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Santee Celebrates ‘Hug the Police Day’ , P7

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East County

Tesla Model S

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AUG. 11-17, 2016 Vol. 17 No. 49

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication

Miss Greater San Diego USA Pageants

Crown 2017 Titleholders Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

East County

PAGE TWO • AUG. 11-17, 2016

Est. 1998

Sycuan Casino Donates $50,000 to Local Charity

You Will Love Our New Price! Rancho Palo Verde 2085 Via Trueno, Alpine, CA 91901

Tuesday, Aug. 2 • El Cajon

Current Price: $985,000-$999,999

Tina Rose (L) of Big Brothers Big Sisters of San Diego County accepts a $50,000 gift from Sycuan Casino’s general manager John Dinius (R) alongside Five for Fighting’s John Ondrasik. EL CAJON — Sycuan Casino presented a $50,000 donation to Big Brothers Big Sisters of San Diego County before Saturday’s, Aug. 2 John Ondrasik charity concert, a result of the show’s proceeds. The funds will benefit the charity’s Operation Bigs program which joins children with parents in the military to volunteer “Bigs” who are in the military, retired or civilian. “Big Brothers Big Sisters of San Diego County is incredibly grateful to Sycuan Casino and the Sycuan Tribal Council for sponsoring and hosting this benefit concert. The funds will provide life-changing, one to one mentoring services for local children of military families,” said Tina Rose, director of marketing and events for Big Brothers Big Sisters of San Diego County. The Five for Fighting front man performed his solo acoustic set just after Sycuan’s general manager, and former Little, John Dinius, presented the check to Rose. “The Big Brothers Big Sisters organization is especially meaningful

to me. Having been able to take advantage of their services as a Little when I was a child then getting to give back in my adulthood, I’ve seen first-hand how important their mission is. It’s great working for an organization like Sycuan who is so willing to provide to a great cause in a big way. We are very appreciative to Mr. Ondrasik for putting on a great show and providing us with an avenue to give back in a great way,” said Dinius. Sycuan Casino began as a humble Bingo Palace back in 1983. Now, 32 years later it has become a community landmark. Undergoing a massive renovation in 2012, Sycuan now features 2,000 exciting reel and video slot machines, more than 40 gaming tables, poker, bingo and a variety of restaurants to choose from. Non-smokers will also enjoy over 800 slots and table games in the comfort of San Diego’s first and largest fully-enclosed non-smoking room – complete with its own separate entrance and Paipa’s Surf & Turf buffet. The GameDay Sports Bar & Grill has 39 wide-screen TVs, including five 90-inch TVs, bar-top slot

machines, a stadium sized menu, over 30 beers on tap, the Party Pit complete with three blackjack tables, an extensive collection of sports memorabilia – and a highenergy atmosphere. Sycuan’s intimate 457-seat entertainment venue, Sycuan Live & Up Close, features national musical acts and comedians year-round. Open 24 hours daily. For additional information visit www.Sycuan.com For more than 100 years nationally and 55 locally, Big Brothers Big Sisters has operated under the belief that inherent in every child is the ability to succeed and thrive in life. As the nation’s largest donor and volunteer supported mentoring network, Big Brothers Big Sisters makes meaningful, monitored matches between adult volunteers (“Bigs”) and children (“Littles”), ages seven-18, in communities across the country. They develop positive relationships that have a direct and lasting effect on the lives of young people. For more information about Big Brothers Big Sisters of San Diego County, please visit sdbigs.org.

A Hero Without a Cape Patrick Dow

For The East COunty Herald SANTEE — Cody Billock of Santee proved everyday citizens can be heroes. On May 28, Billock was working at the boat dock at Santee Lakes when he saw a young man have an epileptic seizure, causing the man to tragically fall face first into the lake. Without a second to spare, Billock sprang into the lake and pulled the young man to safety. If Billock didn’t quickly react to the trouble at hand, the young man might have lost his life. Padre Dam Municipal Water District Board invited Billock to their board meeting, where an award ceremony was held for him. The Santee City Council, the Padre Dam Municipal Water District Board, and State Senator Joel Anderson all provided Billock with certificates and awards. Anderson stated, “I am amazed at the selflessness Cody displayed during his job to save someone else’s L-R: Patrick Dow, on behalf of life. I am honored to represent a community of people like Cody Senator Joel Anderson’s office who are looking out for their neighbors in need.” with Cory Billock. Billock stayed humble throughout the event and repeated that anyone else would have done the same thing if they were in the same situation. Many people spoke during the event praising Billock on his heroic actions. Santee City Councilmember John Minto, who was a police officer, related Billock’s actions to that of his friends in law enforcement—those who constantly risk their lives to keep the people safe. The young man who had the seizure attended the event to meet the man who saved his life, as he could not remember anything from that fateful day.

5 Bdrm, 5 Full Baths, 1 Half Bath, 4 Fire Places, Below Ground Swimming Pool, 4,934 sq. ft., Built 1988. Sunken living room • Formal dining room • Wet bar • Oversized Laundry with granite counter tops and lots of storage • Tankless water heater system. Family room and kitchen with a window walled view of the gorgeous patio, pool and Gazebo • Beautiful usable acreage landscaped with trees, a fruit tree orchard, and large raised vegetable garden beds • A well on property provides irrigation for all landscaping • Includes private access to 65 acre Palo Verde Lake, with adjacent large covered Pavilion with tables, BBQ’s, play ground, a sand volleyball court, diving platforms, fishing for large mouth Bass, swimming, boating, kayak, and more • Complete with a luxurious Clubhouse overlooking the lake with a full kitchen, fitness center and dance floor •Horseback riding, arenas, tennis courts • Gated community.

Master Bathroom Remodel,

A Must See!!! Teresa K. Johnson,

Realtor calbre#02001335

619.203.1603 © The East County Herald

On The Cover SAN DIEGO — The Annual Miss Greater San Diego USA Pageants were held Saturday, Aug. 6 at Joan Kroc Theatre on University Avenue. The pageants are a preliminary to Miss California USA and Miss California Teen USA. Several East County young ladies participate in these premiere pageants and have gone on to compete at the State level and Nationally in the Miss USA Pageant circuit.

Cover: Jay Renard/ The East County Herald Cover design: Dee Dean / The East County Herald

See more P8-P9 and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • AUG. 11-17, 2016

10315 Mission Gorge Road • Santee • 92071

www.SanteeChamber.com Phone: 619.449.6572 Fax: 619.562.7906

YOUR AD HERE!

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy! FREE ESTIMATE

HOUSE CLEANING ROCIO & ANA

(619)

884.1798 References Available

A Culture of Generosity...

Stoney’s Kidsacy

Leg

‘It’s All About The Kids!’ A Non-Profit Organization Benefitting East County Kids... Our Future!

P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 • Ph: 619.345.5622

www.stoneyskidslegacy.org


OPINiON

Politics and

PAGE FOUR • AUG. 11-17, 2016

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias Obama Risks Alienating Latinos From Democrats

H

AWARDS

www.alpinechamber.com

ere’s the one thing Democratic politicians should fear more than any other potential California event: Latinos stay home from the polls in droves on Election Day in November 2016. It went almost unnoticed beyond Orange County in early 2015, but the events in one contest for a spot on that county’s Board of Supervisors should be most instructive. In that race, the virtually unknown Vietnamese-American Republican Andrew Do beat the recently termed out and popular former Democratic state Sen. Lou Correa – now running for Congress – by 43 votes. This wasn’t the classic Orange County campaign in a suburban area where Republicans typically run up huge margins. Instead, it centered on Santa Ana, the mostly-Latino county seat that’s been the base of power for longtime Democratic Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez, now running for the U.S. Senate. This supervisorial seat became vacant in 2014, when former county Supervisor Janet Nguyen took over Correa’s vacated slot in the state Senate in an election where overall turnout was dismal, but Latinos voted in much lower proportions than the general public. While Latino voters were no-shows in large numbers again in the Do-Correa contest, the Vietnamese-American Republicans who elected Nguyen performed again for Do, with 84 percent of the votes cast by mail. One analysis of the race found that ethnic Vietnamese registered voters were twice as likely to turn in ballots as Latinos. Why were Latinos so derelict about voting? It just may be that California is at last feeling some results from President Obama’s determined, long-term policy of deporting as many undocumented immigrants as possible. During his first five years in office, Obama presided over the deportations of 1.9 million persons who were in this country illegally. That was a massive increase from the 1.1 million deported during the last five years of the previous administration led by Republican George W. Bush. Yes, Latinos know Republicans in Congress stymie every move made by Democrats to provide the undocumented with a path to citizenship, even if it’s long, onerous and expensive. But they also see what Obama has done, even though he’s attempted to allow illegal immigrants brought here as children to stay indefinitely. When a report from the often reliable Latino Decisions polling firm shows 63 percent of all Latino registered voters are personally acquainted with someone who is undocumented, mass deportations like Obama’s speak powerfully. When 40 percent of those same registered voters say they know someone who currently faces deportation, that also makes an impact. It means this: The more undocumented immigrants Obama deports, the more Latino registered voters start to wonder if there’s really any difference on immigration between Republicans and Democrats, despite their very different rhetoric. But Obama hasn’t cared about this. His deportation policy has long been an attempt to fend off frequent, completely unsubstantiated claims from the Republican right that he is a traitor with a secret agenda of destroying America. So, while every survey shows that immigration for years has been the single most important issue for Latino voters, Obama persists with his defensive mindset and his deportation policy. Now the results are beginning to come in, with first Nguyen and then Do elected in an area long dominated by Hispanic voters. Overall voting figures from 2014 suggest this might not be confined to the Santa Ana area. Only 1.3 million Latino votes were cast in California that fall, 15 percent of the total. Staying home, then, was more common for Latinos last year than for other voters, who also came out in record low numbers. All of which suggests that Obama’s deportation policy has already hurt a few fellow Democrats, and could hurt more this fall. Latinos who suddenly became active as voters turned this state solidly Democratic because of their fears after the passage of the anti-illegal immigrant Proposition 187 in 1994. If those same voters become convinced Democrats are taking them for granted, as Obama has, Republicans could stage a significant California comeback.

Elias has covered esoteric votes in eight national political conventions. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough, The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. His opinions are his own. Email Elias at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti

To Your

From The Geezer’s Mailbag

Q

. I’m a Baby Boomer who still loves rock concerts, but sometimes I worry if the noise is hurting my old ears.

A

. Sound volume is measured in decibels (dB). You risk hearing loss when you are exposed to sounds at 85 decibels or more. The louder the sound and the longer the exposure, the greater the risk. Here’s the bad news: rock music is on many lists as an example of a dangerous sound. Here’s one of those lists: 30 dB = library 50 dB = rain 60 dB = conversation (apolitical) 70 dB = vacuum cleaner 80 dB = busy street 90 dB = shop tools 100 dB = chain saw 110 dB = rock music among audience 120 dB = rock music on bandstand 130 dB = jackhammer 140 dB = air raid siren 150 dB = rock music crescendo Most people’s hearing diminishes with age. About one in three Americans over 60 suffers from some loss of hearing, which can range from the inability to hear certain voices to deafness. Those who are healthy and not exposed to loud noise can maintain their hearing for many years.

Q A

. I’m allergic to mold. Any tips to avoid it?

. There are many types of molds, which are fungi that thrive where it is damp and warm. They reproduce by spreading spores, asexual reproductive bodies. Spores are invisible to our eyes. They float through outdoor and indoor air. If you are allergic to molds, your immune system overreacts when you inhale spores. Mold allergy symptoms can include sinusitis, sneezing, runny or stuffy nose, cough, postnasal drip, itchy and watery eyes

Here are some ways to keep mold spores away: • When doing yard work, wear a dust mask over your nose and mouth. Mold is abundant where leaves or other vegetation are decomposing. • When the mold count is high, do not drive with your car windows open. • When the nights are wet, sleep with your windows closed. This is when the concentration of spores is the highest. • Reduce your outdoor time when the weather is wet. • Put a dehumidifier anywhere in your home that is musty. • Air-conditioning in your home is a must if you have allergies. Clean the AC filters often. • Ventilate bathrooms especially after bathing or showering. • Clean bathroom and basement wall surfaces regularly with a bleach solution. • Remove leaves and vegetation from around the foundation of your home. Clean gutters often.

PAGE FIVE • AUG. 11-17, 2016

Living with MS with Dee Dean

Lipid Signaling in Cells: A Possible Force in Developing MS

U

nderstanding lipid signaling in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) may be the key to developing more effective therapies for the disease. New work by researchers at Cornell University could bring us closer to unraveling the role of lipids in MS development. Lipids are fat molecules that compose the cellular membranes and surround each organelle inside a cell. Besides being major components of the myelin sheaths that envelop nerve cells, lipids are known to participate in signaling processes inside cells, suggesting that alterations in lipid stability may be involved in a number of diseases, including MS. Usually, to understand the processes in which a protein is involved, scientists tag them with fluorescent probes. But unlike proteins, lipids are very difficult to tag. The Cornell researchers have been working on techniques that might allow the visualization of lipids within the cell, making it

possible to understand the signaling pathways in which they are involved. “We’re taking advantage of chemical reactions to specifically tag lipids with different kinds of imaging agents, so we can track their behavior within living cells using a fluorescence microscope,” Jeremy Baskin, the principal investigator, said in a press release. “We pick components of cells that are hard to tag, so we have to use our ingenuity as chemists to find ways to selectively tag them.” Dr. Baskin, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and in the Weill Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, was recently appointed a Nancy and Peter Meinig Family Investigator in the Life Sciences. This award supports and recognizes researchers with outstanding and innovative work in life sciences at Cornell. Baskin’s laboratory at Cornell is poised to make exciting discoveries in lipid metabolism as well as make available new tools for discoveries in biomedical research more generally.

ddean@echerald.com

While working toward his PhD, Baskin developed a technique that allowed him to tag sugars on the surface of cells, but recently he became interested in fats. In fact, his recent work demonstrated that lipids in myelin sheaths have a role in the development of leukodystrophy diseases. And because those are neurological disorders with similarities to MS, there may be a link between myelin lipids and MS development. Source: Cornell University

Q A

. Is pain a necessary part of aging?

. Pain affects as much as 65 percent of independent older

adults and up to 80 percent of seniors in long-term care facilities. The following are some of the causes: About 80 percent of older adults suffer from osteoarthritis, inflammation of the joints. You get osteoarthritis when cartilage—the cushioning tissue within the joints—wears down. This produces stiffness and pain. You can get osteoarthritis in any joint, but it usually strikes those that support weight. People with diabetes, a condition that affects almost 20 percent of Americans over the age of 60, often have circulatory problems that produce pain. Spinal problems such as herniated disks, spinal narrowing and arthritis are the causes of back and neck pain, which is very common in older adults. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic pain in the muscles and soft tissues surrounding joints. Headache is a common difficulty for seniors. Pain in the face, mouth and teeth can be brought on by periodontal diseases, tooth loss, and medication side effects. When older people suffer from chronic pain, there are many complications. Pain can make them lose sleep, diminish their ability to function, lead them to be more dependent on others, dampen their appetite, isolate and depress them, and reduce physical activity, which can make them get out of shape and be more likely to suffer a fall.

Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

Cornell University researchers Jeremy Baskin, left, examines a Western blot film with graduate student Adnan Shami Shah. (Photo courtesy: Cornell University.) Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 29 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.com. NOTE: Dean is the recipient of the 2004 STAR Community Outreach Award by the MS Society Dec. 2, 2004, the American Red Cross Real Hero Wendell Cutting Humanitarian Award, Oct. 13, 2006 , the Stoney Community Service Award, February 29, 2008, Women in Leadership Award for Art/Media/Culture Oct. 29, 2010, El Cajon Citizen of The Year Nominee Feb. 2013 and Recipient of the National MS Society’s 2014 Media Partner of The Year, Feb. 10, 2015.


COMMUNITY Matters PAGE SIX • AUG. 11-17, 2016

BREAKING NEWS Doctor Makes Hearing Aids Affordable for Everyone

Digital Hearing Aid Costs 90%

Sreekant Cherukuri Board Certified Ear, Nose and Throat Doctor, and MDHearingAid Founder

Less

Board-certified Ear, Nose, and Throat physician Dr. S. Cherukuri, a graduate of the prestigious University of Michigan School of Medicine, built a very successful practice helping patients with hearing problems. “I was often frustrated by the fact that many of my patients could benefit from the use of a hearing aid, but unfortunately couldn’t afford one. I then made it my mission to change this, making quality digital hearing aids affordable for anyone who needs one.”

It’s Nearly Invisible “I knew when I developed a new line of hearing aids that one of the most important requirements would be for the device to be hard for others to see,” said Dr. Cherukuri. “One of the biggest objections people have to wearing a hearing aid is that they are embarrassed. Our design helps people get past this concern.” Digital Hearing Aid Outperforms Competitors The new medical grade hearing aid is called MDHearingAid® AIR. It is sleek, lightweight, and full of the same advanced digital technology found in higher-priced devices, but at a small fraction of the price. “I couldn’t understand why everything in the digital world kept coming down in price, like computers, TVs, and DVD players, but not digital hearing aids,” Cherukuri said. Once the doctor started to realize his dream and was able to produce a device that costs 90% less, the industry was turned upside down.

SAME FEATURES AS EXPENSIVE HEARING AID COMPETITORS FOR

90% LESS

Nearly Invisible!

Mini behind-the-ear hearing aid with thin tubing for a nearly invisible profile Advanced Noise Reduction to make speech clearer Feedback Cancellation eliminates whistling Wide Dynamic Range Compression makes soft sounds audible and loud sounds comfortable

Telecoil setting for usewith compatible phones, and looped environments like churches 3 Programs and Volume Dial accommodate most common types of hearing loss even in challenging listening environments

So How Does He Do It? Since 90% of people with hearing loss have similar needs, MDHearingAids were designed to meet those needs with user-adjustable features, avoiding the need for expensive customized hearing aids. This also makes it so easy for people to try the product, because no prescription is needed, even though it’s an FDA-Registered Medical-Grade digital hearing aid. With their 45 Risk-Free Trial, you can try it at home and if you’re not completely satisfied, just return it. It’s that simple. They even provide Free Shipping and Free Batteries.

Doctors & Buyers Agree, “AIR is the Best Digital Value!” “...This product is just as effective (if not more) than traditional overly-priced hearing aids.” – Dr. Chang “I have been wearing hearing aids for over 25 years and these are the best behind-the-ear aids I have tried.” – Gerald L. “...an excellent quality-to-price ratio.” – J. May, MD “This is truly a miracle... I don’t even know how to begin thanking you for giving me my life back!” – Sherri H.

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Wisdom for

EVERYDAY LIFE

with Pastor Drew

A Day in the Life of Jesus The Messiah

G

PART LXX

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled, “A day in the life of Jesus the Messiah.” As a reminder, we are doing this series that you may come to know the truth about Jesus as the Word of God the Bible conveys it. We are looking at the Apostle John’s account for he gives the most detailed account of Jesus’ final hours before the Crucifixion. What is recorded for us in John 14-17 are some of the most profound teachings of Jesus found in the Word of God the Bible. This also marks the last few hours of Jesus’ time with His disciples prior to His crucifixion. In (John 15:9-17 Jesus further explains what it means to “Abide in Him”, “As the Father loved Me, I also have loved you; abide in My love. If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love, just as I have kept My Father’s commandments and abide in His love. “These things I have spoken to you, that My joy may remain in you, and that your joy may be full. This is My commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends. You are My friends if you do whatever I command you. No longer do I call you servants, for a servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all things that I heard from My Father I have made known to you. You did not choose Me, but I chose you and appointed you that you should go and bear fruit, and that your fruit should remain, that whatever you ask the Father in My name He may give you. These things I command you, that you love one another.” First and foremost, ‘abiding in Jesus’ means obedience, anyone can ‘say’ they love God and are abiding in Christ but the proof of that talk is seen in the life that one lives, are they obeying the Word of God? The second proof of “Abiding in Christ” is the joy of the Lord. When I am walking in obedience to God and His Word I will have the joy of the Lord. This fullness of Joy that the Lord speaks of is not dependent upon perfect circumstances; feelings; things; people, the Joy of the Lord is independent of any of these. The third proof is Love, love for our Lord which is seen by our obedience to Him and His Word and love for one another. It is important for us to understand how Jesus qualifies this love, it is not a love that we determine or define rather it is defined by Jesus Himself, “As I (Jesus) have loved you”. How does Jesus love me? Unconditionally! Jesus would tell us in John 13:34-35 “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another; as I have loved you, that you also love one another. By this all will know that you are My disciples, if you have love for one another.” Also, the Apostle Paul wrote this to the Ephesians 4:32 “And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” The fourth proof of ‘abiding in Christ’ is that we are His friends, there is an intimacy with Jesus that others do not have nor understands. In this intimacy He reveals Himself and will to us which enables us to know Him and walk with Him. As we do this our life produces fruit, lasting fruit that brings glory and honor to Him. This fruit is described in part in Galatians 5:22-23, “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long suffering, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control. Against such there is no law.” Are you Abiding in Christ today dear ones? Are these traits being exemplified in your life? What fruit is being borne in your life today? Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


AUG. 11-17, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE SEVEN

Hug The Police Sunday, Aug. 7 • Santee

Jay Renard / The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

Southern California’s

Largest Outdoor Roller Rink Open Daily

Now – September 5 Sunday – Thursday 5pm – 10pm

Friday & Saturday 5pm – 11pm

$13 12 Years and Under $15 Adults and Teens $2 Off – Military (must present ID) $2 Off – Groups of 10 or More $2 Off – Bring Your Own Skates Weather Permitting

Viejas Casino & Resort ∙ 5000 Willows Road ∙ Alpine, CA 91901 ∙ 619.445.5400

Guests must be at least 21 years of age to enter the Casino. Guests must be at least 21 years of age to drink alcoholic beverages. Guests under 21 years of age are permitted in The Buffet only, but must be accompanied by an adult. Families are welcome at the Viejas Outlets and the Viejas Hotel. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling, call 800.426.2537


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE EIGHT

AUG. 11-17, 2016

Miss Greater 2017 P

Saturday, August 6

SAN DIEGO­­— Miss Greater Sa held at the Joan Kroc Theatre, S egates vying for the 2017 crown and three Junior Misses crowne The Greater San Diego USA Pa the Miss California USA and Mis

New Titleholders, from left: Miss Greater San Diego Teen USA 2017, Asia Cymone Smith; Miss Greater San Diego USA 2017, Alexa Jones; Mrs. Greater San Diego, Lauren Weeks; Miss Greater San Diego USA Pageants Director, Debra Dodge; Miss Gold Counties USA 2017, Caitlin Dahlin and Miss Gold Counties Teen USA 2017, Kelli Loper

Presenting Sponsor Sycuan Band of Kumeyaay Nation

25th Anniversary!

Yo u’r

! d e t i v n I e

Honoring Stoney Stone with Cocktail Hour Hor D’Oeuvres Live and Silent Auctions Raffles Dinner

PARTY UPDATE!!! EAST COUNTY — The board of Stoney’s Kids Legacy has decided to move it’s 25th Anniversary Celebration from August to October for various reasons. Our new date is Thursday, Oct. 27, 5:30-8:30 p.m., at Sycuan Golf Resort! This will enable them to be East County’s ONLY

Buy Tickets Now: $25 pp At Door: $35 pp www.stoneyskidslegacy.org

A Party Like No Other!

BIG BOO BASH / Halloween Party. It’s going to be Spooktacular!

A culture of generosity...

Stoney’s Kids

Sycuan Golf Resort Thursday, Oct. 27

I’ts All About The Kids

5:30-8:30p.m.


AUG.11-17, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE NINE

San Diego USA Pageants

6 • Joan Croc Theatre

an Diego USA 2017 Pageants were Saturday, Aug. 6. There were 27 delns. There were also two Princesses ed. ageants are preliminary pageants to ss California Teen USA Pageant.

Jay Renard/The East County Herald

See more photos at www.echerald.com


PAGE TEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Aug. 11-17, 2016

Steele Canyon Golf Club Hosts

First Friday Breakfast Friday, August 3 • Jamul

Jay RenardThe East County Herald

See more photos at www.echerald.com

postrophe FULL E

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AUG. 11-17, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE ELEVEN

Rancho San Diego

Every Great Event Begins and Ends at Hooleys!

2955 Jamacha Rd. 619.670.7468

La Mesa

5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900

Your Community Calendar

Primary Residential Mortgage to Host Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber Mixer ALPINE — Celebrate 12 years of great business on Wednesday, Aug. 17, at Primary Residential Mortgage Inc. in Alpine! Chris Wiley of Primary Residential Mortgage is hosting the Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Commerce Monthly Mixer, which starts at 5:30 p.m. at the business at 2124 Arnold Way in Alpine. The free anniversary celebration is open to the public. Wiley encouraged people to come enjoy refreshments, great conversation and a ribbon cutting. “It’s been fun,” he said about doing business in Alpine. “We look forward to another 12 years. The Chamber has been with us since the beginning. We’ve been together since the first step.”

To make your reservation, e-mail kimberlyb@alpinechamber.sdcoxmail.com.

PARTY UPDATE!!! EAST COUNTY — The board of Stoney’s Kids Legacy has decided to move our party from August to October for various reasons. Our new date is Thursday, Oct. 27, 5:30-8:30 p.m., at Sycuan Golf Resort! This will enable us to be East County’s ONLY BIG BOO BASH / Halloween Party. It’s going to be amazing! Submit Your Community Event

Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to editor@echerald.com for consideration.

La Mesa Oktoberfest 2016 Join us for the 43rd Annual La Mesa Oktoberfest!

Wieghorst Museum Art Show EL CAJON — The Wieghorst Museum Foundation invites you to the “Moments in Time” art show, from now through Aug. 22. See the beautiful artwork of Grace Schlesier, Gloria Chadwick, Dennis Torzeski, Denise Rich, Millie Shaw, and Debbie Hughbanks. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3p.m. and is located at 131 Rea Avenue in El Cajon. For more information, please call (619) 590-3431.

Free Family Summer Concerts

LA MESA — This is the largest Oktoberfest Celebration West of the Mississippi with over 100,000 attendees. This free event is spread out over nearly six city blocks in the La Mesa Village and features hundreds of exhibitors, family friendly activities, German food, music, dancing, outfits, games and of course beer. This year, to enhance your Oktoberfest experience on many levels, the City of La Mesa has teamed up with veteran event producers EventWerks. They produce a variety of events including several Oktoberfests each year, (Dana Point and Lake Arrowhead). We look forward to having you join us in 2016, and YES, some vendor spaces still available.

Visit: www.TheLaMesaOktoberfest.com

Downtown El Cajon Business Partners

City of Lemon Grove

Fridays • 6-8 p.m.

Thursdays - 6:30 - 8 p.m. Berry Street Park (619) 334-3000 • www.lemongrove.ca.gov Aug. 13: West of 5

Dinner & a Concert

El Cajon Prescott Promenade (619) 334-3000 • www.downtownec.com Aug. 12: Three Chord Justice (Country) Aug. 19: Upstream (Island Music) Aug. 26: Back to the Garden (Classic Music – with Special Guest) Sept. 2: Heroes (Contemporary/Dance) Sept. 9: Soul Persuaders (Funk/Soul) Sept. 16: Siren’s Crush (Modern Pop/ Dance) Sept. 23: Fortunate Son (CCR Tribute Band) Sept. 30: The Petty Breakers (Tom Petty Tribute) October 7: TBD

Summer Concert Series

City of Santee

Summer Concerts in The Park

Thursdays • 6:30-8 p.m. Santee Town Center Community Park East (619) 258-4100 ext. 201 • www.santeesummerconcerts.com Aug. 11: WINGSTOCK** Aug. 18: Santanaways –Tribute to Carlos Santana Aug. 25: James Kruk & the Big Boss Men – Elvis Tribute


PAGE TWELVE

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

AUG. 11-17, 2016

SDSU BEATwith Steve Dolan

SDSU Offers Year-Round Military Educational Benefits Celebrate in Style

Join the Santee Chamber of Commerce at our first-ever

Black Tie Car Show Gala on Saturday, Aug. 20 5 TILL 10 O’CLOCK IN THE EVENING HIGH PERFORMANCE AIRCRAFT AT GILLESPIE FIELD 1850 JOE CROSSON DRIVE • SUITE I. EL CAJON 92020

A Ticket for the Gala Will Include: Hosted Beer and Wine, the Hors D’oeuvres, a Seated Dinner With Dual Entrees, a Live Auction, Dancing to the Live Music of the Mighty Untouchables, and The Opportunity to Mix and Mingle in Black Tie Attire While Enjoying the View of Classic Cars and Modern Aircraft in the Spectacular Hangar of High Performance Aircraft. With any sponsorship or individual ticket purchase, you can choose to donate a ticket to a host a local hero.

For Tickets & Sponsorships Contact: Santee Chamber of Commerce | 619.449.6572 | info@santeechamber.com | santeechamber.com

S

an Diego State University’s College of Extended Studies offers more than 25 programs year-round that are approved for veterans’ education and military spouse benefits. Those still in the service and those who have completed their duty can pursue certificate programs, career training programs, degree programs, and professional skills courses. Fields include business finance and administration, construction, educational services, financial services, health and human services, hospitality, human resources, and information technology. The MyCAA program provides up to $4,000 ($2,000 per fiscal year) of workforce development scholarships to eligible military spouses who are pursuing a license, certification or associate’s degree in a portable career field and occupation. To determine eligibility, visit MyCAA’s Web site at: https://aiportal.acc.af.mil/ MyCAA/. For questions, call the Military OneSource Career Counselor at (800) 342-9647. “SDSU is recognized nationally as one of the top militaryfriendly schools,” said Fatima Peyton, military & veterans services representative for CES. “We provide exemplary support to active duty, veterans, and military dependents by offering numerous certificate programs which focus on education-tocareer occupations. Our goal is to continue to provide the necessary resources to assist veterans with maximizing their VA educational benefits, and our commitment is to give back to those who have served our country.” Classes are available either online or on-site at SDSU. Most SDSU College of Extended Studies on-site classes are held in the evenings, to better accommodate work and family schedules. For more information concerning SDSU College of Extended Studies military benefits, visit the College’s military web pages at neverstoplearning.net/military, email cesveterans@mail. sdsu.edu or call (619) 594-3047. SDSU’s College of Extended Studies reaches out to San Diego, the nation, and the world with a wide variety of lifelong learning opportunities, and more than 50 certificate programs for career advancement. Topics range from contract management, construction, and craft beer, to grant writing, marketing, and human resources. And many programs are available online. The CES also offers one of the largest ESL programs in the U.S. through the American Language Institute; and university-quality courses to students age 50 and better through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Other opportunities include seminars, study abroad, corporate education and access to regular SDSU classes through Open University. For more information or to register, visit neverstoplearning.net or call (619) 265-7378 (SDSU).

Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZwith Rick Griffin Lakeside Chamber presents `Touch-ATruck’

50 live table games, restaurants, bars, lounges and an enclosed underground parking structure with almost 1,900 spaces. More than 1,000 people are expected to be permanently employed at the gaming center, according to the tribe. The Jamul Indian Village is a 54-member tribe of Kumeyaay Indians who call a six-acre area off state Route 94 home. “The compact creates an economic environment that allows the tribe to transition to self-sufficiency and to contribute to other tribes, the community and local government,” said Jamul Indian Village Chairwoman Erica Pinto. “Through this compact, JIV reaffirms its commitment to working with the county on fire service, law enforcement and road improvements.” In April, the county Board of Supervisors approved an agreement between the county and the Jamul Indian Village regarding the casino.

The Lakeside Chamber of Commerce will present “Touch-A-Truck,” a special event featuring a variety of large trucks and construction vehicles, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 18 at a parcel at 12637 Vigilante Road, Lakeside. The event is geared towards children and families, Chamber officials said. Tickets cost $5 a piece for adults ages 16 and higher and $15 a piece for children ages one to 15. VIP tickets, costing $30 per person, includes early entry and swag bag for children. Parking is free, with valet available for $5. On display will be more than 50 trucks and vehicles, including fire trucks, emergency vehicles, dump trucks, 18-wheel tractor-trailer big rigs, garbage trucks, delivery trucks, utility trucks, farm vehicles and all-terrain off-road vehicles. Proceeds will benefit education programs geared towards the trucking, construction and industrial career paths for young people. Sponsors include Daily Disposal, the Lakeside Chamber, Enniss, The 619 area code in San Diego is running out of Inc., Optimal Eats, Bug Bite Thing, Hilliker’s Ranch available phone numbers. So, the California Public Fresh Eggs and Tsco Racing. For tickets and informa- Utilities Commission (CPUC) has scheduled three tion, call (619) 561-1031 or visit www.tatlakeside.com. public meetings to provide information and get input on the introduction of new area codes. The CPUC has started the process to add the 858 area code to the areas now served by the 619 area code, as the 619 area code is Gov. Jerry Brown has signed a 25-year gaming com- expected to use up its available prefixes by March 2019. pact between the state and Jamul Indian Village for Adding the 858 area code to the areas served by the the new Hollywood Casino Jamul-San Diego, which is 619 area code is known as a boundary elimination slated to begin operating later this summer. Compacts overlay, which will provide additional prefixes and are agreements between tribes and states that allow new telephone numbers for the 619 area code customfederally recognized American-Indian tribes to have ers, according the CPUC. The boundary elimination legal gaming on reservations. overlay, pending CPUC approval, would allow all cusThe three-story casino is expected to include a tomers to keep their current phone numbers, includgaming and entertainment facility of 200,000 square ing their area code. To avoid service disruption, the feet that houses more than 1,700 slot machines, nearly 858 area code would be added to the areas served by

Get ready for some 619 area codes changing to 858

Jamul Casino agreement signed by Gov. Brown

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to editor@echerald.com

Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

the 619 area code by September 2018, six months before depletion of prefixes. Then, In September 2018, 619 area code customers requesting new phone numbers would be assigned the 858 area code. The area served by the 619 area code includes the southern portion of the city of San Diego, and the cities of Chula Vista, Coronado, El Cajon, Imperial Beach, La Mesa, Lemon Grove, National City, Santee, and some unincorporated areas of San Diego County. The public meetings are scheduled for 1 p.m. Oct. 4 at the Mission Valley State Building, 7575 Metropolitan Dr., San Diego, and at 6 p.m. Oct. 4 at the La Colonia Community Center, 715 Valley Ave. in Solana Beach. A third meeting is scheduled for Oct. 5 at 11 a.m. at the Pine Valley Improvement Club, 28890 Old Highway 80 in Pine Valley.

Tax increase ballot measure endorsed by taxpayers group

The San Diego County Taxpayers Association has endorsed a November ballot measure that would raise the region’s sales tax by a half-cent to pay for infrastructure projects. The San Diego County Road Repair, Transit, Traffic Relief, Safety and Water Quality Measure would raise an estimated $18 billion over 40 years to improve freeways, fund municipal road repairs and build a trolley line between San Ysidro and Kearny Mesa, among other things. “The Taxpayers Association supports SANDAG’s plan to improve public transportation and mobility for the following reasons — the agency operates effectively and efficiently, it has an excellent track record of leveraging state and federal funds for local projects, it delivers on its promises to voters, and this plan will reduce traffic and commute times, which will improve our quality of life,” said Haney Hong, the taxpayer group’s president and CEO.


AUG. 11-17, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE THIRTEEN


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The San Diego County Herald PAGE FOURTEEN • AUG. 11-17, 2016

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The Christian Science Monitor

5 9 14 15 16 17 20 21 22 23 25 27 33 34 35 39 41 43 44 46 48 49 52 55 56 57 61

36 Arm bone 69 Musical sound Eve’s son 37 Actor Jannings 70 Additional Hide away 38 Blockhead 71 Spine-tingling Natural burn treatment 40 Arizona city 72 Biblical progenitor Affectation 42 Caudal appendage 73 German coal country Marx brother 45 Be authoritative Part 1 of lunch phrase 47 Sandpiper’s cousin DOWN Japanese city 50 Entertainer Griffin 1 Mexican restaurant fare Church council 51 Muscular contractions 2 Grieving comment School meas. 52 Clear the slate 3 Rail bird Doctrine 53 Use an épée 4 Pianist Rudolf Gadabouts 54 Travel guide publisher 5 Prone Part 2 of lunch phrase 58 Teensy bit! 6 Honcho ___ de plume 59 Goad 7 Catch sight of Trite 60 Italian volcano 8 Spanish province Skidded 62 Ancient portico Tails it with your check/money Shipshape Fill out this form and9 send order to: 63 Night in Milan 10 Use a shuttle Work period 64 LLC Decorative vessel 11 Diego Stood County Herald, Ticklish muppet The San 66 Shortest Chinese 12 Plant sprout Surfeited P.O. Box 2568, Alpine, CA 91903 dynasty 13 Large number Eye middle layer Deadline is Monday at 12haven p.m. for that 67 Thursday’s paper. Border 18 Desert Zero 19 Civil wrong Part 3 of lunch phrase 24 Words in Paris Expunge 26 Field mouse Impudence 27 Hill dwellers Vintage car 28 Comic writer Ephron Haggis holder 29 Skip Old hat

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Difficulty:

Row Threeby-three square

2 9 8 6

6 7 4

2 8 1 6 7 9 2

9

3 8

2 5 9 7 1

6 7 2 4

9 2 1 5

How to do Sudoku Fill in the grid so the numbers 1 through 9 appear just once in every column, row, and three-by-three square. See example above.

Contributors: Sheila Buska, Jeff Camp-

The San Diego County Herald is an adjudibell, Fred Cicetti, Curt Dean, Dee Dean, cated newspaper of general circulation by the Steve Dolan, Thomas D. Elias, Rick Griffin, Superior Court of San Diego County. AdjudicaSteve Hamann, Pastor Drew Macintyre, tion No. GIC 778099 AS: Jan. 8, 2002. Dr. Cindy Miles

By Ben Arnoldy

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East County

The Christian Science Monitor

Edited by Linda and Charles Preston

30 Biblical prophet 65 Part 4 of lunch phrase ACROSS 31 Oil source 68 Heroine of “To Kill a 1 Former Russian news 32 Allude Mockingbird” agency Pub Date: 08/12/11 Slug: USUDOKU_g1_081211.eps 36 Arm bone 69 Musical sound 5 Eve’s son 37AllActor Jannings 70(www.csmonitor.com). Additional 9 Hide away © 2011 The Christian Science Monitor rights reserved. 38 Blockhead 71 Spine-tingling 14 Natural burn treatment Distributed by The Christian Science Monitor Service (email: syndication@csmonitor.com) 40 Arizona city 72News Biblical progenitor 15 Affectation 42 Caudal appendage 73 German coal country 16 Marx brother RICH CLABAUGH/STAFF ILLUSTRATOR.eps45 Be authoritative 17 Part 1 of lunch phrase 47 Sandpiper’s cousin DOWN 20 Japanese city 50 Entertainer Griffin 1 Mexican restaurant fare 21 Church council 51 Muscular contractions 2 Grieving comment 22 School meas. 52 Clear the slate 3 Rail bird 23 Doctrine 53 Use an épée 4 Pianist Rudolf 25 Gadabouts 54 Travel guide publisher 5 Prone 27 Part 2 of lunch phrase 58 Teensy bit! 6 Honcho 33 ___ de plume 59 Goad 7 Catch sight of 34 Trite 60 Italian volcano 8 Spanish province 35 Skidded 62 Ancient portico 9 Tails 39 Shipshape 63 Night in Milan 10 Use a shuttle 41 Work period 64 Decorative vessel 11 Stood 43 Ticklish muppet 66 Shortest Chinese 12 Plant sprout 44 Surfeited dynasty 13 Large number 46 Eye middle layer 67 Border 18 Desert haven 48 Zero 19 Civil wrong 49 Part 3 of lunch phrase 24 Words in Paris 52 Expunge 26 Field mouse 55 Impudence 27 Hill dwellers 56 Vintage car 28 Comic writer Ephron 57 Haggis holder The Christian Science Monitor 29 Skip 61 Old hat By John Fort


AUG.11-17, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

El Cajon Dinner and a Concert Friday, August 8 •El Cajon Jay Renard/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

Buzz Campbell

PAGE FIFTEEN


PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

AUG. 11-17, 2016

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