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Dine & Dialog with San Diego District Attorney Summer Stephan , P7

East County

SEPT. 7-13, 2017 Vol. 19 No. 01

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication

Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

PAGE TWO • SEPT. 7-13, 2017

Second Annual ‘Suicide Prevention Ride For Life’

Jay Renard/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

EL CAJON — The 2nd Annual Suicide Prevention Ride for Life took place Saturday, Sept. 2. The event was hosted by Survivors of Suicide Loss San Diego, and was held at El Cajon Harley Davidson. The day included a poker run for bikes, food, music, and an opportunity drawing after the poker run. Survivors of Suicide Loss (SOSL) reach out and supports people who have lost a loved one to suicide. Their goal is to give survivors a place where they can be comfortable expressing themselves, a place to find support, comfort, resources and hope in a judgment-free environment. For more information visit http://www.soslsd.org.

See SUICIDE PREVENTION RIDE FOR LIFE, p13

Art /

2017 Alley Cat Art Walk

Wine

Main Street, Rea Avenue & Arts Alley

the alley in between !

Rodeo Bulls © Denise Rich Alley Cats © Mark Rimland

Vendors

businesses!

/

pallets located outside all participating

Food

Pick up a Passport... collect stamps to win prizes! Follow the hand-painted

/

downtownelcajon.com

Paint & Pallet

Music

DOWNTOWN EL CAJON

EL CAJON — The Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation has donated $25K to help the victims of Hurricane Harvey. The donation will go directly to JJ Watt’s Houston Flood Relief Fund, which has generated over $28 million in donations. “The Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation would like to extend its deepest sympathies to the victims of Hurricane Harvey,” said Cody Martinez, chairman, Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation. “We would like to offer our support and will be donating $25,000 to JJ Watt’s Houston Flood Relief Fund. Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone affected.” About the Houston Flood Relief Fund The Houston Relief Fund is for victims of Hurricane Harvey and organized by Houston Texans defensive end JJ Watt. “Hurricane Harvey has taken a catastrophic toll on our great city, while leaving many stranded and in need of assistance. We must come together and collectively help rebuild the aspects of our community members lives that were damaged or lost. Any donation that you can spare, no matter how large or small, is greatly appreciated. We will come out of this stronger than ever. We are Texans.” The Justin J. Watt Foundation is a certified 501c(3) non-profit.

/

Friday, September 15, 2017 5-10PM

Sycuan Tribe Donates $25,000 to JJ Watt’s Houston Flood Relief Fund

On The Cover LAKESIDE — The Barona Band of Mission Indians held their 47th Annual Powwow, FridaySunday, Sept. 1-3 at the Barona Sports Park on the Barona Indian Reservation in Lakeside. Cover: Rob Riingen/The East County Herald Cover design: Dee Dean / See more on P8-P9 The East County Herald and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • SEPT. 7-13, 2017

Your Voice in the Community San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce

Office: 619.440.6161 Fax: 619.460.6164 info

WWW.EASTCOUNTYCHAMBER.ORG

YOUR AD HERE!

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy!

FREE ESTIMATE

HOUSE CLEANING ROCIO & ANA

(619)

884.1798 References Available

YOUR AD HERE!

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy!

10315 Mission Gorge Road • Santee • 92071

www.SanteeChamber.com Phone: 619.449.6572 Fax: 619.562.7906


OPINiON

Politics and

PAGE FOUR • SEPT. 7-13, 2017

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias Dems Want Feinstein Out: Classic Age Discrimination

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one of the host of ultra-liberal Democrats who would love to succeed her makes the direct argument that at 84 – she’ll be one year older by next November’s election – fellow Democrat Dianne Feinstein is too aged to be one of California’s two United States senators. But that’s what they mean. “Feinstein … is no less alert and active today than she’s been in recent years,” went one essay in California’s largest newspaper, damning her with faint praise. “Generational renewal,” the same essay continued, is one way to measure the strength of a political party. In other words, if you’re lucky enough to acquire some age, get out of the younger folks’ way. That’s, of course, what those younger folks would like – until and unless they also eventually acquire some years. By all appearances, Feinstein, the ranking Democrat on the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee and former chair of the Intelligence Committee, is at least as active now as she was 20 years ago, when no one complained about her age. She wasn’t as loud as some others (read: California’s other senator, Kamala Harris) in questioning Donald Trump administration figures like Attorney General Jeff Sessions during nationally televised hearings last spring, but her civilly-phrased questions seemed more piercing to many. No Democrat has done more to preserve the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, which provides health insurance for about 5 million previously uninsured Californians. In short, Feinstein has lately done as much as when she worked to thwart the conservative agenda of ex-President George W. Bush 15 years ago. But she’s still a centrist, which galls a lot of leftists. She’s offered compromises on water issues and won support from Central Valley farmers, while also fighting for abortion rights and other civil liberties causes. She’s a firm conservationist, the only senator actively opposing Trump appointees who seek to allow the private Cadiz Inc. to tap federally-owned groundwater beneath the Mojave Desert for profit. She’s also been scrupulously fair to business. And she’s been responsible for several measures keeping domestic surveillance by intelligence agencies in check, while clamping down on those same agencies’ proclivity toward using torture. All that and more makes her able to work with Republicans and get them to listen to her reasoning on some key issues. So, yes, she’s out of tune with more radically leftist Democrats who would prefer a more ferocious, partisan approach. But could any of the current field of would-be Democratic senators – figures like Silicon Valley Congressman Ro Khanna, who also used ageism in ousting longtime Rep. Mike Honda, or state Senate President Kevin de Leon or Pasadena Congressman Adam Schiff – be as effective? Advocates urging Feinstein not to run for a fifth full term would never cop to their obvious prejudice against anyone her age. But they want her to leave now, following the example of former colleague Barbara Boxer, who retired at 76 near the end of 2016, allowing Harris to succeed her. Opportunistic Democrats eagerly awaiting Feinstein’s departure will do nothing direct against her, but all know that if she runs again, they can do little to prevent yet more prospects from joining their corps long before her new term would be up. No one knows who might become a viable candidate by 2024, or even whether Democrats will still dominate in California. Six years ago, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti was a littleknown city councilman, Khanna held no office, and virtually no one knew who Schiff was. Just as things changed for them, the same could happen for unknown numbers of others over the span of a new six-year Feinstein term. Meanwhile, some Democrats strongly wish for Feinstein to stay. Former San Diego Congresswoman Lynn Schenk, for one, calls Feinstein “one of the most influential and respected senators” and a “canny expert on legislation” who “probes for the truth in her committees.” That’s what most people want in a senator, and as long as Feinstein provides it, her age should be no factor at all.

Elias has covered esoteric votes in eight national political conventions. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough, The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. His opinions are his own. Email Elias at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti Hypertension: The ‘Silent Killer’

Q

A

. Why do they call high blood pressure the silent killer?

. High blood pressure—

known as hypertension—is very sneaky. It’s called the silent killer, because it usually has no

symptoms. Doctors say you have high blood pressure if you have a reading of 140/90 or higher. A blood pressure reading of 120/80 or lower is considered normal. Prehypertension is blood pressure between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number. The first number represents your systolic pressure when the heart beats. The second number represents the diastolic pressure when the heart rests. If only one number is elevated, you still have high blood pressure with all of its dangers. Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) is the most common form of high blood pressure for seniors. When you have ISH, only the top number is too high. About 2 out of 3 people over age 60 with high blood pressure have ISH. About one in three American adults has high blood pressure. In the U.S., high blood pressure occurs more often in African-Americans High blood pressure can ravage your body. It can enlarge the heart, create small bulges (aneurysms) in blood vessels, damage the blood vessels in the kidneys, harden arteries, produce bleeding in the eyes. The possible consequences are heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and blindness. Your chances of getting high blood pressure are also higher if you are overweight, don’t exercise, eat too much salt, drink too much alcohol, don’t consume enough potassium, endure stress for too long. Obviously, changing your diet, exercising and altering your lifestyle will help. When you go to your doctor to have your blood pressure taken, there are a few things you can do to get an accurate reading. First, don’t eat, drink coffee or smoke cigarettes for an hour before your pressure is taken. (What are you doing smoking anyway?). Empty your bladder, because a full tank can affect the reading. Sit quietly for five minutes before the test. If you’re like me, you have white coat syndrome. That means your blood pressure jumps as soon as a doctor or nurse approaches you. If your doctor knows this, he or she may recommend a home blood-pressure monitor or ambulatory monitor that is worn around the clock and takes your pressure every half hour. If you have high blood pressure and lifestyle changes don’t reduce it, there are medications to treat the problem. Often, two or more drugs work better than one. Some drugs lower blood pressure by removing extra fluid and salt from your body. Others affect blood pressure by slowing down the heartbeat, or by relaxing and widening blood vessels.

To Your

PAGE FIVE • SEPT. 7-13, 2017

Living with MS with Dee Dean Spasticity in Multiple Sclerosis

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pasticity refers to feelings of stiffness and a wide range of involuntary muscle spasms (sustained muscle contractions or sudden movements). It is one of the more common symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Spasticity may be as mild as the feeling of tightness of muscles or may be so severe as to produce painful, uncontrollable spasms of extremities, usually of the legs. Spasticity may also produce feelings of pain or tightness in and around joints, and can cause low back pain. Although spasticity can occur in any limb, it is much more common in the legs. In flexor spasticity, mostly involving the hamstrings (muscles on the back of the upper leg), and hip flexors (muscles at the top of the upper thigh), the hips and knees are bent and difficult to straighten. In extensor spasticity, involving the quadriceps and adductors (muscles on the front and inside of the upper leg), the hips and knees remain straight with the legs very close together or crossed over at the ankles. Spasticity may be aggravated by sudden movements or position changes, extremes of temperature, humidity or infections, and can even be triggered by tight clothing. Treatment of spasticity and muscle tightness by medication and physical and occupational therapy is needed to prevent painful and disabling contractures in the hips, knees, ankles, shoulders and elbows. Surgical measures are considered for those rare cases of spasticity that defy all other treatments. Left untreated, spasticity can

lead to serious complications, including contractures (frozen or immobilized joints) and pressure sores (Momentum magazine article). Since these complications also act as spasticity triggers, they can set off a dangerous escalation of symptoms. Some degree of spasticity can provide benefit, particularly for people who experience significant leg weakness. The spasticity gives their legs some rigidity, making it easier for them to stand, transfer, or walk. The goal of treatment for these individuals is to relieve the spasticity sufficiently to ensure comfort and prevent complications, without taking away the rigidity they need to function. Because spasticity varies so much from person to person, it must be treated on an individual basis and demands a true partnership between the person with MS, physician, nurse, physical therapist and occupational therapist. Treatment begins with the physician recommending ways to relieve the symptoms, including exercise, medication, changes in daily activities or combinations of these methods. The physician will track the progress and make referrals to other health professionals such as occupational and physical therapists. Daily stretching and other exercises are often effective in helping to relieve spasticity. Two major antispasticity medications have good safety records. Neither, however, can cure spasticity or improve muscle coordination or strength. Baclofen, the most commonly used medication, is a muscle relaxant that works on nerves in the spinal cord. Common side effects are drowsiness and a feeling of muscle weakness. It can be administered orally or by

ddean@echerald.com an implanted pump (intrathecal baclofen). Intrathecal baclofen is used for severe spasticity that cannot be managed with oral medication. Tizanidine (Zanaflex®) works quickly to calm spasms and relax tightened muscles. Although it doesn’t produce muscle weakness, it often causes sedation and a dry mouth. In some patients, it may lower blood pressure. Another less commonly-used medication, Diazepam (Valium®) is not a ‘first choice’ drug for spasticity because it is sedating and has a potential to create dependence. However, its effects last longer with each dose than baclofen, and physicians may prescribe small doses of at bedtime to relieve spasms that interfere with sleep. Botulinum toxin (Botox®) injections have been shown to be effective in relieving spasticity in individual muscles for up to three months. Source: NMSS

Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 30 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.com.

Fight For a CURE! Anything Else is NOT ENOUGH!

Do You Know Your Numbers? Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

BEAT MS! The East County Herald ©


COMMUNITY Matters ADVANCED HEARING AID PAGE SIX • SEPT. 7-13, 2017

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Wisdom for

EVERYDAY LIFE The Promises of God

with Pastor Drew

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Part XX

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled “The Promises of God”. As mentioned in part one of this series, there are but a few promises to all of mankind, the vast majority are to those who have become His children by adoption through faith in Jesus Christ and repentance from sin. Some may think this is not “fair”, that all of God’s promises should be to everyone. Well they are to everyone that will repent of sin and turn to Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sin. Think of this way, you are a parent, your children have your protection; love; provision; sacrifice; and will inherit what you have at your departure. Should others who are not your children or even those who hate you and your children be beneficiaries of what you have for your own children? Of course not, that would be absurd! Another of God’s wonderful promises is that of His presence with us at all times. This truth is found in Old and New Testament alike. Deuteronomy 31:6-8 God’s promise to Moses “Be strong and of a good courage. Do not fear nor be afraid of them. For Jehovah your God is He who goes with you. He will not fail you nor forsake you. And Moses called to Joshua and said to him in the sight of all Israel, Be strong and of a good courage…. And Jehovah is He who goes before you. He will be with you; He will not fail you nor forsake you. Do not fear; nor be dismayed.” Joshua 1:5-9 God’s promise to Joshua “No man shall be able to stand before you all the days of your life. As I was with Moses, so I will be with you. I will not fail you nor forsake you. Be strong and of good courage…. Have I not commanded you? Be strong and of good courage. Do not be afraid, neither be dismayed. For Jehovah your God is with you in all places where you go.” 1Chronicals 28:20 God’s promise to Solomon “And David said to Solomon his son, Be strong and of good courage, and do it. Do not fear, nor be dismayed, for Jehovah God, my God, will be with you. He will not fail you nor leave you until you have finished all the work for the service of the house of Jehovah.” Isaiah 43:1-2 God’s promise to the children of Israel “But now so says Jehovah who created you, O Jacob, and He who formed you, O Israel; Fear not, for I have redeemed you; I have called you by your name; you are Mine. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow you. When you walk through the fire, you shall not be burned; nor shall the flame kindle on you.” Romans 8:31-39 God’s promise to the believers at Rome “What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us? Truly He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things? Who shall lay anything to the charge of God’s elect? It is God who justifies. Who is he condemning? It is Christ who has died, but rather also who is raised, who is also at the right hand of God, who also intercedes for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, “For Your sake we are killed all the day long. We are counted as sheep of slaughter.” But in all these things we more than conquer through Him who loved us. For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Finally, Paul testifies at the end of his life of God’s faithfulness to keep His promise, 2Timothy 4:16-18 “At my first answer no one was beside me, but all deserted me. May it not be laid to their charge. But the Lord stood with me and strengthened me, that through me the preaching might be fulfilled, and that all the nations might hear. And I was delivered out of the mouth of the lion. And the Lord shall deliver me from every evil work and will preserve me to His heavenly kingdom, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen.”

Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


SEPT. 7-13, 2017

East County Chamber’s DIne & DIalog

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

With S.D. District Attorney Summer Stephan Wednesday, Aug. 30 • El Cajon

LEE BRICE THURSDAY, 09/28

Venue located in The Park at Viejas Casino & Resort Viejas Casino & Resort ∙ 5000 Willows Road ∙ Alpine, CA 91901 ∙ 619.445.5400 Guests must be at least 21 years of age to enter the Casino. Guests must be at least 21 years of age with valid ID to attend Concerts in the Park. Guests must be at least 21 years of age to drink alcoholic beverages. Guests under 21 years of age are permitted in The Buffet only, but must be accompanied by an adult. This is an outdoor event; all performances will be held rain or shine. Families are welcome at the Viejas Outlets and the Viejas Hotel. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling, call 800.426.2537

www.viejas.com

PAGE SEVEN


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE EIGHT

SEPT. 7-13, 2017

Fri-Sun, Sept. 1-3 • Barona In

e t t A

! n tn io

East County Schools & East County Non-Profits s d i y K c s ’ a y g e e n o t L S

GRANTS AVAILABLE To Obtain a Grant Application Visit: www.stoneyskidslegacy.org or Email: Grants@stoneyskidslegacy.org Note: Stoney’s Kids Legacy Does Not Fund Administrative Costs.

‘Its All About The Kids!’


SEPT. 7-13, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

ndian Reservation • Lakeside

Rob Riingen/The East County Herald See more at www.echerald.com

PAGE NINE


PAGE TEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

El Cajon Dinner & a Concert features

Fortunate Son Friday, Sept. 1 • El Cajon

Jay Renard / The East County Herald See more at www.echerald.com

SOLD OUT SOLD OUT

SEPT. 7-13, 2017


SEPT. 7-13, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Every Great Event Begins and Ends at Hooleys!

PAGE ELEVEN

Rancho San Diego 2955 Jamacha Rd. 619.670.7468

La Mesa

5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900

Your Community Calendar

Submit Your Community Event Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.

‘Twilight Tasting at The Trails

Combines Three East County Kiwanis Clubs in Beer & Wine Tasting Fundraiser at Mission Trails Park, Sept. 9

Alpine Woman’s Club Meeting Alpine Woman’s Club Monthly Luncheon is Tuesday, Sept. 19 at Noon. The Club is open to all East County Women and is located in the Alpine Town Hall, 2156 Alpine Blvd. After lunch they will play a game called, Who am I? Members will bring in a picture of themselves, from years past, and they will try and guess the name of the person in the picture. There will be prizes and surprises. The club’s Mission is to provide opportunities for women to meet and socialize, to maintain the Historic Alpine Town Hall and to hold fundraiser’s for their scholarship fund. So far, they have given away $126,000 in scholarships to local, college bound seniors. They have three major fundraisers each year. Attic Treasurers in February, The Victorian Tea in April and the Christmas Home Tour in December. If you are interested in learning more about the club then please make a reservation to attend their monthly meeting/ luncheon. Please contact Karin Smith karinshouse64@yahoo. com or 619-357-5353. Information about events and programs can also be found on their website at www.alpinewomansclub.org or their Facebook page.

Kiwanians in East County are hitting the trail come September – at least the trails at Mission Trails Regional Park. Members of the Kiwanis Clubs of Lake Murray, La Mesa and Fletcher Hills are combining their efforts to raise funds for their youth scholarships and community sponsorships by presenting ‘Twilight Tasting at the Trails’ from 6–9 pm on Saturday, Sept. 9. The event, which will feature craft beers and wines from local breweries and wineries as well as a variety of tasty foods from local restaurants, will be in the Mission Trails Regional Park Visitor Center. Entrance to the center is off Mission Gorge Rd and east of Jackson Dr. Breweries participating in the event will be Burning Beard Brewing Company of El Cajon, Citizen Brewers of San Diego, and Helix Brew Company of La Mesa. Vistabased Mother Earth Brew Company will be sponsored by Pete’s Place Bar on La Mesa Boulevard. A selection of wines will be provided by PRP Wines International of San Diego. Founded in 1989 and based in San Diego, PRP is considered the pioneer in wine samplings to entertain and educate the public about the world of fine wines. Food offerings will be served by BJ’s Restaurant and Brewhouse in Grossmont Center, Flour Power Bakery in El Cajon, Hooley’s Irish Pub in Grossmont Center, Nonno’s Italian Restaurant in La Mesa, Rita’s Italian Ice in Santee, and Brew Spot Coffee in La Mesa. Others food providers are pending. Other sponsors are Daniel Denhart and Medina Horning & Krause LLP. An opportunity drawing will feature two tickets to tour the Midway Aircraft Carrier in San Diego Bay, and two wine-tasting events for up to 15 people each – each event valued at $300. Other prizes include a Barbeque Accessories Basket, a Jamul Beer Company basket, a gift basket from The Hills Local Pub, a picnic basket with wine, and golf club tickets for four. Plus an Emergency Car Kit with three Body Beautiful Car Washes. And more. Heading the triad team are Cathy Saur and Ginger Aldrich of Lake Murray Kiwanis, Glenna Bloeman and Bob Shultz of La Mesa Kiwanis, and Dave Liss and Chuck Fleming of Fletcher Hills Kiwanis. Tickets for “Twilight Tasting” are $40 per person. Call the Kiwanis Club phone (619) 212-9132 for reservations, or contact any Kiwanian in Fletcher Hills, La Mesa, or Lake Murray.


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THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

SEPT. 7-13, 2017

SPORTS BEAT with Steve Dolan

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Links at Petco Park is Back

he San Diego Padres and Callaway Golf have announced that The Links at Petco Park, the original nine-hole ballpark golf experience, will return for the third year in a row from Thursday, Oct. 5 to Tuesday, Oct. 10. As part of the experience, golfers will have the unique opportunity to take shots onto the playing field from various tees along an unrivaled, redesigned course within the ballpark. “Petco Park was the first MLB ballpark to host a ninehole golf course and we are excited to once again offer this unique and fun experience,” said Padres Chief Operating Officer Erik Greupner. “The event has grown and improved every year and working together with Callaway, we’ve made this year’s course the best layout to date.” “The Links at Petco Park is the original and the best instadium golf experience,” said Harry Arnett, SVP, Marketing, Callaway Golf. “In partnership with the Padres, our mission since we started years ago has been to provide a one-of-a-kind experience on every hole in Petco Park, and that will definitely be elevated this year.” The fully immersive nine-hole course will feature signature holes from years past at home plate and the roof of the Western Metal Supply Co. building. As part of the newly configured course layout, participants will be able to tee off from underneath the National League’s largest video board screen in left field. Holes throughout the course will also feature unique themes and the opportunity to win prizes. Golfers will be escorted by their own dedicated caddy for the entirety of the course. Mulligans will also be available for purchase with proceeds benefitting Pro Kids, an organization aimed at serving underserved youth by promoting character development, life skills and values through education and the game of golf. Upon completion of the course, golfers will finish their day in the Omni Premier Club, which will be transformed into a Callaway clubhouse. There, they will have the opportunity to relax with additional food and beverages available for purchase, watch other golfers along the course, putt on a putting green and shop for commemorative items. For more information or to reserve your tee time, visit www.padres.com/thelinks.

Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZwith Rick Griffin East County Chamber’s Sept. breakfast at prosperity of Alpine and the Mountain Empire. La Mesa Chamber to host breakfast with Ronald Reagan Community Center The San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce will host State Senator Joel Anderson

The La Mesa Chamber of Commerce will host State Senator Joel Anderson at its final breakfast meeting of the year starting at 7:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 27, at the Marie Callender’s restaurant, 6950 Alvarado Road, San Diego. Breakfast sponsor will be Carl Burger Dodge Chrysler Jeep RAM World. The public is invited to attend. Cost to attend is $15 for Chamber members and $20 for guests with advanced reservations, or $25 at the door. Breakfast will include eggs Benedict, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, potatoes, fresh fruit and juice. Prize drawings also will be held. Reservations may be made by sending an e-mail to rsvp@ lamesachamber.com. Anderson’s 38th Senate district in the Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber California Legislature includes nearly 1 million constituents and the welcomes two new businesses communities of Lemon Grove, El Cajon, La Mesa, Santee, Poway, The Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Commerce recently Escondido, San Marcos, Lakeside, Valley Center, Rancho Santa Fe, welcomed two new businesses, including the For the Love Gift Julian, Ramona, Rancho San Diego, Bonsall, Borrego Springs and Boutique, 2530 Alpine Road (next to Janet’s Cafe), and Kahoots Pet Fallbrook. He was first elected to the State Assembly in 2006 and to Store, at the Alpine Creek Town Center, 1347 Tavern Road. For The the State Senate in 2010. In 2011, Anderson was recognized for his Love is a faith-based, affordable novelty gift boutique with something efforts to protect small business with the “California State Legislator for everyone. A Chamber “Red Hot & Moving to the Top” promotional of the Year” award from the California Small Business Association open house was part of the For The Love’s grand opening. Kahoots’ and the California Small Business Roundtable. grand opening included pet adoptions and donations accepted for Lakeside Chamber hosting identity theft Baja Animal Sanctuary. Both ribbon-cutting celebrations included certificates of recognition from East County elected officials, including workshop The Lakeside Chamber of Commerce will host a lunch-andCongressman Duncan Hunter, State Senator Joel Anderson, State learn workshop on identity theft prevention from noon to 2 p.m., Assemblyman Randy Voepel and County Supervisor Dianne Jacob. Thursday, Sept. 28, at Café 67, 12381 Mapleview St., Lakeside. For more information about the Chamber of Commerce, call (619) Admission is $15 for members, $20 for nonmembers. Price 445-2722, or e-mail KimberlyB@AlpineChamber.sdcoxmail.com or visit www.AlpineChamber.com. The Chamber’s mission is to advance includes lunch. The presentation and discussion will be led by the the commercial, industrial, civic, agricultural and general interest and San Diego County District Attorney’s Office. Discussion topics will its upcoming First Friday Breakfast starting at 7:15 a.m. on the second Friday of the month, Friday, Sept. 8, at the Ronald Reagan Community Center, 195 East Douglas Ave, El Cajon. Table-top sponsors will be Point Loma Credit, Crisis House and Panera Bread. Breakfast will be catered by Panera Bread. Cost to attend the Chamber breakfast is $25 per person for members, $30 per person for prospective members with RSVP and $35 per person for walk-ups without RSVP. For more information and to RSVP, contact the Chamber at info@eastcountychamber.org, (619) 4406161, or visit www.eastcountychamber.org.

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to editor@echerald.com

Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

include how to protect yourself and business and how do you know if someone has stolen your identity. The workshop is part of the Chamber’s “Business Matters” series. For more information and to RSVP, phone (619) 561-1031, or visit www.LakesideChamber.org.

Grossmont Healthcare District awards sponsorships to local community organizations The Grossmont Healthcare District (GHD) board of directors recently awarded several sponsorships to community organizations that protect and promote the health of local residents. GHD recently awarded a $6,000 sponsorship to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), San Diego chapter, in support of its mission toward life-changing breakthroughs to cure, prevent and treat type 1 diabetes (T1D) and its complications. According to JDRF officials, approximately 200 children a year, some as young as 2 months old, are diagnosed with T1D in San Diego County and 40 new children are diagnosed every day nationwide. JDRF senior development manager Christine Rhoads said, “Diabetes is a relentless daily struggle. There is no break, no days off and no cure. We are grateful for the support of the Grossmont Healthcare District for their assistance in advancing treatment, prevention and cure therapies.” GHD also awarded $4,400 to the McAlister Institute Kiva Learning Center for Women and Children. The grant will provide admission to the 2017 Celebration of Women (CWC) San Diego conference for 40 adult women who are in recovery and living in a long-term Kiva sober-living residential facility in Lemon Grove. The GHD board of directors also recently approved a $5,000 donation in support of Sharp Grossmont Hospital’s staff participation in the American Heart Association’s annual San Diego Heart & Stroke Walk. The 2017 event will take place on Saturday, Sept. 16 at Balboa Park. Proceeds will fund heart disease, stroke research and initiatives that promote the prevention, treatment and better patient care in the areas of cardiovascular disease.


SEPT. 7-13, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

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SUICIDE PREVENTION RIDE FOR LIFE, cont’d from p.2

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-018087 (A) BRASS SHOTS located at 12441 KEEMO TERRACE, LAKESIDE, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92040. Mailing address: P.O. BOX 710148, SANTEE, CA 92072. This business is conducted by: AN INDIVIDUAL. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: 01/22/2017. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) JEFFREY SHERWOOD GATES of 12441 KEEMO TERRACE, LAKESIDE, CA 92040. Signed by: JEFFREY SHERWOOD GATES. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on JULY 14, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: JULY 10, 17, 24 AND 31, 2017.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-9019348 (A) SG WHOLESALE ROOFING SUPPLY located at 9140 OLIVE DRIVE, SPRING VALLEY, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 91977. Mailing address: 5900 S. LAKE FOREST DRIVE, SUITE 400, MCKINNEY,SEQUENTIAL TX 75070. This business is conducted by: A CORPORATION. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: 07/14/17. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) ROOFLINE, INC. of 5900 S. LAKE FOREST DRIVE, MCKINNEY, TX 75070. State of Incorporation: OREGON Signed by: JOH S. DAVIS / VICE PRESIDENT. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on JULY 31, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: AUGUST 31, SEPT. 07,14 AND 21, 2017.

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Edited by Charles Preston 26 Discernment 57 ___ -deucy ACROSS 27 Nissen ___ 58 So sad 1 Protozoa By Judith Perry Pub Date: 09/09/11 28 Strike breaker 61 USUDOKU_g1_090911.eps Timorous 6 Hungarian castle city Slug: 29All Bind 63 (www.csmonitor.com). HS sports arena 10 A kind of censor Monitor © 2011 The Christian Science rights reserved. 30 Life-giving prefix 64 How to advance gradu14 Contender Distributed by The Christian Science Monitor News 31 Practice piece ally Service (email: syndication@csmonitor.com 15 Interstice 34 Modify 67 Iron chef Cat 16 Between theta and ILLUSTRATOR.eps 36 Cargo boat Hebrides island kappa RICH CLABAUGH/STAFF 68 Inner 37 Outline 69 Coeur d’___ 17 A running commentary 38 Dueling weapon 70 Host 19 Govt. official 40 Slowly and steadily 71 The Marxes, for short 20 Inventor ___ Whitney 42 Neither’s companion 72 Intrinsically 21 CSI’s Stokes 45 Thou, to Marie 22 Collection of hay 47 Former Red Empire DOWN 23 Wreck plans member 1 Dadaist Hans 25 Product of acetylene 50 Bill-collector’s prey 2 This is as good as a 28 Put on 52 Rhubarb miss 30 Smear 53 Friend of Brutus 3 Assayer 32 Felix, for one 54 Barnstormer 4 Making hound sounds 33 Paddock pace 55 Prepare for war 5 Priest’s garb 35 Suffocate 56 Young socialite 6 Hall-of-Famer Rixey 39 Worm or snake 59 Carson’s successor 7 ___ Rush, of yore 41 Vernon or Rainier 60 Relative of a mulberry 8 Deleted 43 Kind of wire tree 9 Ferdinand or Alfonso 44 Haul over the coals 62 Longings 10 A little at a time 46 Hinds 64 Kin 11 Arthur Miller’s Willy 48 Uncle, in Scotland 65 Bark 12 Pompeii’s country 49 Over there 66 Q’s neighbor 13 Type of discussion 51 Moon and sun add-on 18 Lead-in to man 53 Calcium ___ The Christian Science Monitor 24 AB or BA 56 Type of race


SEPT. 7-13, 2017

Eastbound Bar & Grill

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Karaoke Contest Thursday, Aug. 31• Lakeside LAKESIDE — Eastbound Bar & Grill along with Almost Famous Entertainment, turned up the volume on summer with a karaoke contest which ran throughout the month of August. Every Thursday night, the bar & grill held individual karaoke contests. On August 31, the five weekly finalists battled it out to win the Grand Prize which included a trip to Las Vegas. The Grand Prize winner was LaTanya Ramos, she really got the crowd jumping with her version of the Gloria Gainor hit- I Will Survive.

Grand Prize winner LaTanya Ramos, got the crowd amped up with her version of the Gloria Gainor hit- I Will Survive. Congratulations to all the contestants.

Rob Riingen, The East County Herald See More at www.echerald.com

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