slip on page ) Colour in glaze is obtained by using colouring oxides in conjunction with certain fluxes and other ingredients. it also depends in the type of firing. e.g. Iron Oxide -reds, browns, yellows. blacks Copper Oxide -greens, blue, red, purple Manganese -browns, purples Cobalt Oxide -blues, mauve Tin Oxide -white

These colours are very dependent on the glaze make up and the firing type. The two basic firing types are: • Oxidation -plenty of oxygen for the flame to burn clearly, or an electric kiln. • Reduction -oxygen cut back so the flame is not as clean and may produce some smoke. • Reduction is generally limited to gas or solid fuel kilns (wood, coal, sawdust, etc) • This cannot be done in an electric kiln. KILN SHELVES Kiln shelves are made from refractory materials, so that they can withstand high temperatures, constantly changing temperatures, uneven temperatures and various glazes. Kiln shelves are manufactured commercially and are quite expensive. In a department such as this they are easily chipped and broken, SO PLEASE HANDLE WITH CARE. Maintenance of kiln shelves •Kiln Shelves should always be stored in a stacked, leaning position. They should NEVER be dropped or chipped. • To protect them in glaze firings they should be coated with a kiln shelf wash. The purpose of this is to coat the shelf with a friable protective coating which will lift off the shelf if a glaze should run and cause the pot to stick to the shelves. • When your pot does stick to the shelf it is YOUR responsibility to clean this spill. NEVER do this with your hands as melted chipped glaze is the same as a sharp glass shard and will lacerate your hand.

61


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

• • • •

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 62

• Every ceramics major student should have shelf cleaning tools in your tool kit:- A metal scraper, a hammer and goggles. • Very lightly chip the glaze off the shelve taking care not to split the shelf. • Re paint the shelf. Any left over glaze spills will re-melt and cause someone else’s work to stick to the same spill. • If you don’t have tools ask Dave • Make up your own shelf wash or ask Dave for the college supply. • Kiln shelves should not be cleaned next to the kiln or in the glazing area as small bits of friable shelf wash and glaze chips goes flying through the air and can land in or on the work of others. • Always clean your shelves in the designated area at the rear of the kiln shed. ( on the strong metal bench) YOU MUST WEAR EYE PROTECTION. Please vacuum your mess on completion For major catastrophes (and they do happen) please see Dave as there is a portable grinder available. If you find a shelf with a crack in it please bring it to the attention of a staff member – especially Dave, as cracked shelves can collapse during the top temperature of the firing if there is a lot of weight on them. DON’T USE THEM, but we can cut them down to fit smaller kilns.

Kiln shelf wash recipe Silica Kaolin

) equal parts )

Kiln Packing Before staring to pack any kiln please check the following • The kiln is clean, any shards etc have been vacuumed. • The elements / burners are all working ( see separate manual relating to firing gas kilns). NB. This is very important as it’s frustrating to load a kiln and then find that it doesn’t work. • NB. If you suspect that a kiln is not working properly please inform a staff member. • All kiln shelves must have supports ( props). The props are also made from refractory, materials and will break if dropped. Please handle them carefully. The props for each shelf should be directly over those for the shelf beneath including the floor shelves. Check to see where these are supported before packing the kiln. • Make sure the shelves you use are not cracked, clean & repainted if it is a glaze firing. • Plan your pack so that the kiln is packed as evenly as possible throughout the whole kiln. Packing all the small pieces at the bottom may appear to give you a stable structure but it will also make for an uneven firing. Try to achieve both a stable structure and even packing. • Bisque firing – the pots may be stacked inside each other and may touch each other. The exception would be slip cast ware which should not have heavier pots stacked inside or on top.

62


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 63

• Glaze firing – the pots must not touch each other or the props, the melted glaze will act like super glue. No glaze should be on the bases of pots unless the temperature is earthenware and you are using a propping system. Stoneware pots may be propped on little balls of wadding. (see staff for guidelines) • Kiln wash should be used on all shelves in a glaze firing and when in doubt (ie testing a new glaze) pieces should be placed on setters or small pieces of broken kiln shelf instead of directly on a good shelf. • Never close up and fire a half empty kiln without first asking for other people’s work to fill the kiln. PLASTER Plaster is a direct product from the mineral GYPSUM. ( Calcium Sulphate Di-Hydrate. CaSO4 2H2O) Plaster is obtained by heating and grinding Gypsum to a temperature around 150oC. This drives off three quarters of the chemically combined water. The resultant material is known as Calcium Sulphate (CaSO42HxO) or Plaster of Paris, so called because of the early Gypsum mines in Montmartre. When you mix Plaster with water this returns the plaster to the original dehydrate. When water is added to plaster of Paris, needle like crystals interlock to form a hard mass. The absorbent quality that is important to potters, results from the millions of tiny spaces that remain between the needles after drying. If plaster is mixed with a lot of water the spaces will be larger between the interlocking crystals. The result will be a more absorbent, mechanically weaker and softer plaster. With less water a stronger lee absorbent product results. Using plaster is easy if you follow a few simple rules. The first thing to do is to get a copy of the manufacturers recommended plaster to water ratios. This is written on the bags of the plaster that we use in this department. MIXING Plastic buckets are the most common container to use for mixing plaster, they are cheap and can be thrown away if they become difficult to clean properly. Plaster mixing by hand is still the method that most potters use. The first problem is estimating how much plaster you will need. As plaster is not an expensive material always err on the generous side when making an educated guess. Plaster is always added to water. The ratios of plaster to water vary depending on use i.e. for slip casting moulds it should be 1.2 parts plaster to 1 part water by weight, these ratios will vary depending on the type of work produced, denser for press moulds, models and case moulds. Always measure out water first and add plaster through a course sieve or through your outstretched fingers. Plaster should be left to soak for about 2 minutes. This allows each particle of plaster to become saturated with water and it also removes any air that is still trapped in the powder. Then stir fairly slowly in one direction only, and the container banged occasionally to bring air to the surface. When of a creamy consistency it should be poured immediately.

63


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 64

When the plaster has been poured the surface should be vibrated, or the plaster carefully stirred with fingers, (avoid touching the model) this is to bring air pockets to the surface which are caused by pouring. It is then left undisturbed until the shine has completely left the surface. The ideal release agent for mould making is soft soap which should be applied to the surface of the plaster with a soft brush or fine natural sponge. Two to three coats which are then removed with a slightly damp clean sponge. Check that there is no surplus soap, just a waxy patina. When working with plaster you should at all times, where possible, use the plaster room at the rear of building 26, this is part of the sculpture department and therefore classes should not be disrupted. Waste Disposal Plaster must never be poured down the sink. Surplus plaster can be scooped up with newspaper and placed in the rubbish bins or poured onto sheets of glass or into ice cream containers to provide useful batts. The bucket can be wiped clear with newspaper and only after all the plaster has been removed should the bucket be washed in a sink. RAKU A Japanese word freely interpreted as ‘enjoyment’. Raku ware was developed in sixteenth century Japan as a low-fired form of pottery. The pots usually small bowl like forms, were glazed and used for Japanese tea ceremonies. The immediacy of the raku firing method, which involves removing the ware from the kiln while red hot, and its attractive surface qualities, have vastly increased its popularity with western potters. Glaze recipes for raku firing:1. White Crackle Frit 4108 Zircon flour Tin Oxide Ball clay Bentonite

80 5 5 10 2

2. Piepenberg Patina (the dry green glaze) Gerstley Borate 40 Bone Ash 30 Nepheline Syenite 20 Copper Carbonate 10 These glazes are best if fired to 1000oC.

64


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 65

SLIP An homogeneous mixture of clay and water. Slips are used for coating clays to give colour and a smooth textured surface. Slip recipe ( for decorating) Basic white slip recipe: Ceram Clay 70 Silica 20 Frit 4108 10 Bentonite 3 Slip recipe for casting Slip casting is a process of forming clay objects by pouring a liquid clay (slip) into a hollow plaster mould and allowing it to remain long enough for a layer of clay to thicken on the mould wall. The excess slip is then poured out. After hardening the object is removed, dried, fettled and fired in the normal way. Porcelaineous, stoneware casting slip recipe: (this slip is OK at earthenware temperatures too) Ceram Clay Eckalite

25 25

(this could be substituted for Kaolin Adflo, eckalite is whiter- adflo casts better)

Potash Feldspar 25 Silica 200 25 Dispex 0.4% or 4 grams per kilo TERRACOTTA Earthenware ceramics both glazed and unglazed. The word comes from the Italian and means simply fired earth, though the word is often used to describe the orange brown colour of clay.. TERRASIGILLATA Terra sigillata means ‘earth seal’. Quite simply it’s a slip, a mixture of water and clay where the particles of clay are separated and only the very finest of clay particles remain. This forms a very fine slip which when painted onto the surface of pots gives a smooth gloss finish. Terrasigillata recipe and additional notes Recipe – 7 kgs dry clay 14 litres water 100 gms Calgon 1st year ceramics students will be introduced to terrasigillata as a brown slip using earthenware throwing terracotta as the clay base in this recipe.

65


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 66

Mix or stir the slip to remove lumps or sieve if necessary and leave for about 24 hours to settle. Top half of liquid is drained off, leaving the course sediment behind. The fine slip is reduced (evaporation, or boiling is quicker) to form a painting thickness slip. Application The terrasigillata slip is best applied to dry greenware by brush or spraying. When dry it should look shiny. Buffing with a cotton cloth will enhance the shine. Firing Fire in an electric kiln to 1000oC WADDING This is a lump of refractory clay used to support kiln shelves and cones in the firing and is also used to seal saggars in firings. It is highly refractory and does not fuse with the fireclay shelves, supports etc and can be chipped away after the firing. Wadding recipe Sand ) equal parts fireclay or ball clay ) The Kiln Area The kiln area is considered to be an area of high risk from an O.H&S. perspective, the risk factors being :- burns, electric shock, gas explosions, fumes, eye injury, back injury and cuts Thus, students are allowed access to the kiln room only under the following conditions:• That there MUST BE A MINIMUM OF 2 [ TWO ] STUDENTS in the kiln room at ALL times. • Kiln firings are to finish NOT LATER THAN 9.00 PM. • The door nearest to the Burton Street entrance should be kept closed after 5.00 pm. Reminder: There is NO ACCESS to the kiln room after 6.00 pm Friday under any conditions • • • • •

66

Exhaust fans to be used at all times when kilns are in use. No heavy or extended reduction of gas kilns. No foreign matter to be inserted into the kilns for reduction. No salt to be used in firings, glazes or clay bodies (toxic fumes) No soda ash to be used (foul-smelling fumes)


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 67

Kiln A structure built to conserve heat. The word kiln is derived from the Latin culina, a kitchen, as in culinary. The potters’ kiln has a long history from open trench firings to the sophisticated structures today. Students will be introduced to a variety of kiln designs and fuels. There is a wide range of kilns on campus each with its own peculiarities. Learning to fire a kiln requires students to spend time understanding the kiln. The way that a kiln is packed, the rate of temperature and the length of the firing will all affect the results. Kilns 1-6 are all gas kilns and require supervision from staff before students are allowed to fire. No’s 7-16 are electric kilns, some with computer control panels and some with older manual control panels. When firing an electric kiln to glaze temperatures cones should be used as each kiln is different. Never rely on the control panel to get you to the correct temperature. There is one wood kiln – not in use There is a ‘top hat’ raku kiln ELECTRIC KILNS These kilns are used for non reduction (oxidation) low temperature glaze firings (maximum1120oC) and bisque firings. All firings to stoneware temperature are to be done in a gas kiln. Both oxidation and reduction atmospheres can be achieved in a gas kiln. Kiln 7 This is quite an old kiln and has seen a lot of firings, please be patient with it. Always stay with the kiln for a few minutes to check that the elements switch on and off. This kiln does not have a computer and uses older style settings. It is important to understand how to set this kiln. The student is required to attend to the kiln throughout the firing to turn up the black energiser dials. The advantages of these settings is that you, the student, have much more control over the firing process, but you can’t just set and forget!! Setting: The temperature setting is chosen by moving the outside ring of the white temperature dial until the small red arrow is lined up with the temperature required. NB. Never rely on this to be accurate, it may be OK for a bisque but always use cones in a glaze firing. The switch under the kiln should be on ‘auto’ (automatic). This will mean that when the kiln reaches the desired temperature it will switch itself off. If you choose to leave the switch on ‘man’ (manual), the kiln will stay soaking at the temperature required until you turn it off. This is an advantage if you wish to soak or check the cones, but a huge disadvantage if you fire this kiln on a Friday and leave without checking… The kiln would stay on at top temperature all weekend!!!! It has happened before and it caused a complete melt down of all pots, props, elements and shelves. The black energiser dial controls the rate of temperature climb in the kiln.

67


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 68

Turn the black energiser dial to 1 to start firing slowly maybe for an hour or 2 depending on whether the work is bisque or glaze, and gradually turn up until the black dial is on full or hi. Glaze firings can be fired at a much faster rate. (see suggested firing schedule) Kilns 8, 10, 14, 15 & 16, 14, 15 & 16 are specifically for testing and should not be used for personal bisque firings or stoneware glaze firings, use gas kiln no 1 for stoneware glaze testing. These kilns are fitted with the Harco computer which means that you can set the kiln to follow a program. (Not recommended for Glaze firings) Setting: Setting these kilns is quite complicated and takes some time to learn to set the program with out help or referring back to the manual. Please check with staff or a 3rd year student if unsure. The following information is probably too long winded but will perhaps help you through the first teething problems. NB* Kiln 10, also has black energiser dials but as the computer takes control of the firing them leave the 2 black dials on high/ full. DO NOT ALTER THESE DIALS!!! The control is divided into programs, cycles and stages. Selecting the required program: 1. When you first approach the computer press reset to begin. The last program fired in the kiln will appear on the panel. There are 8 program choices available and if this was your own kiln you would probably preset a different firing program in each number. They appear on the control panel as 001 - 008. Most students just change which ever one appears, but you can press the up or down button to move into a different program. Then press enter to lock in your choice. 2. A red light next to cone will flash on and there should be 000 on the panel. Do not put any numbers in here and if there is a number in the program from a previous firing, press the down button to delete. The cone is there for an electronic cone number to control the firings , but as the numbers don’t coincide with the orton cones don’t use it as it is too confusing. Press enter to lock in cone setting at 000. 3. There should be a yellow light flashing on stage 1, press temp to reveal numbers already preset by someone else and then press up or down button to change the temp to suit your firing. ( see note on kiln firings for suggested guidelines Page 12). Once you have put in the required temperature then press enter to lock in your choice. Then press rate/time to select the rate at which you wish the kiln to fire. Press the up/ down button to make your selection, then press enter to lock in your choice. 4. Next press cycle to take you into stage 2. Press temp to reveal numbers preset for the previous firing and change as in step 3.

68


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 69

Continue through each stage until you have all firing information locked in. Continue to press cycle until the control light comes on and you hear the kiln start.

KILNS 11 & 12 . New Woodrow kilns. The Harco 6 and 8 stage controllers: SELECTING A PROGRAM NUMBER • Push and release the reset button - the last program number used will be displayed. If you wish to change to a different program use the up or down button to alter the number. • Push and hold the enter button until the temperature appears. This is the temperature inside the kiln now. You have now selected one of the 8 programs. (The program will be stored within the control even if you turn off the power to the control). SETTING THE STAGE 1 • Push the cycle button to display stage 1 • Press the temperature button • Press either the up or down button to set the temperature for stage 1 • Press the enter button to enter the temperature for Stage 1 • Press the rate/time button • Press either the up or down button to set the firing “rate” for stage 1 (this value will be in degrees C per hour) • Press the enter button to enter the firing “rate” for stage 1 SETTING STAGE 2 • push the cycle button to advance to stage 2 • Repeat steps (4 to 9) above to set the temperature and firing “rate” for stage 2. Note: if you want to set any stage as a soak instead of an up or down stage, then the control will recognise this – because the soak stage will have the same temperature “entered” as the previous stage. The control will know when you go to push the rate/time button that rather than a “rate” (in deg C per hour) you will be wanting a “time” (in minutes). Use the up or down button to set a “time” & press the enter button. SETTING FURTHER STAGES • push the cycle button each time to advance to the next stage. Repeat steps (4 to 12) until all of the required stages are entered. SETTING THE LAST STAGE OF THE FIRING • If you have not used all of the stages which are available you must set zero values into the remaining unused stages. Repeat steps (4 to 12) and enter zeros for all temperature and rate/time values up to and including the last stage.

69


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 70

• Push the cycle button to advance past STAGE the last stage 8. You will see a cycle over light appear. Note: for Harco 8 stage units a timer light may also appear after approx 10 seconds. If the timer light did not appear push enter If the timer light has already appeared then don’t press enter After observing the timer light, you may choose to set a delay start SETTING A DELAYED START If you do not want to have a delay start then go to step 17 below. If you do want to have a delay start continue to step 15 below • Press the Time button and release • Press the up or down button to set the delay start time (in minutes) STARTING THE KILN • Push and release the cycle button. The kiln will start according to the program. If no delay start has been set then the kiln will begin heating in Stage 1 immediately.. If a delay start time has been set then the Timer will begin counting down from the delay time set. When the timer completes timing out (reaches zero), the kiln will begin heating in Stage 1. NOTE: The Harco controllers have an inbuilt alarm function, which will initiate if the kiln is slow to heat at the very beginning of the firing. Ie if the kiln does not respond by providing heat. The Alarm will also be initiated if the kiln has been unable to follow the program and is “dragging the chain” for more than 3 hours. Bisque Firing Bisque firings are usually done in an electric kiln to ensure an oxidising atmosphere; the purpose of bisquing is to fire ware unglazed in preparation for glazing. This is an overall term but it implies a temperature lower than the following glaze firing. At the end of a workshop session, completed work will be taken to the kiln room and stored on shelves. When the work has dried it will be packed into an electric kiln. Bisque temperatures vary depending on the final requirements of the work. The temperature is a personal choice, but generally a temperature of 1000oC is used for the following reasons • All the carbonates in the clay body are totally combusted by 980oC • The body has developed sufficient mechanical strength to withstand the silica inversion from Beta to alpha as the clay cools through 573oC • The ware is harder and easier to handle for glazing. • The ware is porous and will readily accept a layer of glaze, also if not glazing but subjecting the work to sawdust firing the work will be absorbent enough to accept the carbon colouring that smoke will give to the surface. A typical schedule is as follows; this is only a guide but explains some of the chemical changes that take place

70


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 71

0-100oC slow (60/hour) To allow any physical water in the clay to be removed as moisture rather than as steam. Steam is a gas. Gasses expand rabidly when heated. 100-350/400oC slow (60/hour) All clay has chemical water as a component. eg kaolin Al203.2SiO2.2H2O The chemical water must be removed slowly to avoid Hydraulic cracking in the clay. 400oC (approx) Until this temperature is reached the body appears black. At approximately 400o the carbonates present in the clay body begin to combust and the clay looses its black surface. 573oC slow(60/hour) At this temperature the free silica in the body converts from Alpha silica to Beta silica. This change is accompanied by a 3-5% volume increase in the silica. 600oC increase(100/hour) Dull red heat. After this temperature is reached the rate per hour can be safely increased to at least 100oC per hour. BISQUE FIRINGS IN AN ELECTRIC KILN Suggested firing cycle for a slow bisque: Kilns 8 & 10 These 2 kilns have the older type Harco controller with only 4 up cycles Stage 1: Temp 175oC, Rate 15. Stage 2: Temp 175oC, Rate/ time 90 this is a soak and it means that the kiln will stay soaking at 175o for 90 minutes. It is good to do this if the work is still a bit damp or very large, as it gives time for the work to finish ‘steaming’ PLUS the whole kiln has a chance to get to 175oc before it is ramped up to the next stage Stage 3: Temp 700oC, Rate 50 Stage 4: Temp 1000oC, Rate 100 Suggested firing cycle for a slow bisque: Kilns 11 & 12 These 2 kilns up the newer Harco controlled which has 8 cycles which can be either up, down or soak Stage 1: Temp 175oC, Rate 15. Stage 2: Temp 175oC, Rate/time 90 this is a soak and it means that the kiln will stay soaking at 175oC for 90 minutes. It is good to do this if the work is still a bit damp or very large) Stage 3: Temp 300oC, Rate 45 Stage 4: Temp 700oC, Rate 60 Stage 5: Temp 700oC Rate/ time 60 (another soak) Stage 6: Temp 1000oC Rate 100

71


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

Stage 7: Temp 1000oC Stage 8: Temp 000

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 72

Rate/ time 30 ( another soak) Rate 000

If you want to do a higher temperature bisque as in the 1st year once fired project to 1120oc, then just change your top temperature from 1000oc to 1120oc NB firing damp work is not recommended. The physical water present may convert to steam too quickly and the work may ‘blow up’. Occasionally work is pushed through but at a risk to both the work and the kiln. DRY WORK OUT FIRST. Glaze Firing The temperature of the glaze firing is dependent on the type of work made. For example earthenware is usually 1040-1120oC, Stoneware is usually 1260-1300oC, and raku is usually 1000oC Suggested firing cycle for a 1120oC Glaze Firing Stage 1: Temp 1000oC Rate 100 Stage 2: Temp 1120oC Rate 50 Slowing the firing down for the last couple of hours will allow the kiln to even out in temperature. This allows the glaze to mature and melt more evenly. (especially in BIG kilns like “Beatrice Wood” (no.8). If fired too quickly the top reaches 1120 but the bottom can be 100oC cooler. NB. This is only a rough guideline and should be seen as a starting point. GAS KILNS CHECK with a staff member if you wish to fire to stoneware temperatures: use a gas kiln as the electric kilns will not reach stoneware temperatures.

72


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 73

DRAWING Drawing is a core subject at the National Art School and is regarded as the fundamental discipline that underpins the other major areas. First year delivers a comprehensive introduction to basic drawing skills, centred on life, general and objective drawing. In the second year, these skills are further enhanced, again through intensive life and general drawing. The student is also made aware of the broad debate of drawing and the range of historical and contemporary practice. Third year sees the introduction of greater self-direction and the development of a personal drawing language. This strengthens both coherent and communicable visual thinking and underpins the successful development of concepts in their major area. Critiques and class discussions are encouraged to reinforce specific lessons. All drawing classes require attendance with participation in class critiques and tutorials. YEAR 1 DRA100 Foundation Drawing 18CP HPW9 S3 Subject Description Foundation drawing is divided into three categories: Life, Objective and General with the collective aim to develop an understanding of the visual language. The Life Drawing program focuses on drawing from the life model and includes studies such as plaster casts, skeleton, portrait and figure with an investigation of a range of drawing media. Aspects of gesture, anatomical structure and figure in space will be encountered. Objective Drawing focuses on drawing from the objective, visible world with an emphasis on the representation of form and space. Drawing strategies such as direct observation, recording, analytical translation and notational drawing are used to investigate a wide range of subjects such as still life, landscape, interior/exterior, architecture and natural/mechanical forms. The General Drawing program focuses on drawing from the visible world to develop non-objective or abstract images as well as the representational. A range of strategies such as memory drawing, automatic drawing and data gathering are employed to interpret and translate the visible world. This strand emphasises composition and pictorial structure with an increased range of media experimentations including digital imaging. Learning Outcomes On completion students will be able to: • Demonstrate through practise an understanding of the fundamental principles of Life, Objective and General drawing; i.e., representation, composition, pictorial form. • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the historical traditions of Life ,Objective and General drawing by incorporating features of those traditions in their studio work • Demonstrate the ability to realise visual ideas through drawing.

73


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 74

• Explore and utilise a range of drawing skills and develop an understanding of different media and methodologies • Demonstrate safe drawing practises including relevant OH&S procedures. Assessment On completion students are required to submit: • 5 major developed drawings from each strand • 15 support drawings from each strand • 1 A4 or A3 visual diary/ journal Assessment will be made by panels, which include class lecturer and Head of Department (or nominee) YEAR 2 DRA200 Drawing II 12CP HPW6 S3 Prerequisite/s/s: Completion of Year 1 Corequisite/s: 26CP in Studio Major II Subject Description Drawing II is divided into two classes: Life Drawing and General Drawing. The Life Drawing program consolidates the concerns introduced in Foundation Life Drawing I and investigates in-depth the life model in both contemporary and traditional figure drawing practice. The General Drawing program develops student’s critical awareness of both contemporary and traditional notions of research drawing and relates this understanding to their own work through rigorous analysis and discussion. Students will experiment with a range of media and explore innovative approaches in drawing. Learning Outcomes On completion students will be able to: • demonstrate through practise the ability to realise form and structure inherent in the human form • develop a competent knowledge and practical understanding of the ‘language’ articulated in general drawing • comprehend the human figure through an understanding of figure/ground relationships and display a workable knowledge of functional anatomy • engage in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers using terms and concepts understood from studies of historical and contemporary life and general drawing • experiment with a range of media and explore innovative approaches in their drawing • demonstrate an awareness of OH&S issues pertaining to the expanding range of drawing mediums employed in contemporary practise. Assessment On completion students are required to submit:

74


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 75

• 5 major developed drawings from each strand • 15 support drawings from each strand • 1 A4 or A3 visual diary/ journal Assessment will be made by panels, which include class lecturer and Head of Department (or nominee) YEAR 3 DRA300 Drawing III 12CP HPW6 S3 Prerequisite/s/s: Completion of Year 2 Corequisite/s: 30CP in Studio Major III The subject of Drawing consists of three electives (Research, Life or Autonomous). Students must select two electives to be completed in third year. It is possible for a student to do Double Life or Double Autonomous, or a combination of the three choices. The subject will consolidate the conceptual and philosophic knowledge and technical skills introduced in Life Drawing II and General Drawing II, leading to students being able to independently research and visualise ideas through drawing. Elective Strand Life Drawing Life Drawing III provides students with an opportunity to consolidate the drawing skills attained in their previous years of study and to extend the creative potential of Life Drawing. It will provide the opportunity to explore scale, multiple figure composition and the use of the human form to express allegorical and metaphorical ideas. Elective Strand Research Drawing Research Drawing provides students with an opportunity to consolidate the drawing skills attained in their previous years of study with the specific intention of supporting the development of their major area of study. Research Drawing will be conducted in direct reference to the major work of each student and will develop their graphic skills in support of their area of major study. Elective Strand Autonomous Drawing Autonomous Drawing is seen as a self contained studio practice where the student can realise drawing projects, both lecturer and student devised, where the pursuit of high quality and engaging graphic artwork is seen as the desired outcome. Autonomous Drawing is a personal and independent practice of drawing as an end in itself, unrelated to the need to support the student’s major area. Learning Outcomes On completion students will be able to: • Demonstrate sound technical skills within a range of drawing media, that correlate with the requirements of various studio projects.

75


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 76

• Demonstrate a deeper understanding of contemporary and traditional drawing conventions through the application of concepts and techniques to relevant projects (Life & Research) • Conceive, develop and realise an independent engagement in drawing as an autonomous practise, and demonstrate a coherent personal graphic language in drawing (Autonomous) • Demonstrate safe drawing practise and knowledge of OH&S when using both traditional and non traditional procedures. Assessment On completion students are required to submit: • 5 major developed drawings from each strand • 10 support drawings from each strand • 1 A4 or A3 visual diary/ journal Assessment will be made by panels, which include class lecturer and Head of Department (or nominee) OH&S RESPONSIBILITIES IN THE DRAWING STUDIOS • Do not use any spray aerosols or spray fixatives in the studios. Please take your work outside for spraying. For your own protection use a mask whilst spraying • If you are aware of any pre-existing skin sensitivity you may have, or you experience skin irritation from the use of pastels, charcoals or any other drawing material, please protect your hands by wearing disposable surgical gloves and/ or using barrier cream • If a drawing project involves the generation of excessive amounts of charcoal or pastel dust please protect yourself from the possible harmful effects from inhalation by wearing a disposable dust mask. • Please conduct yourself in a safe and orderly manner while in drawing studios, (as well as field trips and excursions) and observe any safety instructions as directed by your lecturer. In particular safe handling of heaters, fans, portable lights, screens, drawing boards and easels. Take special care when around electrical cords to avoid electrical hazards and tripping. • Under no circumstances climb on furniture (donkeys, easels, chairs etc) to reach, install or dismantle studio set ups or exhibitions. Use only the ladders provided. • Strictly no student access to models change rooms or prop stores.

76


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 77

Honours Level Students considering studying for Honours in the Department of Drawing should, if possible, consult the Head/s of Department by the end of third year of study to discuss the possibility of a fourth year. It is, however, possible to move to Honours at a later stage (maximum of 4 years after the completion of the BFA), and students wishing to do so should contact the School and submit an application.

DRA400 Honours Drawing Major 50CP HPW4 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of BFA with a credit average and a Distinction grade in the final year of Drawing Corequisite/s: STS400, AHT400 This Course provides students with the opportunity to further their technical, creative and speculative capacity and establish the skills necessary for autonomous practice and postgraduate study. Individual Student Project Proposals form the basis for self-directed study with staff guidance.

PAINTING The Painting Department maintains the historic values and practice of painting in its contemporary context. Drawing, and Art History and Theory underpin its focus on traditional studio practice. Its courses aim to provide opportunities at all levels for the pursuit of excellence and continuing educational goals. Undergraduate courses provide knowledge of contemporary art, its practice, history and theoretical foundations for individuals to become highly skilled and informed professional artists. The foundation year is an introduction to materials, techniques and aesthetic problem solving through the observation of colour, tone, composition, form and space and other fundamental elements of painting. Projects cover the perceptual investigation of a variety of genres, the preparation of supports, grounds, archival properties and issues of occupational health and safety. Second year consolidates the technical, aesthetic and conceptual development of painting. The development of research based studio projects focuses on the historic and contemporary overview of past and current concerns of Painting, with the support of regular critiques, tutorials and studio seminars. Third year is proposal driven and tailored towards individual student development. The studio investigation provides opportunities for the further analysis of paint, mediums and techniques appropriate to self directed research and conceptual expansion. These are

77


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 78

supported by overviews from individual lecturers, guest lecturers and critiques provided by tutorial and peer evaluation. Professional Studies contextualises the relationship of current and historic values and develops on a comprehensive understanding and knowledge of the broader art community. The Honours year focuses on the student’s preparation for Post Graduate study, as well as practice at a more independent, professional level. Students develop a body of work based on an initial Proposal. The Proposal is developed further and accompanied by an Investigation Report that clearly articulates the conceptual development and process of advanced studio practice and research. YEAR 1 PAI100 Studio Introduction Painting 3CP HPW12 for 3 weeks S1 Pass Requirements: Completion of all projects, attendance and participation in class critiques and tutorials. Subject Description Studio Introduction Painting introduces students to the fundamental skills and technologies of studio practice. The subject aims to familiarise students with the basic knowledge and technical expertise required to explore a creative response to set studio projects based on the formal concerns of observation in painting. Course outline and recommended reading list are provided. Learning Outcomes The student should demonstrate: • Creative ability to employ the formal elements of painting. • Ability to analyse the content and structure of a painting. • Proficient use of materials, techniques, safe work practice and observation of the principles of OH&S. • Ability to construct and prepare various surfaces and grounds for painting. • Ability to research, document and work from a variety of sources and interdisciplinary reference material. Assessment Students are required to submit: • All finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed • Portfolio of support work including relevant sketchbooks, preparatory drawings and studies. • Journal that evidences relevant aspects of study of painting practice within the visual arts, including notes from critiques, technical demonstrations, individual investigation of technical and individual artist practice

78


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 79

Assessment will be made by panels, which will include class lecturer and Subject Leader (or nominee). All extensions for assessable work are to be made in writing to the First Year coordinator of Painting at least 24 hours prior to assessment. If you are ill on the day of assessment please contact Subject Leader or coordinator of First Year Painting to arrange an alternative time for assessment. Recommended Reading Bartlett, B and Rossol, M. Danger, Artists at Work. Port Melbourne: Thorpe, 1991 Ferrier, J. Art of Our Century, Prentice Hall, New York, 1989 Itten, Johannes. Design and Form. Van Nostrand Reinhold. New York. 1974 Itten, J. The Art of Colour New York. Van Nostrand Reinhold. 1974 Lyons, Deborah. Edward Hopper: A Journal of His Work, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1997 Saitzyk, Steven. Art Hardware. Watson – Guptil, New York. 1987. Materials List This is a basic acrylic painting set that can be added to. It contains the warm and cool colour variations required to mix the complex range of colour combinations encountered in the natural world as well as a Gel medium for variations of texture and binding. These materials are available from most art suppliers and are available locally. These paints are required from week one of your painting rotation. Work made in rotation one should be done on prepared paper. Brown, heavy weight Kraft paper (sometimes called pattern board) is available from Oxford Art Supplies and is often sold in one-metre lengths. Brushes Size 2 round Size 5 round Size 10 round

Size 2 flat Size 5 Flat Size 10 Flat

Paints are defined in series, the higher the series number the more complex and expensive the pigment used to make that colour. Please note the following costs may vary. The 80ml size (for all colours) is suitable for 1 semester, although it maybe more convenient to buy Titanium White in 250ml size. Approximate prices Series 1 80ml $6.00 250ml $10.00 Series 2 80ml $7.00 Series 3 80ml $9.00 250ml impasto medium $10.50 and 250ml gel medium for glazing $10.50 A few good quality acrylic paints are: Atelier Interactive Artists Acrylics, Absolute Matt, Matisse Structure Formula Acrylic. The following acrylic paints have the series number in brackets.

79


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 80

Yellows: Cadmium Yellow Medium (4) Arylamide Yellow Light (3) Yellow Ochre (1) Reds: Permanent Alizarin (4) Cadmium Red Light (Scarlet) (4) Blues: French Ultramarine Blue (2) Cobalt Blue Hue (2) Mars Black (1) Burnt Umber (1) Burnt Sienna (1) Titanium White 250ml (1) You will also need a painting knife for mixing colour, old cotton rags, plastic containers for water, masking tape. Quality art materials available from: Parkers - Sydney Fine Art Supplies 3 Cambridge Street (Corner Argyle & Cambridge) THE ROCKS (student discounts available). Oxford Art Supplies, Oxford St, Darlinghurst. PAI120 Studio Elective I Painting 5CP HPW12 for 4 weeks S2 Prerequisite/s: CER100, PAI100, PHO100, PRI100, SCU100 Corequisite/s: AHT100, DRA100 Pass Requirements: Completion of all projects, attendance and participation in class critiques and tutorials. Learning Outcomes • Demonstrate a creative ability to employ the formal elements of painting. • An informed observation of spatial relations and form. • Demonstrate a proficient use of materials, techniques, safe work practice and the observation of the principles of OH & S. • Engage in the analysis of the content and structure of a painting. • Research, document and work from a variety of source and interdisciplinary reference material. • Demonstrate the ability to construct and prepare various surfaces and grounds. Assessment Class mark at the end of Painting Elective 1.

Weighting 100%

SUBMIT: FOR ASSESSMENT By panel made up of Class Lecturer, Departmental Head (or nominee) and external moderator. • A minimum of three comprehensive works that display a developing professional approach to conceptual investigation and techniques and includes at least two handmade stretchers. • Portfolio. A body of all support work and studies presented in a folder. • Sketchbook. A class journal that documents references and studies for paintings.

80


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 81

• Evidence of participation in class critiques and tutorials. • Homework and self directed study. All extensions for assessable work are to be made in writing to the First Year coordinator of Painting at least 24 hours prior to assessment. If you are ill on the day of assessment please contact the Subject Leader or the coordinator of First Year Painting to arrange an alternative time for assessment. Recommended Reading Bartlett, B and Rossol, M. Danger, Artists at Work. Port Melbourne: Thorpe, 1991 Ferrier, J. Art of Our Century, Prentice Hall, New York, 1989 Itten, Johannes. Design and Form. Van Nostrand Reinhold. New York. 1974 Itten, J. The Art of Colour New York. Van Nostrand Reinhold. 1974 Lyons, Deborah. Edward Hopper: A Journal of His Work, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1997 Saitzyk, Steven. Art Hardware. Watson – Guptil, New York. 1987. Materials List For Oils Possible choices of oil paint: Art Spectrum, Atelier, Windsor & Newton, Rowney, Le Franc. 75ml or 250 ml tubes. The following list of colours provides a range that can be useful for most colour mixing requirements; it includes both warm and cool colours. Those marked with an asterisk should be purchased, the others extend the colour mixing range. Consult with your lecturer. Odourless Solvent is available from the workshop. Bring a small container, approx 250ml. Cadmium Red (Hue)* Cadmium Yellow (Hue)* Lemon Yellow* Ultramarine Blue* Cerulean Blue Pthalo Blue* Viridian Green Ivory or Mars Black* Titanium White* Burnt Sienna Yellow Ochre* Red Oxide Burnt Umber* Raw Umber

81


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 82

MEDIUMS Medium is essential to the practice of oil painting. It may be bought pre-mixed, as with Art Spectrum gel medium, medium No 1 and Medium No 2. A simple medium for oil painting. 60% refined linseed oil mixed with 40% solvent, this can have wax added to improve drying time. TIMBER Radiata Pine Cheap, needs to be checked carefully when buying as it can be twisted or warped and can contain knots. Best for small works. Cedar Expensive, light, remains straight and is easy to work. Oregon Reasonably priced, easy to work. Maple Similar price to Oregon can warp/bend. For the first works you will be supplied with Radiata Pine 5cm x 3cm dar. Plywood – 75cm x 60 cm to be mounted on a wooden frame. CANVAS Cotton Duck and cotton/polyester mixed weaves are supplied for your first work. 10 ounce is fine for semester 2. Heavier weights such as 12 or 16oz are recommended for larger works. Canvas is usually 2 metres wide. One metre length should be enough to make up a stretcher approx 75cms x 90 cms. Linen can also be used, it is generally used for work at a professional level, it comes in a variety of weaves and weights. It is more durable and expensive than cotton duck. BRUSHES Eterna flat and round Bristle - sizes 8, 12 and 16 ie: small, med and large. Two of each. Palette Knives, one large and one medium PAPER: KRAFT, CARTRIDGE or RAG papers as required Quality art materials are available from: Parkers - Sydney Fine Art Supplies 3 Cambridge Street (Corner Argyle & Cambridge) THE ROCKS (student discounts available) also Oxford Art Supplies, Oxford St, Darlinghurst.

82


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 83

YEAR 2 PAI200 Painting Major II 26CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1, PAI120 Corequisite/s: DRA200 Subject Description The second year major expands and develops on the fundamental knowledge learned in year one. An extensive and intensive range of projects requires a more individual and creative approach toward the development of the historic and contemporary outcomes of painting. The studio seminar introduces the relevant theoretical, historical and practical concerns of each project. Projects observe, colour, traditional figurative and abstract genres and new approaches to painting. Course outline and recommended reading list are provided for individual projects. Recommended Reading The Art Book, Phaidon Press Ltd, London, 1994 Bartlett, B and Rossol, M. Danger, Artists at Work. Port Melbourne: Thorpe, 1991 Bell, Julian. What Is Painting, Thames and Hudson, London, 1999 Berger, John. Ways of Seeing, rep, Viking Press, London, 1995 Breuvart, Valerie, ed. Vitamin P, Phaidon, London, 2002 Cantz, Hatje. Neo Rauch, Hatje Cantz, Germany 2002 Crook, Jo. Learner, Tom. The impact of Modern Paints,Tate Gallery publishing, London, 2000. Foster, H, Krauss, R, Alain Bois, Y, Buchloh, B. Art Since 1900, Thames & Hudson, London, 2004. Gudiol, J. Goya, Poligrafa, Barcelona, 1985 Grosenick, Uta, Art at the Turn of the Millennium, Taschen, 1999. Harrison, Martin. In Camera-Francis Bacon, Thames & Hudson, London, 2005. Jaffe, David. Titian, National Gallery Co, London, 2003 Jones, Caroline A. Bay Area Figurative Art 1950-65, UCLA Press 1990 Rugoff, Ralph. The Painting of Modern Life, London: Hayward publishing, Southbank Centre, 2007. Sturgis, A, ed, Understanding Paintings, themes in art explored and explained, Octopus publishing, London, 2000. Learning Outcomes • Demonstrate the skills necessary to deliver pictorial form to two-dimensional surfaces. • Demonstrate a competency with the materials of painting in particular the craft of paint, surfaces, grounds and supports. • Demonstrate basic painting skills together with evidence and development of an individual analysis, understanding and language of painting.

83


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 84

• Establish strong relationships between painting and other areas of the course. • Demonstrate an awareness of historical and contemporary painting and use this understanding to create a context for making paintings. • Show an awareness of technical innovations and their interdependency with pictorial and material concerns throughout the history of painting. • Demonstrate a growing awareness of a professional approach to work habits and the safe use of materials. Reviews and Assessment Advisory and mid year review Students will be advised in writing, of progress, by a review panel made up of Studio Lecturers, Subject Leader or nominee. Present at the end of semester one: a. All project work for semester one. b. Portfolio containing support work, studies and examples of self directed study. c. Sketchbooks of working ideas, references, and studies. ASSESSMENT: Class mark at the end of Semester 2 Weighting 100% SUBMIT: FOR ASSESSMENT By panel, made up of Studio lecturer, Subject Leader or nominee and independent moderator. a. A minimum of 5 major works showing evidence of developed skills and attitudes. b.Portfolio containing project work, studies, support work and examples of course work. c. Portfolio containing studies, support work and examples of self directed study. d.Sketchbooks of working ideas, references and studies/drawings. e. Evidence of participation in Professional Studies tutorials and lectures by presentation in notebook or equivalent. All extensions for assessable work are to be made in writing to the Second Year Coordinator of Painting at least 24 hours prior to assessment. If you are ill on the day of assessment please contact the Subject Leader or the Coordinator to arrange an alternative time for assessment.

84


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 85

SECOND YEAR STUDIO ELECTIVES PAI210 Technologies and Painting: Vermeer to Richter 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 1 – 9) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Current technologies of the time have frequently influenced the development of painting techniques and conceptual process. Students will investigate a range of historic and contemporary technological influences and the impact they have made on the thinking and practice of painting. Course outlines and recommended reading are provided. Requirements: Completion of all projects, attendance and participation in class critiques and tutorials Learning Outcomes • Demonstrate a creative ability to employ the formal elements of painting. • Demonstrate a proficient use of materials, techniques, safe work practice and the observation of the principles of OH & S. • Engage in the content and structure of painting through the research of techniques and contexts that investigate a variety of methods to portray images that may include projection, digital imagery, found objects and image layering. • Demonstrate the use of technologies in painting. • Research, document and work from a variety of source and interdisciplinary reference material. • Demonstrate the ability to construct and prepare various surfaces and grounds. Assessment Class mark at the end of Painting Elective 2.

Weighting 100%

SUBMIT: FOR ASSESSMENT By panel made up of Class Lecturer, Departmental Head (or nominee) and external moderator • All finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work. • Portfolio. A body of all support work and studies presented in a folder. • Sketchbook. A class journal that documents references and studies for paintings. • Evidence of participation in class critiques and tutorials. • Homework and self directed study. All extensions for assessable work are to be made in writing to the Second Year supervisor of Painting at least 24 hours prior to assessment. If you are ill on the day of assessment please contact the Head of Painting or the supervisor of Second Year Painting to arrange an alternative time for assessment.

85


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 86

PAI211 Constructing a Painting 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 10 – 18) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Constructing a Painting provides students with the opportunity to expand on the more specific context of making a painting by exploring the processes of collage and construction in relation to traditional picture making. Students will explore the origins of ideas and look at their development through Modernism into Contemporary painting. Course outlines and recommended reading are provided. Requirements: Completion of all projects, attendance and participation in class critiques and tutorials. Learning Outcomes • Demonstrate a creative ability to employ the formal elements of painting. • Demonstrate a proficient use of materials, techniques, safe work practice and the observation of the principles of OH & S. • Engage in the analysis of the content and structure of constructivism in relation to easel painting through the exploration of ideas and processes of collage and construction within modernism through to cotemporary painting. • Demonstrate the use of collage and construction in painting. • Research, document and work from a variety of source and interdisciplinary reference material. • Demonstrate the ability to construct and prepare various surfaces and grounds. Assessment Class mark at the end of Painting Elective 2.

Weighting 100%

SUBMIT: FOR ASSESSMENT By panel made up of Class Lecturer, Departmental Head (or nominee) and external moderator. • All finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work. • Portfolio. A body of all support work and studies presented in a folder. • Sketchbook. A class journal that documents references and studies for paintings. • Evidence of participation in class critiques and tutorials. • Homework and self directed study. All extensions for assessable work are to be made in writing to the Second Year Coordinator of Painting at least 24 hours prior to assessment. If you are ill on the day of assessment please contact the Subject Leader or the Coordinator to arrange an alternative time for assessment.

86


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 87

PAI230 The Figure in Context 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 19 – 27) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Students will investigate the traditions of figure painting through the observation and contextual application of the figure as subject by studying the processes of painting from life, as well as other visual resources, focussing on specific artists that have made use of the model as a subject in painting. Course outline and recommended reading list are provided. Pass Requirements: Completion of all projects, attendance and participation in class critiques and tutorials. Learning Outcomes • Demonstrate a creative ability to employ the formal elements of painting. • Demonstrate a proficient use of materials, techniques, safe work practice and the observation of the principles of OH & S. • Engage in the analysis of the content and structure of a painting through the use of the Figure. • Demonstrate the use of the conventions of figure painting • Research, document and work from a variety of source and interdisciplinary reference material. • Demonstrate the ability to construct and prepare various surfaces and grounds. Assessment Class mark at the end of Painting Elective 2.

Weighting 100%

SUBMIT: FOR ASSESSMENT By panel made up of Class Lecturer, Subject Leader (or nominee) and external moderator. • All finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work. • Portfolio. A body of all support work and studies presented in a folder. • Sketchbook. A class journal that documents references and studies for paintings. • Homework and self directed study. All extensions for assessable work are to be made in writing to the Second Year Coordinator of Painting at least 24 hours prior to assessment. If you are ill on the day of assessment please contact the Subject Leader or the Coordinator to arrange an alternative time for assessment.

87


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 88

YEAR 3 PAI300 Painting Major III 30CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: AHT200, DRA200, PAI200, 6CP in electives Corequisite/s: DRA300 Subject Description Third year painting comprises two projects. Project one is based on the conceptual premise of the Grid. Students are required to research and respond with an individual approach to a variety of interpretations of the how the Grid may assist in informing the work of various artists. This can be through the use of division, sequential and serial imagery or the mapping of the picture plane. It may refer to image, text, narrative or abstract observations. The project does not have a set time frame, it finishes through consultation with the third year coordinator and may continue to form the basis for continuous study in project two. Project two is self-directed, the student should draw on the knowledge and skills obtained from previous studies. A proposal of 300-500 words is required to describe and define the criteria and outcomes of the project, this may continue to expand on project one, or develop as a new and individually conceived body of work. There is an emphasis on the understanding of the contemporary insights that inform current practice. Learning Outcomes 1. Demonstrate the skills necessary to deliver pictorial form to two-dimensional surfaces. 2. Demonstrate a competency with the materials of painting in particular the craft of paint, surfaces, grounds and supports. 3. Demonstrate basic painting skills together with evidence and development of an individual analysis, understanding and language of painting. 4. Establish strong relationships between painting and other areas of the course. 5. Demonstrate an awareness of historical and contemporary painting and it’s context for making paintings. 6. Show an awareness of technical innovations and their interdependency with pictorial and material concerns throughout the history of painting. 7. Demonstrate a growing awareness of a professional approach to work habits, research and the safe use of materials. Professional Studies: The Professional Studies component comprises of a series of lectures and group tutorials intended to guide students toward the establishment of independent art practice.

88


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 89

Recommended Reading Bachelard, G, The Poetics of Space. Boston: Beacon Press, Boston, 1969. Bartlett, B and Rossol, M. Danger, Artists at Work. Thorpe Port Melbourne, 1991. Bell, Julian, What Is Painting, Thames and Hudson, London, 1999. Bois, Alain,Yves. Painting As Model, MIT Press, Massachusetts, 1993. Breuvart, Valerie, ed. Vitamin P, Phaidon, London, 2002 Cluver, C, Plesch, V, Hoek, L. Orientations – Word and Image, Rodopi, New York, 2005. Danto, Arthur, C. Beyond the Brillo Box , rep,Unversity of California Press, 1998. Deleuze, Gilles. Francis Bacon, The Logic of Sensation, Continuum 2003 (1981) Elkins, James. What Painting Is, Routledge, 2000. Foster, H, Krauss, R, Alain Bois, Y, Buchloh, B. Art Since 1900, Thames & Hudson, London, 2004. Krauss, Rosalind. The Originality of the Avant-Garde and Other Modernist Myths, MIT Press, Cambridge,1999. Lucie-Smith, Edward, Art Today, Phaidon, London, 2001 McAuliffe, Chris, Jon Cattapan Possible Histories, Miegunyah Press, Melbourne, 2008. Richter, Gerhard, The Daily Practice of Painting, Thames and Hudson, London, 1995. Ursprung, Philip. Herzog & de Meuron: Natural History, Lars Muller, 2003. Mid Year Review and Assessment Advisory mid year review Students will be advised in writing, of progress, by a review panel made up of Studio Lecturers, Subject Leader or nominee. Present at the end of semester one: • Minimum of 5 substantive works based on set and self directed projects, demonstrating evidence of developed skills and attitudes. • Portfolio containing all support work, research and examples of self directed study. • Sketchbooks of working ideas, references, and studies. ASSESSMENT: Class mark at the end of Semester 2

Weighting 100%

SUBMIT: FOR ASSESSMENT By panel, made up of Studio lecturer, Subject Leader or nominee and independent moderator. • A minimum of 7 major works showing evidence of developed skills and attitudes. • Portfolio containing studies, support work and examples of self directed study. • Sketchbooks of working ideas, references and studies/drawings. • Evidence of participation in Professional Studies tutorials and lectures by presentation in notebook or equivalent. All extensions for assessable work are to be made in writing to the Third Year Coordinator of Painting at least 7 days prior to assessment. If you are ill on the day of assessment please contact the Subject Leader or the Coordinator.

89


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 90

Honours Level Students considering studying for Honours in the Department of Painting should, if possible, consult the Subject Leader by the end of third year of study to discuss the possibility of a fourth year. It is, however, possible to move to Honours at a later stage (maximum of 4 years after the completion of the BFA), and students wishing to do so should contact the School and submit an application. PAI400 Honours Painting Major 50CP HPW4 S3 50CP HPW4 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of BFA with a credit average and a Distinction grade in the final year of Painting Studio Major Corequisite/s: STS400, AHT400 Subject Description Honours Painting Major and pr\ovides the opportunity to further the technical, creative, and speculative capacity of each student within the Painting discipline. The subject aims to establish in each student the necessary technical, conceptual, and critical skills for autonomous art practice and postgraduate study within the specific context of the Painting discipline. Students are required to undertake a Studio Project, which is comprised of two parts across the two semesters: Semester 1 The student will: • Refine their original Statement of Intention through defining aims, expected outcomes and timeframe. • Begin to develop the Studio Project through the production of preliminary artwork. • Attend regular individual and group tutorials reviews with their lecturers. • Prepare a draft Investigation Report for mid-year review. • Participate in specialist workshops and visiting artist lectures in the Painting department. Semester 2 The student will: • Produce a major body of work for exhibition which visually articulates the concerns identified in the Studio Project Statement of Intention. • Complete an Investigation Report. • Compile support resource documentation of the Studio Project. Reading List Reading lists are created by the student when considering of the Honours proposal and in consultation with class lecturers. Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Honours Painting Major, students will be able to: • Develop a coherent body of work through the systematic investigation of a Studio

90


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 91

Project. • Present a completed body of work to exhibition standard that confirms the knowledge and skill integral to independent practice. • demonstrate technical and conceptual accomplishment with the Painting media utilised in individual studio projects. • Locate and evaluate their individual work within a broader historical and cultural framework. • Extend their knowledge of both the historical and contemporary practices relevant to Painting discipline. • Engage with Painting studio conventions and protocols relevant to their individual enquiry, at a level commensurate with independent art practice. • Demonstrate a sound understanding of contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the Painting studio and more specifically their independent practice Delivery Methods All contact hours in Honours Painting Major are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. Responding to the range of expertise required to meet subject content and learning outcomes, a range of staff are employed within the program to respond to individual student project and areas of study. The allocated 4 hours per week consists of: • Studio Instruction. • Individual and group tutorials. • Technical demonstration. • Formal critiques. Studio based instruction throughout the subject is augmented by a visiting artist program, staff directed off campus activities, and self directed study. Facilities and Equipment The Painting Department provides individual studio areas offering facilities for the study of Painting. Students enrolled in Honours Painting Major are provided with an independent workstation in the studio area. Assessment Dates Assessment of PAI400 will be conducted on the conclusion of the academic year. Assessment Requirements Mid year review At mid year a formal review of all work undertaken is conducted. Students are advised of their progress through the use of the progress indicators: ‘satisfactory’ or ‘un-satisfactory’ and advised where necessary of action required to address unsatisfactory progress. End of Year Assessment At the end of the academic year, final assessment will be based upon the presentation of a body of completed artwork including supporting resource documentation. Major Body of Work - 80% Students are required to present a major body of work of professional standard. This work

91


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 92

should fulfil the intentions articulated in the Statement of Intention for the Studio Project. Studio Investigation Report - 20% Students are required to submit a Studio Investigation Report that documents and discusses the technical, material and conceptual issues relevant to the student’s investigations. The report will include: • A written paper which serves to discuss and contextualise the body of work presented for assessment. • Relevant technical data. • A bibliography citing relevant texts. • Visual documentation of the major body of work presented for assessment. OH &S GUIDELINES Painting Department • All students within the NAS Painting Department are required to observe safe studio and workshop practice and acknowledge the principles of Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S): • If you have an existing medical condition or a disability or you are taking prescribed medication that may effect your ability to use studio equipment/materials please notify the lecturer in charge or Head of Public Programs. • Appropriate clothing must be worn at all times in the studio area including sturdy closed footwear, no loose clothing, long hair tied back. • Accidents, injuries and near misses must be reported immediately to the lecturer in charge or the Head of Public Programs. • Do not use the studio equipment/materials if you are under the effect of alcohol or any illegal drugs. • Familiarise yourself with the studio in case of emergency, eg location of first aid kits, exits, fire extinguisher, fire blankets, safety shower etc. • The consumption of food, beverages and cigarettes is prohibited in the studio area. • The use of mobile phones and personal stereos is prohibited in the studio area. • Please comply with any staff request regarding health and safety. • Open windows and turn on studio ventilation units where available, when working in confined spaces. • Keep lids on solvent containers and solvent soaked rags in lidded bins provided in studios • Do not dispose of paint or solvents in sinks. Solvents should be disposed of in drums provided in solvent cabinets in studios. Paint should be scraped into paper and placed in bins. • Confirm competence before using tools and machinery with class lecturers or Technical Assistant. • Students are required at all times to have at least one other person of staff member present when working in studios and or workshops. • Consider the comfort of colleagues in the shared work space. • Do not work with excessive solvent based washes and glazes inside studios. • Avoid direct skin contact with paints, pigments and solvents by wearing latex gloves and or applying barrier cream.

92


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 93

Excessive exposure to solvents can cause headaches, sore throats, respiratory irritation and long term medical concerns in some individuals. Excessive exposure to solvents may cause adverse responses to some medications particularly some antidepressants and in the long term may be responsible for some carcinogenic conditions. Solvents and pigments can be absorbed through the skin, cuts, abrasions, by respiratory action and through ingestion, (when eating, drinking or smoking). Odourless solvents are less toxic than other similar solvents and should be used at NAS. If you feel any adverse effect, immediately notify your lecturer, year coordinator or the Subject Leader to review your situation and devise an appropriate personal strategy. If necessary you may refer questions in writing to the NAS OH&S Committee. All staff, students and visitors are required to observe the OH&S guidelines. Failure to comply may result in you being asked to leave the studio. Recommended Reading Beware – Artist at work, Australia Council Saitzyk, Steven. Art Hardware. Watson – Guptil, New York. 1987. (Part 11).

93


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 94

PHOTOGRAPHY The Photography Department offers a diverse programme concerned with photography as a medium for creative and critical expression. Lecturing staff guide students towards acquiring a broad range of theoretical knowledge and practical skills. Students are offered the opportunity to develop visual awareness, technical confidence and critical skills. Structured projects provide frameworks for the introduction of techniques and concepts that help students identify and develop individual studio interests. Students investigate the materials and methodologies of contemporary photographic art practice, from traditional wet media to digital processes. They examine photography’s particular historical, conceptual and cultural contexts and its specific concerns and visual language. The department supports the development of extended-presentation and timebased artworks as well as photographs based in the fine-print tradition. YEAR 1 PHO100 Studio Introduction Photography 3CP HPW12 for 3 weeks S1 Subject Description Introduction to the essential concerns and methodologies of fine art photographic practice. Projects and exercises explore the fundamental processes of creative imagemaking using B&W and colour photographic materials and techniques. Students translate ideas into B&W photographs and colour transparencies using cameras and film and darkroom printing. They are introduced to framing, composing, selecting and editing images for aesthetics and meaning. Learning Outcomes On successful completion students will be able to identify and describe principle photographic characteristics, apply basic compositional and tonal controls, make B&W prints and colour transparencies, discuss their work and the work of others, and work cooperatively following OH&S guidelines. Delivery Methods Face to face studio-based instruction including illustrated lectures, workshops and demonstrations, supervised projects, individual tutorials, critiques and discussion. Specialist Facilities and Equipment B&W darkroom, film processing facility, tutorial room Assessment Dates Final day of rotation

94


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 95

Assessment Requirements Folio of slides and prints completed for projects; visual journal documenting drawings, proof sheets, tests, reference images and notes from individual investigation; full, punctual attendance and engagement in class activities. Recommended Readings Horenstein, Henry. Black and White Photography: a Basic Manual. Boston: Little, Brown, 1983.

PHO120 Studio Elective I Photography 5CP HPW12 for 4 weeks S2 Prerequisite/s: CER100, PAI100, PHO100, PRI100, SCU100 Corequisite/s: AHT100, DRA100 Subject Description Consolidates introductory-level understanding and practice of the essential concepts and methodologies of fine art photography, and furthers creative, speculative capacity. Studio practice includes translating ideas and emotions into photographs, controlled use of cameras and film, lighting and exposure techniques, framing, composing, directing, selecting and editing images for aesthetics and meaning, experimental darkroom techniques, print finishing and presentation, discussion of student and artist work and the cultural and contemporary contexts of photography, working cooperatively following OH&S guideline. Learning Outcomes On successful completion students will be able to analyse basic elements of light, tone, composition, framing, directing, editing and sequencing; demonstrate basic technical competence in using equipment and facilities to realise expressive photographs; participate in discussion of their work, the work of others and some historical and contemporary contexts of photography including brief written texts; work cooperatively and contribute to the learning environment following OH&S guidelines. Delivery Methods Face to face studio-based instruction including illustrated lectures, workshops and demonstrations, supervised projects, individual tutorials, critiques and discussion. Specialist Facilities and Equipment B&W photographic darkroom, film processing facility, tutorial room Assessment Dates Final day of elective Assessment Requirements Major folio of prints completed for projects; support portfolio of additional completed work; visual journal documenting drawings, proof sheets, tests, reference images and notes from individual investigation; full, punctual attendance.

95


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 96

Recommended Readings Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. London: British Broadcasting Corporation; Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1972. Fiedler, Jeannine. Photography at the Bauhaus. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1990.

PHO200 Photography Major II 26CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1, PHO120 Corequisite/s: DRA200 Subject Description An introduction to the full scope of photographic art practice. Projects and exercises develop understanding of the materials, processes, histories and theories of fine art photography. Studio practice includes translating personal ideas and emotions into photographs within themed projects; using 35mm and medium format film cameras; selective exposure with light meters; controlled development of black and white film; colour film selection and exposure; introduction to colour printing; framing, composing, directing, selecting and editing images for aesthetics and meaning; introduction to archival materials and techniques; basic studio lighting; digital image manipulation and print output; print finishing and presentation techniques; discussion, presentation and written analysis of the historical and contemporary contexts of photography; critical discussion and analysis of work produced by students and others; using photographic equipment and facilities to contemporary professional standards; OH&S in photography. Professional Studies: Regular tutorials examine issues and new developments in contemporary photographic art practice as well as the history, theoretical concerns and visual qualities specific to photography. Learning Outcomes On successful completion students will be able to identify and analyse the characteristics of photographs produced using a wide range of methodologies; understand and apply a wide range of fine art photographic and digital processes; critically discuss the aesthetic and conceptual dimensions of their work and the work of others verbally and in writing; understand historical and contemporary practices and have the technical ability to translate ideas and emotions into photographs; demonstrate knowledge of the cultural contexts of historical and contemporary photography and its relationship to other media; competently use photographic equipment and facilities; demonstrate knowledge and practice of OH&S in photography; undertake guided technical and theoretical investigation to support structured projects. Delivery Methods Face to face studio-based instruction including illustrated lectures, workshops and demonstrations, supervised projects, individual tutorials, critiques and discussion.

96


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 97

Specialist Facilities and Equipment B&W and colour photographic darkrooms; film processing facility; digital studios; controlled lighting studios; print finishing facility; student studio space. Assessment Dates Final day of classes Assessment Requirements Major folio presentation of selected finished prints; support folio of additional prints including self-directed work; journal containing relevant working proofs, preparatory sketches, drawings, notes on technical demonstrations and individual trials, project and selfdirected investigations into photographic and artist practice etc; volume of written assignments completed for Studio Theory; full, punctual attendance and participation. Recommended Readings Horenstein, Henry. Beyond Basic Photography: a Technical Manual. Boston: Little, Brown, 1977. London, Barbara and John Upton. Photography. New York: Longman, 1998. Frizot, Michel, ed. A New History of Photography. Koln: Konemann, 1998.

PHO235 Pinhole Photography 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 1 – 9) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description Students in Pinhole Photography have the opportunity to make their own camera/cameras in a range of shapes, sizes and materials as well as convert an existing SLR camera to a pinhole lens. Students use their cameras to create experimental black and white or colour photographs in the darkroom and digitally. Studio practice is project based and students are encouraged to incorporate ideas from their major discipline studies. Includes: discussion of camera principles; making basic pinhole cameras and lenses; exposure principles with pinhole photography; special pinhole camera formats and applications; print selection and editing; printing options including black and white and colour darkroom photographs and digital prints; the history of pinhole cameras from camera obscuras to contemporary artists working with pinhole photography; discussion of work produced by students and artists; using equipment and facilities to contemporary professional standards; OH&S in pinhole photography. Conventional cameras are not required for this elective but may be optionally used experimentally. Learning Outcomes On successful completion students will be able to demonstrate basic ability to: translate ideas and emotions into images; describe principles and visual characteristics of pinhole

97


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 98

photography; create experimental images using pinhole photographs; engage in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers; work to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and OH&S. Delivery Methods Face to face studio-based instruction including illustrated lectures, workshops and demonstrations, supervised projects, individual tutorials, critiques and discussion Specialist Facilities and Equipment. Photographic darkrooms; studio workspace; digital studio with computers, scanners and printers. Assessment Dates Final day of elective Assessment Requirements Presentation of prints completed for projects and exercises; additional prints demonstrating investigation of projects; visual journal documenting drawings, proof sheets, tests and individual investigation; full, punctual attendance. Recommended Readings Pinhole photography: rediscovering a historic technique (2nd ed.) Renner, Eric, Focal Press, Boston c2000.

PHO236 Intro to Montage 3CP HPW3 for 12 weeks in S2 (Weeks 10 – 18) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description Intro to Montage is an opportunity to create a series of digital photographic prints using basic montage, collage and compositing techniques in Photoshop. Through invisibly blending or visibly juxtapositioning photographic image elements, new meanings can be created. Studio practice is project based and students are encouraged to incorporate ideas from their major discipline studies. Includes: discussion of basic montage principles and techniques; an overview of montage from Dada, Constructivist and agitprop to current digital post-production; discussion of work produced by students and artists; using equipment and facilities to contemporary professional standards; OH&S in moving image. Students supply any digital camera for this elective.

98


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 99

Learning Outcomes On successful completion students will be able to demonstrate basic ability to: translate ideas and emotions into images; describe principles and visual characteristics of montaged photographs; create experimental images using basic montage techniques; engage in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers; work to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and OH&S. Delivery Methods Face to face studio-based instruction including illustrated lectures, workshops and demonstrations, supervised projects, individual tutorials, critiques and discussion. Specialist Facilities and Equipment Digital studio with computers and printers Assessment Dates Final day of elective Assessment Requirements Presentation of prints completed for projects and exercises; additional prints demonstrating investigation of projects; visual journal documenting drawings, proof sheets, tests and individual investigation; full, punctual attendance. Recommended Readings The art and craft of montage Larbalestier, Simon, London, Mitchell Beazley, 1993. Photography Reborn: Image Making in the Digital Era Lipkin, J. Abrams NY 2005 Teaching Staff Digital Studio Bldg 11 Contact: HoD Room 5.1M8 Bldg 5 Consultation Times: by appointment

PHO237 Intro to Moving Image 3CP HPW3 for 12 weeks in S2 (Weeks 19 – 27) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description Students in Intro to Moving Image have the opportunity to create a short moving image artwork using standard digital cameras or video cameras and Imovie to edit. Studio practice is project based and students are encouraged to incorporate ideas from their major discipline studies. Includes: discussion of basic moving image principles; basic shooting techniques; relationship between image and sound; basic animation techniques; editing;

99


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 100

presentation options; an overview of moving image from video art of the 1970s to contemporary artists working with moving image; discussion of work produced by students and artists; using equipment and facilities to contemporary professional standards; OH&S in moving image. Students supply any movie-capable digital camera or dedicated video camera for this elective. Learning Outcomes On successful completion students will be able to demonstrate basic ability to: translate ideas and emotions into moving images; experiment with shooting continuous and animated footage using basic cameras; edit footage in Imovie to create a simple short movie, engage in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers; work to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and OH&S. Delivery Methods Face to face studio-based instruction including illustrated lectures, workshops and demonstrations, supervised projects, individual tutorials, critiques and discussion Specialist Facilities and Equipment Digital studio Assessment Dates Final day of elective Assessment Requirements Presentation of movies completed for projects and exercises; additional footage demonstrating investigation of projects; visual journal documenting drawings, tests and individual investigation; full, punctual attendance. Recommended texts: To be advised

PHO300 Photography Major III 30CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: AHT200, DRA200, PHO200, 6CP in electives Corequisite/s: DRA300 Subject Description A consolidation of the concepts, skills and methodologies of fine art photography developed in Year 2. Practical studio experience and written work expand creative, speculative capacity. Projects develop understanding of theories and methodologies of fine art photography and prepares for student-proposed investigation, plus research and production of a final body of work. Students are given the opportunity to articulate their intentions, identify the scope of a proposed project and realise it to contemporary

100


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 101

professional standards. The program includes: the development of visual ideas through photographic media; analysis and discussion of work produced; studio conventions and protocols of photographic practice relevant to individual enquiry; conceptual underpinnings of photographic media; the development of individual working methodologies toward independent studio practice; broader cultural implications of independent art practice; documentation and presentation of photographs to contemporary standards of professional studio practice; OH&S for photography and independent art practice. Learning Outcomes On successfully completing the subject the student will be able to: conceive, develop and realise visual ideas to resolved exhibition standard; demonstrate technical competence in the range of fine art processes used in traditional and contemporary photographic practice; locate and evaluate their work within the context of contemporary photographic practice; demonstrate knowledge of the cultural contexts of historical and contemporary photographic practices; demonstrate independent, professional studio work patterns and the ability to undertake more sustained investigation and realise projects within specific time frames; demonstrate and apply understanding of archival and professional-standard materials, processes and principles in making, presenting and storing photographic artworks; demonstrate knowledge and practice of OH&S photography guidelines; undertake independent technical and theoretical investigation to support individual projects. Delivery Methods Illustrated lectures; workshops and demonstrations; supervised projects; individual tutorials; critiques and discussion; guest lectures. Specialist Facilities and Equipment B&W and colour photographic darkrooms; film processing facility; digital studios; controlled lighting studios; print finishing facility; student studio space. Assessment Dates Final day of classes Assessment Requirements One or more bodies of work presented to professional standard representing sustained, substantial independent and guided investigation; support portfolio comprising folio of additional completed prints, visual journal documenting drawings, proof sheets, tests and notes and illustrations demonstrating independent theoretical investigations; full, punctual attendance and participation. Recommended Readings Dexter, Emma and Thomas Weski, eds. Cruel and Tender: the Real in the Twentieth-Century Photograph. London: Tate, 2003.

101


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 102

French, Blair and Palmer, Daniel, Twelve Australian Photo Artists, Piper Press 2009 Foster, Alasdair, ed. Photographica Australis Sydney: Australian Centre for Photography, 2002. Janus, Elizabeth, ed. Veronica's Revenge: Contemporary Perspectives on Photography. Zurich: Scalo, 1998.

Honours Level Students considering studying for Honours in the Department of Photography should, if possible, consult the Subject Leader by the end of third year of study to discuss the possibility of a fourth year. It is, however, possible to move to Honours at a later stage (maximum of 4 years after the completion of the BFA), and students wishing to do so should contact the School and submit an application.

PHO400 Honours Photography Major 50CP HPW4 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of BFA with a credit average and a Distinction grade in the final year of Photography Studio Major Corequisite/s: STS400, AHT400 The Honours program offers structured guidance in developing, refining and realising a project proposed by the student. Self-directed studio practice and theoretical investigation are supported by tutorials and critiques, culminating in the public exhibition of a body of work of professional standard. PHOTOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY [OH&S] GUIDELINES RESPONSIBILITY All students need to cooperate to ensure a safe, healthy working environment. It is vital to: • familarise yourself with the following information • follow the instructions and advice of your lecturers • talk to your lecturers any time if you have any problems or questions IDENTIFYING & MINIMISING HAZARDS The main potential hazard in photographic practice is exposure to photographic chemicals. If handled carelessly many of the chemicals can cause skin problems and/or lung problems. Clean processing habits minimise the hazard. Work with care. Always report all breakages, hazards and malfunctioning equipment promptly. When you finish using a work area make sure you take time to clean it up; this includes studio and tutorial areas. Discuss any concerns with your lecturer. Always avoid inhaling chemicals & skin contact with chemicals

102


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 103

Working safely in the darkrooms and film processing area spills • Avoid spilling chemicals – spills create fumes • Mop up all spills straight away • Always use a tray to move prints and test strips in and out of the darkroom • Avoid spilling chemicals from trays or jugs in the wet benches so they mix – this is called cross contamination. Certain chemicals, eg developer and fixer, are more toxic when combined than when separate. • Hold all containers and tanks over the sink to prevent chemistry spills or drips. Don’t process film away from the sink. • If you spill any chemical on your skin, wash immediately with soap and water Fumes • Ensure the ventilation system is switched on in darkrooms and the film processing area. If it seems quiet, the system probably isn’t on and you’re breathing chemicals. • Never lean over trays of chemicals or over the wet bench. • Always rinse test strips and prints before placing in a tray to evaluate in white light. Otherwise you’ll breathe in fixer. • You are more exposed to fumes when processing large prints (50x60cm+). Wearing a respirator is recommended. Personal protection • Eat, drink and smoke outside the department • Wear a waterproof apron in wet areas • Wear shoes in lab areas; thongs are not allowed • Wear rubber gloves when handling and developing film. Gloves are also recommended for agitating trays. • Use tongs when processing prints. Wet and dry areas • Keep wet materials or equipment in designated wet areas • Handle electrical equipment with dry hands: enlargers, timers, print dryers, light boxes, phones, heaters, radios or studio lights Moving around safely • Knock before entering darkrooms and don’t enter if your way is blocked • Carry materials or equipment in such a way that you can see where you’re going • When moving around wet materials, always contain them in a tray or tank so they don’t drip Specific chemical hazards While staff usually mix chemicals, you need to be aware of these hazards. The greatest hazards occur during the preparation and handling of concentrated stock solutions of various chemicals. During these procedures, it is essential to wear protective gloves, goggles and a respirator to protect against splashes, dust and fumes. Take special care to avoid skin contact with powder, and to avoid stirring up dust which can be inhaled. Good ventilation is important to get rid of vapours, especially from the fixer and stop bath. Wherever possible, use concentrated liquid chemicals instead of powdered chemicals. Liquid chemicals are usually more expensive but are safer to handle. Read the safety warnings on

103


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 104

the labels of all packages before mixing and using chemicals. Be sure that your work area is well ventilated. In particular, avoid small unventilated closets when mixing chemicals or processing negatives and prints. Take special care when mixing dry chemicals and always wear the correct lung and eye protection. Do not share respirators and store them sealed in a container so the filters don’t continue to absorb impurities from the atmosphere. Developer The developer usually contains considerable quantities of hydroquinone and metol (monpmethylpñaminophenol sulphate), both of which cause severe skin irritation and allergic reaction. These are dissolved in an alkaline solution containing sodium sulphite and sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide. These chemicals can cause skin irritation and burns. NEVER PUT HANDS INTO THE DEVELOPER. If skin contact does occur, wash the skin copiously with water and then with an acid type cleanser. Stop bath The stop bath in film processing consists of weak acid solution. The concentrated acid can cause burns and inhalation of the vapours can irritate the eyes, breathing passages and throat. Potassium chrome alum, sometimes used as a stop hardener, contain chromium and can cause ulcerations especially in cuts and nasal membranes. Always add the acid (stop bath) to the water, not the water to the acid. Fixer The fixer usually contains sodium sulphite, acetic acid and sodium thiosulphate (hypo), boric acid and potassium alum. The mixture of sodium sulphite and acetic acid produces sulphur dioxide which is extremely corrosive to the lungs. Potassium alum, a hardener used in film fixer, is a weak sensitiser and may cause skin dermatitis. Toners Not offered at the NAS. Handle toners with care. Do not allow toning chemicals to touch your skin and avoid breathing vapours. Selenium toner is particularly dangerous and some manufacturers have discontinued production. Intensifiers and bleaches can be very dangerous. The common two components of intensifiers contain potassium and hydrochloric acid. The separate components can cause burns and the mixture produces chromic acid. Its vapours are very corrosive and may cause lung cancer. Handling of the powder of another intensifier, mercuric chloride, is very hazardous because of the inhalation of the dusts and resultant mercury poisoning. Reducer The commonest reducer contains potassium ferricyanide. If it comes into contact with heat or concentrated acid, the extremely poisonous hydrogen cyanide gas may be released. Hardeners and stabilisers These often contain formaldehyde which is very poisonous, extremely irritating to the eyes, throat and breathing passages and can cause dermatitis, severe allergies and asthma. Some of the solutions used to negatives contain harmful chlorinated hydrocarbons. Working safely with colour processing • Keep colour processor door CLOSED at all times to prevent chemical backdraft • Wait for your print away from the print exit point – avoid breathing in the fumes there Colour processing involves many of the same chemicals used in black and white processing. Developers use dye couplers, which can cause severe skin problems and some solutions contain toxic organic solvents. As colour printing chemicals are covered and contained in the processor, the risk to printers is reduced. However, if the door to the processing room is left open, the backdraft causes users to breathe in chemicals For information about specific chemicals, refer to the material safety data sheets (MSDS)

104


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 105

Working safely in the lighting studio • Receive class instruction in the use of all equipment before handling it • Avoid shining lights in people’s eyes; don’t look directly at photographic lights • Allow tungsten lights to cool down before moving. Lamps can explode if moved while hot. • Keep protective covering on lamps • Ensure all tripods, light stands, camera stands are secured properly and do not cause a trip hazard • Be aware of other people’s movements in the space at all times. Inform people sharing the space of your movements • Set up electrical cords so they are not a trip hazard • Discuss potentially toxic or dangerous props with lecturers prior to using Working safely in the digital studio • Wash your hands before and after a computer session to avoid transmitting and receiving viral infections • Set up your chair before you begin computer work so your neck, back and arms are not strained. • Use a chair with a dynamic chair back and sit back in it • Sit at arm’s length from monitor, feet on floor or stable footrest, wrists flat and straight in relation to forearms to use keyboard/mouse • Centre monitor and keyboard in front of you with top of monitor at eye level • Take regular breaks of at least 5 mins every hour away from the screen SUMMARY Take seriously the possibility of health hazards. The best safeguards are: • being aware of potential hazards • following these guidelines to minimise hazards • using common sense Further reading: Beyond Basic Photography by Henry Horenstein Health Hazards Manual for Artists by Michael Mcgann Overexposure: Health Hazards in Photography by Susan D.Shaw

105


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 106

PRINTMAKING In First Year students are introduced to some of the traditional processes of printmaking. These may include: lithographic, relief, intaglio and silkscreen processes. Students who choose Printmaking as their Major Study use printmaking to develop images that form the basis for individual aesthetic and technical development. Studio history and theory contextualises studio practice. As students progress in their Printmaking Major, it is expected that their work will become increasingly self-directed, and will evidence critical and speculative processes. Students can then develop an increasing capacity to analyse and discuss their own work and that of their peers in a contemporary art context. The Printmaking Department currently operates two studios with facilities for intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printing. Students are encouraged to use the departments’ and campus computer facilities and second and third year students have their own permanent work areas outside the specialised print studios.There are no prescribed texts for this course. Students are expected to research and identify text relevant to their needs. List of suggested text are supplied by staff. There are no prescribed texts for this course. Students are expected to research and identify text relevant to their needs. Lists of suggested texts are supplied by staff. YEAR 1 PRI100 Studio Introduction Printmaking 3CP HPW12 for 3 weeks S1 Subject Description Studio Introduction Printmaking introduces students to the essential concepts, skills and methodologies of the printmaking studio. The subject aims to familiarise students with the creative possibilities of printmaking practice, informed by a practical studio experience. The subject comprises a series of thematically based class projects and exercises that explore the fundamental principles of image development through the use of printmaking process including: • Development and realisation of visual ideas through the use of intaglio and relief printmaking media • Historical origins and function of printmaking process as a means for the production and dissemination of images. • Printmaking studio conventions and protocols including the editioning and documentation of prints • Contemporary standards of professional studio practice and OH&S relevant to the printmaking studio

106


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 107

Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Printmaking Studio Introduction, students will be able to: • develop and realise visual ideas through the use of elementary printmaking process • demonstrate technical competence in elementary printmaking process • describe and compare the historical origin, function and principle characteristics of intaglio and relief printmaking media • engage in discussion of their work and that of their peers • understand the fundamental principles of display and conservation of printed works on paper • undertake tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio Delivery Methods All contact hours in Printmaking Studio Introduction are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. • formal studio instruction • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstrations • formal critiques Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI100 will be conducted on the final day of each class rotation. Assessment Requirements Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal which evidences all aspects of research into the use of printmaking practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice etc. Textbooks Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data.

107


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 108

Recommended Readings Landau, David and Peter Parshall. The Renaissance Print: 1470-1550. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994. McCann, Michael. Health Hazards Manual for Artists. Guilford, Conn.: Lyons, 2003. Saff, Donald and Deli Sacilotto. Printmaking: History and Process. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1978. Walker, Barry and Karyn Zieve. Prints of the German Expressionists and their Circle: Collection of the Brooklyn Museum. New York: Brooklyn Museum, 1988. PRI120 Studio Elective I Printmaking 5CP HPW12 for 4 weeks S2 Prerequisite/s: CER100, PAI100, PHO100, PRI100, SCU100 Corequisite/s: AHT100, DRA100 Subject Description Studio Elective Printmaking 1 provides students with an opportunity to consolidate the introductory experience attained in Studio Introduction Printmaking. The subject aims to further the creative, intellectual and speculative capacity of each student, informed by a practical studio experience and to introduce to each student the body of knowledge that constitutes the printmaking discipline. Studio Elective Printmaking 1, follows a sequence of thematically based class projects and exercises that further explore the fundamental methodologies of printmaking practice including: • origins and function of the process area studied as a means for the reproduction and dissemination of images. • development and realisation of visual ideas through the use of printmaking media • the material nature of printmaking media and its functional relationship with subject matter. • printmaking studio conventions and protocols including the editioning and documentation of prints • contemporary standards of professional practice and OH&S relevant to the printmaking studio Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Printmaking Studio Elective 1, students will be able to: • develop and realise visual ideas through the use of intaglio and relief printmaking process • demonstrate technical competence in ‘single matrix’ intaglio printmaking process • describe the historical origin, development and function of intaglio and relief printmaking • describe and compare the historical and contemporary perspectives that underscore these practices

108


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 109

• understand the fundamental principles of the editioning, documentation, display and conservation of prints • engage in critical analysis of their work and that of their peers • undertake tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio Delivery Methods All contact hours in Studio Elective 1 Printmaking are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. • formal studio instruction • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstrations • formal critiques Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI120 will be conducted on the final day of class. Assessment Requirements Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal which evidences all aspects of research into the use of printmaking practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice etc. Textbooks Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data. Recommended Readings Landau, David and Peter Parshall. The Renaissance Print: 1470-1550. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1994. McCann, Michael. Health Hazards Manual for Artists. Guilford, Conn.: Lyons, 2003. Saff, Donald and Deli Sacilotto. Printmaking: History and Process. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1978. Walker, Barry and Karyn Zieve. Prints of the German Expressionists and their Circle: Collection of the Brooklyn Museum. New York: Brooklyn Museum, 1988.

109


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 110

YEAR 2 PRI200 Printmaking Major II 26CP HPW13 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1, PRI120 Subject Description Printmaking Major II provides students with an opportunity to expand the introductory skills attained in their first year of study within the more specific context of the printmaking studio. The subject aims to further the creative, intellectual and speculative capacity of each student, informed by a practical studio experience and to develop in each student an evolving awareness of the body of knowledge that constitutes the printmaking discipline. The subject involves a sequence of thematically based class projects that constitute a comprehensive exploration of the significant techniques and methodologies of printmaking practice including: • intaglio, relief, lithographic and silkscreen printmaking process, artist books and folios • development and realisation of visual ideas through the use of printmaking media • visual and perceptual response to subject matter and thematic premise • the formal nature of printmaking media and its functional relationship with subject matter. • research and development of visual ideas within the context of printmaking practice • print editioning, documentation and conservation practices • contemporary standards of professional practice and OH&S relevant to the printmaking studio The Professional Studies component comprises of a series of weekly group tutorials of one hour that address the development and key aspects of printmaking practice within the context of the process areas being studied in Printmaking Major II including: • origins and function of the various processes as a means for the reproduction and dissemination of images • evolution from the industrial genesis of printmaking process toward discrete fine art practice. • student presentations and associated written paper (500-1000 words) Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Printmaking Major II, students will be able to: • conceive, develop and realise visual ideas through the use of printmaking media in response to thematic premise • demonstrate technical competence in the Printmaking process areas of Intaglio, relief, lithographic and silk screen printmaking process • demonstrate awareness of the formal and conceptual capacity of each process area studied

110


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 111

• demonstrate understanding of the historical and contemporary perspectives that inform printmaking practice • demonstrate understanding of display and conservation issues relating to works on paper • critically analyse and discuss their work and that of their peers such that their criticism may acknowledge the broader cultural implications of printmaking practice • undertake tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio Delivery Methods All contact hours in Printmaking Major II are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. Responding to the range of expertise required to meet subject content and learning outcomes, a range of staff are employed within the program to deliver specialised project units and areas of study. The allocated 13 hours per week consists of: • studio Instruction • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstration • formal critiques • supervised studio project units of study Studio based instruction throughout the subject is augmented by a visiting artist program, staff directed off campus activities, and self directed study. Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI200 will be conducted on the conclusion of the academic year. Assessment Requirements Mid year review At mid year a formal review of all work undertaken is conducted. Students are advised of their progress, through the use of the progress indicators: ‘satisfactory’ or ‘un-satisfactory’ and advised where necessary of action required to address unsatisfactory progress. End of Year Assessment Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for each project unit including any self-directed work completed that evidences competence in three printmaking processes • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc.

111


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 112

• a journal which evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of printmaking practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and individual artist practice etc. • any set writing tasks from the Studio Theory component Textbooks Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts, for every process area and thematic project studied. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data. Recommended Readings Gage, John. Colour and Meaning. London: Thames & Hudson, 1999. Castleman, Riva. Prints of the Twentieth Century: a History. London: Thames & Hudson, 1988. Castleman, Riva. American Impressions: Prints since Pollock. New York: A.A. Knopf, 1985. Feldman, Frayda and Jorg Schellmann, eds. Andy Warhol Prints: Catalogue Raisonne, 19621987. New York: Distributed Art Publishers in association with Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, Inc., Edition Schellmann, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., 1997. Grishin, Sasha. Australian Printmaking in the 1990s: Artist Printmakers 1990-1995. Roseville: Craftsman House, 1997. Harrison, Charles and Paul Wood, eds. Art in Theory, 1900-2000: an Anthology of Changing Ideas. Malden: Blackwell, 2003. Kolenberg, Hendrik and Anne Ryan. Australian Prints from the Gallery's Collection. Sydney: Art Gallery of New South Wales, 1998. Saff, Donald and Deli Sacilotto. Printmaking: History and Process. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1978. Storck, Gerhard. Artist's proof. Koln: Oktagon, 1998. Tallman, Susan. The Contemporary Print: from Pre-Pop to Post-Modern. London: Thames & Hudson, 1996. Watrous, James. American Printmaking: a Century of American Printmaking, 1880-1980. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984. Wye, Deborah and Wendy Weitman. Eye on Europe: Prints, Books & Multiples, 1960 to Now. New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2006.

112


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 113

SECOND YEAR STUDIO ELECTIVES PRI215 Printmaking and the Figure 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 1 – 9) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description Printmaking and the Figure will involve working in the printmaking studios with a life model, working directly to the plate/block to produce images that will be further developed throughout the subsequent weeks. The course will provide students with an opportunity to expand the introductory skills gained in the first year of study in printmaking including monotype, relief and intaglio process. Students will be encouraged to further develop images and ideas being developed in their respective Studio Major studies and to explore the creative use of printmaking with the figure as subject. Students will be provided with a materials list in the first lesson. Basic tools, equipment and some materials will be supplied. Students will be expected to provide their own printing paper, plates/blocks and protective clothing. Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of the subject, students will be able to: • conceive, develop and realise imagery through the use of printmaking media in response to the life model • demonstrate technical competence in the printmaking processes utilised • demonstrate awareness of the historical and contemporary perspectives which underscore these practices • critically analyse and discuss their work and that of their peers • undertake tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio Delivery Methods All contact hours in Printmaking and the Figure are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. The allocated 6 hours per week consists of: • studio Instruction • life drawing sessions • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstration • formal critiques

113


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 114

Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI215 will be conducted on the conclusion of the elective classes. Assessment Requirements Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the subject including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal which evidences relevant aspects of research into the subject, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice etc. Textbooks Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts, for the various process area studied. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data. Recommended Readings Castleman, Riva. Prints of the Twentieth Century: a History. London: Thames & Hudson, 1988. Castleman, Riva. American Impressions: Prints since Pollock. New York: A.A. Knopf, 1985. Grishin, Sasha. Australian Printmaking in the 1990s: Artist Printmakers 1990-1995. Roseville: Craftsman House, 1997. Watrous, James. American Printmaking: a Century of American Printmaking, 1880-1980. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984

PRI214 Printmaking and the Landscape 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 10 – 18) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description The course will involve a series of field trips to different locations including the built environment, working directly to the plate/block to produce images that will be further developed in the printmaking studios. The course will provide students with an opportunity to expand the introductory skills gained in the first year of study in printmaking including monotype, relief and intaglio process. Students will be encouraged to further develop images and ideas being developed in their respective Studio Major studies and to explore the creative use of printmaking with landscape subjects.

114


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 115

Students will be provided with a materials list in the first lesson. Basic tools, equipment and some materials will be supplied. Students will be expected to provide their own printing paper, plates/blocks and protective clothing. Learning Outcomes • Upon the successful completion of the subject, students will be able to: • conceive, develop and realise imagery through the use of printmaking media in response to landscape subjects • demonstrate technical competence in the printmaking processes utilised • demonstrate awareness of the historical and contemporary perspectives which underscore these practices • critically analyse and discuss their work and that of their peers • undertake tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio Delivery Methods All contact hours in Printmaking and the Landscape are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. The allocated 6 hours per week consists of: • studio Instruction • field trips • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstration • formal critiques Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI214 will be conducted on the conclusion of the elective classes. Assessment Requirements Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the subject including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal which evidences relevant aspects of research into the subject, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice etc.

115


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 116

Textbooks Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts, for the various process area studied. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data. Recommended Readings Castleman, Riva. Prints of the Twentieth Century: a History. London: Thames & Hudson, 1988. Castleman, Riva. American Impressions: Prints since Pollock. New York: A.A. Knopf, 1985. Grishin, Sasha. Australian Printmaking in the 1990s: Artist Printmakers 1990-1995. Roseville: Craftsman House, 1997. Watrous, James. American Printmaking: a Century of American Printmaking, 1880-1980. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984.

PRI232 The Painterly Print 5CP HPW6 S2 (Weeks 19 – 27) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description The course will involve a series of demonstrations and exercises in the use of both traditional and non-tradition printmaking media to develop original work. Emphasis will be placed upon processes that explore the use of colour, the ‘gestural’ mark and image surface, including monotype and collagraph. The course will provide students with an opportunity to expand the introductory skills gained in the first year of study in printmaking including monotype, relief and intaglio process. Students will be encouraged to further develop images and ideas being developed in their respective Studio Major studies and to explore the creative use of printmaking within their independent practice. Students will be provided with a materials list in the first lesson. Basic tools, equipment and some materials will be supplied. Students will be expected to provide their own printing paper, plates/blocks and protective clothing. Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of the subject, students will be able to: • conceive, develop and realise imagery through the use of printmaking media studied • demonstrate technical competence in the printmaking processes utilised • demonstrate awareness of the historical and contemporary perspectives which underscore these practices • critically analyse and discuss their work and that of their peers

116


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 117

• undertake tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio Delivery Methods All contact hours are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. The allocated 6 hours per week consists of: • studio Instruction • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstration • formal critiques Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI232 will be conducted on the conclusion of the elective classes. Assessment Requirements Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the subject including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • a journal which that evidences relevant aspects of research into the subject, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice etc. Recommended Readings Castleman, Riva. Prints of the Twentieth Century: a History. London: Thames & Hudson, 1988. Castleman, Riva. American Impressions: Prints since Pollock. New York: A.A. Knopf, 1985. Grishin, Sasha. Australian Printmaking in the 1990s: Artist Printmakers 1990-1995. Roseville: Craftsman House, 1997. Noyce, Richard. Printmaking at the Edge. London: A & C Black, 2006. Watrous, James. American Printmaking: a Century of American Printmaking, 1880-1980. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1984. Please Note: As these subject areas may not be covered in such detail in Second Year Printmaking Major, any students intending to enrol in Second Year Printmaking Major who have an interest in these subjects are strongly advised to enrol in the relevant studio electives.

117


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 118

YEAR 3 PRI300 Printmaking Major III 30CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: AHT200, DRA200, PRI200, 6CP in electives Corequisite/s: DRA300 Subject Description Printmaking Major III provides students with an opportunity to consolidate the studio skills attained in their previous years of study within specific context of the printmaking studio and is designed to accommodate each student’s individual development. The subject aims to consolidate the creative, intellectual and investigative capacity of each student, informed by a practical studio experience. The subject seeks to establish in each student an understanding of the body of knowledge that constitutes the printmaking discipline and the required skill and methodology for independent studio practice. Students are required to develop and submit an individual Studio Major project proposal. The Studio Major project proposal forms a foundation for self directed research and development of a body of work throughout the year, which in turn, forms the basis for final assessment at the conclusion of the year. It provides students with the opportunity to develop a comprehensive body of work that is reflective of their individual technical and conceptual interests. The Professional Studies component comprises of a series of weekly group tutorials of one hour that are intended to guide students toward the contextualisation of their individual Studio Major projects by addressing significant aspects of the development of contemporary printmaking practice. Each student is required to present a slide talk and associated written paper with visual documentation that discusses the historical aesthetic and conceptual influences that have shaped and informed their individual Studio Major project. The written paper will serve to discuss and contextualise the work presented in the final assessment. Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Printmaking Major III, students will be able to: • conceive, develop and realise visual ideas through the use of printmaking media in response to individual enquiry • demonstrate technical and conceptual accomplishment with the printmaking media utilised in individual studio projects • identify and analyse the history, conventions, ethics and materials of the printmaking process utilised • identify and analyse the formal and conceptual underpinnings of printmaking media utilised • locate and evaluate their individual work within a broader historical and cultural framework • critically analyse and contextualise their work and that of their peers

118


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 119

• engage with printmaking studio conventions and protocols relevant to their individual enquiry, at a level commensurate with independent art practice • locate their individual practice within, or across, established curatorial models • undertake tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio and more specifically their independent practice Delivery Methods All contact hours in Printmaking Major III are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. Responding to the range of expertise required to meet subject content and learning outcomes, a range of staff are employed within the program to respond to individual student project and areas of study. The allocated 13 hours per week consists of: • studio Instruction • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstration • formal critiques Studio based instruction throughout the subject is augmented by a visiting artist program, staff directed off campus activities, and self directed study. Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking. Students enrolled in Printmaking Major III are provided with an independent workstation in the studio area. Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI300 will be conducted on the conclusion of the academic year. Assessment Requirements Mid year review At mid year a formal review of all work undertaken is conducted. Students are advised of their progress, through the use of the progress indicators: ‘satisfactory’ or ‘un-satisfactory’ and advised where necessary of action required to address unsatisfactory progress. End of Year Assessment Students are required to submit: • a cohesive body of work completed for the Studio Major project component • an associated written paper that will serve to discuss and contextualise the work presented in the final assessment • visual documentation of 5 major works produced as part of the Studio Major Project • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc • a journal which evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of printmaking

119


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 120

practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice Recommended Readings Students are provided with technical notes and associated texts, for every process area and thematic project studied. Students are required to maintain a resource journal containing all such material in addition to any self directed research and technical data. Recommended Readings Castleman, Riva. Contemporary Prints. New York: Viking Press, 1973. Connor, Steven. Post-Modernist Culture: an Introduction to the Theories of the Contemporary. Oxford: Blackwell, 1997. Grishin, Sasha. Contemporary Australian Printmaking: an Interpretative History. Roseville: Craftsman House, 1994. Humphries, Tristan. Transformations: the Fine Art Print and the Computer. London: Chelsea College of Art and Design, 1996. Noyce, Richard. Printmaking at the Edge. London: A & C Black, 2006. Saunders, Gill and Rosie Miles. Prints Now: Directions and Definitions, London: V&A, 2006. Tallman, Susan. The Contemporary Print: from Pre-Pop to Post-Modern. London: Thames & Hudson, 1996. Wye, Deborah. Committed to Print: Social and Political Themes in Recent American Printed Art. New York: Museum of Modern Art, c1988. Wye, Deborah and Wendy Weitman. Eye on Europe: Prints, Books & Multiples, 1960 to Now. New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2006. Journals Art on Paper Imprint Printmaking Today

120


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 121

Honours Level PRI400 Honours Printmaking Major 50CP HPW4 S3 Prerequisites: Completion of BFA with a credit average and a Distinction grade in the final year of Printmaking Studio Major Co-requisites: AHT400, STS400 Subject Description Honours Printmaking Major and provides the opportunity to further the technical, creative, and speculative capacity of each student within the Printmaking discipline. The subject aims to establish in each student the necessary technical, conceptual, and critical skills for autonomous art practice and postgraduate study within the specific context of the Printmaking discipline. Students are required to undertake a Studio Project, which is comprised of two parts across the two semesters: Semester 1 The student will: • refine their original Statement of Intention through defining aims, expected outcomes and timeframe. • begin to develop the Studio Project through the production of preliminary artwork. • attend regular individual and group tutorials reviews with their lecturers. • prepare a draft Investigation Report for mid-year review. • participate in specialist workshops and visiting artist lectures in the Printmaking department. Semester 2 The student will: • produce a major body of work for exhibition which visually articulates the concerns identified in the Studio Project Statement of Intention • complete an Investigation Report • compile support resource documentation of the Studio Project Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Honours Printmaking Major, students will be able to: • develop a coherent body of work through the systematic investigation of a Studio Project. • present a completed body of work to exhibition standard that confirms the knowledge and skill integral to independent practice • demonstrate technical and conceptual accomplishment with the printmaking media utilised in individual studio projects • locate and evaluate their individual work within a broader historical and cultural framework

121


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 122

• extend their knowledge of both the historical and contemporary practices relevant to Printmaking discipline. • engage with printmaking studio conventions and protocols relevant to their individual enquiry, at a level commensurate with independent art practice • demonstrate a sound understanding of contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the printmaking studio and more specifically their independent practiceeir independent practice Delivery Methods All contact hours in Honours Printmaking Major are delivered as ‘face to face’ studio based instruction. Responding to the range of expertise required to meet subject content and learning outcomes, a range of staff are employed within the program to respond to individual student project and areas of study. The allocated 4 hours per week consists of: • studio Instruction • individual and group tutorials • technical demonstration • formal critiques Studio based instruction throughout the subject is augmented by a visiting artist program, staff directed off campus activities, and self directed study. Specialist Facilities and Equipment The printmaking studios of NAS operate two workshop areas offering comprehensive facilities for the study of intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen printmaking. Students enrolled in Honours Printmaking Major are provided with an independent workstation in the studio area. Assessment Dates Assessment of PRI400 will be conducted on the conclusion of the academic year. Assessment Requirements Mid year review At mid year a formal review of all work undertaken is conducted. Students are advised of their progress, through the use of the progress indicators: ‘satisfactory’ or ‘unsatisfactory’ and advised where necessary of action required to address unsatisfactory progress. End of Year Assessment At the end of the academic year, final assessment will be based upon the presentation of a body of completed artwork including supporting resource documentation.

122


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 123

Major Body of Work - 80% Students are required to present a major body of work of professional standard. This work should fulfil the intentions articulated in the Statement of Intention for the Studio Project. Studio Investigation Report - 20% Students are required to submit a Studio Investigation Report that documents and discusses the technical, material and conceptual issues relevant to the student’s investigations. The report will include: a written paper which serves to discuss and contextualise the body of work presented for assessment relevant technical data a bibliography citing relevant texts visual documentation of the major body of work presented for assessment. Textbooks There are no set texts for PRI400. Recommended Readings Bachelard, Gaston. The Poetics of Space. Boston: Beacon Press, 1994. Castleman, Riva. Contemporary Prints. New York: Viking Press, 1973. Connor, Steven. Post-Modernist Culture: an Introduction to the Theories of the Contemporary. Oxford: Blackwell, 1997. Grishin, Sasha. Contemporary Australian Printmaking: an Interpretative History. Roseville: Craftsman House, 1994. Humphries, Tristan. Transformations: the Fine Art Print and the Computer. London: Chelsea College of Art and Design, 1996. Noyce, Richard. Printmaking at the Edge. London: A & C Black, 2006. Saunders, Gill and Rosie Miles. Prints Now: Directions and Definitions, London: V&A, 2006. Tallman, Susan. The Contemporary Print: from Pre-Pop to Post-Modern. London: Thames & Hudson, 1996. Wye, Deborah. Committed to Print: Social and Political Themes in Recent American Printed Art. New York: Museum of Modern Art, c1988. Journals Art on Paper Imprint Printmaking Today

123


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 124

PRINTMAKING OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY (OH&S) GUIDELINES In the interests of maintaining a safe and productive studio, all users the NAS Printmaking Department are required to observe safe studio and workshop practice. All staff, students and visitors are required to observe the following OH&S guidelines: 1. If you have an existing medical condition or a disability or you are taking prescribed medication that may affect your ability to use studio equipment/materials please notify the lecturer in charge or Head of Department before beginning work. 2. Appropriate clothing must be worn at all times in the studio area including sturdy closed footwear, no loose clothing, long hair tied back. 3. Appropriate protective clothing must be worn in the studio including protective apron, solvent proof gloves, dust mask/respirator, protective eyewear, ear protection. 4. Accidents, injuries and near misses must be reported immediately to the lecturer in charge or the Head of Department. 5. Do not use the studio equipment/materials if you are under the effect of alcohol or any illegal drugs. 6. Do not use tools or equipment that you have not been instructed in the use of. 7. Do not help yourself to tools, equipment or materials unless instructed by a member of staff. 8. Students and visitors are not permitted to mix and dispense chemicals 9. All works areas are to be kept clean and tidy and designated clean up areas must be used. 10. Designated clean up areas must be used 11. Familiarise yourself with the studio in case of emergency, eg location of first aid kits, exits, fire extinguisher, fire blankets, safety shower etc 12. The consumption of food, beverages and cigarettes is prohibited in the studio area 13. The use of mobile phones and personal stereos is prohibited in the studio area 14. Smoking is prohibited in all buildings. Compliance with any staff request regarding health and safety is regarded as compulsory. Failure to comply with any of the above may result in you being asked to leave the studio. If you feel adversely effected by any of these guidelines or feel unable to comply, please notify your studio lecturer or Head of Department to review your situation and devise an appropriate personal strategy. If necessary you may refer questions in writing to the NAS OH&S Committee.

124


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 125

SCULPTURE The Sculpture Department offers a broad range of programs that emphasise the exploration of conceptual and aesthetic development through the teaching of specific technical skills in an expansive and experimental approach, which encourage innovation within the culture of studio practice. Students are taught the origins and history of sculptural language in relation to the development of their own practice. Students are exposed to a number of levels of critical evaluation of their studio work. This includes discussion with lecturers on a one to one basis, group discussions, critique involving a number of lecturers and professional studies which underpins their studio practice. Students will acquire a thorough knowledge of traditional and non traditional material usages and the associated methodologies relating to studio practice. The Sculpture Department facilities include studios for first, second, final year and Honours students. There is a series of workshop areas, which include a foundry, woodworking area, metal fabrication area, stone carving area, wet area (for modelling and plaster casting), tool bay housing a large range of specialist hand tools and power tools, available to support sculpture students. YEAR 1 SCU100 Studio Introduction Sculpture 3CP HPW12 for 3 weeks S1 Subject Description The subject involves problem solving exercises exploring the means of expression through the conventions of carving and construction developing and understanding of sculpture language. Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Studio Introduction Sculpture students will be able to: • Identify and describe the historical/contemporary modes, function and principle characteristics of carving, modelling and construction relevant to introductory sculpture • demonstrate technical competence in the elementary sculptural processes and appropriate modes • develop and realise ideas through the use of the elementary processes of sculpture • engage at an introductory level in critical discussion of their work and that of their peers • undertake prescribed technical and performance tasks in sculpture to contemporary standards of professional studio practice • Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the sculpture studio. Assessment Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed

125


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 126

• support work including relevant maquettes, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc • journal that evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of sculptural practice in the visual arts, including notes from historical/theoretical discussions and technical demonstrations, individual technical research, journal articles and research of individual artist practice etc Provisional Assessment is conducted by a minimum of two people including: • the Head of Department or nominee • nominated Studio Lecturer/s Recommended reading Barker, Ian, and Giovanni Carandente. Caro at the Trajan Markets, Rome. New York: Overlook Press, 1994. Duby, Georges and Jean-Luc Daval, ed. Sculpture: from Antiquity to the Present Day. Koln: Taschen, 2002. Edwards, Deborah. Bertram Mackennal. Sydney: Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2007. Gray, Cleve, ed. David Smith by David Smith: sculpture and writings. London: Thames & Hudson, 1968. Meyer, Laure. Black Africa: masks, sculpture, jewelry. Paris: Editions Pierre Terrail, 1992. Varnedoe, Kirk et.al. Rodin: a Magnificent Obsession. London: Merrell, 2001.

SCU120 Studio Elective I Sculpture 5CP HPW12 for 4 weeks S2 Prerequisite/s: CER100, PAI100, PHO100, PRI100, SCU100 Corequisite/s: AHT100, DRA100 Subject Description The first year Sculpture elective develops the student sculptural skills and knowledge in relation to the expressive language of the body and also develops an understanding of the relationships between anatomical, skeletal structure, volume and surface tension. Learning Outcomes Students will be able to: • develop and realise ideas through the use of traditional processes in sculpture • demonstrate technical competence in at least two of the traditions of sculpture (carving, construction, modelling) • engage in critical analysis of their work and that of their peers • undertake all technical and performance tasks in sculpture to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the sculpture studio Year 2

126


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 127

Assessment Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed • support work including relevant maquettes, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc • journal that evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of sculptural practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research, journal articles and individual artist practice etc. Provisional Assessment is conducted by a minimum of two people including: • the Head of Department or nominee • nominated Studio Lecturer/s

SCU200 Sculpture Major II 26CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1, SCU120 Corequisite/s: DRA200 Subject Description The course continues the development of practice in the four major conventions in sculpture (Carving, construction, modelling and installation). The programs are designed to develop the students ability to resolve conceptual, technical and aesthetic problems. The students will also become proficient in using a large range of equipment. Learning Outcomes Upon the successful completion of Sculpture Major II, students will be able to: • conceive, develop and realise a variety of sculptural modes, ideas and means as a response to assignments given by lecturers • identify and describe the conceptual underpinnings of the sculptural modes and technical methodologies eg (carving, modelling and construction) studied • understand the physical strengths and limitations of various materials and methods • identify and describe the historical and contemporary perspectives that underscore their individual practice in sculpture • critically discuss their work and that of their peers such that their criticism may acknowledge the broader cultural implications of sculptural practice undertake prescribed technical and performance tasks to contemporary standards of • professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and • safety standards relevant to the sculpture studio

127


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 128

Assessment Students are required to submit: • all work produced for each project including any self-directed work completed that • evidences competence sculptural processes • support work including relevant maquettes, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc • journal that evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of sculptural practice in the visual arts including notes from historical/theoretical discussions and technical • demonstrations, individual technical research and individual artist practice etc • any set writing tasks from the Studio Theory component. End of Year Assessment is conducted by a minimum of three people including: • the Head of Department or nominee • nominated Studio Lecturer/s • a moderator external to the department Recommended Reading Barker, Ian, and Giovanni Carandente. Caro at the Trajan Markets, Rome. New York: Overlook Press, 1994. Duby, Georges and Jean-Luc Daval, ed. Sculpture: from Antiquity to the Present Day. Koln: Taschen, 2002. Edwards, Deborah. Bertram Mackennal. Sydney: Art Gallery of New South Wales, 2007. Gray, Cleve, ed. David Smith by David Smith: sculpture and writings. London: Thames & Hudson, 1968. Meyer, Laure. Black Africa: masks, sculpture, jewelry. Paris: Editions Pierre Terrail, 1992. Varnedoe, Kirk et.al. Rodin: a Magnificent Obsession. London: Merrell, 2001.

128


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 129

SECOND YEAR STUDIO ELECTIVES SCU210 Construction 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 1 – 9) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description and Learning Outcomes The subject will introduce to students the techniques and methodologies involved in making constructional sculpture. The course encourages students to consider the development and realization of visual ideas from various aspects including: • the making of sculpture by means of manipulating materials eg. Mild steel; sheet and plate steel, shaft grade rods, timber, plywoods, and other fabrication materials • the making of sculpture from subjects such as life eg. portrait and the figure or still life, landscape , transcriptions of art historical works, non representational ideas • the exploration of the above subject conventions • the historical and contemporary perspectives relating to the particular practice • expansion of knowledge of the equipment, techniques and materials used • discussion of work produced in the class • contemporary standards of professional studio practice and OH&S relevant to the • foundry and the sculpture studio Assessment Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc • journal that evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of printmaking practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and individual artist practice etc Final Assessment is conducted by a minimum of three people including: • the Head of Department or nominee • nominated Studio Lecturer/s • a moderator external to the department Recommended Reading Hall, James. The World as Sculpture. London: Pimlico, 2000. Krauss Rosalind E. Passages in Modern Sculpture. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1981. Schwabsky, Barry et al. Jessica Stockholder. London: Phaidon, 1995. Thompson, Jon et al. Richard Deacon. London: Phaidon, 2000. Tucker, William. The Language of Sculpture. London: Thames & Hudson, 1977.

129


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 130

SCU211 Bronze Casting 3CP HPW6 S1 (Weeks 10 – 18) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description and Learning Outcomes The subject will introduce students to the techniques and methodologies involved in the making of sculpture in the field of bronze casting. The course encourages students to consider the development and realization of visual ideas from various aspects including: • the making of sculpture by means of malleable materials such as clay and wax • the making of sculpture from the figure using models. • the exploration of figurative conventions • the historical and contemporary perspectives relating to the particular practise • expansion of knowledge of the equipment, techniques and materials used • discussion of work produced in the class • contemporary standards of professional studio practice and OH&S relevant to the foundry and the sculpture studio Assessment Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc • journal that evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of printmaking practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and individual artist practice etc. Final Assessment is conducted by a minimum of three people including: • the Head of Department or nominee • nominated Studio Lecturer/s • a moderator external to the department Recommended reading Hitchcock, Howard. Out of the Fiery Furnace. Los Altos: W. Kaufmann, 1985. Ammen, C. W. Lost Wax Investment Casting. Blue Ridge Summit: G/L Tab Books, 1977. Hughes, Richard and Michael Rowe. The Colouring, Bronzing & Patination of Metals. London: Crafts Council, 1982.

130


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 131

SCU230 Modelling 3CP HPW6 S2 (Weeks 19 – 27) Prerequisite/s: Completion of Year 1 Subject Description and Learning Outcomes The subject will introduce students to the techniques and methodologies involved in making sculpture within the field of modelling. The course encourages students to consider the development and realization of visual ideas from various aspects including: • the making of sculpture by means of malleable materials eg. clay, wax, papier mache, plaster • the making of sculpture from subjects such as life eg. portrait and the figure or still life, landscape, transcriptions of art historical works, non representational ideas • the exploration of the above subject conventions • the historical and contemporary perspectives relating to the particular practice • expansion of knowledge of the equipment, techniques and materials used • discussion of work produced in the class • contemporary standards of professional studio practice and OH&S relevant to the foundry and the sculpture studio Students are required to submit: • all finished work produced for the prescribed projects including any self-directed work completed. • support work including relevant working proofs, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc. • journal that evidences relevant aspects of research into the use of printmaking practice in the visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice etc. Final Assessment is conducted by a minimum of three people including: • the Head of Department or nominee • nominated Studio Lecturer/s • a moderator external to the department Recommended reading Boucher B. Earth and Fire: Italian Terracotta Sculpture from Donatello to Canova. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2001. Hall, James. The World as Sculpture. London: Pimlico, 2000. Krauss Rosalind E. Passages in Modern Sculpture. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1981. Tucker, William. The Language of Sculpture. London: Thames & Hudson, 1977.

131


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 132

YEAR 3 SCU300 Sculpture Major III 30CP HPW12 S3 Prerequisite/s: AHT200, DRA200, SCU200, 6CP in electives Corequisite/s: DRA300 Subject Description and Learning Outcomes In third year there is a change from an exercise orientated program set by staff to a more independent course of study. This leads the students towards developing a particular direction in their work and the beginning of an artistic vision. • conceive, develop and realise ideas through the use of sculpture in response to individual enquiry • demonstrate conceptual and technical accomplishment with the materials utilised in individual studio projects • identify and describe the history and conventions of the processes utilised • identify and describe the formal and conceptual/ theoretical underpinnings of their • sculpture in relation to their contemporary environment • locate and evaluate their individual work within a broader contemporary historical and cultural framework • critically analyse and contextualise their work and that of their peers as a process of realisation of the broader cultural implications of their art practice • engage with sculpture studio conventions and protocols relevant to their individual enquiry, at a level commensurate with independent art practice • locate their individual practice within, or across, established curatorial models • undertake all technical and performance tasks to contemporary standards of professional studio practice and according to acceptable Occupational Health and Safety standards relevant to the sculpture studio and more specifically their independent practice Assessment Students are required to submit • all finished work produced including any self-directed work completed in relation to their studio major project • an associated written paper that will serve to discuss and contextualise the work presented in the final assessment. • visual documentation of 5 major works produced as part of the Studio Major Project • a curriculum vitae detailing the development of their practice • support work including relevant maquettes, sketchbooks, preparatory drawings, technical trials etc • journal that shows evidence of relevant aspects of research into the making of sculpture in visual arts practice, including notes from technical demonstrations, individual technical research and research of individual artist practice etc.

132


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 133

End of Year Assessment is conducted by a minimum of three people including: • the Head of Department or nominee • nominated Studio Lecturer/s • a moderator external to the department Recommended Reading Bullock, Natasha and Reuben Keehan, ed. Zones of contact: a critical reader. Woolloomooloo: Artspace Visual Arts Centre Ltd., 2006. Beardsley, John. Earthworks and beyond: contemporary art in the landscape. New York: Abbeville Press, 2006. De Oliveira, Nicolas et al. Installation Art in the New Millennium. London: Thames and Hudson, 2003. Fuller, Peter. Beyond the Crisis in Art. London: Writers and Readers Pub. Cooperative Society, 1980. Goodwin, Richard. Richard Goodwin: Performance to Porosity. Fishermans Bend, Vic: Thames and Husdon Australia, 2006. Greenberg, Clement. Homemade Esthetics: observations on art and taste. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. Poeschke, Joachim. Donatello and his world: sculpture of the Italian Renaissance. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1993. Princenthal, Nancy et al. Doris Salcedo. London: Phaidon, 2000. Putnam, James. Art and Artifact. London: Thames & Hudson, 2001.

133


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 134

Honours Level Students considering studying for Honours in the Department of Sculpture should, if possible, consult the Head of Department by the end of third year of study to discuss the possibility of a fourth year. It is, however, possible to move to Honours at a later stage (maximum of 4 years after the completion of the BFA), and students wishing to do so should contact the School and submit an application.

SCU400 Honours Sculpture Major 50CP HPW4 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of BFA with a credit average and a Distinction grade in the final year of Sculpture Studio Major Corequisite/s: STS400, AHT400 The successful Honours candidate will be a self motivated person willing and able to further their creative and technical ability within the context of Sculpture. They will establish the conceptual, critical and technical skills necessary to become autonomous practicing artists. This will be done through studio practice, research and with the guidance of supervising staff. SCULPTURE DEPARTMENT SAFETY RULES The following rules must be complied with by staff, students and visitors: 1. Students and staff must ensure their own safety and the safety of others when in the sculpture area. 2. Safe foot wear must be worn at all times, either enclosed leather boots or shoes. No sandals or open toed shoes are allowed. No dresses, shorts, loose fitting clothes are to be worn and no dangling jewellery. Long hair should be tied back. 3. Personal protective equipment such as safety eye protection, hearing protection, gloves and dust masks must be worn when required and must be available at all times. To be purchased by students before classes. 4. The consumption of alcohol and illegal drugs is prohibited. 5. Persons using prescribed medication which may affect their ability to use machinery and equipment should notify the lecturer in charge. 6. Accidents and injuries must be reported immediately. There is a first aid cabinet in each work area in case of injury. For more serious injuries contact campus security immediately. 7. Students are not to work alone. 8. Work areas are to be kept clean and tidy, with rubbish and other safety hazards cleaned up promptly. 9. At the end of each class clean bench tops, sweep the floor, clean and put away tools. 10. Ensure power tools and leads are not damaged or unsafe. Report damage to the lecturer or technical assistant. 11. Remove all completed work after assessment.

134


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 135

12. Do not put toxic wastes or plaster down sinks or drains. 13. Lift awkward or heavy loads correctly or with the lifting equipment provided. 14. Do not use machinery or equipment unless you have received instruction in it’s use from a lecturer. If unsure about a safety issue check with your lecturer first. 15. Be polite when dealing with fellow students, lecturers and technical staff.

STUDIO SEMINAR (HONOURS) STS400 Honours Studio Seminar 5CP HPW2 S3 Prerequisite/s: Completion of BFA with a credit average and a Distinction grade in the final year of a Studio Major Corequisite/s: 50CP in Honours Studio Major, AHT400 The Honours Studio Seminar subject aims to: • provide specific support for students in the development of their Studio Project • extend student understanding of the practical realities of working as a professional artist • consider the broader social and cultural questions that contemporary artists face The Studio Seminar subject will contribute to the overall aims of the programme by requiring students to consider their activity within a professional and cultural framework and in relation to the concerns addressed in the Studio Major and the Art History and Theory subjects. The course will cover three main areas: • Methodology: Approaches to researching project directions including ways to identify and focus on initial ideas, source and select subject matter, record technical trials and tests, identify and investigate related precedents in the field, refine the student project and document investigations • Issues for contemporary artists: traditional and new media and techniques in the 21st century; art in an age of mass production and mass media; art between the market and the museum; art in the public arena and in public spaces • Professional practice management: Certain topics introduced in the BFA course will be reconsidered at a more advanced level: e.g. international gallery relations, legal issues, project funding and major survey exhibitions such as Biennale.

135


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 136

BACHELOR OF FINE ART RULES STANDARD ENROLMENT 1. In any year of study students must enrol in a minimum of 60CP to complete the requirements for the following year. No part time study mode is available in the Bachelor of Fine Art.

PREREQUISITE/S AND COREQUISITE/S REQUIREMENTS 2. A student enrolling in the Bachelor of Fine Art must satisfy the Prerequisite/s and Corequisite/s requirements for the degree.

PROGRESSION 3. In order to obtain credit points for the degree, a student must in that course: a. satisfy all attendance requirements b. complete satisfactorily any assignments prescribed c. pass any prescribed examination and assessment. 4. Students are not permitted to enrol in second year subjects until they have completed 60CP in Year 1. 5. Students are not permitted to enrol in third year subjects until they have completed 60CP in Year 1 and 50CP in Year 2. 6. Students who fail to complete 60CP in first year or 50CP in second or third year will be required to ‘show cause’ as to why they should be permitted to proceed with their studies. 7. A maximum of five years is permitted to complete the degree with approval by the Show Cause Committee. 8. The degree of Bachelor of Fine Art may be awarded as a Pass degree, or as an Honours degree in one Department. Three classes of Honours are awarded: Class 1, Class 2 in two divisions and Class 3.

SUBJECT EXEMPTIONS 9. Students seeking subject exemptions must submit documentary evidence of subjects completed elsewhere and specify the subjects they wish to complete within the course. The Registrar will then determine the number of credit points to be granted. Exemptions will not be granted for subjects completed more than 10 years ago.

MODIFICATION OF REQUIREMENTS 10. NAS may modify the requirements of any of these rules in special circumstances.

136


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 137

UNDERGRADUATE STUDY CONDITIONS FOR THE AWARD OF DEGREE 9856

BACHELOR OF FINE ART * Pass Degree To qualify for the award of the degree at Pass level, a student must obtain, normally over three years of study, 180CP in approved subjects including: 1. a total of 60CP in Year 1 subjects; 2. a Studio Major sequence of 56CP from Studio Discipline list below; 3. 6CP from second year Studio Electives; 4. 24CP from the Drawing core program in second and third year; 5. 4CP in second year Studio Seminar and 6CP in third year Professional Studies; 6. 12CP from the Art History/Theory core program in second and third year; 7. 12CP in Art History/Theory Electives taken in the second and third year of study. Studio Major Discipline List Ceramics, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture 9857

BACHELOR OF FINE ART HONOURS* To qualify for the award of the degree, a student must obtain, normally over four years of study, 240CP in approved subjects including: 8. A student who wishes to enter an approved Honours level program must have obtained no fewer than 180 credit points in accordance with Rules 1. – 6. above, and have satisfied the relevant Prerequisite/s. 9. In year 4 of study, the student shall complete an Honours level program in the relevant Department consisting of 50CP in Honours Studio Major (see list below), 5CP in Honours Studio Seminar and 5CP in Honours Art History and Theory. 10. Students who have been awarded the degree of Bachelor of Fine Art at Pass level from the National Art School, or a comparable degree from another institution, may be admitted to candidature for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Fine Art Honours level with credit for all subjects completed if, during their studies for the Pass degree, they have satisfied the Prerequisite/s for entry to the Honours program. Such permission will not be granted if more than four years have elapsed since the completion of the Pass degree. 11. If a candidate for the award of the degree at Honours level fails to obtain one of the classes of Honours specified in Rule 8, he/she may proceed to graduation for the award of a Bachelor of Fine Art degree if completed at the National Art School. Honours Studio Major List Ceramics, Drawing (available at Honours level only), Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture * In addition to the Conditions for the Award of the Degree, students should consult the Bachelor of Fine Art Rules.

137


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 138

STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT The Student Code of Conduct defines behaviour expected of all National Art School students. It is each student’s responsibility to know and comply with the NAS’ Student Code of Conduct. The aim of the National Art School is the intellectual, personal, social, and ethical development of the student. Self discipline and a respect for the rights of others in the School are necessary for the fulfilment of such goals. The Student Code of Conduct sets forth the standards of conduct expected of students who choose to study at the National Art School. The Code applies to individual students and is used to enforce NAS policies and regulations. The adoption of the Student Code of Conduct does not prohibit the NAS from implementing or maintaining additional rules to govern the conduct of students. Students are responsible for making themselves aware of all NAS rules and regulations pertaining to their rights and responsibilities as students. It identifies those behaviours considered unacceptable and not permitted for all students of the National Art School while on campus owned or controlled property, while on off campus field trips, or while representing the NAS in the community. Students who violate these standards will be subject to disciplinary action.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES NAS students are expected to accept the following responsibilities and to participate appropriately in the range of experiences which shape their courses of study: • to be self-motivated and self-directed learners • to be responsive and courteous when communicating and dealing with students, staff and visitors to the National Art School • to participate actively and positively in the teaching-learning environment, and maintain steady progress in their academic studies • comply with workload expectations, and notify appropriate staff if difficulties are experienced • to submit work which is their own • to provide feedback to NAS staff which is honest and fair • to accept constructive criticism • deal with differing opinion by rational debate rather than by vilification, coercion, bullying or any form of intimidatory behaviour

138


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 139

• to treat staff and students of the NAS with openness, honesty and courtesy and take an active role in the promotion of an environment free from harassment and discrimination according to state and federal legislation and NAS policy • to respect both NAS and private property • actively consider the health and safety of yourself and others when carrying out your duties • to be informed of opportunities to participate in institutional decision making • to make yourself aware of and comply with NAS policies and rules including information contained in NAS handbooks • protect the privacy of others and maintain appropriate confidentiality regarding personal matters • to use appropriately the relevant services and resources that the NAS provides • to ensure that information provided at enrolment is kept up to date

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Students must adhere to Health and Safety regulations provided by each Department. Failure to comply with the following regulations and procedures may result in misconduct penalties. • Always comply with health and safety instructions from technical assistants, academic staff and security. • Notify appropriate academic staff of any medical condition you have or medication you take, the medical procedure staff should follow to assist you in an emergency, and inform them of how it may impair your safety or performance. All information provided will be treated as confidential. • Do not use machinery or equipment if alone in the building, work always in pairs. • Footwear that completely encloses the feet must be worn at all times in workshops and studios. • Hair must be worn up at all times when using machinery. • Animals are not permitted on campus at any time. • No children or non-enrolled individuals are permitted in NAS buildings. • Students under the influence of non-prescribed drugs or alcohol are not permitted to use tools, equipment or machinery. • Protective clothing and appropriate masks in workshops must be worn. Students may not operate machinery or use tools when wearing loose clothing, unrestrained hair or jewellery. • Observation of ventilation requirements, use of odourless solvents, observance of disposal methods of paint and solvents in Painting and Drawing studios. • Smoking is not permitted in NAS buildings. • Should an accident or injury be sustained or encountered you must fill in an Accident Injury Report Form available from building 22 ground floor or a Subject Leader Please contact the Subject Leader for a more detailed description of OH&S regulations and practices relevant to each Department.

139


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 140

The following section defines behaviours that are considered misconduct.

1. ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT Academic Misconduct includes but is not limited to the following: AIDING or ABETTING ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT: Knowingly helping, procuring, or encouraging another person to engage in academic misconduct. CHEATING: Any dishonesty or deception in fulfilling an academic requirement such as: • Use and/or possession of unauthorised material or technology during an examination (any written or oral work submitted for evaluation and/or grade), such as, notes, tests, calculators, or computer programs. • Obtaining assistance with or answers from another person with or without that person's knowledge for assessment. • Providing assistance with or answers to another person during assessment. • Possessing, using, distributing, or selling unauthorised copies of an examination, or computer program. • Representing as one's own an assessment taken by another person. • Taking an assessment in place of another person. • Obtaining unauthorised access to the computer files of another person or agency, and/or altering or destroying those files. FABRICATION: The falsification of any information or citation in an academic exercise. PLAGIARISM: includes: • Submitting another's published or unpublished work, in whole, in part, or in paraphrase, as one's own without fully and properly crediting the author with footnotes, citations or bibliographical reference. • Submitting as one's own, original work, material obtained from an individual or agency without reference to the person or agency as the source of the material. • Submitting as one's own, original work, material that has been produced through unacknowledged collaboration with others without release in writing from collaborators.

2. NON ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT Student Misconduct is conduct which impairs the reasonable freedom of other persons to pursue their studies or research or to participate in the life of the School, which includes but is not limited to the following:

140


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 141

AIDING AND ABETTING MISCONDUCT: Knowingly helping, procuring, or encouraging another person to engage in non academic misconduct. ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, UNAUTHORISED USE: Possessing or consuming alcoholic beverages except during events or in circumstances authorised by NAS officials; failing to comply with state or NAS regulations regarding use, transporting, or sale of alcoholic beverages. ASSAULT: Knowingly or recklessly causing serious physical harm to another; knowingly causing or attempting to cause physical harm to another or any act which endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a staff member or student. BREACH: breach of any rule relating to student conduct in the NAS. CITIZENSHIP: failure to give full and accurate particulars of citizenship or residency status at the time of the initial enrolment, failure to produce evidence of the residency status if required to do so by NAS staff, and to give full accurate particulars of any change in residency status within 14 days of any such change. DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY: Intentionally or recklessly damaging, destroying, defacing, or tampering with the property of the NAS or the property of another person or entity. DIRECTION: disobeys or disregards an order or direction of a member of staff, including a direction regarding safety. DISCRIMINATION: discriminates or incites hatred towards, serious contempt for, or severe ridicule of, a person or group of people on the grounds of the person’s age, race sex, homosexuality, transgender, marital status, physical or intellectual disability, or religion. DISHONESTY AND MISREPRESENTATION: Knowingly or recklessly providing false written or oral information including false identification to NAS members, Department, and/or staff; forgery, alteration, or misuse of NAS documents or records. DISRUPTION/OBSTRUCTION: Knowingly or recklessly disrupting, obstructing, or interfering with NAS staff or students, classes and functions or activities or the pursuit of the NAS mission, including but not limited to teaching, research, administration, disciplinary proceedings, or other NAS activities. DISTURBING THE PEACE: Knowingly or recklessly disturbing the peace of the NAS, including, but not limited to, disorderly conduct, failure to comply with an order to disperse, fighting, quarrelling, and/or being intoxicated. DRUGS OR NARCOTICS: Manufacturing, distributing, selling, offering for sale, or possessing any illegal drug or narcotic (except in the use of substances prescribed by a licensed physician).

141


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 142

FAILURE TO COMPLY OR IDENTIFY: Failure to comply with the directions of an NAS official or any law enforcement officer acting in the performance of their duties and/or posted or written rules including failure to evacuate during an emergency and/or failing to identify oneself to any of these persons when requested to do so. FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH PENALTIES: Failure to comply with penalties imposed in accordance with the procedures described herein may be basis for additional penalties. FALSE CHARGES/STATEMENTS: Knowingly making false charges or allegations including testimony at NAS discipline/misconduct hearings. FALSE REPORT OF EMERGENCY: Knowingly causing, making, or circulating a false report or warning of a fire, explosion, crime or other emergency, e.g. activating a fire alarm. HARASSMENT: Conduct that has the purpose or foreseeable effect of unreasonably interfering with an identifiable individual's work or academic performance or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive work or learning environment for that individual. IDENTIFICATION, MISUSE OF: Unauthorised transferring, lending, presenting someone else's, borrowing or altering NAS identification or any other record or instrument of identification. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, MISUSE OF: Theft or abuse of information technology, e.g. computer, electronic mail, voice mail, telephone, fax, including but not limited to: • Unauthorised entry into a file to use, read or change the contents, or for any other purpose. • Unauthorised transfer or distribution of a file. • Unauthorised use of another individual's identification and password. • Use of information technology to interfere with the work of another student, Department member or NAS official. • Use of information technology to send obscene or threatening messages. • Use of information technology to interfere with normal operations of the NAS’ systems. LAW, VIOLATION OF: Violating any criminal law on campus and off-campus activities where the foreseeable effect is to interfere with the NAS’ organisational objectives, mission or responsibilities. MENACING: Knowingly causing another person to believe that the offender will cause serious physical harm to another, a member of their immediate family or their property. PROBATION, VIOLATION OF: Violating the Student Code of Conduct while on NAS disciplinary probation or violating the specific terms of that probation will be cause for additional penalties.

142


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 143

PROPERTY OR SERVICES: Unauthorised use or possession of property or resources of the NAS or of a staff member of the NAS or other person, removal of or damage to property without authorisation from a member of staff. SAFETY EQUIPMENT, MISUSE OF: Unauthorised use or alteration of safety devices, fire alarms, fire extinguishers or other emergency SMOKING POLICY, VIOLATION OF: Violating the NAS policy on designated smoking areas. STALKING: engaging in a course of conduct that is directed towards another person if that conduct would cause a reasonable person to fear for their safety. STOLEN PROPERTY: Unauthorised possession of property known to be stolen and/or that may be identified as property of the NAS or any person or entity. THEFT: Theft of the property or services of the NAS or any person or entity. TRESPASS OR FORCIBLE ENTRY: Unauthorised trespass, or forcible entry into any NAS building, structure or facility, or onto NAS property. NAS KEYS, MISUSE OF: Unauthorised use, distribution, duplication or possession of any key(s) issued for any NAS building, studio, facility, or room. NAS POLICIES OR RULES, VIOLATION OF: Any violation of published NAS policies or rules is a violation of the Student Code of Conduct and failure to comply with a provision of this Policy or with an order or direction given under such a provision.

PENALTIES FOR MISCONDUCT Students found to be in violation of the Student Code of Conduct will be subject to misconduct penalties. Penalties shall be imposed according to the severity of the misconduct. In all cases, the NAS shall reserve the right to require counselling of students as deemed appropriate. Definitions of Penalties The following are definitions of disciplinary penalties that may be imposed as a consequence of misconduct. Each penalty may be separately or cumulatively applied should the behaviour call for the imposition of a more severe penalty. • Withdrawal from Class When a member of staff believes a student’s behaviour is inappropriate and is repeatedly disrupting the class, or is causing or encouraging others to do so, a staff member may withdraw the student from class after negotiation is unsuccessful. Should the behaviour persist in following classes a complaint is lodged with the Discipline Committee for investigation.

143


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 144

• NAS disciplinary Reprimand (Warning) A warning is an official (written notification) reprimand to the student, that his/her behaviour is unacceptable, effective for a specified period of time. The warning period provides a time for the student to reflect upon the offence and to consider the responsibilities of an NAS student. A warning gives notice that any subsequent offence under this policy may result in more serious consequences because of the warning. • NAS Disciplinary Probation permits the continuation of enrolment at the NAS but imposes specific restrictions and/or extra requirements or guidelines to be placed on the student for a specified period with a continuing review of the student’s behaviour with the terminal date of which coincides with the official ending of the academic semester. These may vary with each case and may include restriction from participating in some class activities, restrictions in campus areas, or may involve other requirements not academically restrictive in nature which are consistent with the philosophy of providing constructive learning experiences as a part of the probation. A student may be required to meet periodically with designated staff. Any further misconduct on the student's part during the period of probation may result in disciplinary suspension or disciplinary expulsion from the NAS. • NAS Disciplinary Suspension shall prohibit the student from attending the NAS and from being present without permission of the Head of Studies or Registrar on NAS campus or property for a specified period of time. The Discipline Committee shall determine the effective beginning and ending dates of the suspension. Students placed on NAS disciplinary suspension shall be required to show cause for readmission to the academic program. The suspension restricts a student's physical access to campus if deemed necessary, in order to: • Maintain order on NAS property and campuses. • Preserve the orderly functioning of the NAS and the pursuit of its mission. • Stop interference in any manner with the rights of students, staff and the public while on NAS owned or controlled property, while on field trips and/or while representing the NAS. • Stop actions that threaten the health, safety or integrity of any person within the NAS or the proper functioning of any NAS activity. • Stop actions that destroy or damage property of the NAS or of any member of its community. This shall be a temporary suspension which may be imposed pending the application of the disciplinary process. A hearing shall be scheduled by the Discipline Committee to determine if the interim suspension shall remain in effect, be modified, or be revoked pending a disciplinary hearing. • NAS Disciplinary Exclusion shall prohibit the student from attending the NAS and from being present on any NAS campus or property for a specified period of time. The

144


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 145

Discipline Committee shall determine the effective beginning and ending dates of the exclusion. Students placed on NAS disciplinary exclusion shall be required to apply for readmission to the NAS after the period of exclusion has elapsed. Exclusion is imposed when other penalties are deemed ineffective to deal with the severity of the conduct committed and/or in cases of aggravated or repeated violations. Exclusion may also carry conditions that must be satisfied prior to future re-admission to the NAS. • NAS Disciplinary Expulsion shall permanently prohibit the student from attending the NAS and from being present on any NAS campus or property. Permanently cancels the enrolment of a student at the NAS and the withdrawal of all rights and privileges as a student of the School, including the right to re-enrol as a student and the right to enter or be on NAS grounds. Expulsion therefore is reserved for the most serious offences. Expulsion is required in certain violations of drug policies, harassment and in cases of falsified admission applications and information to the School and repeated violations of NAS discipline policies. • Psychological Evaluation and Counselling Requests for psychological evaluation may be made by the Discipline Committee if, in their judgement, a student’s behaviour as shown by evidence, is unexplained or appears beyond the actions of a reasonable person informed of policies of the NAS, or if the student’s behaviour suggests a threat of personal safety either to self or to the larger NAS community. Such evaluation is undertaken with the following conditions: • Following the penalties imposed the student may be required to submit evidence of psychological evaluation and recommendation as to their readiness to re-enrol at the NAS under existing academic conditions. Such evaluation will be at the expense of the student and through external agencies to the School. • A student involved in misconduct procedures, who believes his/her behaviour was attributable to a disability, may request a deferral of penalties, pending presentation of medical documentation of the disability and an explanation of its claimed relevance to the behaviour at issue. This request for deferral must be made prior to final action being taken in the disciplinary process. • Other Disciplinary Penalties may be imposed by the Discipline Committee with or without disciplinary probation including, but not limited to: • A Fail grade for the relevant subject for charges pertaining to academic misconduct in assessment or examinations. • Withdrawal or restrictions of borrowing privileges for the following: • misuse of NAS Library facilities • computer access, equipment and tools • Fine not exceeding $1000 for the following: • damage to NAS property

145


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 146

• misuse of NAS Library facilities • misuse of NAS computing, communications facilities and studio equipment All students who enrol and sign an enrolment form agree to abide by all rules and regulations of the National Art School and are aware of the penalties imposed on students who violate the Student Code of Conduct and other rules of the NAS.

146


NAS HndBk 2010 Int v4:Layout 1

NOTES

15/2/10

3:38 PM

Page 147


STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010 NATIONAL ART SCHOOL

SYDNEY • AUSTRALIA CRICOS Provider Code 01605G

Photography by Oliver Strewe/Wave Productions

NATIONAL ART SCHOOL

STUDENT HANDBOOK 2010 NATIONAL ART SCHOOL

SYDNEY • AUSTRALIA Forbes Street Darlinghurst NSW 2010 Australia t [61 2] 9339 8744 www.nas.edu.au

NAS_HBook2010COVfinal.indd 1

9/2/10 9:36:59 AM


NAS Student Handbook 2010  

National Art School 2010 Handbook

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you