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P.L.A.Y. Performance of Pocahontas, P15

Win a 2016

East County

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MAY 19-25, 2016 Vol. 17 No. 37

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication

Miss Alpine Pageant Crowns

‘East County Royalty Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

PAGE TWO • MAY 19-25, 2016

Santee City Council Honors and Recognition SANTEE — Santee City Council Member Ronn Hall presented B.W. “Stoney” Stone’s daughters Tina Kelly and Bonnie Stone Davis with a certificate of sympathy and adjourned the council meeting in Stoney’s name. Vice Mayor Jack Dale presented the City’s Softball Championship Trophy to this year’s winners, Santana High School (pictured bottom). The trophy is perpetual and is awarded to either Santana or West Hills High Schools depending who wins. Councilman John Minto presented Certificates of Commendation to the Santana High School Sultan Robotics team as Regional Winners at the 2016 FIRST Robotics Competition at La Vegas. This win qualified them to compete championship in St. Louis Councilman Rob McNelis was presented a certificate from the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection recognizing Santee as a Tree City USA. The Tree City Award requires a comprehensive community forestry program and Arbor Day observance and proclamation. This is Santee’s 14th year as a Tree City. May 15-21, is National Public Works Week. Council Member John Minto presented the Proclamation to Carl Scmitz Principal Civil Engineer, and Bob Stein Public Services Manager. National Small Business Week is the first week in May. Locally Virginia Hall, Santee Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce, and Rob Treadwell, accept proclamation from Council Member Ronn Hall. Vice Mayor Jack Dale recognizes Van Collingsworth as instrumental in getting the part of SR52 from Mast to Santo Road as a scenic route through Mission Trails Regional Park. Mayor Randy Voepel presented Captain James Bovet a Proclamation for his two years as commander of the Santee Sherriff Sub-station for superior dedication to his duties and best wished on future accomplishments. According to Voepel, Bovet was essentially the Santee Police Chief.

Sycuan Casino Meet & Greet with UFC Bantamweight Champion Dominick Cruz

From left: Santee City Councilman Ronn Hall with Bob and Tina Kelly (Stoney’s son-in-law and daughter) and Bonnie Stone Davis (Stoney’s daughter). The city of Santee honored the late ‘Stoney’ Stone for his vast contributions to East County by adjourning their council meeting in his name.

DEHESA — Sycuan Casino held a Q&A session followed by a meet and greet event with the current UFC Bantamweight Champion, Dominick Cruz Sunday, May 15 at the casino’s main lobby. The event – hosted by Rock 105.3 personality Eddie Pappani and Fox Sports San Diego Xtra 1360AM host Dave Palet (pictured below, with Cruz) – was free for the public to attend. Cruz,, with a record of 21-1-0, is nicknamed The Dominator and is from San Diego. He will defend his UFC 199 Bantamweight Champion title on Saturday, June 4. He currently trains two practices five days a week and one on Saturday’s out of San Diego at Alliance MMA located in Chula Vista and Santee. Sycuan features 2,000 exciting reel and video slot machines, more than 40 gaming tables, poker, bingo and a variety of restaurants to choose from. For more information visit www.Sycuan.com

On The Cover ALPINE — The 47th Miss Alpine Haley Ford (cover, center) was crowned and the titles of Miss Mt Empire and Miss San Diego East were also awarded, Sunday, May 15. Jay Renard / The East County Herald See more at www.echerald.com

Cover: Kathy Foster for The East County Herald Cover design: Steve Hamann / The East County Herald

See more P10 and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • MAY 19-25, 2016

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www.SanteeChamber.com Phone: 619.449.6572 Fax: 619.562.7906

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OPINiON

Politics and

PAGE FOUR • MAY 19-25, 2016

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias New Charges of Corruption, Lies in State Government

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peaking to a group of crime survivors in Sacramento recently, Gov. Jerry Brown confessed a tough sentencing law he signed in the 1970s was a big mistake. “The problems I create, I can clean up,” Brown declared, pitching his latest plan to reduce sentences and ease paroles for many crimes. Even as he spoke, two new charges of lying and misuse of funds confronted Brown’s administration. So it’s legitimate to wonder whether he would generalize his statement to the many questionable acts his appointees have perpetrated in state government. While there are not yet indictments or convictions, collusion between the some members of the state Public Utilities Commission (PUC) and companies it regulates is well documented. So was cronyism and conflict of interest at the state Energy Commission, whose chairman Brown nevertheless reappointed. There were also admitted falsehoods from prison authorities over a long-standing claim that no seriously violent criminals have been sent to low-security fire camps. To this list, add two new charges. One sees the federal Interior Department’s inspector general investigating a whistleblower claim that as much as half a $60 million grant for improving fish habitats in and near the Delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers may have been misappropriated by the state Department of Water Resources. The question: Did Brown appointees spend that money preparing the environmental impact statement for Brown’s stalled Delta Tunnels project, which would send Northern California river water south via hyper-expensive tunnels? A second claim, by consumer advocates, alleges numerous lies in an April state report insisting there could be rolling blackouts this summer unless the leak-plagued Aliso Canyon natural gas storage field in northern Los Angeles reopens soon. This report was a joint project of the reputation-stained PUC and Energy Commission, along with the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power and the state’s electricity-allocating Independent Systems Operator. The paper was reportedly at least in part written by the Southern California Gas Co., eager to get its storage field back online, with money and gas once again flowing from it. The report claimed that without the stored gas, Southern California might not be able to fuel power plants at peak electric-use times this summer, thus provoking blackouts. Consumer advocate Bill Powers, a San Diego engineering consultant who helped kill several early-2000s plans to make California dependent on ultra-expensive imported liquefied natural gas (LNG), notes that peak gas use comes in winter, not summer. He said the highest gas use of the last 10 years came in winter 2008, when demand in Southern California reached 4.9 billion cubic feet (bcfd) per day. Even that quantity is well below the 5.7 bcfd available at all times from incoming pipelines and other storage fields in the region. But peak use in the summer has not gone above 3.7 bcfd in the last 10 years, meaning pipelines alone, with no storage fields, provide more than enough gas to satisfy all customers, including power plants. There is, then, no real threat of a blackout, leading Jamie Court, president of the Consumer Watchdog advocacy group, to call the state report “blackout blackmail.” The parallel is unmistakable with the Arnold Schwarzenegger-era push for LNG and its completely false threats of outages. All these ethical lapses have been or are being perpetrated by Brown’s administration. Yet, the governor says nothing about any of them, behaving as if he’s unaware of any problem (he’s not; first-hand accounts says he reads news reports on alleged wrongdoing in his administration) or hopes all these things will quietly go away and leave him a totally clean legacy. Repeated attempts to get Brown to address the allegations against his appointees or their documented transgressions have been rebuffed. Example: “We won’t be commenting on that,” was all his office would say on revelations of the $1.04 million gifted to Brown chief of staff Nancy McFadden and a “non-disparagement” agreement she signed to get the money when she left a top job at PG&E to become the governor’s closest aide. If Brown wants to clean up the multiple messes made by his appointees, he can. But he shows no signs of that, leaving open the question of whether Brown consciously backs those questionable acts or merely puts up with them.

Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It. The book is now available in soft cover, fourth edition. His opinions are his own. He can be reached at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti

To Your

From The Geezer’s Mailbag

PAGE FIVE • MAY 19-25, 2016

QA

Living with MS with Dee Dean

. Any suggestions for dealing with tinnitus?

. Most tinnitus—a symptom, not a disease— comes from damage to the microscopic endings of the hearing nerve in the inner ear. People who suffer from tinnitus hear phantom noises that include not just ringing but whistling, hissing, buzzing, roaring and clicking. Tinnitus is most common in people over 65. Besides treatments such as hearing aids, drugs and therapy, there are techniques for dealing with tinnitus. Here are some: • Music – Many people find focusing on music helps them ignore their tinnitus. • Noise – Avoid noise, which can make your tinnitus worse. If you can’t escape a noisy environment, wear ear plugs. • Salt – Cut your salt intake which impedes blood circulation. Good circulation can help relieve tinnitus. • Blood pressure – High blood pressure can affect tinnitus. Get your pressure checked. • Stimulants – Stay away from coffee, tea, colas and nicotine. • Exercise – This improves circulation. • Fatigue – Get enough rest. • Stress – Stress can intensify tinnitus. Try relaxation techniques. . Is it possible to find out what the chances are of having a heart attack? . There is a calculator that tells you what the odds are of having attack Salon in the next 10 years. The Fulla heart Service calculator is for adults 20 or over who do not have heart disease or diabetes. You can find this calculator online at: http://cvdrisk.nhlbi.nih.gov/calculator.asp The risk-assessment tool is based upon the Framingham Heart Study, a joint project of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and Boston University. The objective of the Framingham Heart Study, begun in 1948, was to identify the common characteristics that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD), which affects the heart and blood vessels. The calculator asks seven questions: your age, gender, total cholesterol, HDL level, whether you smoke, systolic blood pressure (the first number), and whether you are taking medication for blood pressure. You plug in your numbers and the calculator generates your odds as a percentage. . Do you think an annual physical is really necessary? . Regular health checkups are important. How often you get one depends on your condition. Let me put it to you this way: How often do you have a mechanic check your new car? How many times do you visit the garage with a car that’s cranked over 100,000 miles? If you’re over 65, get regular physical exams even when you feel great. You can read about the federal guidelines for physical exams at the two following web pages. These are for people over the age of 65. The guidelines for women are at: http://www.nlm.nih. gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007463.htm The guidelines for men are at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/ medlineplus/ency/article/007466.htm

Q A

Q A

H

Hearing Problems and Tinnitus in MS earing problems are not a common symptom of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). That’s good news for most MS-sufferers. However, for approximately four to six percent of individuals with MS, hearing challenges are a reality that can have an impact on their quality of life, although the other good news is that most patients recover completely. Most patients recover, not so lucky for me thus far. I have a significant bilateral hearing loss coupled with tinnitus since 1991. The hearing loss was sudden, not gradual, which is normal with MS-associated hearing loss as opposed to age-related hearing loss. The tinnitus was an extra added bonus. Frankly, if it weren’t for the tinnitus, the hearing loss wouldn’t both me at all. Also on the positive side, for the majority of people with MSrelated hearing loss the hearing loss occurs in one ear only. Hearing problems associated with MS can include tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and varying degrees of hearing deficit or loss, which is defined as a loss of 30 decibels or more. This amount

deficits. Again, in that minority – I’ve had it for 25 years, bilaterally and constant. For me, it is a continuous ringing and hissing in my ears with occasional clicking on top of that. It’s quite loud – significantly impeding my hearing in addition to the hearing loss already occurring. I’m always astonished that no one else can hear it. Decades ago, Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit came out with a masking device specifically for tinnitus. It works by bring in white noise and fits like a hearing aid. They are probably fairly common now for tinnitus sufferers. My husband and I flew to Detroit only to find out my “pitch was too high” and there was nothing they could do to help me – although, they did give me a book on the subject. The device would have had to have been turned up so loud that my hearing would have been far worse than it already is. Worth a shot, though. I’ve also tried many nutritional cocktails prescribed by my neurologist without benefit. The one thing that gives me some relief are my hearing aids. They bring in more outside noise, thereby reducing the inside noise. I still

of hearing deficit is about half as loud as normal talking. Another hearing-related problem that can be experienced by people with MS is receptive aphasia (understanding words). Tinnitus, which is not a common occurrence in MS, can include more than ringing; murmurs, clicks, buzzing, and whistling sounds are also common. Among people with MS who experience tinnitus, the symptoms typically go away completely within a short time and do not cause any hearing

find it comforting that at the age of 34 my ENT (ears, nose and throat) specialist told me that I had “perfectly normal hearing – for a 78-year old!” Again, for the majority of MS patients, hearing problems are rare and even more rare that they are coupled with tinnitus, bilateral or that they last. In one study, investigators reviewed the files from a five-year period of patients with MS. Of 253 patients, 11 (4.35 percent) had experienced sudden hearing loss. Of these, seven had hearing

Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

ddean@echerald.com

loss as their presenting symptom of MS. Hearing loss developed early in the disease in all 11 patients, and it occurred in one ear only in all cases. Nine of the 11 patients had no residual hearing deficit. Receptive aphasia is an infrequent challenge in MS. Individuals with receptive aphasia can hear voices but may not understand what is being said. As a result, their own speech may be affected because they do not understand their own words. For this, I went through speech therapy, as my ENT specialist felt I would eventually loose my “th’s.” Additionally, I took three years of American Sign Language at Cuyamaca College as I felt that went hand in hand with lip-reading and there aren’t any courses for that, to my knowledge. I’m not the best signer as the spasticity in my hands interferes with that somewhat. However, I’m still glad I did it early on in my hearing loss. Here are a few points to consider about hearing problems and Multiple Sclerosis: • Hearing loss may occur during an acute exacerbation of the disease • Sudden hearing loss can signal an MS relapse • Hearing loss can be related to heat exposure • On very rare occasions, hearing loss can be the first symptom of the disease • The majority of acute episodes of hearing deficit associated with MS improve • Complete hearing loss (deafness) associated with MS is very rare If you suffer from tinnitus, see The Healthy Geezer’s column (to the left), for tips to help you manage it.

Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 29 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.com. NOTE: Dean is the recipient of the 2004 STAR Community Outreach Award by the MS Society Dec. 2, 2004, the American Red Cross Real Hero Wendell Cutting Humanitarian Award, Oct. 13, 2006 , the Stoney Community Service Award, February 29, 2008, Women in Leadership Award for Art/Media/Culture Oct. 29, 2010, El Cajon Citizen of The Year Nominee Feb. 2013 and Recipient of the National MS Society’s 2014 Media Partner of The Year, Feb. 10, 2015.


COMMUNITY Matters PAGE SIX • MAY 19-25, 2016

• PUBLIC NOTICE • NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the LAKESIDE UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT of San Diego County, California, acting by and through its Governing Board, hereinafter referred to as the DISTRICT, will receive up to, but not later than 2:00 P.M. on the 7th day of June 2016, sealed bids for the award of a contract for: SITE AND BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS AT TIERRA DEL SOL MS AND LAKESIDE FARMS ES Such bids shall be received in the office of the Governing Board of said DISTRICT located at 12335 WOODSIDE AVENUE, LAKESIDE, CALIFORNIA, and shall be opened and publicly read aloud at the above stated time and place. All bids received after the deadline above shall be returned unopened to the prospective bidder. Each bid must conform and be responsive to this invitation, the INFORMATION FOR BIDDERS, the SPECIFICATIONS, the PLANS, if any, and all other documents comprising the pertinent CONTRACT DOCUMENTS, and must be accompanied by the bid security referred to therein. Copies of the CONTRACT DOCUMENTS are on file and may be viewed in the office of said Board at the above address. Copies of the documents may also be obtained at Mayer Reprographics and information can be obtained online at www.mayer.com, by selecting “Projects Bidding”, and then selecting the folder for the project. All printing orders require a minimum of 24 hours to complete. Copies to be purchased at bidder’s non-refundable expense. There will be a non-mandatory pre-bid job walk at 9:30 A.M. on the 31st of May, starting at Lakeside Farms Elementary School, 11915 Lakeside Ave., Lakeside, CA 92040. Each bid shall be submitted on the bid form provided in the bid documents. Each bid shall be accompanied by a satisfactory Bid Bond executed by the bidder and surety company, or certified check, or cashier’s check in favor of the Lakeside Union School District, or cash, in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the bid. Said Bid Bond shall be given to guarantee that the bidder will execute the contract as specified, within three (3) working days after the notification of the award of the contract to bidder. Payment and Performance bonds shall be required. Pursuant to the provisions of section 22300 of the California Public Contract Code, the successful bidder may substitute securities for any monies withheld by the DISTRICT to ensure performance of the work. Procedures shall be as provided in said section 22300. WAGES: The Director of the Department of Industrial Relations has determined the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which this public work is to be performed for each craft, classification, or type of worker needed to execute the contract. Wage rates can be found at on the California Department of Industrial Relations web site at: www.dir.ca.gov/dlsr. It shall be mandatory upon the contractor to whom the contract is awarded and upon any subcontractor under him, to pay not less than said specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the contract. Each bidder shall be a licensed contractor pursuant to the Business and Professions Code, classification B – General Building Contractor. Pursuant to subdivision (e) of Business and Professions Code section 7028.15 “a licensed contractor shall not submit a bid to a public agency unless he or she contractor’s license number appears clearly on the bid, the license expiration date is stated, and the bid contains a statement that the representations are made therein are under penalty of perjury. Any bid not containing this information or a bid containing information which is subsequently proven false, shall be considered nonresponsive and shall be rejected by the public agency.” No contractor or subcontractor may be listed on a bid proposal for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code section 1725.5 [with limited exceptions from this requirement for bid purposes only under Labor Code section 1771.1(a)]. No contractor or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project (awarded on or after April 1, 2015) unless registered with the Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code section 1725.5. This project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. No bidder may withdraw his bid for a period of THIRTY (30) days after the date set for the opening of bids. Notice to Bidders Regarding Fingerprinting: Education Code section 45125.1 requires all entities having certain contracts with school districts to certify that employees of contractors who may have contact with pupils have not been convicted of serious or violent felonies as defined by statute. Prior to certification, contractors must have their employees fingerprinted and receive clearance from the California Department of Justice (DOJ). Todd Owens, Maintenance, Transportation and Operations Supervisor Lakeside Union School District Lakeside, CA BID NO. 2016-206

SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD dba THE EAST COUNTY HERALD PUBLISH: MAY 19 and 26, 2016.

Wisdom for

EVERYDAY LIFE

with Pastor Drew

A Day in the Life of Jesus The Messiah

G

PART LVII

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled, “A day in the life of Jesus the Messiah.” As a reminder, we are doing this series that you may come to know the truth about Jesus as the Word of God the Bible conveys it. We are looking at the Apostle John’s account for he gives the most detailed account of Jesus’ final hours with His disciples. In John 12:20-26 we read one of many profound paradoxes of the Christian faith that Jesus would repeat over and over again, “Now there were certain Greeks among those who came up to worship at the feast. Then they came to Philip, who was from Bethsaida of Galilee, and asked him, saying, “Sir, we wish to see Jesus.” Philip came and told Andrew, and in turn Andrew and Philip told Jesus. But Jesus answered them, saying, “The hour has come that the Son of Man should be glorified. Most assuredly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the ground and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it produces much grain. He who loves his life will lose it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life. If anyone serves Me, let him follow Me; and where I am, there My servant will be also. If anyone serves Me, him My Father will honor.” What is the paradox you might be wondering? It is simply this: if you really want to live you must die; if you want to experience the “Abundant Life” that Jesus spoke of, you must first die; “whoever will save his life will lose it but whoever will lose his life for Jesus’ sake and the Gospel will save it.” Every man and woman that Jesus calls to come and follow Him, He bids to come and die. I know this is not the popular message of the modern church that is purported by the like of Joel Osteen, Benny Hinn, and a myriad of other false teachers of our day but it IS the message of Jesus Christ and neither He nor His Word will ever change. If you would, consider the context for which this truth of Jesus is spoken and others like it. It was at the end of Jesus’ life; His popularity had reached a climax; Jerusalem was filled with people in observance of the Passover; many were expecting and hoping that Jesus would announce His Kingship, overthrow the Romans, set up His Kingdom and they would be part of it. No such thing would happen for this describes the kingdom of men not of Jesus. Listen again to what He said, “The hour has come that the Son of Man should be glorified. Most assuredly, I say to you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the ground and dies, it remains alone; but if it dies, it produces much grain. He who loves his life will lose it, and he who hates his life in this world will keep it for eternal life.” Jesus would be glorified in; by; and through His death. Before the crown must first come the cross. Look at what He says next, “If anyone serves Me, let him follow Me; and where I am, there My servant will be also. If anyone serves Me, him My Father will honor.” Jesus was about to go to the Cross and this is where He demands that everyone that would follow Him would have to choose the same path. Luke 9:23 “Then He said to them all, “If anyone desires to come after Me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross daily, and follow Me.” Luke 14:25-27;33 Now great multitudes went with Him. And He turned and said to them, “If anyone comes to Me and does not hate his father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters, yes, and his own life also, he cannot be My disciple. And whoever does not bear his cross and come after Me cannot be My disciple. So likewise, whoever of you does not forsake all that he has cannot be My disciple.” Though the Cross was literal for Jesus and has been so for many of His followers through history, the meaning of the Cross to the follower of Christ for everyday life is: death to self. It is only when I die to self can I truly follow Jesus.

Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


MAY 19-25, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE SEVEN

San Diego River Park Festival • Saturday, May 14 • Santee Town Center Community Park East

Jay Renard/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

The rich flavors of spring Southern Califorina’s are in abundance Largest Outdoor at The Buffet!

Roller Rink

Enjoy a wide variety of classic and contemporary gourmet offerings from the freshest fare of the season.

Opening Soon Viejas Outlets

As always, enjoy unlimited beer, wine, and champagne with your buffet! Featured items are subject to availability.

Viejas Casino & Resort ∙ 5000 Willows Road ∙ Alpine, CA 91901 ∙ 619.445.5400

Guests must be at least 21 years of age to enter the Casino. Guests must be at least 21 years of age to drink alcoholic beverages. Guests under 21 years of age are permitted in The Buffet only, but must be accompanied by an adult. Families are welcome at the Viejas Outlets and the Viejas Hotel. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling, call 800.426.2537


PAGE EIGHT

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

MAY 19-25, 2016

Water Conservation Garden’s

3rd Annual Butterfly Festival Saturday, May 14 • El Cajon

HGH

Gala Bright and bubbly the evening will be... tremendous, stupendous a sensation to see. Magnificent gowns, feathers and top hats... a bedazzlement of opulence at The US Grant. Ooh, la, la... a spectacular, spectacular Cabaret Event.

Event Coordinator, at 619-938-2854 or jessica@guidinghands.org. www.guidinghands.org

Jay Renard/The East County Herald

See more photos at www.echerald.com


MAY 19-25, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE NINE

6th Annual

AMGEN Tour of California

Sunday, May 15 • Downtown El Cajon

Jay Renard/The East County Herald

See more photos at www.echerald.com

State Route 52 Designated a Scenic Highway Wednesday, May 11 • San Diego

Jay Renard/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com


PAGE TEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

MAY 19-25, 2016

Miss Alpine/Mt. Empire Pageant Sunday, May 15 • Alpine

ALPINE — The 47th Miss Alpine, Haley Ford, was crowned and the titles of Miss Mt Empire and Miss San Diego East were also awarded. The pageant supports the Presidential Volunteer Service Awards, the annual Father/Daughter Dance and The Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. Congratulations to all the new community ambassadors.

Kathy Foster forThe East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

Alpine Community Center

Revitalization Party Friday, May 13 • Alpine

Kathy Foster for The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com


MAY 19-25, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE ELEVEN

Your Community Calendar HGH’s t a g n i n ical Eve turday, June 11 s m i h W A Sa l Gala – a g will u n n A evenin e. e d n th 2 ly 4 to se bubb

on and sensati a Bright ON — stupendous a d top hats... J A C L n E , a s s u t. r o n e Gra mend , feath the US Cabaret be... tre ificent gowns nce at r le n la u g u p c a o M of cta lement lar, spe bedazz ... a spectacu ted to , la Event! ou will be trea ors Ooh, la y t, la n a me h eG ntertain e dinner, t Roug e e r e a v b li a f C go cours At the g r evenin ktails, three la u evenin c ta c and an you to a spec , themed co g in c n t es , da por nd’oeurv silent auction me will trans with ca e d th n te a ’s le r e p a m liv e nt y o a c g is t bare e ele m. Th progra isian ca les, and all th for this r a P s b s ou the fam ers, roulette ta Paris. Join u , bringing in c n n g fu a in d d n n n e a ca f an ev with intrigue o gether. r to u s o ader glam lled le fi at t ic n p e o v r ge nth dinator, engagin nity and phila r Event Coor -2854 for 8 ) 93 commu ct Jessica, ou or (619 ds.org Conta n a . h n g o @guidin ore informati m jessica

Submit Your Community Event

Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.

Thinking Of A

EL CAJON — ety of dogs, ca looking to adop by the shelter, cats in the ado The shelter i 10:00 a.m. to 5 For more info


PAGE TWELVE

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

• PUBLIC NOTICE •

MAY 19-25, 2016

SDSU BEATwith Steve Dolan

Torah Scroll on Display Tuesday, May 31

S

outhern California Seminary invites the community to join faculty, students, staff, and friends Tuesday, May 31 at 6 p.m. for the dedication of a Torah Scroll being donated to the seminary. The affair takes place at the Shadow Mountain Community Church event center, 2100 Greenfield Drive in El Cajon. For thousands of years, the Hebrew Torah scroll has been the most cherished object in the Jewish faith, and its message forms the historical foundation for Christianity. Containing the first five books of the Bible (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy) Torah represents the spiritual heritage upon which the Christian faith is built. The Torah scroll at Shadow Mountain will be a stunning display of the passion and precision of those who gave their lives for the preservation and transmission of God’s Word. Meticulously hand-copied on the skins of more than 35 cattle, the scroll stretches nearly 100 feet long when fully unrolled. Every letter in every line reflects the devout practices of the scribes whose dedication ensured that God’s Word would be passed on to future generations with utmost accuracy. This particular scroll follows the Ashkenazi tradition. It originated in central Europe nearly 200 years ago and was protected and preserved through the sweat, tears and blood of those who lived – and often died -- for the message it contained. This scroll survived the Nazi Holocaust before being taken to Israel for safekeeping. Now, through the generosity of Ken and Barbara Larson, this scroll will find new life and purpose in the community. Also, have you ever thought about attending courses at San Diego State University, but didn’t want to go through the process of being formally admitted? The Open University program allows high school graduates, working adults, and students from other universities to take both online and in-class SDSU courses if space is available once SDSU matriculated students have registered. SDSU classes are open to the public through the College of Extended Studies Open University program. Summer classes start Monday, May 23; registration opens Tuesday, May 17 online as well as at the Extended Studies registration window. Open University fees are $261 per unit for undergraduate courses and $308 per unit for graduate courses (600 level and above). More information about Open University is available at neverstoplearning.net/openu or by calling (619) 265-7378 (SDSU).

Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZwith Rick Griffin Chick-fil-A in Santee to host `Military Appreciation Night’

The nine Chick-fil-A restaurants in San Diego County, including the Chick-fil-A restaurant at 9418 Mission Gorge Road, Santee, are preparing to give away more than 10,000 chicken sandwiches on Wednesday, May 25, as part of its annual “Military Appreciation Night” promotion. Between the hours of 4 and 7 p.m., any active duty member of the military or retired veteran with a military ID or proof of service, along with every one of their immediate family members with them, will receive their choice of a free entrée. Choices include the Chick-fil-A original chicken sandwich, spicy chicken sandwich, eight-piece nuggets or three-piece chicken-nstrips. Offer valid for dine-in customers only. The event will include family-friendly activities and entertainment for guests at each Chick-fil-A restaurant. “As a military community, we’re looking forward here in San Diego to this opportunity to honor all who are serving or have honorably served in the simplest way we know how, with great food,” said Kyle Steck, Santee Chick-fil-A owner-operator. “It is a remarkable event and our privilege to extend our gratitude and recognize our armed services heroes who have sacrificed so much for our freedom.” Chick-fil-A restaurants in San Diego County are located in Chula Vista, Encinitas, Oceanside, San Marcos, Santee, Escondido and in San Diego on Sports Arena Blvd., Camino Ruiz in Mira Mesa and Carmel Mountain Road in Carmel Mountain Ranch. For addresses and directions, visit www.chick-fil-a.com. This is Chick-fil-A’s ninth annual “Military Appreciation Night” in San Diego. The event began in San Diego in 2008, when there were four Chick-fil-A restaurants in San Diego County. It has since grown to more than 50 participating Chick-fil-A restaurants through-

out Southern California.

Realtors group hosts golf tournament at Cottonwood

The Pacific Southwest Association of Realtors, a 2,300-member trade group for San Diego-area realtors, will hold its 41st annual fundraising golf tournament starting with check-in 7 a.m. on Friday, June 3, at Cottonwood Golf Course, 3121 Willow Glen Road, El Cajon. Cost to play is $125 per player or $500 per foursome, which includes green fees, cart, box lunch and dinner. Sponsorships are available. Donations of raffle prizes are welcomed. Proceeds from the golf tournament will benefit the California Association of Realtors’ Housing Affordability Fund (HAF). HAF is a charitable entity dedicated to addressing California’s growing housing affordability crisis. For more information and to RSVP, contact PSAR at (619) 421-7811, or visit www.psar.org/golf.

Clark Marketing Solutions of La Mesa wins AIVA award

Neal Clark of Clark Marketing Solutions of La Mesa reports his firm recently received a Communicator Award of Distinction for creative excellence from the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts (AIVA), a 600member international professional group that promotes creativity in media design, production and distribution. The award was for the use of music in a commercial radio spot called “Ah Summer” produced for client Diamond Valley Honda of Hemet, Calif. It was Clark’s sixth AIVA award he has received since 2011, and third for Diamond Valley Honda. AIVA’s Communicator Awards draws more than 6,000 entries worldwide, Clark said. Clark, who opened his firm in 2004, serves clients in the automotive, finance, real estate development and hospitality industries.

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to info@rickgriffin.com or faxed to (619) 461‑3151. Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

Medical Society’s foundation has new name

The charitable foundation formed 11 years ago by the San Diego County Medical Society has changed and shortened its name. Formerly called the San Diego County Medical Society Foundation, the foundation’s new name is Champions for Health. The announcement was made by Barbara Mandel, Champions for Health chief executive officer, who said planning for the rebranding has been underway since late 2015. “The name was changed to Champions for Health to reduce confusion and misconceptions,” said Mandel. “Some people thought we existed in order to give money to doctors, which is incorrect. Rather, the new name was selected to reinforce the selfless contributions of doctors and many others in medicine who are involved in addressing the unmet healthcare needs of low-income and uninsured people in San Diego County. The name describes the tireless efforts of medical professionals who work to improve community health and wellness and change lives. These people really are our champions for health.” Mandel said the rebranding also includes a new logo displaying a stethoscope. “Champions for Health is a name not only inclusive of our community partners, such as doctors and nurses, other medical staff and allied health professionals, but it will help us be more recognizable in the general community. It’s a name that highlights our health heroes and means more in the public eye.” Mandel said Champions for Health’s flagship physician volunteer program, called Project Access San Diego (PASD), will continue under the new moniker, along with several other existing programs. PASD links volunteer specialist doctors with uninsured people who need healthcare services and cannot afford specialty surgeries.


MAY 19-25, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE THIRTEEN

Alpine Community Planning Group AGENDA

P.O. Box 1419, Alpine, CA 91901-1419

Notice of Regular Meeting • Preliminary Agenda Thursday, May 26, 2016 at 6:00 pm Alpine Community Center | 1830 Alpine Boulevard, Alpine, CA 91901 Archived Agendas & Minutes http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/pds/Groups/Alpine.html • County Planning & Sponsor Groups - http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/pds/CommunityGroups.html

Group Member Email List–Serve *membership in this email list– serve is optional for group members

Travis Lyon Chairman travislyonacpg@gmail.com Jim Easterling Vice Chairman alpjim@cox.net Leslie Perricone Secretary leslieperriconeacpg@gmail.com Glenda Archer archeracpg@gmail.com George Barnett bigG88882@cox.net Aaron Dabbs aarondabbs.apg@aol.com Roger Garay rogertax@ix.netcom.com Charles Jerney cajerney@yahoo.com Jennifer Martinez jmartinez.acpg@gmail.com Mike Milligan starva16@yahoo.com Tom Myers tom.myers@alpine-plan.org Lou Russo louis.russo.acpg@gmail.com Richard Saldano rsaldano@contelproject.com Kippy Thomas kippyt@hydroscape.com John Whalen bonniewhalen@cox.net

A. Call to Order • B. Invocation / Pledge of Allegiance • C. Roll Call of Members D. Approval of Minutes / Correspondence / Announcements 1. Approval of Minutes • i. April 28, 2016 Meeting Minutes 2. ACPG Statement: The Alpine Community Planning Group was formed for the purpose of advising and assisting the Director of Planning, the Zoning Administrator, the Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors in the preparation, amendment and implementation of community and sub-regional plans. The Alpine Community Planning Group is an advisory body only. 3. Notice: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the County of San Diego, Planning & Development Services (PDS) has completed the review of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for the project described below and has determined that it is ready for CEQA Public Review. i Public Review Start Date: April 28, 2016, at 8:00 A.M. ii Public Review End Date: June 13, 2016, at 4:00 P.M. iii Project: Agriculture Promotion Ordinance and General Plan Amendment [PDS2014-POD-14-001, PDS2016-GPA-16-004] iv Contact: Dennis Campbell, Planning & Development Services at (858) 505- 6380, at address: 5510 Overland Ave., Suite 310, San Diego, CA 92123. v PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The County of San Diego proposes to encourage agricultural uses in the County by amending the Zoning Ordinance as follows: Streamline regulations to provide more opportunities for agricultural operations; Update definitions, procedures and standards regarding permitting of agriculture-related accessory uses; and Amend the following: 1) Agricultural tourism (agritourism); 2) Accessory agricultural uses, such as homestays, microbreweries, cideries, and micro-distilleries; and 3) Horticultural retail animal raising, aquaponics, creameries/dairies, fishermen’s market, mobile butchering and wineries. The proposed project includes a General Plan Amendment (GPA) to amend the Mobility Element at Table M-4, by revising existing and adding new roadway segments that may function at a Level of Service E or F, as a result of the zoning changes. The project applies to all Community/Regional Planning Areas, within the unincorporated area of San Diego County. The DEIR may be viewed at: http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/content/sdc/pds/ceqa_public_ review.html. The proposed GPA and zoning changes may be viewed at: http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/content/sdc/pds/advance/agriculturepromotion.html. E. Open Discussion: Opportunity for members of the public to speak to the ACPG on any subject matter within the ACPG’s jurisdiction that is not on the posted agenda. F. Prioritization of this Meeting’s Agenda Items G. Organized / Special Presentations 1. On December 16, 2015, the Board of Supervisors approved recommendations evaluate the current Park Lands Dedication Ordinance (PLDO), research other ordinances and gather input from stakeholders. Department of Parks and Recreation will provide the Board with recommendations and proposed changes to the PLDO in June 2016. LINK to PLDO Update webpage: http://www.sandiegocounty.gov/content/sdc/parks/ public_review/park-lands-dedication-ordinance--pldo-.html i Group will review recommendations to the Board of Supervisors for updates/changes to the overall PLDO program for consideration in June 2016. Discussion, & Action. H. Group Business: 1. Group to review updates to the ACPG Standing Rules proposed by the Coordinating Committee and adopt changes to the Standing Rules for the 2016 calendar year. Discussion, & Action. 2. Appointment of Subcommittee Chairs. Discussion, & Action. 3. Subcommittee Chairs to submit list of subcommittee members for approval. Discussion, & Action I. Consent Calendar J. Subcommittee Reports (including Alpine Design Review Board) K. Officer Reports • L. Open Discussion 2 (if necessary) • M. Request for Agenda Items for Upcoming Agendas • N. Approval of Expenses / Expenditures Announcement of Meetings: • 1. Alpine Community Planning Group – June 23, 2016. • 2. ACPG SubO. committees – TBD • 3. Planning Commission – June 17, 2016 • 4. Board of Supervisors – June 21, 22 & 28, 29 P. Adjournment of Meeting Disclaimer Language: Public Disclosure – We strive to protect personally identifiable information by collecting only information necessary to deliver our services. All information that may be collected becomes public record that may be subject to inspection and copying by the public, unless an exemption in law exists. In the event of a conflict between this Privacy Notice and any County ordinance or other law governing the County’s disclosure of records, the County ordinance or other applicable law will control. Access and Correction of Personal Information – You can review any personal information collected about you. You may recommend changes to your personal information you believe is in error by submitting a written request that credibly shows the error. If you believe that your personal information is being used for a purpose other than what was intended when submitted, you may contact us. In all cases, we will take reasonable steps to verify your identity before granting access or making corrections.


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27 Run in neutral 57 Beethoven’s ACROSS 28 ___ Plaines “Archduke,” and others 1 Machine parts Pub Date: 32 Principle 58USUDOKU_g1_052011.eps Ballroom dance 5 All there05/20/11 Slug: 33 Left off the list 9 Arctic abode © 2011 The Christian Science Monitor62(www.csmonitor.com). All Golfer’s rights collection reserved. 34 Other, in Toledo 63 ___ bagatelle 14 Slews Distributed by The Christian Science Monitor64 News Service (email: syndication@csmonitor.com) 35 Einstein’s theory: abbr. Exchange premium 15 Zounds! 37 Colombian city 65 Store event 16 Din RICH CLABAUGH/STAFF ILLUSTRATOR.eps 38 Compulsively preoc66 Lecterns 17 TV’s “Nick at ___” cupied with 67 Canine complaint 18 Winter boredom 39 Persian and Manx 68 Kind of sch. 20 Voodoo 40 Take on 22 Lazy 41 Downcast DOWN 23 Composer Heitor 44 Millet’s “Man With ___” 1 Comedienne Judy 26 Disencumber 45 Grieg’s homeland 2 Suspected felons’ outs 29 Fool 47 Kind of fear 3 Motorists’ abodes 30 Debussy subject 48 Prima ballerina, e.g. 4 Purloin 31 Oceanic disturbance 49 Part of CBS 5 Wait a ___! 34 Wickerwork material 52 Accepted practice 6 Turkish chief 36 Lively dances 53 Lost a lap 7 Mogul governor 37 Curds concoction 55 Longfellow’s bell town 8 Greeley or Brown, e.g. 41 Buffalo ice hockey 56 Court action 9 Dope, shortly player 58 Lid 10 Exits 42 Those not of the cloth 59 Latin I word 11 Uniforms for the help 43 Loser 60 Diamond ___ 12 Verb ending 46 Due follower 61 One of Sennett’s finest 13 Finished, to poets 47 Caesar’s foot 19 ___ prius 50 Wither away 21 Rodent pet 51 Frat affair 24 “Star Wars” princess 54 Flavors The Christian Science Monitor 25 Salem’s St. By Alfio Micci


MAY 19-25, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE FIFTEEN

La Mesa Arts Academy

Grease

May 12, 13, 14 • LMAAC Outdoor Amphitheater

Rob Riingen/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

P.L.A.Y Performance of

Pocahontas

May 13, 14, 15 • Lakeside Middle School

Rob Riingen/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com


PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

MAY 19-25, 2016

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