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A Herald Happy Thanksgiving, P9

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East County

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NOV. 24-30, 2016 Vol. 18 No. 12

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication

Santee Chamber of Commerce

Morning Mixer Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

PAGE TWO • NOV. 24-30, 2016

Local Youth Give Back To Their Community

EAST COUNTY — Two local boys Cameron Barnes of El Cajon, 16 and friend Braden Sampson, 16, of Alpine, juniors at Granite Hills High School are both members of two local volunteer organizations. One is ‘Hands on San Diego’ and ‘Padre Volunteers of San Diego.’ Barnes and Sampson began volunteering last year, when they helped feed the homeless at St. Vincent De Paul’s during the holiday season in downtown San Diego. The opportunity to give back remains a goal of both boys today. This month the boys volunteered for ‘Pedal For A Cause’ through Padres Volunteer program which helps many charities throughout San Diego. Last week Saturday, Nov. 12 they volunteered in Alpine at the refueling station at the Children’s Nature Reserve for the hundreds of cyclist participating in Pedal for a Cause to raise funds to fight cancer. Barnes helped in repairing bicycle chains for the riders during the 100-mile course. Both Sampson and Barnes handed out cold bottled water as well as sliced oranges to keep the riders hydrated in the heat. The following week, Saturday, Nov. 19, the dynamic duo of Barnes and Sampson volunteered to help during the Silent Auction portion of the annual Multiple Sclerosis Gala held at Lowes Coronado Bay Resort. The boys are committed to

East County High School Football Team Wins 2016 CIF San Diego Section Football Championship for Division VI

Laurel Moore for The East County Herald

EAST COUNTY — Foothills Christian High School Knights broke Calvin Christian Crusaders’ 16-game winning streak to win the championship game 44-38 Friday, Nov. 18 at Mission Bay High School.

Fron left: Cameron Barnes, 16 and Braden Sampson, also 16, donate their time to worthy causes. help these and other noble causes that aid those whose lives are greatly affected by disease or homelessness. May their efforts and dedi-

cation be an inspiration and example to the other youth in the community to freely give their time and energy toward organizations in need.

On The Cover SANTEE — Senator Joel Anderson (far right) pictured with Warren Savage, was the featured guest speaker at the Santee Chamber of Commerce’s Morning Mixer held at Mimi’s Cafe, Tuesday, Nov. 15. Cover: Ronn Hall/Jay Renard The East County Herald Cover design: Dee Dean / The East County Herald

See more on P8 and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • NOV. 24-30, 2016

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OPINiON

Politics and

PAGE FOUR • NOV. 24-30, 2016

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias An Incomplete State Corruption Probe

E

ven in the midst of the heated presidential campaign, two news stories about alleged corruption in California government managed to draw significant headlines and public attention. One came when the state auditor issued a call for significant changes in procedures at the Public Utilities Commission, which sets rates for almost all electricity and natural gas used in California, routinely deciding billion-dollar issues. Changes similar to what the auditor recommended passed the state Assembly with a massive majority, but died without a state Senate vote on the last day of the year’s legislative session. The other item saw the state’s Fair Political Practices Commission announce it will investigate charges of improper donations to the California Democratic Party brought by the advocacy group Consumer Watchdog, which raised the question of links between those donations and significant actions by Gov. Jerry Brown that affected oil and energy companies which made the contributions. But the FPPC said it won’t investigate Brown. This was no surprise, considering Brown appoints the powerful commission chair. But leaving Brown out of this investigation is a bit like eating a hot-dog bun without the sausage. It quite possibly omits the meat of the matter, not to mention vital questions. Auditor Elaine Howell, lacking power to do more than issue reports, meanwhile, took 64 pages to say the PUC “has not effectively guarded against the appearance of improper influence in its public decision-making.” The report noted that former PUC President Michael Peevey “engaged in private discussions that were not disclosed in a timely manner,” casting legal and ethical doubts on key commission decisions. Peevey met with officials of both the Southern California Edison Co. and Pacific Gas & Electric Co. around the times of the shutdown of Edison’s San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) and the multi-fatal 2010 natural gas pipeline explosion in San Bruno. In both cases, meetings, emails and phone calls went unreported to the public. One case resulted in a token fine to PG&E, the other in forcing Edison’s customers to pay the bulk of the costs of the SONGS closure, caused by an Edison blunder. The PUC last spring reopened that Edison decision, but has yet to make a new ruling. In both cases, Brown did not discipline the commissioners he appointed, and the Legislature’s inaction as it ended its session allows for continued secret contacts like those central to those cases. The FPPC’s investigation comes after Consumer Watchdog documented large Democratic Party contributions from Occidental Petroleum Corp. and Chevron Corp. Oxy’s donation came just after Brown fired two oil and gas regulators the company felt were slow to approve its desired fracking projects. Chevron’s arrived on the very day tough regulations were dropped from the 2013 Senate Bill 4, which was intended to restrict fracking operations where agricultural and drinking water aquifers might be threatened. Oxy also gave $250,000 to Brown’s 2012 campaign for the Proposition 30 tax increases and another $100,000 to one of the governor’s pet charities, the Oakland Military Institute. These donations and others Consumer Watchdog reported smacked of old-fashioned pay-to-play politics. To investigate the state Democratic Party for accepting the money begs the question of who solicited those donations. There also is no announced investigation of how the military school donation came about. Similar donations in the late 1990s from insurance companies regulated by former Republican Insurance Commissioner Chuck Quackenbush led to his being hounded from office in the midst of his term amid charges the donations were actually payoffs. Considering the timing of Oxy’s donation, not investigating Brown’s possible link to it amounts to a clear-cut double standard. One likely outcome of all this appears to be that there will be no immediate changes at the PUC. The appearance – and perhaps reality – of undue influence by utilities over the agency that regulates them continues. Brown, meanwhile, will likely coast through two more years until the end of his fourth and final term as governor. The question remaining is whether his legacy will be the green-and-clean one he so clearly desires or whether he’ll be remembered instead for the alleged corruption among some of his appointees.

Elias has covered esoteric votes in eight national political conventions. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough, The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. His opinions are his own. Email Elias at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti

Q

Motion Sickness . What causes motion sickness?

A

. Many people—including me—suffer nausea when traveling by boat, car or airplane. It also happens on rides in amusement parks and playgrounds. The symptoms of motion sickness are caused by conflicting messages arriving at the central nervous system. Different parts of your body let your brain know where you are and what you’re doing. The inner ears let you know if you’re turning, or moving forwardbackward, side-to-side, and up-and-down. The eyes also monitor the directions of motion and where the body is in space, such as upside down. Skin pressure receptors tell you what part of the body is touching the ground. The muscle and joint sensory receptors tell what parts of the body are moving. If all the signals tell the same story, there are no problems. However, suppose you’re below deck in a heaving sea. Your body is getting information that the boat is moving violently. But your eyes see the unmoving walls of your cabin. If you are susceptible to motion sickness, this below-deck scenario is almost guaranteed to make you look for a porthole to get rid of your last meal. How about the example of reading in the car? Well, your body is picking up all kinds of cues that you’re in motion, but your eyes see only the unmoving pages of your book.

Here are some tips to avoid motion sickness: Always ride where your eyes will see the same motion that your body senses. For example, sit in the front seat of the car and look out the windshield to distant scenery; don’t stare at the rapidly passing telephone poles outside the passenger window. I prefer driving so I am forced to look straight ahead. If you’re on a boat, go up on deck and watch the horizon. Request a cabin in the forward or middle of the ship, or on the upper deck. On an airplane, sit by the window and look outside. Also, choose a seat over the wings where there is the least motion. Direct the air vent at your face. On a train, take a seat near the front and next to a window. Face forward. Minimize head movement. Avoid strong odors and spicy or greasy foods immediately before and during your travel. Don’t overeat. Don’t smoke or sit near smokers. Before your travel begins, take motion sickness medicine recommended by your physician. There are over-the-counter drugs. There is also prescription medicine in an adhesive patch or in oral form. There are other treatments for motion sickness that may benefit some people, but they have not been proven to be consistently effective. High levels of ginger have helped some. There’s an acupuncture point of the wrist that provides relief of nausea during pregnancy and after chemotherapy, but there is contradictory evidence about its effectiveness in treating motion sickness.

Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

To Your

PAGE FIVE • NOV. 24-30, 2016

Living with MS with Dee Dean Eight Less Common Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

M

ultiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease where the myelin, the protecting coating on nerve fibers in the brain and/ or spinal cord of the central nervous system are damaged. Common symptoms of MS include fatigue; numbness and tingling of the face, body, arms and legs; muscle spasms; walking difficulties; bladder problems; bowel problems; vision problems; and cognitive changes. But there are some less common symptoms of MS that you should know about. Here’s a list of eight lesserknown potential MS signs

• Speech Problems

Speech problems might happen in approximately 25 to 40 percent of MS patients. Problems with speech may show during a later stage of the disease course, and during periods when patients experience an extreme level of fatigue. Stuttering is also a speech issue that can occasionally occur.

• Swallowing Problems

Difficulty swallowing, called

dysphagia, is a serious result of nerve damage. It can occur if there is nerve damage to any part of the brain that controls swallowing or if there is damage to the connections between the brain and the spinal cord.

• Tremors

Tremor, or shaking uncontrollably, may happen in several parts of the body. This is a result of damaged areas along the complex of nerve pathways that are responsible for coordinating movement.

• Seizures

Seizures are the result of abnormal electrical discharges in an injured area of the brain. They are estimated to occur in two to five percent of people with MS.

• Breathing Problems

Trouble breathing may occur in people with damage to the autonomic (automatic) nervous system, which is responsible for our breathing without us even thinking about it. Weakness can occur in the ventilatory muscles of the chest or abdomen.

• Itching

Itching, also called pruritus, is not the kind of itching

ddean@echerald.com people without MS feel. MS patients describe the itching as “pins and needles,” burning, stabbing, or tearing pains.

• Headache

Headaches are not a common symptom of Multiple Sclerosis, but some reports suggest that people with MS may experience an increased incidence of certain types of headache, such as migraine.

• Hearing Loss

About six percent of patients with from Multiple Sclerosis complain of impaired hearing. Hearing loss can occur, but it is rare.

Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 29 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.com. NOTE: Dean is the recipient of the 2004 STAR Community Outreach Award by the MS Society Dec. 2, 2004, the American Red Cross Real Hero Wendell Cutting Humanitarian Award, Oct. 13, 2006 , the Stoney Community Service Award, February 29, 2008, Women in Leadership Award for Art/Media/Culture Oct. 29, 2010, El Cajon Citizen of The Year Nominee Feb. 2013 and Recipient of the National MS Society’s 2014 Media Partner of The Year, Feb. 10, 2015.


COMMUNITY Matters PAGE SIX • NOV. 24-30, 2016

BREAKING NEWS Doctor Makes Hearing Aids Affordable for Everyone

Digital Hearing Aid Costs 90%

Sreekant Cherukuri Board Certified Ear, Nose and Throat Doctor, and MDHearingAid Founder

Less

Board-certified Ear, Nose, and Throat physician Dr. S. Cherukuri, a graduate of the prestigious University of Michigan School of Medicine, built a very successful practice helping patients with hearing problems. “I was often frustrated by the fact that many of my patients could benefit from the use of a hearing aid, but unfortunately couldn’t afford one. I then made it my mission to change this, making quality digital hearing aids affordable for anyone who needs one.”

It’s Nearly Invisible “I knew when I developed a new line of hearing aids that one of the most important requirements would be for the device to be hard for others to see,” said Dr. Cherukuri. “One of the biggest objections people have to wearing a hearing aid is that they are embarrassed. Our design helps people get past this concern.” Digital Hearing Aid Outperforms Competitors The new medical grade hearing aid is called MDHearingAid® AIR. It is sleek, lightweight, and full of the same advanced digital technology found in higher-priced devices, but at a small fraction of the price. “I couldn’t understand why everything in the digital world kept coming down in price, like computers, TVs, and DVD players, but not digital hearing aids,” Cherukuri said. Once the doctor started to realize his dream and was able to produce a device that costs 90% less, the industry was turned upside down.

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Wisdom for

EVERYDAY LIFE

with Pastor Drew

A Day in the Life of Jesus The Messiah

G

PART LXXXII

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled, “A day in the life of Jesus the Messiah.” As a reminder, we are doing this series that you may come to know the truth about Jesus as the Word of God the Bible conveys it. We are looking to the four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) and drawing from them to get an accurate look at the chronological view of Jesus. Last time we saw Jesus being led away from the Garden of Gethsemane to be tried by the religious leaders of His day. Matthew 26:57-68 “And they that had laid hold on Jesus led him away to Caiaphas the high priest, where the scribes and the elders were assembled. But Peter followed him afar off unto the high priest’s palace, and went in, and sat with the servants, to see the end. Now the chief priests, and elders, and all the council, sought false witness against Jesus, to put him to death; But found none: yea, though many false witnesses came, yet found they none. At the last came two false witnesses, and said, This fellow said, I am able to destroy the temple of God, and to build it in three days. And the high priest arose, and said unto him, Answerest thou nothing? What is it which these witness against thee? But Jesus held his peace. And the high priest answered and said unto him, I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son of God. Jesus said unto him, Thou hast said: nevertheless I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven. Then the high priest rent his clothes, saying, He hath spoken blasphemy; what further need have we of witnesses? Behold, now ye have heard his blasphemy. What think ye? They answered and said, He is guilty of death. Then did they spit in his face, and buffeted him; and others smote him with the palms of their hands, saying, Prophesy unto us, thou Christ, Who is he that smote thee?” There is much for us to consider from this account. First, there has been much said about Peter following Jesus from afar, but at least he was following Him. Peter often gets a bad rap from many, but he was a person just like the rest of us that was ever prone to falter and fail. He was also the one who said to Jesus, “If that is you Lord, bid me to walk on the water to you.” Peter was also the one who identified Jesus as the Messiah. Second, the trial of Jesus was a sham, it showed the true intentions of the religious leader who wanted to shut up Jesus because He had exposed their corruption and threatened their livelihood of taking advantage of the people for their own gain. They could not find two witnesses to testify against Jesus which was required by Jewish Law, so they had to bribe 2 malefactors to falsely accuse Jesus. Third, to their question of who he is, Jesus clearly testifies to them of Who He is, “Jesus said unto him, Thou hast said: nevertheless I say unto you, Hereafter shall ye see the Son of man sitting on the right hand of power, and coming in the clouds of heaven.” Jesus had many times in the past made clear who He is by His words and actions, but they refused to believe to their own destruction. Finally, the reaction of the religious leaders was predictable, they expressed outrage and contempt for Jesus. It is interesting this same reaction is given by many today that refuse to believe that Jesus is the Who He says He is. You can talk about all kinds of things regarding religion, various idealologies; angels; miracles; spiritual things, but the moment you bring up Jesus and what the Bible says, people have a tendency to get upset. Isn’t that peculiar!

Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


NOV. 24-30, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Herald file photos

Ready, Set, Glow at Alpine Parade of Lights and Snow Festival ALPINE — Enjoy a lighted holiday parade and real snow for free sledding on Friday evening, Dec. 2, in Alpine. The 21st Annual Alpine Village Christmas Parade of Lights starts at 6:30 p.m. on Alpine Boulevard at West Victoria Drive. Awards will be presented this year for best holiday theme, best lighted and best overall group entries. The free Snow Festival with sledding, Santa Claus, entertainment and vendors begins at 7 p.m. at the Alpine Creek Town Center, 1347 Tavern Road. Bring a camera. Vendor booths are $15 for nonprofit organizations, $40 for businesses. There is no duplication of services, products or food. Best lighted booth wins an award. Presented by the Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Commerce, call the Chamber at (619) 445-2722 for details or to register.

‘Not What We Say About Our Blessings, But How We Use Them, Is The True Measure of Our Thanksgiving.’ — W.T. Purkiser

East County

Est. 1998

PAGE SEVEN


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE EIGHT

Joel Anderson at the

Santee Chamber’s Morning Mixer Tuesday, Nov. 15 • Santee

Nancy Hazen/Jay Renard/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

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NOV. 24-30, 2016


NOV. 24-30, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

F

PAGE NINE

FAMILY FEATURES

rom running his workshop to delivering toys around the world, the holiday season is a busy time for Santa. To keep himself going, Saint Nick relies on some essential gadgets to stay connected, organized and entertained throughout the holidays. This year, make your own holidays a little less hectic or someone else’s holiday a little more merry. With the help of U.S. Cellular, you can give some of Santa’s favorite gadgets. Drones: To keep an eye on who’s been naughty or nice, Santa depends on his Parrot Mini-Drone Rolling Spider. The Spider flies smoothly in all directions with its sophisticated stabilizing autopilot system, and a free app with touch controls makes it easy to pilot. Thanks to the “swipe” control feature, you can execute rapid, agile aerobatics, including 90 degree and 180 degree turns, as well as forward, backward and sideways flips. An embedded vertical mini-camera lets you take snapshots from the unique vantage point. Mobile devices: Santa’s Apple iPhone 7 and Samsung Galaxy S7 help him stay connected, organized and entertained. With the iPhone’s new and advanced camera system, you’ll be able to capture memories all season long, and immersive stereo speakers will have you rockin’ around the Christmas tree – all with the strongest battery life ever in an iPhone. If admiring holiday

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

lights is a tradition you hold dear, you’ll appreciate the Galaxy S7’s exceptional low-light image capture, and the smartphone’s expandable memory makes it easy to grab all the photos and videos you can snap. Alarm systems: While Santa is away delivering presents around the world, the Nest Cam provides home security. A crisp, clear, high-quality glass lens, image sensor and 8x digital clear zoom let you see every detail in full 1080p HD right on your phone, where you can also receive alerts so you know if creatures start stirring – perhaps a jolly old elf ? The camera allows you to both talk and listen, and with eight infrared LED, you can see the whole room, even when the night is dark. Music: What’s a sleigh ride without Christmas music? Santa jingles all the way with the UE Roll 2 Bluetooth Speaker. The speaker pumps out crisp sound with deep bass in every direction to spread holiday cheer all around. A rechargeable lithium-ion battery allows for up to nine hours of playtime, so you can keep the festivities going strong late into the night. Using the UE Roll app, you can take advantage of additional features to tune it, alarm it, personalize it and double up the sound by pairing with another UE speaker. Health trackers: After all the countless cookies and glasses of milk, Santa takes charge of his health with the Samsung Gear S2 smartwatch. The built-in S Health app empowers your active lifestyle and continuously challenges you to practice healthy habits. Effortless navigation, personalization options and features like calendar notifications make it easier than ever to keep everything you need at your fingertips. Wireless Bluetooth: Santa relies on the Plantronics Voyager Legend Bluetooth Headset to communicate with his elves while he navigates the world on his sleigh. The device intuitively directs calls to phone or headset, pauses music for incoming calls and allows you to automatically answer by simply placing the headset on your ear. Dual-microphone noise-cancelling technology retains the natural sound of your voice while three layers of WindSmart technology help block intrusive noises. Keep up with loved ones in comfort this holiday season with a pivoting mic boom that lets you wear the headset on either ear. Santa doesn’t have to be the only ultimate gift giver. You can find the items that keep Santa super-charged during the busiest time of the year at USCellular.com, where you can also locate a store near you.


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

NOV. 24-30, 2016

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NOV. 17-23, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Every Great Event Begins and Ends at Hooleys!

PAGE ELEVEN

Rancho San Diego 2955 Jamacha Rd. 619.670.7468

La Mesa

5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900

Your Community Calendar La Mesa Chamber of Commerce Welcomes

Orchard Supply Hardward LA MESA — Join The La Mesa Chamber of Commerce and Welcome Orchard Supply Hardware to Our Community, Thursday, Dec. 8 from 5:306:30 p.m. the La Mesa Chamber of Commerce invites you to join them for an evening of celebration and a ribbon cutting, as we welcome Orchard Supply Hardware to our community and the La Mesa Chamber of Commerce. The “official” ribbon cutting and chainsaw board cutting is scheduled for 6 p.m. that evening, so be there at that time to be in the photo to commemorate this special evening for our member. Orchard Supply Hardware is located at 8780 Navajo Road, San Diego. Shane Holly, the Store Manager and his entire team are making preparations to show you why Orchard Supply Hardware is the best place to purchase all the items that make your house a home. Orchard Supply Hardware believes in neighbors helping neighbors. That’s why Club Orchard was created. The team at Orchard Supply Hardware are highly skilled and will make sure that you get all the help you need to make your home project a success. “What an excellent remodeled storefront for our business community and a premium location for our region to shop,” stated Mary England, President & CEO of the La Mesa Chamber of Commerce “This is our first time in San Diego and thanks to the warm welcome we’ve received, we already feel like we’re part of the community,” said Shane Holly. “We’re excited to open our doors officially on November 29th and further celebrate at our Grand Opening Saturday, December 10th. We look forward to helping the community with all of their hardware and home project needs,” added Mr. Holly. The welcome begins on Thursday, Dec. 8 at 5:30 p.m. and ends at 6:30 p.m., with the “official” ribbon cutting and chainsaw board cutting scheduled for 6 p.m. Following the ceremony, there will be a store tour followed by a reception with light refreshments. Make plans to stop by and see why Orchard Supply Hardware will become your favorite place to visit and purchase all of those items that will turn your house into a home.

Hosted by Pathways Community Church

2016 Waddle and Trot 5K and Kids Fun Run SANTEE — Get your Thanksgiving off to a fun and healthy start while helping two great local charities. The 5th Annual Waddle and Trot 5K and Kid’s Fun Run will be held on Thursday, Nov. 24 at 8:00 am in Santee, CA. Our fast and flat, certified 5K course winds through beautiful Santee Lakes and is ideal for all fitness levels. All race proceeds benefit Santee Santas and Santee Food Bank and race participants will receive a T-shirt and finisher’s medal. Awards will be given to the top three male and female finishers by age categories. Also, be sure to come early and check out our Race Expo and Silent Auction. The is a fun event for the entire family.

Event details and schedule Wednesday, November 23, 2016

4:30 PM to 6:30 PM - Early Bird Race Packet & T-Shirt Pickup and Race Registration

Thursday, November 24, 2016

6:30 AM - Race Packet & T-Shirt Pickup and ‘Day Of Race’ Registration. Come early! 8:00 AM - 5K Start 9:00 AM - Kids Fun Run

‘Christmas in Alpine’ Home Tour, Dec. 10

ALPINE — The Alpine Woman’s Club will hold its Eleventh Annual ‘Christmas in Alpine’ Home Tour on Saturday, Dec. 10 from 10am to 3pm. You will have an opportunity to view five stunning country estates, stroll through Kathy and Mario’s quaint and spectacular Alpine Country Garden and Gifts Shop and visit the Alpine Museums decorated in 1800’s Christmas decor. The Historic Town Hall will be open from 1-4pm, where you can view the Dickens Christmas Village on the Town Hall stage. Ticket holders can also enjoy light refreshments and a surprise gift to say thank you for your support. Tour Tickets are $30 prior to Home Tour and $35 at the door. You can pre purchase tour tickets and raffle tickets at several places, The Postal Annex 2710 Alpine Blvd., Dana’s Boutique 2271 Alpine Blvd., and Alpine Garden and Gifts 2442 Alpine Blvd. If you prefer to mail a check please make it payable to Alpine Woman’s Club and send it to Karin Smith – Home Tour Chairperson, 536 Makenna Lane Alpine CA 91901. Tickets are available for pick up and purchase at the Alpine Woman’s Club 2156 Alpine Blvd. on Saturday Dec 10th starting at 9:30am. There will be a selection of handmade gift items available for purchase to make your holiday shopping a breeze and an opportunity drawing for a $500 cash prize. Raffle tickets are $5 each or 6 for $20. The drawing will be held at the Club House at 3:45pm after the Tour but you do not have to be present to win. Proceeds benefit the Alpine Woman’s Club Scholarship Fund and the maintenance of the Historic Town Hall which was built in 1899. They are a 501 (c) 3 non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible as allowed by law. For further information or questions, please contact Karin at (619) 357-5353 or email her at karinshouse64@yahoo.com

Submit Your Community Event Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.


PAGE TWELVE

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Lakeside Library

NOV. 24-30, 2016

SDSU BEATwith Steve Dolan

SDSU Writers’ Conference Set For Jan. 20-22

W

ill 2017 be your year to break through to publication? Get one step closer to becoming a published writer by attending the 33rd annual SDSU Writers’ Conference, Jan. 20-22, 2017, at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley. Each year, more than 300 attendees from all over the world pursue their literary dreams and get direct feedback on their writing in 1:1 appointments with editors and agents. The three-day SDSU conference was among the first to pioneer these 1:1 appointments, giving writers unprecedented access to top-tier publishing professionals — many of whom interact with unpublished authors only through conferences. Award-winning, best-selling, and thrilling keynote speakers: • R.L. Stine – One of the best-selling children’s authors in history • J.A. Jance – Top 10 New York Times best-selling author • Jonathan Maberry – Best-selling author and five-time Bram Stoker Award-winner • Sherrilyn Kenyon – International and New York Times #1 bestselling author of fantasy, horror, and more New features this year include: 1 pm starting time on Friday opening with keynote speaker Maberry, and a hosted dinner. There will also be more than 40 concurrent workshops – the most ever – facilitated by top publishing professionals. Networking opportunities include dinner and genre-specific tables with fellow writers and faculty, a Saturday evening reception, and countless moments to mix with other writers, editors, and agents from throughout the United States. For complete information, visit neverstoplearning.net/writers, email sdsuwritersconference@mail.sdsu.edu, or call (619) 594-2099. The conference has a long history of launching careers, including those of Richard Lister and Monique Domovitch. Lister co-authored, The View From the O-Line: Football According to NFL Offensive Linemen and an Uncommon Coach, with former NFL coach Howard Mudd. Domovitch, author of The Chef Landry Mystery Series, first wrote, Getting Skinny, a novel that was picked up by an agent at the conference, based solely on its first page. “I can honestly say that if it hadn’t been for that conference, chances are I would still be unpublished,” she noted. “My advice to aspiring writers? Write one hell of a good first line.” Early-bird registration for the SDSU Writers’ Conference is $449 thru Jan. 3. Registration is $499 from Jan. 4-17 and $549 at the door, if space allows. Advance reading appointments are $50 each and must be scheduled by Jan. 3, also the deadline for submitting the first 10 pages of a manuscript. Consultations (a face-to-face Q&A opportunity to discuss a project’s marketability) are available for $50 each through Jan. 17, and $50 at the door, only if space allows. Attendees may purchase additional consultations at the conference, if they are still available. The conference takes place 1-9 pm Friday, Jan. 20; 8:30 am-7 pm Saturday, Jan. 21; and 9 am-12 pm Sunday, Jan. 22. On-site registration begins at 11 am on Friday, with the first breakout session at 2:15 pm.

Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZwith Rick Griffin Santee Chamber presents Taste of Santee

an appearance by Santa and lighting ceremony for the community Christmas tree. Admission is free. Exhibit areas can be reserved for $75 for Chamber members and $125 for non-members. Food vendors can reserve space for $150. According to Kathy Kassel, Chamber executive director, Christmas on Maine Avenue is a holiday tradition for many families. This year’s sponsors include Barona Resort & Casino, San Diego Gas & Electric, Hilliker’s Ranch Fresh Eggs, Alpine Rock & Block, Daily Disposal Services, Lakeside Equipment, State Farm Insurance, Rise City Church, 7 San Diego Church and Montessori East County Preschool, Bob’s Crane, Williams & Sons Masonry, Lakeside Veterinary Hospital, EC Constructors, Inc., Easy Open Doors, Lloyd’s Collision, Cyphertech Mechanical, National Security Works, True Lawn Care, AT&T, Enniss Inc. and Payton’s Hardware. For more information, visit www.LakesideChamber.org.

SANTEE — The Santee Chamber of Commerce will present its 29th annual Taste of Santee from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 1, at Toyota Certified Center showroom, 8871 Fanita Dr., Santee. The public is invited to attend. Cost to attend is $10 per person. Event sponsors include Union Bank and Toyota Certified Center. There is no cost to participate as a food provider. More a dozen providers are expected to participate. About 150 people are expected to attend. For more information, visit www.SanteeChamber. com. Besides enjoying samples of foods from local restaurants, attendees are encouraged to bring an unwrapped toy or non-perishable food item for the Santee Santas Foundation, a local non-profit that benefits needy families living within the Santee School District who are in need of assistance. Santee Santas is expecting to help about 300 families in the community this year. The all-volunteer organization includes school district employees, city staff, firefighters, local business leaders and service organization members. A portion of the $10 admission fee from the Taste event will provide a Santeeopoly board game that Santee ALPINE — The Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Santas will give to families as a Christmas gift. Commerce will host its next “Hot Topics” networking breakfast meeting starting at 7:15 a.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 13, at the Alpine Community Center, 1830 Alpine Blvd. Guest speaker will be State Sen. Joel Anderson who will discuss proposed legislation and LAKESIDE — The Lakeside Chamber of Commerce an update on Sacramento activity. Also speaking will is planning its 18th annual “Spirit of Christmas on be Richard Davila, County Sherriff ’s Dept. Retired Maine Avenue” from 4 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 3. The Senior Volunteer Patrol (RSVP), on the need for more community celebration will be held on Maine Avenue RSVP volunteers. The public is invited to attend. Cost between Laurel Drive and Parkside Street. Featuring a to attend the Chamber breakfast is $20 per person, hometown atmosphere with the sights and sounds of which includes opportunity drawing tickets. Prizes Christmas, the event will include performances by local will include admission to future chamber events, school children, craft booths, activities for children, including a “Hot Topics” breakfast and a “Red Hot and

Alpine Chamber will host Joel Anderson at `Hot Topics’ breakfast

Lakeside Chamber will host Spirit of Christmas

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to editor@echerald.com

Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

Moving to the Top” promotional event for businesses and organizations. For more information and to RSVP, call (619) 445-2722 or visit www.AlpineChamber.com. Anderson’s 38th Senate district in the California Legislature includes Alpine, Lemon Grove, El Cajon, La Mesa, Santee, Poway, Escondido, San Marcos, Lakeside, Valley Center, Rancho Santa Fe, Julian, Ramona, Rancho San Diego, Bonsall, Borrego Springs and Fallbrook. He was first elected to the State Assembly in 2006 and to the State Senate in 2010.

Lakeside realtor named Realtor of the Year

LAKESIDE — Lakeside resident Ron Boland has been named 2016 East County Realtor of the Year by the Pacific Southwest Association of Realtors (PSAR), a 2,500member trade group for San Diego-area realtors. Boland, a real estate sales agent since 2005, has served on the PSAR board of directors since 2012. He also has served the past four years on the PSAR Budget and Finance Committee and the past two years on the PSAR Tech Committee. Two years ago, he singlehandedly installed a flag pole for an American flag at PSAR’s East County Service Center, 1150 Broadway, El Cajon. Since 2009, he has worked with Parkway Real Estate, an El Cajon real estate sales and property management firm. A native of Winona, Minn., Boland, 78, has lived in California since 1982. Prior to real estate, he spent 20 years selling frames to artist supply shops in Utah, Arizona and California. Ron has resided with wife Carolyn in Lakeside’s Eucalyptus Hills community since April 1984. They have been married since January 1968. Founded in 1928, PSAR offers San Diego County REALTORS® access to the Sandicor MLS, along with educational training, advocacy and other services and resources. For information on PSAR, visit www.PSAR.org.


NOV. 24-30, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

U.S. Small Business Administration Celebrates Small Business Saturday, Nov. 26

Estimated 95 million consumers shopped, dined small in 2015 U.S. Small Business Admistration (SBA) will once again celebrate Small Business Saturday on Nov. 26. Occurring between Black Friday and Cyber Monday, Small Business Saturday is a national initiative that gives shoppers an opportunity to buy from the local merchants who are creating jobs, boosting the economy, and supporting communities across the country. “Small businesses have advantages over their big box competition including better customer support, unique merchandise, and innovative services not found at national chain stores,” said SBA Region IX Director Donna Davis. “The money consumers spend with local merchants stays right in the community. That’s important because small businesses generate two of every three net new jobs, and half of working Americans either own or work for one” Consumer spending on Small Business Saturday is a boost to local communities. An estimated 95 million consumers went out to shop at small businesses last year, and Small Business Saturday has become a holiday tradition for some shoppers. Consumers can visit http://www.shopsmall.com to find a participating business near them, and share their support of local merchants on social media with #SmallBizSat The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) was created in 1953 and since January 13, 2012 has served as a Cabinet-level agency of the federal government to aid, counsel, assist and protect the interests of small business concerns, to preserve free competitive enterprise and to maintain and strengthen the overall economy of our nation. The SBA helps Americans start, build and grow businesses. Through an extensive network of field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations, the SBA delivers its services to people throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam. www.sba. gov

Lakeside Chamber of Commerce’s 18th Annual Spirit of Christmas on Maine Ave Saturday, December 3rd 2016 FREE to ATTEND! Santa and his elves are hard at work getting ready for Christmas… And the elves of the Lakeside Chamber of Commerce work to create an annual event that will attract and delight people of all ages. There will be an atmosphere of an old-fashion hometown Christmas. The event features all the sights and sounds of Christmas; • Local School performances • Santa Claus – Photos with Santa • Food and Drink • Kid Activities • Jumpy Jumps, Rides • Booths - Crafters • Lighting the Community Christmas Tree Join us for some Holiday Fun!

PAGE THIRTEEN

Black Friday is Here, Santa’s on His Way; Time to Check Receipts

By Gig Conaughton, County of San Diego Communications Office

SAN DIEGO COUNTY — Black Friday is coming. Santa is readying the reindeer. That means the “shop ‘til you drop” holiday season is back! It also means it’s time to remember to double-check your receipts when you hit the stores so you don’t get overcharged by faulty cashregister price scanners. It can definitely happen. Every year, County inspectors from the Department of Agriculture, Weights and Measures inspect thousands of local businesses, checking price-scanning devices, scales that charge items by weight, and the other equipment that set prices, to make sure they are charging customers accurately. Last year, one out of every six businesses inspected had over-

charging errors. So check all your receipts, because even small overcharges can add up in “shop ‘till you drop” season.

Here are some other tips to help you shop smartly and safely:

Protect Against Overcharging:

• Always verify receipts and immediately notify store management of any price discrepancies. • Stores are required to display the price of an item (as you are buying it) before the transaction is complete. Watch the display screen as your items are scanned. • Take sales advertisements with you when shopping to verify prices. • Know that stores cannot legally charge more than their lowest advertised, posted or quoted price.

Shop Smart:

• Plan ahead. Start watching for store sale fliers, flea markets, garage sales, clearance sales, etc. • Make a list of what you need. • Comparison shop with at least five different sources for the best values. • Don’t buy everything at once. Establish a spending plan and timetable to buy what you need over several weeks or months to take full advantage of future sales and true bargains. Call Agriculture, Weights and Measures at 1-888-TRUE SCAN (1-888-878-3722) or email to sdcawm@sdcounty.ca.gov to report overcharges you can’t resolve with store. For more information, go to Agriculture, Weights and Measure’s Consumer Protection webpage and check out this video about the scanner inspection program.

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11 Late Brooklyn Dodgers 47 Circle segment ACROSS outfielder 48 Norse peace god 1 Disconcert Pub Date: 11/18/11 Slug: USUDOKU_g1_111811.eps 12 Roman road 49 Secular 6 Clothes © 2011 The Christian Science Monitor AllHardy rights 13 girlreserved. 51(www.csmonitor.com). Compass pt. 10 Mine entrance 18 Stag’s horn 53News Diluted 14 Hot winter drink Monitor Distributed by The Christian Science Service (email: syndication@csmonitor.com) 22 Fine table linen 55 Glossy finishes 15 Space beginning RICH CLABAUGH/STAFF 24 Of an eye part 59 ___ILLUSTRATOR.eps Ridge 16 Sitar kin 25 More dryly humorous 60 Former jazz bandlead17 Supreme Court Justice 26 Voodoo er and composer of note 27 Creole jazz legend 62 “___ a Song Go Out of 19 Turner and Eisenhower 29 Tug My Heart” 20 George or Connie 31 Silas or Seamus 63 Woody’s boy 21 Geezers 32 Full of lather 64 “___ Gantry” 23 Summer time, in NYC 34 Chinese provincial 65 Gaze intently 24 St. Paul’s book of the capital 66 Favorites Bible 35 Mark 67 Della, of song 25 Asian cooking pans 39 Emphasis 28 Leaching solution 42 Send forth DOWN 30 Recompense 46 Arctic land cover 1 Experts 33 Baseball stat 48 She 2 Watercraft 34 Preliminary contests 50 Worship 3 Farm measure 36 French goodbye 52 Cavalry sword 4 Figures out 37 Desire 53 Journey 5 Fumbled in speaking 38 Eurasian perennial 54 Hawaiian seaport 6 Sailors herb 55 Slaughter, of baseball 7 “___ the ramparts ...” 40 Father 56 Salinger heroine 8 Hellenic 41 Raring to go 57 Prevaricates 9 Valley north of San 43 Talent 58 Withered Francisco 44 USNA grad The Christian Science Monitor 61 Maximum: abbr. 10 Formed up 45 Parallelograms By Dan Bazer


NOV. 24-30, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE FIFTEEN

Frutzia Grand Opening

Thursday, Nov. 10 • Santee

Ronn Hall/Jay Renard/The East County Herald

See more photos at www.echerald.com

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PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

NOV. 24-30, 2016

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