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Aloha 5K Fun Run and Walk, p10 East County

APR. 23-29, 2015 Vol. 16 No. 33

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NEWS PAGE TWO • APR. 23-29, 2015

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Time to Stop Gambling With Our Futures Steve Hunyar

For The East County Herald EAST COUNTY — As a born and raised Southern Californian, I have lived through droughts, floods, horrible wildfires, earthquakes, traffic , killer bees, Med flies, and more droughts. Droughts are a way of life here, and the only difference from one to the next is their intensity and duration. There is no question our current drought is particularly dire, given the low levels of the snow pack in the Sierra Nevada range this year. The most up-to-date information available on the statewide reservoir levels is available at http://cdec.water. ca.gov/cgi-progs/current/ RES. The two largest NoCal reservoirs which store SoCal water are Shasta and Oroville. As of tax day, each was 60 percent and 51 percent full respectively, with 71 percent and 65 percent of average for the date. So yes, with the lack of snow, this is a problem. Now let’s play the blame game. First and foremost, let’s blame nature. Second, we can point the finger directly at Sacramento, whose politicians have done little or nothing other than conservation measures. While we are at it, we can also blame ourselves for allowing these politicians to not plan. There is no “Comprehensive Water Strategy” in Sacra-

mento. Third, we can blame environmentalist who stand in the way of additional anything. Fourth, blame the unaccounted increase in population, which is 8 million more than the 70s waterways and lakes were originally designed to accommodate. Fifth, blame ourselves for not recognizing this is still a desert. Drought-scaping has come a long way and can be very colorful and beautiful. Sixth, blame that pesky small fish called the Delta Smelt and the EPA for forcing a trillion gallons of water into the ocean to protect this species. Lastly, we can blame anthropogenic Global Warming – oh wait – perhaps we cannot. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric

Administration, the drought is not caused by global warming. In fact, their admission in a December 2014 article (www.washingtonpost.com/ blogs/capital-weather-gang/ wp/2014/12/08/noaa-reports ay s - c a l i fo r n i a - d ro u g h t mostly-due-to-natural-causes/) stated that global warming would cause humidity to increase and therefore precipitation. Since the blame game is an exercise in futility, let’s discuss solutions? Certainly, it makes absolute sense to build more storage capacity and we should be planning for 10 year droughts. Since smelt is designated as an important part of the eco

See CALIFORNIA DROUGHT, p4

East County Coronations

On The Cover LAKESIDE — El Capitan Stadium Association held their Annual Lakeside Rodeo FridaySunday, Apr. 17-19 at the Lakeside Rodeo grounds.

Cover photo: Rob Riingen / The East County Herald Cover design: Steve Hamann / The East County Herald

See more on Page 8-9 and at www.echerald.com

EAST COUNTY — East County crowned new 2015 ambassadors for the communities of Ramona and Singing Hills. Pictured above, from left and clockwise: Miss Teen Ramona 2015 Megan Kelly (with dad); Miss Teen Singing Hills 2015 Vanessa Bram with Miss Singing Hills 2015 Chrissy Rhamy; and the Miss Ramona Court: Miss Ramona 2015 First Princess Shannon Huff, Miss Ramona 2015 Shannon Singleton, Miss Teen Ramona 2015 Megan Kelly and Teen Miss Ramona First Princess 2015 Ciara Webb-Martin.


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OPINiON Politics and

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias

PAGE FOUR • APR. 23-29, 2015

Smell the Fear as Utilities Commission Lawyers Up

T

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT, cont’d from p.2

system, we should be producing them by the millions in fish hatcheries as we do for trout. Desalinization is a viable, albeit, expensive alternative. To our west is a small pond of water that is available. These past example have been traditional thinking. We need to look for out-of-the-box solutions as well. For example, my research shows we can build a pipeline from the Missouri River to the near headwaters of the Colorado River in the Rockies, to supplement our supplies in the Southwest. The pipe would be approximately 550 miles in length and I have designed a line that would avoid the National Parks. (see above diagram). Over 140 trillion gals of water pour into the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River each year. Southern California and the other Southwestern States could use a fraction of that water to supplement our

water supplies. For the naysayers, this is nowhere near the size and scope of the California Aqueduct System of the 70’s, and I am certain we could find a method to filter the water for wildlife and organisms that are endemic to the Missouri River. In addition, this pipeline would provide relief from the massive flooding that seems to occur every five years in middle America. Our country is lined with millions of miles of natural gas and oil pipelines. Is the idea of a water line all that unrealistic and abhorrent? Shasta and Oroville were last full five years ago. The last time Lake Powell was at full capacity was 1999. That is a long time to “hope” for more water. Yet if we continue to embrace nothingness when it comes to these problems, this gamble will eventually bankrupt Californians. Conservation will only work until the supplies are dried up, which is happening in some cities up north.

California is completely dysfunctional when it comes to this issue. It’s time to get off the couch and innovate once again. Water is the very first thing we cannot live without. Prologue Kudos to the San Diego County Water Authority and our City and County Boards for negotiating the compact with the Imperial Farmers and providing San Diegans with some drought tolerance, and for the foresight to build the Carlsbad Desalinization facility. The desalinization plant is slated to go online sometime early 2016 and provide 10 percent of our water needs in San Diego County. The balance will consist of invitational entrants, many of whom run for local charitable organizations. Since 1989, between the B.A.A.’s Official Charity Program and principal sponsor John Hancock Financial’s Non-Profit Bib Program for the Boston Marathon, more than $200 million has been raised for charity.

he strong odor surrounding California’s most powerful regulatory commission this spring stems not only from corrupt-seeming decisions but also from fear. Fear that past and present members or top staffers of the state Public Utilities Commission might do jail time. Fear they could see personal fortunes decimated by legal fees while fending off state and federal criminal investigations. How bad have things become at the PUC, which sets prices for privately-owned utilities like Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison and San Diego Gas & Electric? Even the commission’s new president, Michael Picker, said the recently that when it comes to cleaning up his agency, “I think we have a long way to go.” Of course, over the last 17 months, he backed every questionable decision pushed by disgraced former PUC President Michael Peevey. Like many outfits overcome by fear, the PUC has lately tried to cover up by claiming internal documents are “privileged” and by hiring top defense attorneys. The commission’s first contract with the SheppardMullin law firm was for $49,000, work to be done at a “discount” rate of $882 per hour. That deal fell just below the $50,000 level where state contracts for outside work must be approved by the Department of General Services. But the Picker-led PUC has followed up by awarding SheppardMullin a contract for $5.2 million for the rest of this year. Both agreements may be illegal, even if the new one is approved by the DGS. Still, there is little doubt of that approval. All present PUC members were appointed by Gov. Jerry Brown, who also named all top officials of the DGS, so this is really the right hand approving what the left hand wants. What’s more, Brown’s chief of staff, Nancy McFadden, was PG&E’s chief lobbyist in Sacramento before joining him. Asked under what authority it hired SheppardMullin, the PUC cited state government code section 995.8. That section says a public entity can only hire criminal lawyers to defend present or former officials if “The public entity determines that such defense would be in the best interests of the public entity…” The PUC would have to hold hearings to make such a circular determination, but it has not. This makes the big-buck pacts appear illegal, no matter what the DGS might rule. The obvious question here is why state taxpayers should fund the defense of officials who may have conspired with big utilities to bilk them via decisions like the one forcing consumers to pay most costs for retiring the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. Commission spokeswoman Terrie Prosper claims outside lawyers are needed because the PUC “does not have the expertise… or time to handle…the massive amount of work that needs to be done to…manage and cooperate with investigations.” The SheppardMullin contract suggests that “managing investigations” includes stonewalling requests for documents while “assisting in public relations.” It says attorneys will also “develop and manage litigation strategies” and “assist and attend interviews of commission employees by investigators (including preparing witnesses).” “This means the $5.2 million is for a cover-up,” says former San Diego City Attorney Michael Aguirre, who has sued to block the contracts. “They will restrain and restrict documents and the testimony of witnesses and use privilege to (try to) conceal crimes.” Aguirre notes the commission never formally voted to spend the money, but PUC Executive Director Timothy Sullivan simply signed the new contract. Because the PUC itself cannot be indicted, it’s clear the money will be spent to help defend individuals – present or former commission officials. Neither Sullivan nor any other PUC official responds to repeated inquiries about who SheppardMullin will defend. Nor would the PUC say why those officials should not fund their own defenses. Aguirre suggests that if Picker really favors transparency, as he often claims, he would waive all privilege and open every commission document to press, public and investigators, saving the $5.2 million in legal fees. But Picker repeatedly refuses to be interviewed and by the end of March, the commission had spent more than $2 million on outside lawyers to deny document requests during the last six months, all without a hearing. So the smell of fear is plain at the PUC, and no one can predict the next major errors and cover-up attempts that might produce.

Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It. The book is now available in soft cover, fourth edition. His opinions are his own. He can be reached at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti

To Your

No Proof of Efficacy for St. John’s Wart on Depression Q

. I have friends in France who take St. John’s wort for depression. Do you think this stuff works?

A

. St. John’s wort (Hypericum

perforatum or Klamathweed) is one of the most commonly purchased herbal products in the United States. However, do not take this product unless you have consulted your family physician. The St. John’s wort plant has been used as a medicine for many centuries. It was popular in ancient Greece. Today in Europe, it is used widely to treat mild-to-moderate depression. St. John’s wort is a shrubby plant with clusters of yellow flowers. Both the flowers and leaves of the plant are used as medicine. St. John’s wort can be obtained in capsules, tablets, tinctures, teas, and oil-based skin lotions. Chopped or powdered forms of the dried herb are also available. The plant grows in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the western United States. The plant is often in full bloom around June 24, the day traditionally celebrated as the birthday of St. John the Baptist. St. John’s wort has antibacterial and antiviral properties. It fights inflammation and has been used to treat wounds. St. John’s wort may help relieve some types of depression but the evidence is not definitive. There is some scientific data indicating that St. John’s wort may be helpful in treating minor depression. However, two large studies showed that the herb was no more effective than placebo in treating major depression of moderate severity. One of these studies was sponsored by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), which is part of the National Institutes of Health. St. John’s wort contains several chemicals, including hypericin, hyperforin, and flavonoids. Researchers aren’t sure how St. John’s wort works. Some have suggested that the herb acts like antidepressants by making more of the brain chemicals serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine available. These chemicals--known as neurotransmitters-are mood elevators. It should be stressed that the herb can cause serious side effects. In general, herbal therapies are not recommended for the elderly, pregnant women, children, or those taking certain medicines. It is also important to note that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved St John’s wort for use as an over-the-counter or prescription medicine for depression. Combining St. John’s wort with certain antidepressants can lead to a potentially life-threatening increase of serotonin. St. John’s wort can also limit the effectiveness of many prescription medicines such as antidepressants, some bloodpressure drugs, birth control pills, the heart medication Digoxin, some HIV drugs, blood thinners, antihistamines, cough medicines, sedatives, some cancer medications, and statins that lower cholesterol. Other less threatening side effects of St. John’s wort include stomach upset, hives or other skin rashes, fatigue, restlessness, headache, dry mouth, and feelings of dizziness or mental confusion. St. John’s wort can also make the skin overly sensitive to sunlight.

Full Service Salon

Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

PAGE FIVE • APR. 23-29, 2015

Living with MS with Dee Dean What Happens When Multiple Sclerosis Patients Stop Taking Their Medication?

N

ew research led by NYU Langone Medical Center examines what happens when a patient with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) who is clinically stable stops taking their medication. The international, multi-site study found almost 40 percent of patients had some disease activity return when they stopped taking their meds. “Despite long periods of disease stability while taking medication, we found a large minority of patients who stopped experienced relapses or disability progression,” says lead study author Ilya Kister, MD, an assistant professor of neurology at the NYU Langone Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center. “We need to identify situations when it is safe for patients with MS to stop taking these medications.” Little is known about MS disease progression after first-line, disease-modifying therapies are discontinued in clinically-stable patients. For the study, Dr. Kister and colleagues prospectively studied 181 patients from the global observational MSBase Registry, examining MS relapse rates and disability progression rates in patients who stopped taking disease-modifying therapy. Patients in the study were ages 40 and older, had experienced no relapses and reported stable disability progression (measured by EDSS scores) for at least five years, and had been taking medication for at least three years. Once medications were ceased, patients were followed for at least three years. After discontinuing medication, 24 percent of patients experienced a clinicianreported relapse, 32 percent sustained three-month disability progression, and 10.6 percent of patients recorded both relapses and disability progression. Researchers found 77 patients – or 42 percent – restarted medication after a median of 22 months. Restarting medication was associated with a 59-percent risk reduction of disability progression. More than 2.5 million people worldwide are affected by MS. The unpredictable disease affects the central nervous system, causing disability that can range in severity, with symptoms including muscle weakness, pain, difficulty with coordination and balance, partial or complete paralysis, tremors and hearing and vision loss. Medication can help to manage attacks, reduce symptoms, and slow the progression

of Multiple Sclerosis. According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, some people stop taking disease-modifying medication for reasons including side effects, perceptions they’re not feeling better or because they still experience exacerbations, or insurance purposes. “Decisions regarding stopping disease-modifying therapy may have implications for short and long-term prognosis. We know a lot about what happens when therapy is started, but we know very little about what happens when therapy is stopped,” says Dr Kister Dr. Kister and colleagues call for a randomized trial of discontinuation of diseasemodifying therapy to provide more evidence of when exactly it might be safe for patients to stop taking their medications.

My Personal Experience With Disease Modifying MS Drugs

Without going into great detail for lack of space, I will omit most of my struggles. I’ve had MS for 28 years, (wow, I never thought it would be that long. I thought a cure would have been found within five years), there was no medication for it, one could only treat the symptoms. I have Primary Progressive MS, in that, I experience no remissions and relapses, although stress can bring on an excacerbation immediately. My disease course was steadily progressing and I had to learn to mourn and let go of things I could no longer do. Initally, I was on a slippery downhill slope. It wasn’t until Sept. 1993 that they came out with the first disease modifying therapy, BetaSeron. Demand was so high, one had to be put in a “lottery” by your neurologist, when your number got pulled, you could begin the therapy – which was not covered by insurance – but that’s a whole other story! My number got pulled in March of 1994. I actually felt somewhat guilty because I had a friend that was far worse than me and I got it before her. She has since passed several years ago, at the young age of 39 years old. No more suffering, my friend. I think of her often. Back to BetaSeron, again, briefly, – an every other day subcutaneous injection. It is Interferon beta-1a, an immune suppressant. The beginning was extremely rough for me with the side effects. However, in my eleventh month I began noticing small improvements. Enough where I continued the therapy for eight years.

ddean@echerald.com

After that, it became ineffective. I didn’t develop antibodies against it – which is common after long-term use – rather I was slowly progressing again. I then switched to Rebif, very similar to BetaSeron, also Interferon beta-1a. This did nothing for me, but give me lovely side effects. Still searching for a magic bullet, I found they were experimenting with stem cell transplants with great success. I was scheduled to have that done in Oct. 2003 at Scripps Green by a very reputable oncologist. He thought I was the perfect candidate. I’ll never forget that phone call two weeks prior to the procedure – my oncologist told me the FDA had pulled the plug on the research. He recommended I try chemotherapy for a year. They were having some success with it on people with progressive MS. I did it for a full year to no avail, except all the nasty side effects. I won’t be doing that again. In 2004, I began taking Copaxone, a subcutaneous daily injection – glatiramer acetate – different than the other injection – it is believed to work by molecular mimicry. I did well on this for many years with minimal side effects. I stayed on this until March of 2011. I suffered the greatest loss in my life, when my father passed months earlier. This threw me into an exacerbation. It was my decision alone to discontinue all disease-modify therapies. There were many contributing factors that I considered – such as the multitude of golf ball size scar tissue I developed after injecting for 17 years – among several others. I did discuss it with my neurologist. He suggested an antiinflammatory diet, which I have been on since then. I feel

See MS THERAPIES, p6


lp!

COMMUNITY Matters PAGE SIX • APR. 23-29, 2015

REAL ESTATE

A

Can Your Kids Afford to Buy a Home in San Diego

Here’s how they can do it:

• With a little help from my parents. There are many good reasons for a parent to help a child

to purchase a home. Parental assistance can help a child to “settle down faster than he or she might be able to on his or her own,” explains David Weliver, the publisher of www. MoneyUnder30.com. According to http://www. motageloan.com “Refinance your home, let your kids buy your home for the difference and assume the debt. You now have cash equity from the home to purchase another one, they didn’t have to qualify and they have a home. You need to get the lender’s permission to do this.” Purchase a property for them when they are young and rent it out. The rental payments will reduce the debt owed and have built up 22 years’ worth of equity when they graduate college • With a little help from my friends Co-op purchasing. I pur-

chased my first property in my early 20’s with my buddy Lorenz Stacks. Find a few friends and go in on a purchase with them. This is a fabulous way to combine assets and resources to afford a down payment. Have the seller participate by carrying back a loan. Although hard to find, this is a nice way to save financing fees and can be easier to qualify. So don’t dismay. With a little help, your kids you can afford to purchase a property in San Diego County.

Campbell is the sales manager for Pacific Growth Sales and has offices in Alpine, El Cajon and Mission Valley. He and his team of Concierge REALTORS® can be found on line at SanDiegoHomeBuys.com

MS THERAPIES, cont’d from p.5

1.99%

include, but are not limited to, of course, noticeably, my gait, extreme fatigue, spasticity, significant hearing loss accompanied by tinnitus and chronic migraines. In addition to that, I have developed fairly severe hammer toes, worse on my right foot than left, due to spasticity in my feet. This adds to impeding my ability to walk and can be very painful. All toes are involved. I am taking measures to correct that with surgery as an absolute last resort. It is important to note that I am in no way encouraging

Financing

that this is the right path for me. With help from the man upstairs, I feel that I am finally beginning to heal. In addition, I gave up meat in 2010 and have stayed away from dairy for more than 20 years. I continue to have my annual MRI’s, visit my neurologist routinely to monitor the disease and still take meds to treat my symptoms. But, this new therapy seems very promising for me. Currently, my most troubling symptoms

EVERYDAY with PastorLIFE Drew

G

A Day in the Life of Jesus the Messiah with Jeff Campbell

Real Matters in

ccording to SANDICOR MLS, the median home price in San Diego County is $517,000 and depending on the rate and down payment, the payment can be green housearound $2,148/ month. A condo is $348,500 with a payment around $1,632/ month including HOA fees. Can your kids afford to own a home nearby? At what age will they be able to purchase a property? Will they need to purchase an affordable home in Wahoo, Nebraska? The answer is yes, they can buy a home in San Diego County.

Wisdom for

others to follow my personal regimen. Please do not quit any medications or change therapies without first discussing it with your neurologist. I am merely sharing what seems to be working for me. One thing I have learned over the years is that with MS, everyone’s path is different. What works for one person may not work for another or may even have adverse effects. ALWAYS discuss your therapies with your doctor FIRST. Source: NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine

Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 28 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.

com.

NOTE: Dean is the recipient of the 2004 STAR Community Outreach Award by the MS Society Dec. 2, 2004, the American Red Cross Real Hero Wendell Cutting Humanitarian Award, Oct. 13, 2006 , the Stoney Community Service Award, February 29, 2008, Women in Leadership Award for Art/Media/Culture Oct. 29, 2010, El Cajon Citizen of The Year Nominee Feb. 2013 and Recipient of the National MS Society’s 2014 Media Partner of The Year, Feb. 10, 2015.

See Our Ad On Page 15.

PART III

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series w h i c h is entitled, “A day in the life of Jesus the Messiah.” Over the past 2,000 years there have been many writings, books, messages, ideas, expressing various thoughts and opinions concern who Jesus was and is. My intention in doing this series is that you, the reader may come to know who Jesus really is and there is no better place to look than the Word of God the Bible. I remind you of what we looked at in the past concerning Jesus: He has not changed and never will. Hebrews 13:8 “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, today, and forever.” And as Hebrews 1:1-4 tells us that, Jesus is the express image of God, Hebrews 1:1-4; as well as what Jesus told Philip in John 14:7-10 “If you had known Me, you would have known My Father also; and from now on you know Him and have seen Him… He who has seen Me has seen the Father.” Because He is Who He says He is and that He never changes, the work He did 2,000 years ago, He has continues to do today through those who are surrendered to Him, offering themselves as vessels fit for the Master’s use. This brings great hope to us today as we live in a dark and hopeless world. I remind you of this each week because there are many today that would have you believe that Jesus is not who He says He is; that He is not the same today and forever. Now let us continue to look at what happened the same day that Jesus called Peter, Andrew, James, and John to follow Him. Mark 1:21-34, “Then they went into Capernaum, and immediately on the Sabbath He entered the synagogue and taught. And they were astonished at His teaching, for He taught them as one having authority, and not as the scribes. Now there was a man in their synagogue with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, saying, “Let us alone! What have we to do with You, Jesus of Nazareth? Did You come to destroy us? I know who You are-the Holy One of God!” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be quiet, and come out of him!” And when the unclean spirit had convulsed him and cried out with a loud voice, he came out of him. Then they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? What new doctrine is this? For with authority He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey Him.” And immediately His fame spread throughout all the region around Galilee. Now as soon as they had come out of the synagogue, they entered the house of Simon and Andrew, with James and John. But Simon’s wife’s mother lay sick with a fever, and they told Him about her at once. So He came and took her by the hand and lifted her up, and immediately the fever left her. And she served them. Now at evening, when the sun had set, they brought to Him all who were sick and those who were demon-possessed. And the whole city was gathered together at the door. Then He healed many who were sick with various diseases, and cast out many demons; and He did not allow the demons to speak, because they knew Him.” Last time we focused on His teaching and how that many were amazed because He taught as one who had authority. Today our focus will be upon an event that happened while He was teaching in the synagogue, “Now there was a man in their synagogue with an unclean spirit. And he cried out, saying, “Let us alone! What have we to do with You, Jesus of Nazareth? Did You come to destroy us? I know who You are--the Holy One of God!” But Jesus rebuked him, saying, “Be quiet, and come out of him!” And when the unclean spirit had convulsed him and cried out with a loud voice, he came out of him. Then they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? What new doctrine is this? For with authority He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey Him.” A man was possessed by more than one demon, the plural ‘us’ and ‘we’ is used a number of times; they recognize who Jesus is (this happened every time!); Jesus commands the demons to come out of the man and they do. It is interesting to me the high rate of demon possession that existed in Israel during the time of Jesus. The people see there is power in the Words of Jesus. Remember dear ones, Jesus and His Word has not changed in all these years, He still sets those free and changes lives. Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 23-29, 2015

Mother’s Day Dining Celebrate with your loved ones at The Buffet. To celebrate Mother’s Day, we have created some extraordinary gourmet offerings and cocktails to make it a truly memorable occasion! • Prime rib, artichoke and mushroom pizza with white chocolate béchamel • Sweet soy-marinated flank steak with chocolate-chipotle sauce • Baked salmon with shrimp mousse and spinach in puff pastry • Herb-crusted rack of lamb • Tomato and basil bruschetta with white chocolate-balsamic vinaigrette • Bittersweet chocolate-infused tomato bisque • White chocolate and amaretto cheesecake shooters • White Cosmopolitan (vodka, white cranberry juice, lime juice).

Saturday, May 9 and Sunday, May 10—only $34.99!

Viejas Casino & Resort ∙ 5000 Willows Road ∙ Alpine, CA 91901 ∙ 619.445.5400

Guests must be at least 18 years of age to enter. Guests must be at least 21 years of age to drink alcoholic beverages. Guests under 18 years of age are permitted in The Buffet only, but must be accompanied by an adult. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling, call 800.426.2537. Copyright 2015 Viejas Enterprises

East County

Est. 1998

PAGE SEVEN


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE EIGHT

APR. 23-29, 2015

El Capitan Stadi

Lakeside

April 17, 18 & 19 • Lak

Rob Riingen/The E See more photos at

Sage

&Songbirds

Community Chuckwagon Celebratio

18th Annual Alpine

Garden Tour

Wednesday, April 15 • Lakeside Middle School Rob Riingen/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

MAY 1-3, 2015

Ticket Price: $20/person ($17.50 early bird - by April 15)

Ticket is valid all 3 days. One entry per garden - Per ticket • Map to all 7 sites included with ticket. Rain or Shine event • Buy tickets online or at select locations in Alpine Ticket Info: 619.445.8352 • www.chirp.org •

MONARCH MANIA! Butterfly Releases • Monarch Host Plants Monarch Growing Kits

Monarch Mania Butterfly Release & More at Barons Market!

TOUR: 5 Private Home Gardens PLUS: 2 Bonus Sites IN-THE-GARDENS:

• Vendors • Plant Sales • Music • Demonstrations • Live Butterfly Releases • Reptile & Insect Exhibit • Owl Encounter • Hummingbird Rescue • Opportunity Drawings • Silent Auctions

AlpineCreekCenter.com

Noon • May 2 & 3 • FREE 1347 Tavern Road, Alpine

Presented by CHIP for Garden Wildfife, Inc. CHIRP is dedicated to the preservation and enjoyment of birds, butterflies, and other creatures of habitat, through hands-on and interactive programs and gardens. A 501(c)3 not-for-profit habitat eductatin corporatin


APR. 23-29, 2015

ium Association

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e Rodeo

keside Rodeo Grounds

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on

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Schedule a tour of the community & stay for lunch at the Terrazza Restaurant!

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(619) 258-8886 400 Lantern Crest Way • Santee, CA 92071

www.lanterncrestseniorliving.com Ask about our Move-in Special!

Assisted Living & Memory Care Available

The Pointe Plus Program Lantern Crest’s Pointe Plus Program provides basic services to assist our residents in maintaining their independence. • Three Meals & Nutritious Snacks Daily • Medication Management* • Basic Bathing Services* • Grooming Assistance* • Dressing Services*

PAGE NINE


PAGE TEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Santee School District Foundation

Aloha 5K Fun Run and Walk Saturday, April 18 • Town Center Community Park, Santee Jay Reynard/East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

APR. 23-29, 2015

Green Elementary Foundation

Taste of Navajo

Friday, April 10 • Mission Trails Regional Park

Jay Reynard/East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 23-29, 2015

Your YourCommunity CommunityCalendar Calendar Alpine Kiwanis Foundation

PAGE ELEVEN

Submit Your Community Event Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.

Invites you to

Saturday, April 25, 2015 9:00 am - 4:00 pm

At Cuyamaca College Free Admission and Parking RANCHO SAN DIEGO — The Spring Garden Festival at Cuyamaca College, in its 22nd year, is a family-friendly community celebration of spring and a greener future that attracts more than 3,000 visitors annually. The festival features fun programs, exhibitors and demonstrations that will help you become a better gardener and learn how to conserve our precious resources. The renowned Cuyamaca College Ornamental Horticulture department will be holding its biggest plant sale of the year.

25th Annual

Vintage Alpine Sunday, May 3, 2015 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Summers Past Farms 15602 Olde Hwy 80 Flinn Springs, CA 92021 (619) 390-1523

• Tickets are $70 in advance, and $80 at the door. The event includes live music in a garden setting, a silent auction, and opportunities to meet wine and food specialists. • Vintage Alpine is an adult-only event. No one under 21 years will be admitted. To learn more about Vintage Alpine and the Kiwanis Club of Alpine, visit www.alpinekiwanis.com. The East County Herald ©

Wounded Marine Golf Classic

EL CAJON — For the tenth year, golfers are gathering to support the discretionary needs of the wounded military personnel at Naval Medical Center San Diego. Cottonwood Golf Club is generously donating their course, personnel, and equipment absolutely free of charge so that every dollar will go to support our ill and injured service members. The Tenth Annual Duncan L. Hunter Wounded Marine Golf Classic will be held at Cottonwood Golf Club on Monday, May 4 7 a.m. sign-in and continental breakfast, 8 a.m. shotgun start, 1 p.m. lunch and awards ceremonies. Reserve your foursome, contact Joe Browning: JoeRBrowning@hotmail.com (ph) 619-212-9186

Vintage Cameras at Alpine Historical Society Open House

ALPINE — Our April 25 & 26 Open House at the DeWitt Museum of the Alpine Historical Society will feature a new exhibit of “Vintage Cameras’’ from the collection of Fred Bray. In 1984 Fred and his brother Arthur moved to Alpine, but their interest in vintage cameras dates back to 1968 when Arthur purchased his first Stereo Realist camera. Our exhibit features cameras from the late 1800’s to early 1900’s and includes view cameras, portrait cameras, and wooden field cameras. Unlike today’s digital cameras, these cameras primarily used photographic plates that required long exposure times. Many of the historical photographs on exhibit in our museum were made on cameras such as these. Our exhibit will also include a historical glimpse at the life and works of Clarence Stearns, who would have used cameras such as these. Stearns was a highly acclaimed and well-travelled photographer in the early 1900’s who lived in Alpine on Zumbrota Road for10 years beginning in 1952. The Open House on Saturday, April 25th and Sunday, April 26th is open from 2:00 pm to 4:00pm. Contact Carol Morrison at 619-445-2544 or info@alpinehistory.org for more information. Free Admission.

Submit Your Community Event Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE TWELVE

SDSUwithBEAT Paul’swithWorld S. Buska - Trying to fit in with disabilities Steve Dolan Talk to ME

O

ne thing about being handicapped - disabled or in a wheelchair or using a walker – some people think you’re not THERE. If you’re by yourself, it’s not so bad: they either have to talk to you or not say anything but if you’re with someone, they’ll ask the other person. Like when Mom runs into someone she knows and she introduces me. “This is my son, Paul. Paul, this is Sharon.” Sharon smiles and asks, “How old is he?” Mom gives me that LOOK that means: Paul, speak up so she knows you can talk. Granddad’s in a wheelchair, looking smart in his blue V-neck sweater and grey trousers, but the waiter asks my mom what he wants to drink. I think he can speak perfectly well for himself he’s an English professor! I’m sure this happens to lots of people. Mom coached me about these situations so well that the last time a waitress asked MOM how I wanted MY meat done, I said, “Hey! I can talk for myself. Well-done.” We go to Denny’s for dinner or breakfast quite often because it’s cheap and the food is good and the waiters and waitresses are really friendly and we know most of them. But sometimes a new waiter doesn’t know me. When it’s my turn to order I

tell him I want a patty melt, well-done, no onions, and seasoned fries; iced tea to drink. The waiter turns to my mom. “Does he want lemon with the iced tea?” Wha-a-a-t? Didn’t I just tell him what I want? Does he think I can’t tell him if I want lemon in the iced tea? Mom’s gotten pretty good at handling this type of situation. Sometimes she plays dumb and acts like she doesn’t hear or looks down at the table. Other times she gets feisty and says, “I don’t know. Ask HIM.” Or she gets that stubborn look on her face. “Paul,” she says. “the gentleman wants to know if you want lemon with your iced tea.” I tell him no and he finally gets it! Oh, this guy can talk! After that, he’s very careful to talk to me – not my mom, whom he’s probably scared of by now. When we go to a Starbucks where they don’t know me, Mom doesn’t stand with me in line because if she does, they’ll ask HER what I want. Even though I’m sitting right there. Going to the doctor’s office is a whole ’nother story. Since we found out about the compressed neck discs, Mom has a million questions and she’s determined to ask every one of them. I got smart. Before we go to my appointment, I tell her, “I’ll do the talking.” She says, “Oh, I’m sorry. Okay. I’ll wait

W

’til you’re done and then I’ll ask my questions.” Last month I had an appointment with a new doctor. He came in, walked right past me and shook hands with Mom. She nodded toward me and told him I was the patient. He sort of shook my hand and then looked right back at Mom. “Does he have any pain? How long has he had it?” I was RIGHT THERE! But he kept on talking to Mom. On the way out she told him, “Paul is the patient. I’d appreciate it if you’d treat him as such.” I’ve always made my own appointments and gone into the examining room by myself – at least until all this compressed disc stuff started – but it’s okay. Mom has some questions I hadn’t thought of, and she’s the one taking care of me when I need help, so I guess it’s alright for her to talk to the doctor. Just not too much, Mom…

Buska is an author, columnist and long-time resident of East County. Send e-mail to Sheila at 4smbrks@gmail.com and visit her website www.smile-breaks.com

John Olsen, who served as president/CEO of the Santee Chamber of Commerce since 2011, has resigned to become vice president of business development at Twisted Manzanita Ales & Spirits, a Santee-based brewery and distillery. Under Olsen’s leadership, the chamber grew to its current roster of about 300 members. Kristen Dare and Liz Shank, Chamber administration staff, will continue to handle day-to-day chamber operations. Robert Lloyd, owner of Lloyd’s Collision & Paint Center and the chamber’s 2015 board chairman, will serve as interim chamber CEO. Chamber officials said Olsen will serve the chamber as an independent consultant to assist with publishing the Spring edition of Santee Magazine and with organizing the Santee Street Fair and Craft Beer Festival over Memorial Day weekend. The chamber’s seventh annual street fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, May 23 at the corner of Riverview Parkway and Town Center Parkway. The event will feature 300 food and vendor booths, carnival rides and two stages with live music and entertainment, along with a craft beer festival and a crafters row and artist alley. With 30,000 people expected to attend the Santee Street Fair is considered one of East County’s largest one-day events. For information, visit www.SanteeStreetFair.com.

Free senior health fair in Santee

La Mesa Resident Thriving at SDSU

hen La Mesa resident Renee Merrill switched her major from chemistry to international business as a sophomore at San Diego State University, little did she know the direction her life would take. Two years later, she studied abroad for a semester in France. She enjoyed the experience so much that upon graduating from SDSU, she took the TESL/ TEFL teaching certificate program through SDSU’s American Language Institute (ALI) that prepares novice instructors to live and teach English overseas, hoping to go back and teach in France. “I loved the people and the culture in France,” she said. “I enjoyed speaking the French language every day. I loved not only being in France; I enjoyed meeting people from all over the world through the study abroad program.” But life sometimes takes unexpected twists and turns. While she was working as a facilitator at the ALI three years ago, an opportunity to teach in the Business English for Global Practices (BEGP) program surfaced, and she jumped at the chance to teach at ALI. This semester, she is also teaching in the new Social Entrepreneurship (SE) program. Launched this year, it’s a content-based English program that allows advanced students to focus on successful social entrepreneur enterprises. However, becoming an instruc-

tor at ALI did not stop Merrill from furthering her education as well. Currently, she’s studying for her Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree, most likely planning to focus on marketing and entrepreneurship. Her passion for marketing began during her undergraduate studies, and intensified when she accepted a position to work as an online marketing intern. Merrill worked for the company writing blogs, managing social media accounts, and creating websites. She turned that into her own business for the past 2 ½ years, but put the business on hold due to her full-time teaching schedule during the day and part-time MBA program at night. Studying for her MBA actually has a twofold purpose, she said. Not only is she furthering her education; she also takes what she learns by night and applies those business concepts to the BEGP classes that she teaches. “My students learn so many valuable things,” Merrill said. “Not only are they learning business concepts, they are also learning that business culture varies from country to country. “They learn a lot about business culture through class. It will help them when they begin their careers in multinational companies. Not only are they applying what they learn in America; they are also learning customs in a multitude of countries such as Japan, Germany, Brazil, Taiwan, and many others. It’s an extremely good skill to have.”

Steve Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZ with Rick Griffin Santee Chamber exec leaves to join local brewery

APR. 23-29, 2015

the amphitheater and food court, 9850 Mission Gorge Road, in Santee. Admission is free. The public is invited to attend. The East County Senior Services Providers, a coalition of community organizations and agencies serving seniors in the East County, said the health fair will feature more than 60 exhibit booths, along with free health screenings for stroke, blood pressure, blood glucose/diabetes, depression, balance and video otoscope. Information will be available about senior housing, home care services, home safety, fall prevention, health education, advance directives, nutrition services, relaxation techniques, caregiving services, educational programs and volunteer opportunities. Attendees can bring a list of their daily medications and officials with the San Diego County Sheriff ’s Department will collect and dispose of unwanted, unused or expired prescription medications as part of a prescription drug take back effort aimed at preventing prescription drug abuse. Sponsors include the Grossmont Healthcare District, a public agency that supports health-related community programs and services in San Diego’s East County region, along with Sharp Grossmont Hospital, Santee Trolley Square and the City of La Mesa. For event information, phone the La Mesa Adult Enrichment Center at (619) 667-1322.

Kiwanis Clubs seeking canned food donations on Saturday

The Fletcher Hills Kiwanis Club is organizing a The 16th annual East County Senior Health Fair canned food drive on Saturday, April 25 at the Grosswill be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday, April 24, mont Center mall to celebrate this year’s 100th anniat the Santee Trolley Square shopping center, near versary of Kiwanis International.

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to info@rickgriffin.com or faxed to (619) 461‑3151. Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

Local residents are encouraged to visit the mall at 5500 Grossmont Center Dr., La Mesa and donate canned food item from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the former The Highlander store near the movie theaters. The canned food will be donated to local schools to stock their pantries. Needy local students and their families will be recipients of food items donated at the Kiwanis event, said Bruce Chase, 2015 president, Fletcher Hills Kiwanis. Also participating in the canned food drive are the 13 other Kiwanis Clubs who meet in San Diego’s East County region. Also at the event will be exhibits of art sculptures made from canned food items. For more event information, visit www.kiwaniscnh31.org or phone (619) 994-4663 or (619) 200-7676. The Highlander, an apparel store and one of the mall’s first tenants, closed in early 2014 after operating for about 50 years.

East County Chamber’s breakfast will be at Cuyamaca College The San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce will host its upcoming First Friday Breakfast starting at 7:15 a.m. on the Friday, May 1, at Cuyamaca College’s Student Center, 900 Rancho San Diego Parkway, El Cajon. The breakfast sponsor will be the Grossmont Union High School District and its Career Technical Education program. Cost to attend is $20 per person for members (with RSVP), $25 per person for nonmembers, and $30 per person at the door without reservations. RSVPs are requested by Monday, April 27. For more information and to RSVP, contact Sarah McCorkle at sarahm@eastcountychamber.org, (619) 440-6161, or visit www.eastcountychamber.org.


APR. 23-29, 2015

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

LMS awarded Support Music Merit Award

PAGE THIRTEEN

Rob Riingen/East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

LAKESIDE — Lakeside Middle School was recently awarded the Support Music Merit Award (SMMA) which recognizes outstanding efforts by teachers, administrators, parents, students and community leaders who have made music education part of the core curriculum. This nation wide survey by the NAMM Foundation recognized the top 120 schools in the US. The award is based on many factors including: quality of curriculum, range of music classes offered during the regular school day, credentialing of the teachers, percentage of students involved, classes being open to all students, performance opportunities and community support.

Budweiser Clydesdales Come to Lakeside Photo by Torrie Ann Needham


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THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 23-29, 2015

PAGE FIFTEEN

“THE CLOCK IS TICKING ON

SOLAR’S SWEET DEAL.” Dear San Diego Homeowner, We want you to have the best current solar information so you can make a wise investment. In that spirit, there are two big changes for solar happening in the near future that you should know about. Taken together, they argue for moving forward SOON – in the next 6 months. If you’ve been putting off the purchase of a solar energy system until a “better time” – please note: the best time to go solar has now arrived!

Net Metering Law

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Current California rules about “net metering” — which allow solar customers to zero out their power bills, guaranteed for the next 20 years — will be changing in the next year or two. The present favorable rules will apply until solar reaches 5% penetration in SDG&E territory. With the popularity of solar still growing, that deadline could be reached as early as December 2015, according to some industry experts. After that, who knows what will take its place?

Federal Income Tax Credit The very generous solar income tax credit — which allows the federal government to pay for 30% of the solar energy system cost — is set to expire at the end of next year (2016). That amounts to a 30% price increase on new solar after that date.

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PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

5000 Willows Road, Alpine, CA 91901 • www.viejas.com • 619.445.5400 Must be 21 years of age. Viejas reserves all rights. Visit a V Club Booth for details. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling call 1-800-426-2537. © 2015 Viejas Casino & Resort, Alpine CA

APR. 23-29, 2015

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