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Santee Salutes – Annual 4th of July Celebration, P8

East County

JULY 6-12, 2017 Vol. 18 No. 44

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication

Alpine Fourth of July Parade & Carnival Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

PAGE TWO • JULY 6-12, 2017

Alpine Art League

Red Hot & Moving to The Top Thursday, June 29 • Dick’s BBQ Pit • Alpine

Lamplighters Community Theatre Celebrates 80th Anniversary

Lyanne Dalida

For The East County Herald LA MESA — Lamplighters Community Theatre commemorated its 80th anniversary, Wednesday, June 21, just a few feet from the stage where some of their most well-known productions have taken place. Lamplighters Community Theatre is a nonprofit organization located in La Mesa that has been providing entertainment for the community since 1937. The 80th anniversary celebration was hosted by the La Mesa Chamber of Commerce and the night consisted of a reception with hors d’oeuvres and raffle prizes followed by the presentation of several certificates of recognition by local representatives. Mary England, President and CEO of the La Mesa Chamber of Commerce, concluded with a few words that underlined this theatre’s historical roots within the La Mesa community and the commitment of the volunteer actors who dedicate their time to share their passion and skills. This community theatre helps bring the arts to life, and encourage anyone who is interested to join their organization. “We are open to anyone that might want to become involved in theatre in any capacity, we will find space for them,” stated George Bailey, the President of the Lamplighters Community Theatre. State Senator Joel Anderson acknowledged the Lamplighters Community Theatre and provided them with a Senate certificate of recognition for successfully serving the La Mesa community for 80 years. In a statement expressing his ongoing support, Anderson stated, “I want to personally congratulate the Lamplighters Community Theatre on reaching the momentous milestone of 80 years of continuous theatrical production. I also want to thank them for sharing their talents to bring art and cultural enrichment opportunities to the community of La Mesa and all of East County.” Lamplighters Community Theatre is located at 5915 Severin Drive in La Mesa. For more information, visit www.lamplighterslamesa.com

On The Cover Grossmont Healthcare District Awards Healthy Grant to ‘Volunteers in Medicine’ The Grossmont Healthcare District (GHD) recently hosted a check presentation ceremony with Maureen Hartin, CEO, Volunteers in Medicine (VIM) San Diego. The ceremony celebrated GHD’s ongoing support of VIM, including a $150,000 grant awarded during GHD’s current fiscal year. GHD’s grant will assist with paying for diagnostic test lab tests and fees as well as medical supplies for uninsured residents in the East Region, who are treated for free at the VIM El Cajon medical clinic at 1457 East Madison Ave. In addition to the GHD board members on either side of the check, VIM officials holding the check (from left to right) include Callie Warren, Maureen Hartin and Stuart Harvey.

ALPINE — The Kiwanis Club of Alpine, the Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Commerce and the Alpine Community Center hosted Alpine’s Annual 4th of July Parade & Carnival, Tuesday, July 4. Congressman Duncan D. Hunter (cover, left) and Alpine Kiwanis member, Dan Foster (cover, right) participated in the celebration Cover: Rick Terrazas & Jay Renard Cover design: Dee Dean / The East County Herald

See more on P9 and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • JULY 6-12, 2017

Your Voice in the Community San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce

Office: 619.440.6161 Fax: 619.460.6164 info

WWW.EASTCOUNTYCHAMBER.ORG

YOUR AD HERE!

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy!

FREE ESTIMATE

HOUSE CLEANING ROCIO & ANA

(619)

884.1798 References Available

YOUR AD HERE!

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy!

10315 Mission Gorge Road • Santee • 92071

www.SanteeChamber.com Phone: 619.449.6572 Fax: 619.562.7906


OPINiON

Politics and

PAGE FOUR • JULY 6-12, 2017

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias No Limit to State Parties’ Money Laundering

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ust in case anyone wonders what the real issue was in the very close race between Eric Bauman and Kimberly Ellis over who would become the next chairperson of the California Democratic Party, it was money. No, not salary or other personal emoluments, although Bauman – the party’s longtime Los Angeles County leader – has received his share of payments from ballot initiative campaigns. This was really about who would control the purse strings of the nation’s most successful state party and thus decide who gets its many millions of laundered dollars in each election cycle. It’s all because the year-2000 Proposition 34 made party heads in California the state’s most powerful unpublicized political kingmakers, allowing huge contributions to party committees which then parcel funds out where they like. It’s a way for donors to circumvent campaign donation limits with identities partially concealed. This is money laundering, plain, simple and also legal. The current dicey system is now sure to continue at least another two years, too, as state legislators (about two-thirds of them Democrats) the other day killed a bill making gifts to political parties subject to the same limits imposed on donations to candidates. In 2014, for example, the state Democratic Party passed out $10.4 million, while also influencing where the party’s many county central committees funneled their millions. Republicans, meanwhile, doled out just a little more than half as much as Democrats, as billionaires, big unions and big business donors realize the GOP has little chance to retake control of state government anytime soon. The biggest recipients of party money that year included Democrat Luis Chavez, ranked No. 1 with $2.35 million in party money, who lost a tight Hanford/Fresno-area state Senate race to Republican Andy Vidak, the No. 5-ranked recipient of party money with $2.1 million. Over the years, the bigger-money recipients in close races have usually won. Yes, ideology also had a lot to do with the extremely close Bauman-Ellis contest, where establishment candidate Bauman eked out a 60-vote win over Richmond political organizer Ellis. (It’s a sign of California’s times that Bauman, an openly gay man favoring gun controls, easy access to abortions and strong environmental protections, was considered the more conservative candidate.) This was essentially a re-run of last year’s Hillary Clinton-Bernard Sanders primary election contest, where the liberal feminist Clinton was not liberal enough for many Democrats. Ellis, a Sanders supporter, benefited from that faction’s strong turnouts at district meetings where many party convention delegates are chosen. Weeks after the state party convention, she still had not conceded the outcome of the convention vote. Bauman’s apparent win probably will see many more moderate Democrats get party backing and money than if Ellis had won. It means Sanders backers will at least have to bide their time before making another try at taking over the state party and being able to funnel party cash to ultra-liberals. But the Legislature’s refusal to clean up the current system is what really cries out for change. On the Republican side, for example, billionaire Charles Munger in 2014 gave $3.3 million to the party, with the ability to request privately where it would end up. This means there is no public record of who benefited from his largesse, while there would be if he’d given directly to candidates. Essentially, Munger and other big donors like the Service Employees International Union ($2.3 million), California Teachers Assn. ($676,000), Philip Morris USA and affiliates ($650,000) and PG&E Corp. ($526,000) can give to whoever they like without anyone holding the eventual winners’ feet to the fire over where they’re getting their funds and whether they later vote to benefit their benefactors. Among last year’s biggest donors were Indian casinos, utilities and healthcare companies, each interest having a huge stake in the makeup of the Legislature. As in 2014, there was no public accounting last year of where their money went. This disgraceful system is a major legacy of former Democratic Gov. Gray Davis, recalled in 2003 partly because of his own political fund-raising practices. Since Prop. 34 passed, one tally shows, the state Democratic Party has spent fully $401 million on candidates and campaigns. With that kind of money and commensurate influence at stake, it’s no wonder this spring’s contest to head that party was so hotly contested. ever. That could give Harris, as a Californian well known to California Democrats, a huge leg up in the nomination process. It has been 21 years since a Californian made a serious bid for President and more than 32 since a Californian actually won the office. So why should Harris wait, even though, at 52, in theory she has a lot of time? It’s unlikely she would have anywhere near as vulnerable a potential Republican opponent in any later election than the next one. No President has ever had start-of-term job approval ratings as low as Donald Trump’s. Very few have heard loud calls for impeachment from their first month in office, as Trump has. Yes, patience is a virtue. But in politics, so is opportunism. And the ambitious Kamala Harris may never see a better opportunity than she has right now.

Elias can be reached at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti Summertime & Sunscreens

QA

. I am totally confused about sunscreens. Advice?

.First

some background on sunscreens. Sunscreens work to prevent the damage of ultraviolet (UV) rays, an invisible component of sunlight. There are three types of UV rays: UVA, UVB and UVC. UVA is the most abundant of the three ultraviolet rays at the earth’s surface. These rays penetrate through the outer skin layer. Many of the UVB rays are absorbed by the stratospheric ozone layer, so there aren’t as many of these at the earth’s surface as the UVA rays. UVB rays don’t penetrate as far as UVA rays but are still harmful. UVC radiation is extremely hazardous to skin, but it is completely absorbed by the ozone layer. Sunburn and suntan are signs of skin damage. Suntans appear after the sun’s rays have already killed some cells and damaged others. UV rays do more harm than damaging skin. They can also cause cataracts, wrinkles, age spots, and skin cancer. Sunscreens are given SPF (Sun Protection Factor) ratings that tell you how well they protect you from damaging rays from the sun. The SPF ratings can be as low as two and as high as 100+. Here’s how the ratings work: If you apply a sunscreen rated at SPF 2, you will double the time it takes for your skin to burn. A sunscreen rated at SPF 15 will multiply the burning time by 15. The SPF number indicates the screening ability for UVB rays only. Research is being to done to establish a system to measure UVA protection. There is a point of diminishing returns with sunscreens. Here’s how it goes: • A sunscreen with an SPF of 2 screens 50 percent of UVB rays. • A sunscreen with an SPF of 15 screens 93 percent of UVB rays. • A sunscreen with an SPF of 30 screens 97 percent of UVB rays. • A sunscreen with an SPF of 50 blocks 98 percent of UVB rays. • A sunscreen with an SPF of 100 blocks 99 percent of UVB rays. Not applying enough sunscreen can seriously reduce your protection. You should use an ounce—about a palmful—on your body to gain the full protection indicated by the SPF on the product. Also, dermatologists advise reapplication every two hours or after swimming or sweating. Under FDA regulations, sunscreen labels must include the following information: Broad Spectrum designation. Sunscreens that pass FDA’s broad spectrum test procedure, which measures a product’s ultraviolet A (UVA) protection relative to its ultraviolet B (UVB) protection, may be labeled as “Broad Spectrum SPF [value]” on the front label. For Broad Spectrum sunscreens, SPF values also indicate the amount or magnitude of overall protection. Broad Spectrum SPF products with SPF values higher than 15 provide greater protection and may claim additional uses, as described in the next paragraph. Use claims. Only Broad Spectrum sunscreens with an SPF value of 15 or higher can claim to reduce the risk of skin cancer and early skin aging if used as directed with other sun protection measures. Non-Broad Spectrum sunscreens and Broad Spectrum sunscreens with an SPF value between 2 and 14 can only claim to help prevent sunburn. “Waterproof,” “sweatproof ” or “sunblock” claims. Manufacturers cannot label sunscreens as “waterproof ” or “sweatproof,” or identify their products as “sunblocks,” because these claims overstate their effectiveness. Sunscreens also cannot claim to provide sun protection for more than 2 hours without reapplication or to provide protection immediately after application (for example-- “instant protection”) without submitting data to support these claims and obtaining FDA approval. Water resistance claims. Water resistance claims on the front label must indicate whether the sunscreen remains effective for 40 minutes or 80 minutes while swimming or sweating, based on standard testing. Sunscreens that are not water resistant must include a direction instructing consumers to use a water resistant sunscreen if swimming or sweating. Drug Facts. All sunscreens must include standard “Drug Facts” information on the back and/or side of the container. To reduce your risk of skin cancer and early skin aging, the American Academy of Dermatology recommends everyone choose a sunscreen that states the following on the label: broad spectrum, SPF 30 or higher, and water resistant.

Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

To Your

PAGE FIVE • JULY 6-12, 2017

Living with MS with Dee Dean Over-the-Counter Antioxidant May Slow Progression of MS

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ommon overthe-counter antioxidant lipoic acid slows down the progression of Multiple Sclerosis, new research suggests. The effects were seen on patients with the secondary progressive form (SPMS) of the common neurological disease. In a pilot study, researchers found that taking a high dose of lipoic acid every day for two years reduced whole brain atrophy by 68 percent compared with a placebo. Also known as thioctic acid, it is a naturally occurring compound that is synthesised in small amounts by humans, which is available in supplement form. The findings offer new hope for patients with SPMS, for which there is currently no cure. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is generally progressive and estimated to affect more than 2.5 million people worldwide. It is a demyelinating disease in which the myelin – the fatty protective coating surrounding nerve cells in the central nervous system – is damaged. This damages and disrupts signalling between the brain and spinal cord, either partially or completely, causing vision and balance problems, dizziness, fatigue, bladder and stiffness and/or spasms. Researchers from Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine in Portland in the US carried out a random-

ized, double-blind study on 51 adults aged 40 to 70 years who all have SPMS. A total of 27 participants were randomly assigned to receive 1,200 milligrams of lipoic acid every day for to years, while the remaining 24 were given a placebo. Whole brain atrophy – which refers to the reduction in total brain volume due to the loss of neurons, considered a marker of MS progression – was assessed at the start of the study, a year in, and at the end using MRI scans. The research, published in the journal Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, noted that the reduction of brain atrophy by 68 percent with lipoic acid was greater than the reported impact of the drug ocrelizumab. Known as brand name Ocrevus, the medication was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of primary progressive MS – improving whole brain atrophy by 18 percent in clinical trials. Furthermore, the new study revealed participants treated with lipoic acid had fewer falls and better walking times, compared with those who were given the placebo. The team found that lipoic acid was generally safe and well tolerated by participants, with the most common side effect being gastrointestinal upset. However, the researchers caution that further trials

ddean@echerald.com involving a larger number of patients is necessary before lipoic acid can be recommended as a safe and effective treatment for the disease. ‘These are high doses. And while it seems safe, we won’t know whether it actually improves the lives of people with MS until we can replicate the results in the pilot study through a much bigger clinical trial,’ said lead study author Dr Rebecca Spain. The team plan to build on the results of their pilot study and carry out a further trial later this year. ‘Fortunately, we’re going to be able to answer that question with the participation of kind volunteers,’ added Dr Spain.

Source: Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine in Portland

Fight For a CURE! Anything Else is NOT ENOUGH!

BEAT MS! The East County Herald ©


COMMUNITY Matters ADVANCED HEARING AID PAGE SIX • JULY 6-12, 2017

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Wisdom for

EVERYDAY LIFE The Promises of God

with Pastor Drew

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Part XI

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled “The Promises of God”. As mentioned in part one of this series, there are but a few promises to all of mankind, the vast majority are to those who have become His children by adoption through faith in Jesus Christ and repentance from sin. Some may think this is not “fair”, that all of God’s promises should be to everyone. Well they are to everyone that will repent of sin and turn to Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sin. Think of this way, you are a parent, your children have your protection; love; provision; sacrifice; and will inherit what you have at your departure. Should others who are not your children or even those who hate you and your children be beneficiaries of what you have for your own children? Of course not, that would be absurd! I want us to continue to look at the promise of God (which we began last week) concerning His love for His children; how He has promised to love us with an everlasting love. Jeremiah 31:3 “The Lord hath appeared of old unto me, saying, Yea, I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with lovingkindness have I drawn thee.” The context of this shows that it is in reference to the children of Israel but it is also true of all who have put their trust in the Lord. When a person turns from sin (repents) and places their faith in Christ, they become a child of God and a fellow heir with Christ. The Apostle John has this to say about this great love of God, 1John 4:17-20 “Herein is our love made perfect, that we may have boldness in the day of judgment: because as he is, so are we in this world. There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear: because fear hath torment. He that fears is not made perfect in love. We love him, because he first loved us. If a man say, I love God, and hates his brother, he is a liar: for he that loves not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen?” Psalm 103:17 “But the mercy of the Lord is from everlasting to everlasting upon them that fear him, and his righteousness unto children’s children.” 2Thesalonians 2:16-17 “Now our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God, even our Father, which hath loved us, and hath given us everlasting consolation and good hope through grace, comfort your hearts, and establish you in every good word and work.” Romans 8:31-39 “What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us? He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things? Who shall lay anything to the charge of God’s elect? It is God that justifies. Who is he that condemns? It is Christ that died, yea rather, that is risen again, who is even at the right hand of God, who also makes intercession for us. Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword? As it is written, for thy sake we are killed all the day long; we are accounted as sheep for the slaughter. Nay, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us. For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” What a great love with which God loves us with, a love that was not warranted by anything we did (in fact it is a love in spite of what we have done), nor is His continuing to love us dependent upon anything we do now. It is important to understand that as we understand this great love our response should be to desire Him more than life and breath itself; to desire to obey and serve Him with everything I have.

Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


JULY 6-12, 2017

Santee – Lakeside Rotary

Officer Instillation Dinner Thursday, June 29 • Santee

Jay Renard / The East County Herald See more at wwww.echerald.com

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE SEVEN


PAGE EIGHT

City of Santee

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Annaul Santee Salutes Tuesday, July 4 • Santee

Jay Renard / The East County Herald See more at www.echerald.com

JULY 6-12, 2017


JULY 6-12, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE NINE

Alpine 4th of July Parade & Carnival

Kathy Foster, Rick Terrazas/ The East County Herald

See more at www.echerald.com


PAGE TEN

Rancho San Diego Library

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Children’s ‘Celebrate USA’ Saturday, July 1 • Rancho San Diego Jay Renard / The East County Herald See more at www.echerald.com

JULY 6-12, 2017


JULY 6-12, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Every Great Event Begins and Ends at Hooleys!

Your Community Calendar

It’s a Party, Charley Brown Preschool 45th Anniversary and you’re invited to join the celebration honoring its long history of service to East County families! Come one, come all – former students, parents, friends and neighbors! Bounce House – Petting Zoo – Face Painting Food - Lots of Food!

Saturday, July 15, 2017 • 10:30am – 2:30pm 5921 Jackson Drive, La Mesa, CA 91942 (619-463-5126)

Admission Free

LA MESA OFFERS ‘SUNDAYS AT SIX’ FREE SUMMER CONCERTS

PAGE ELEVEN

Rancho San Diego 2955 Jamacha Rd. 619.670.7468

La Mesa

5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900

‘Summer Fun – Bikinis Optional’ La Mesa Woman’s Club members invite the community to beat the summer heat at our “Summer Fun – Bikinis Optional”, beach themed event, at our clubhouse on Monday, July 31, 10:00a.m. to 2:00p.m. Join us for lunch. Play cards. Bring your friends, or come and make new friends. Donate a new pair of socks to our “Sock-It-ToMe” socks for the homeless community service project. Socks will be donated to the East County Crisis House. Help us fund our projects. Learn about our community service, our history, our Federation friendships and check out our clubhouse for your future events. Cost is $30.00. Reservations are required by Tuesday, July 26. Questions: please contact event chair, Sandi Phoenix, sphoenix@cox.net, 619-588-1923, or reservation chair, Margie Hartman, marjoree10s@ cox.net, 619-440-2449.

Come out and enjoy the line-up of local bands at La Mesa’s ‘Sundays at Six’ free summer concert series. Bring the family, grab a picnic and have fun listening to great tunes at the beautiful outdoor amphitheater at

Harry Griffen Park, 9550 Milden Street, from 6:00pm – 7:00pm. Sno-Cal Shaved Ice will also be available.

July 9: Dim the Lights – Disco July 16: Fringe Benefitz – Classic Rock July 23: Sonic Epidemic – Horn Tunes of the 70’s The Sundays at Six Concert Series is sponsored by Sharp Grossmont Hospital, Grossmont Center, the La Mesa Park and Recreation Foundation and the City of La Mesa. For more information email: recreation@ci.la-mesa.ca.us, call 619-667-1300 or visit lamesaparks.org.

Submit Your Community Event Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.


PAGE TWELVE

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

JULY 6-12, 2017

SPORTS BEAT with Steve Dolan UC San Diego StudentAthletes Honored

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niversity of California San Diego senior student-athletes Michael Cohn and Adam Klie were selected to receive NCAA Postgraduate Scholarships when the association announced its winter sports awardees. NCAA postgraduate scholarships are given to student-athletes who excel academically and athletically and who are at least in their final year of intercollegiate athletics competition. Cohn is a member of UC San Diego’s nationally-ranked swimming and diving team. A four-time All-American, he finished fifth in the 200 backstroke at the 2017 NCAA Championships and was the national runner-up in the event in 2016. The music major is a two-time CoSIDA Academic All-America First Team selection and has won the NCAA Elite 90 Award (given to the NCAA Championships participant with the highest GPA) in each of the last two years. A guard on the men’s basketball team, Klie helped lead the Tritons to their most successful season ever as the squad set program records for wins (27) and California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) victories (17). UCSD won its first ever conference regular season title and second league tournament crown en route to advancing to the NCAA West Region championship game for the second consecutive season. Klie picked up many athletic awards, including CCAA Player of the Year and all-region accolades. A bioengineering major, Klie holds a 4.0 GPA. He was named the CoSIDA Academic All-America of the Year, the CCAA Scholar-Athlete of the Year, and UC San Diego’s Outstanding Senior Student-Athlete. The one-time, non-renewable NCAA Postgraduate Scholarships of $7,500 are awarded three times a year corresponding to each sport season (fall, winter, and spring). Every season, there are 29 scholarships available for men and 29 scholarships available for women for use in an accredited graduate program. All former student-athletes who earned an undergraduate degree from an NCAA member school are eligible to be nominated by that school for an NCAA graduate degree scholarship, regardless of when they received their undergraduate degree. The NCAA postgraduate scholarship program was created in 1964 to promote and encourage graduate education by rewarding the association’s most accomplished student-athletes through their participation in NCAA championship and/or emerging sports. Athletics and academic achievements, campus involvement, community service, volunteer activities, and demonstrated leadership are evaluated.

Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZwith Rick Griffin Grossmont Healthcare District continues support of Volunteers in Medicine in El Cajon

East County EDC receives $5k from Bank of America

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to editor@echerald.com

Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

since 1979, Johnston had the choice to follow the team to Los Angeles. Johnston explained that he looked into moving his wife The East County Economic Development Council (ECEDC), to another facility before concluding that it was better for her to a regional non-profit, business-growth organization, reports stay put. So he decided to stay in San Diego as well. Bill has run The Grossmont Healthcare District (GHD) recently hosted it has received a $5,000 grant from the Bank of America 16 marathons to help raise more than $860,000 in donations for a check presentation ceremony with Maureen Hartin, CEO, Foundation to support the ECEDC’s Manufacturing Workforce the Huntington’s Disease Society of America. Johnston graduated Volunteers in Medicine (VIM) San Diego. The ceremony portfolio of projects. ECEDC’s manufacturing workforce portfolio with a journalism degree in 1981. He married Ramona, a fellow celebrated GHD’s ongoing support of VIM, including a is designed to unite education and industry to create a robust, Helix High grad who caught his eye as a cheerleader, in 1983, $150,000 grant awarded during GHD’s current fiscal year. reliable manufacturing workforce through projects that increase and became assistant PR director in 1984. GHD’s grant will assist with paying for diagnostic test lab tests economic mobility and provide workers with the skills and Travel writer talks about her 800-mile and fees as well as medical supplies for uninsured residents pathways needed to enter and advance in manufacturing walk at Heritage Museum in the East Region, who are treated for free at the VIM El careers. ECEDC’s manufacturing-related activities include its International travel journalist Maggie Espinosa will discuss her Cajon medical clinic at 1457 East Madison Ave. Careers in Manufacturing series of tours and employer panels, book about her 800-mile walk to California’s 21 missions at 1 Michael Emerson, GHD board president, said, “We are as well as the East County Manufacturing Expo and Resource p.m., Saturday, July 8, at the Heritage of the Americas Museum on proud to support Volunteers in Medicine and their mission Fair on Oct. 3. The 2016 Manufacturing Expo and Resource the campus of Cuyamaca College, 12110 Cuyamaca College Dr. to improve access to health care for America’s underserved, Fair drew 21 manufacturer exhibits, 20 resource providers, West, El Cajon. Admission is $5 per person. Espinosa’s 10-month particularly the uninsured, by relying on volunteer medical and more than 300 attendees. The ECEDC is a non-profit professionals, including retired doctors and nurses. We organization dedicated to promoting a healthy economic climate walk from California’s first mission in San Diego to the end of the applaud Volunteers in Medicine in their effort to bring and enhanced quality of life in San Diego’s East County region. Mission Trail in Sonoma became a book called “On a Mission, 800-mile Walk to Discover California’s El Camino Real” together medical professionals with patients who don’t have La Mesa native Bill Johnston hired by San An (published in 2015). The El Camino Real, or the King’s Road, health insurance.” Diego Padres was the route that originally connected the 21 missions of old VIM’s El Cajon clinic is staffed by more than 100 La Mesa native, Helix High School graduate and Jamul Spanish California. The book includes sightseeing and adventure professional volunteers, including retired doctors, nurses and resident Bill Johnston, who spent 38 years working in public opportunities, as well as the best choices for restaurants, bed and support staff, who donate thousands of hours in providing breakfasts and hotels. “I was only the 11th person to complete primary care services to more than 2,000 patients annually. relations roles with the San Diego Chargers, has been hired by this sojourn which included several 20-mile days. My book is The majority of patients are from employed working families the San Diego Padres as special advisor to Executive Chairman Ron Fowler. In 1983, Johnston married Ramona, a fellow a compilation of the journal and photos I recorded along the who earn too much to qualify for a government health Helix High grad and cheerleader. Later, Ramona developed way,” said Espinosa, a San Diego Press Club board member who program, yet too little to afford health insurance, according Huntington’s Disease, a neurodegenerative disorder has taken has authored two books and visited more than 40 countries. to Hartin. Founded in 1994, VIM is a nationwide nonprofit away her ability to speak along with other basic motor functions. Heritage of the Americas Museum, a cultural and educational dedicated to developing free community-based health Ramona Johnston was diagnosed with Huntington’s in 1999. She facility featuring historic art, culture and the natural history of the clinics for the uninsured. There are currently 97 VIM clinics operating in 25 states. When the El Cajon clinic opened in the was moved into Edgemoor Hospital. a skilled nursing home, eight Americas, opened in January 1993. For museum information, years ago. A member of the team’s media relations department visit www.heritageoftheamericasmuseum.com. fall of 2006, it was California’s first VIM clinic.


JULY 6-12, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Join Us At These Upcoming Summer Activities July 19: San Diego Air & Space Museum Hosting Mega Mixer • 5:30 pm • 2001 Pan American Plaza, San Diego July 27: THRiVE Real Estate Ribbon Cutting • 4:30 - 7:30 pm • 8693 La Mesa Blvd. August 3: Joint Mixer at Lantern Crest • 5 - 7:30 pm • 40 Lantern Crest Way in Santee August 17: Summer Bash – Business Expo • 5-8 pm • 4975 Memorial Drive RSVP to: rsvp@lamesachamber.com or call 619-465-7700 ext. 2 View event details and our full calendar at lamesachamber.com.

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Contact Bob at 619.855.2047 for your closest location. GET YOUR COMMUNITY FIX!


BILLBOARD

METTLE-TESTING

The San Diego County Herald PAGE FOURTEEN • JULY 6-12, 2017

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-014854 (A) CULTIVATE (B) CULTIVATE SD located at 4171 MT. BIGELOW WAY, SAN DIEGO, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92111. Mailing address: SAME. This business is conducted by: A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: 08/09/2016. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) STEPHANIE RABELO of 4171 MT. BIGELOW WAY, SAN DIEGO, CA, CA 92111. (B) ALLEN DJURKOVIC of 3367 C. STREET, SAN DIEGO, CA 92102. Signed by: STEPHANIE RABELO. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on JUNE 5, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: JUNE 8, 15, 22 AND 29, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-012503 (A) A & S ARCO located at 9108 CAMPO ROAD, SPRING VALLEY, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 91977. Mailing address: SAME. This business is conducted by: A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: 01/01/2017. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) A & S ARCO of 9108 CAMPO ROAD, SPRING VALLEY, METTLE-TESTING CA 91977. State of Incorporation: CALIFORNIA Signed by: SARTHAK JAIN / MANAGING MEMBER. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/ County Clerk of San Diego County on MAY 8, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: JUNE 8, 15, 22 AND 29, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-014470 (A) SLICK SUITS located at 522 GARFIELD, OCEANSIDE, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92054. Mailing address: SAME. This business is conducted by: AN INDIVIDUAL. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: 05/31/2017. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) RICARDO MERAZ of 522 GARFIELD, OCEANSIDE, CA 92054. Signed by: RICARDO MIRAZ. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/ County Clerk of San Diego County on MAY 31, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: JUNE 15, 22, 29 AND JULY 6, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-015014 (A) ADF ENTERPRISES located at 1787 TURNBERRY DR., SAN MARCOS, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92069. Mailing address: SAME. This business is conducted by: A CORPORATION. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: 04/04/2017. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) ADF ENTERPRISES, INC of 1787 TURNBERRY DR., SAN MARCOS, CA 92069. State of Incorporation: CALIFORNIA Signed by: DANIELLE JOHNSTON-FINE / CEO. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/ County Clerk of San Diego County on JUNE 7, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: JUNE 15, 22, 29 AND JULY 6, 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-013813 (A) BARGAIN BAY located at 15895 AVENIDA VENUSTO, 1018, SAN DIEGO, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92128. Mailing address: SAME. This business is conducted by: AN INDIVIDUAL. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: N/A. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) ANDREW CHOI of 15895 AVENIDA VENUSTO, 1018, SAN DIEGO, CA 92128. Signed by: ANDREW CHOI. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/ County Clerk of San Diego County on MAY 24, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: JUNE 15, 22, 29 AND JULY 6, 2017.

Legal Notices

CLASSIFIED

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF DIANE AUBRY [PROBATE CODE 19052] CASE NO. 37-2017-00019375-PRNC-CTL IN THE MATTER OF THE REVOCABLE TRUST CREATED BY Place your Classified or Announcement Ad with the East County Herald News for only $5.00 for DIANE AUBRY, DECEDENT. three lines per week. (Approx. 35 characters per line) - $2.00 per line after the first three. Add $5 for NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the creditors and contingent crediphoto. (Note: photos will not be returned.) Lost and Found Ads are Free. tors of the above-named decedent, DIANE AUBRY, that all persons Edited by Linda and Charles Preston having claims against the dece26 Overwhelming 52 Stargazer? ACROSS dent are required to file them with By Sam Parker 27 Hong Kong neighbor 54 Chased by the monkey 1 Underworld boss the SUPERIOR COURT at 1100 28 Queeg’s playthings 56 Facial decoration 5 Ledger entry UNION STREET, SAN DIEGO, CA 30 City rodents 60 ___ cacciatore 10 Tyrant 92101, and mail or deliver a copy 31 Tennis pro Richards 61 Heavy metal band 14 Abu Dhabi native to ANNETTE LERDAHL, as trustee 32 Align, on parade 64 ___ the lily 15 Pietro’s pals of the trust dated 06/17/14, wherein 34 Out of ___ 65 Part of TNT 16 Lille laugh the decedent was the settlor, at 38 Depth finder 66 Tuscan isle 17 Judas’ specie P.O. BOX 5675, SANTA ROSA, 40 In ___: private 67 Relaxation 19 Insert: abbr. CA 95402, within the later of four 44 “___ gratias” 68 Basso Simon 20 Piglet’s creator months after personally delivered 46 Ives’ collaborator 69 67 Across again 21 Swell! to you, 60 days after the date this 48 Marquis ___ 23 Remove legally notice is mailed or personally delivFill out this form and send it with your check/money order to: 49 Papua port DOWN 25 Flaccid ered to you, or you must petition to 50 Los ___, N.M. 1Diego Avila abode 26 Dutch river The San County Herald, LLC file a late claim as provided in Sec53 Literary type 2 Pavarotti piece 29 Armband tion 19103 of the Probate Code. A P.O. Box 2568, Alpine, CA 91903 54 Compensation 3 An oil source 33 Needed in a drought claim form may be obtained from 55 Director Kazen 4 at Make 34 Place on board is Monday Deadline 12unnecessary p.m. for that Thursday’s paper. the court clerk. For your protection, 57 Not earning 54 Down 5 Rye grass 35 Comparative ending you are encouraged to file your claim 58 Snouts 6 Talk show host 36 Diamonds: sl. by certified mail, with return receipt 59 Midge 7 Short life story 37 Underhand requested. 62 ___ de veau 8 Here in Haiti 39 Cop, of sorts DEBORAH G. CORLETT, ESQ. 63 Mel, of baseball 9 Can coating 41 D.C. to N.Y.C. O’BRIEN WATTERS$ DAVIS, LLP, 10 Unguents 42 Nairn negative ATTORNEYS FOR ANNETTE LER11 White pigments 43 Goals DAHL, Successor Trustee, 3510 12 Pert 45 Le Tartuffe parts UNOCAL PLACE, Suite 200, 13 Depend 47 Queeg’s arm decoraP.O. BOX 3759, SANTA ROSA, 18 Church group tion CALIFORNIA, 95402-3759. 22 It’s frozen in Frankfurt 50 Diverts THIS STATEMENT WAS FILED 24 G.B. award 51 Wampum The Christian Science Monitor WITH THE CLERK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT ON JUNE, 07, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD – GIC778099 PUBLISH: JUNE 15, 22 AND 29, 2017.

MONITORCROSSWORD

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Sudoku Difficulty:

Row

East County

Est. 1998

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Est. 1998

MONITORCROSSWORD METTLE-TESTING

Threeby-three square

2 9 8 6

6 7 4

2 8 1 6 7 9 2

9

3 8

2 5 9 7 1

6 7 2 4

9 2 1 5

Column

East County

How to do Sudoku Fill in the grid so the numbers 1 through 9 appear just once in every column, row, and three-by-three square. See example above. By Ben Arnoldy

The Christian Science Monitor

Edited by Linda and Charles Preston

26 Overwhelming 52 Stargazer? ACROSS 27 Hong Kong neighbor 54 USUDOKU_g1_070811.eps Chased by the monkey 1 Underworld boss Pub Date: 07/08/11 Slug: 28 Queeg’s playthings 56 Facial decoration 5 Ledger entry © 2011 The 10 Christian rights reserved. 30All City rodents 60 (www.csmonitor.com). ___ cacciatore Tyrant Science Monitor 31 Tennis pro Richards 61 Heavy metal band 14 Abu Dhabi native Distributed by The Christian Science Monitor News Service (email: syndication@csmonitor.com 32 Align, on parade 64 ___ the lily 15 Pietro’s pals RICH CLABAUGH/STAFF 34 Out of ___ 65 Part ILLUSTRATOR.eps of TNT 16 Lille laugh 38 Depth finder 66 Tuscan isle 17 Judas’ specie 40 In ___: private 67 Relaxation 19 Insert: abbr. 44 “___ gratias” 68 Basso Simon 20 Piglet’s creator 46 Ives’ collaborator 69 67 Across again 21 Swell! 48 Marquis ___ 23 Remove legally 49 Papua port DOWN 25 Flaccid 50 Los ___, N.M. 1 Avila abode 26 Dutch river 53 Literary type 2 Pavarotti piece 29 Armband 54 Compensation 3 An oil source 33 Needed in a drought 55 Director Kazen 4 Make unnecessary 34 Place on board 57 Not earning 54 Down 5 Rye grass 35 Comparative ending 58 Snouts 6 Talk show host 36 Diamonds: sl. 59 Midge 7 Short life story 37 Underhand 62 ___ de veau 8 Here in Haiti 39 Cop, of sorts 63 Mel, of baseball 9 Can coating 41 D.C. to N.Y.C. 10 Unguents 42 Nairn negative 11 White pigments 43 Goals 12 Pert 45 Le Tartuffe parts 13 Depend 47 Queeg’s arm decora18 Church group tion 22 It’s frozen in Frankfurt 50 Diverts 24 G.B. award 51 Wampum The Christian Science Monitor By Sam Parker

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JULY 6-12, 2017

La Vida Real Senior Living

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

East County Chamber After Hours Mixer Tuesday, June 27 • Rancho San Diego Jay Renard, The East County Herald See More at www.echerald.com

PAGE FIFTEEN


PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

TICKETS NOW ON SALE. PLEASE VISIT www.viejas.com

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JULY 6-12, 2017

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Enjoy the July 6-12 digital version of The Herald! Get Your Community Fix! See P8 to book early for SMSC's 40th Annual Haute with Heart!

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