Page 1

Alpine Kiwanis Foundation’s Annual Vintage Alpine, P9

Win a 2017

Mustang GT

East County

MAY 11-17 2017 Vol. 18 No. 36

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication

El Capitan Dance & Jr. Dance Company

Annual Spring Show Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

East County

East County Chamber of Commerce Est. 1998

Tuesday, May 2 • El Cajon

PAGE TWO • MAY 11-17, 2017

Hospital Day Simulation Brings Together 100 Allied Health Students at Grossmont College EL CAJON — For the first time, more than 100 students from four disciplines in Grossmont College’s allied health programs took part Friday in “Hospital Day,” a large-scale simulation exercise in the college’s high-tech Health and Sciences Complex, along with more than 20 instructors, college alumni and community volunteers. In an event unique to the college, the students utilized eight stations in simulation labs that closely mimic hospital rooms to care for a student posing as an elderly patient with a variety of health issues. The intent of the exercise was to get the students from the different disciplines – nursing, cardiovascular technology, occupational therapy assistant, and respiratory therapy – to work together and communicate effectively in preparation for what they will be facing in real life as healthcare professionals. This event took two years to plan, and involved the largest number of students and faculty to use the simulation labs at one time, organizers said. In addition to the students – all dressed in hospital garb – more than 20 instructors and college alumni participated in the event as facilitators. The scenarios involved a student taking the role of an elderly

person with a tracheostomy who had also developed metastatic cancer. An afternoon simulation involved the patient refusing care, and students facing end-of-life decisions, and discussions on medical ethics. The objective of Hospital Day was to expose students to inter-professional education, or IPE, which refers to students from multiple healthcare disciplines joining to train for collaborative patient care. About 300 students are enrolled in the allied health programs at Grossmont College and most will have jobs in their fields within six months to a year after completing their training. Grossmont College

Jay Renard / The East County Herald See more at www.echerald.com

is the only public institution in the county with programs in cardiovascular technology, occupational therapy assistant, respiratory therapy, and orthopedic technology. Grossmont College is one of five community colleges in the county to offer associate degrees in nursing. Graduates who pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses are licensed as RNs. Grossmont College students can continue on to earn their bachelor’s in nursing through a baccalaureate program offered through Point Loma Nazarene University, with classes taught by PLNU faculty at Grossmont College and online.

Sycamore Canyon Elementary School Recognized for Commitment to Arbor Day Nitsa Ioannides

For The East County Herald SANTEE — Since Arbor Day was founded in Nebraska in 1872, it has encouraged groups and individuals to dedicate this day to plant and care for trees in order to improve our environment. Sycamore Canyon Elementary School in Santee demonstrated its commitment to caring for trees and their community by proclaiming Thursday, May 4 as Arbor Day. The students from the school gathered for a celebration at the morning assembly and

Dine & Dialogue with District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis

On The Cover SANTEE — The El Capitan Dance Company and Jr. Dance Company held their Annual Spring Show at West Hills High School Theatre, May 3 & 5.

Ted Walton for The East County Herald

Above: Arbor Day Group Celebration.

See SYCAMORE CANYON ELEMENTARY, P13

Cover: Rob Riingen Cover design: Dee Dean / The East County Herald

See more on P8 and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • MAY 11-17, 2017

Your Voice in the Community San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce

Office: 619.440.6161 Fax: 619.460.6164 info

WWW.EASTCOUNTYCHAMBER.ORG

YOUR AD HERE!

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy!

FREE ESTIMATE

HOUSE CLEANING ROCIO & ANA

(619)

884.1798 References Available

A Culture of Generosity...

Stoney’s Kids Legacy ‘It’s All About The Kids!’

A Non-Profit Organization Benefitting East County Kids... Our Future!

P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903

www.stoneyskidslegacy.org

10315 Mission Gorge Road • Santee • 92071

www.SanteeChamber.com Phone: 619.449.6572 Fax: 619.562.7906


OPINiON

Politics and

PAGE FOUR • MAY 11-17, 2017

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias Will Court Ruling on Officials’ Email Move Brown

M

ore than one month after the state Supreme Court ruled unanimously that text messages and emails sent by public officials on their personal devices are matters of public record if they deal with public business, Gov. Jerry Brown has still not moved on his own email issues. During that time, in fact, Brown flouted his own boasts of transparency by using a federal anti-terror rule to deny public access for records on various aspects of the Oroville Dam crisis. Brown’s email issues stem from his communications with the state Public Utilities Commission at the time of the infamous PUC decision on financing the closure of the crippled San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. The settlement forced customers of Southern California Edison Co. and the San Diego Gas & Electric Co. to foot more than 70 percent of the $4.7 billion cost for the shutdown, largely caused by an Edison blunder. The question: Was that so-called settlement mostly decided in a well-documented secret meeting between then-commission President Michael Peevey and Edison executives in a luxury hotel in Warsaw, Poland? Or did Brown have a major hand in it? Either way, the division of costs was so unfair that the PUC was forced last fall to reopen its decision-making process, a process that is not yet finished. For sure, more than 60 possibly relevant emails exist between Brown and the PUC. San Diego consumer lawyers Michael Aguirre and Mia Severson have pushed almost two years for their release, but Brown steadfastly refuses, calling them confidential. No one knows if any or all involved Brown’s personal email, which would make these communications subject to the recent state Supreme Court ruling. It would not be a good idea to bet on these emails being released anytime soon. When current U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris was state attorney general and conducting a loudly announced investigation (still incomplete well over two years after Peevey’s homes were raided by investigators), she delayed indefinitely a ruling on whether Brown must divulge the emails. Meanwhile, Brown was heartily endorsing her Senate candidacy. Now, with the impending retirement of Pete Wilson-appointed state high court Justice Kathryn Werdegar, Brown will soon have appointed the majority of members of that court. Given that Brown appears to expect even supposedly independent appointees to toe his political line – his PUC commissioners are good examples – there’s no reason to expect the state’s high court ever to go against him. For sure, there are indications from material already been made public that Brown at the very least knew and approved what would happen between Edison and the PUC at the time San Onofre was playing out. A June 6, 2013 note sent by Edison CEO Ted Craver to company board members starts with Craver saying he “wanted to give you a quick report on my phone calls with Gov. Brown.” At the time, Brown was meeting in Rancho Mirage with thenPresident Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping. Reported Craver, “He said what we were doing seemed right under the circumstances.” Craver also said Brown “indicated a willingness to” say publicly that Edison was acting responsibly. No one knows what, if anything, else might have been covered in that call. No one also knows what Brown said in all his subsequent emails to PUC members. But the eventual PUC decision blatantly favored Edison. There is no record of Brown talking to consumer advocates around that same time. Maybe Brown was directly involved in the entire decision-making process. Without the 60-plus emails – and maybe even with them – it’s impossible to know. He and his press secretary have consistently refused any comment. Now comes the state Supreme Court’s ruling on private emails dealing with public policy decisions. If any of the Brown messages were on a private email account, they should be subject to this ruling. No one yet knows how new Attorney General Xavier Becerra, appointed by Brown, will deal with the issue. So far, he’s said nothing about the entire investigation into the PUC. All of which means the taint of possible Brown complicity in what may have been corruption remains, and could become a significant part of his eventual legacy unless he relents and lets the public in on public business he so far has kept very private.

Elias has covered esoteric votes in eight national political conventions. His book, “The Burzynski Breakthrough, The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It,” is now available in a soft cover fourth edition. His opinions are his own. Email Elias at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti Walking in Your Sleep

Q

. Is it true that sleepwalkers can’t be hurt when they walk in their sleep?

A

. This is a common misconception.

Sleepwalkers (aka somnambulists) are often injured when they trip and fall in their sleep. Another myth is that you should not wake up a sleepwalker. It is not dangerous to awaken a sleepwalker. In fact, it can be quite dangerous not to wake a sleepwalker. The only problem with rousing a sleepwalker is that the person will be disoriented for a while. The term sleepwalking is defined as a disorder that occurs when people are active while sleeping. The activities are not limited to walking. Some sleepwalkers can perform complex functions. Some can get dressed, walk out the door and drive all while asleep. Sleepwalking is classified as a parasomnia. Parasomnias are abnormal things that can happen to people while they sleep such as nightmares, sleep paralysis, sleep aggression and sexomnia. Yes, people are capable of performing sex acts while sleeping. Most sleepwalking episodes last for less than ten minutes. However, they can go on for a half hour or even more. Sleepwalking usually occurs during deep sleep, early in the night. Sleepwalking episodes can occur multiple times a night for a few consecutive nights. Sleepwalking can occur at any age. It is much more common in children than adults. It seems to be an inherited trait. Fatigue, lack of sleep, and anxiety are all associated with sleepwalking. So are alcohol, medications, mental disorders, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome, migraines, head injuries, and sleeping in unfamiliar surroundings. Occasional episodes of sleepwalking aren’t usually a cause for concern. However, consult your doctor if the sleepwalking episodes become more frequent or lead to dangerous behavior or injury. Most people don’t need any specific treatment for sleepwalking. In some cases, short-acting tranquilizers have been helpful in reducing sleepwalking. Treatment for adults who sleepwalk may include hypnosis. The primary problem with sleepwalking is potential injury. If you are sleepwalking, you should move any objects that are tripping hazards such as wires and small furniture. Expandable gates on stairways are advisable. The prevalence of sleepwalking in the general population is estimated to be between one percent and 15 percent. Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

To Your

PAGE FIVE • MAY 11-17, 2017

Living with MS with Dee Dean Smoking Reduces Levels of Circulating Immune Cells that Protect Against MS

N

New research suggests that smoking decreases frequencies of mucosal-associated invariant T cells in circulating lymphocytes

ew research published in the May 2017 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology provides another reason why smoking tobacco is harmful. In the report, researchers from Denmark show that smokers have reduced levels of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, a cell type involved in autoimmune diseases. Not only does this information shed more light on the effects of smoking, but it also reveals possible strategies to mitigate these effects. “We believe that our study represents an important contribution to the understanding of systemic immune cell alterations in smokers,” said Cecilie Ammitzbøll, M.D., Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Danish Multiple Sclerosis Center in Copenhagen, Denmark. “From our findings

we hope that focused research in specific cell populations might reveal pathogenic mechanisms contributing to the understanding of diseases associated with smoking.” To make their discovery, scientists investigated circulating immune cells from cohorts of healthy individuals and patients with Multiple Sclerosis. The researchers looked for differences in smokers compared with non-smokers and found that the frequencies of certain cell types were altered. These findings were evident in both healthy individuals and patients with Multiple Sclerosis. Further, by using two different techniques, the scientists found that T cells from smokers were not more easily activated when they encountered foreign- and self-antigens. “It is clear that smoking is detrimental to overall health and can predispose to many diseases,” said John Wherry, Ph.D., Deputy Editor of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. “These new studies shed

ddean@echerald.com

like on how smoking can also influence the immune system, an effect that may have implications in autoimmunity and also in other settings such as cancer and chronic inflammatory diseases.”

Source: University of Copenhagen

Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 30 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.com. NOTE: Dean is the recipient of the 2004 STAR Community Outreach Award by the MS Society Dec. 2, 2004, the American Red Cross Real Hero Wendell Cutting Humanitarian Award, Oct. 13, 2006 , the Stoney Community Service Award, February 29, 2008, Women in Leadership Award for Art/Media/ Culture Oct. 29, 2010, El Cajon Citizen of The Year Nominee Feb. 2013 and 2017 and Recipient of the National MS Society’s 2014 Media Partner of The Year, Feb. 10, 2015.

Fight For a CURE! Anything Else is NOT ENOUGH!

BEAT MS! The East County Herald ©


COMMUNITY Matters ADVANCED HEARING AID PAGE SIX • MAY 11-17, 2017

TECHNOLOGY For Less Than $300 “I was amazed! Sounds I hadn’t heard in years came back to me!” — Don, January 2016

How can a hearing aid that costs less than $300 be every

bit as good as one that sells for $2,000 or more?

The answer: Although tremendous strides have been made in Advanced

Hearing Aid Technology, those cost reductions have not been passed on to you. Until now...

The MDHearingAid PRO ® uses the same kind of Advanced Hearing Aid Technology incorporated into hearing aids that cost thousands more at a small fraction of the price. Over 75,000 satisfied PRO customers agree: High-quality, FDA-registered hearing aids don’t have to cost a fortune. The fact is, you don’t need to spend thousands for a medical-grade hearing aid. MDHearingAid PRO ® gives you a sophisticated high-performance hearing aid that works right out of the box with no timeconsuming “adjustment” appointments. You can contact a hearing specialist conveniently on-line or by phone — even after sale at no cost. No other company provides such extensive support. Now that you know... why pay more? TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR

45-DAY RISK-FREE TRIAL!

Hearing is believing and we invite you to try this nearly invisible hearing aid with no annoying whistling or background noise for yourself. If you are not completely satisfied, simply return it within that time period for a

100% refund of your purchase price.

For the Lowest Price Call

1-800-306-0349 Use Code

Nearly Invisible

BIG SOUND. TINY PRICE.

BATTERIES INCLUDED!

READY TO USE RIGHT OUT OF THE BOX!

BY62

and get FREE Batteries for 1 Year Plus FREE Shipping DOCTOR DESIGNED | AUDIOLOGIST TESTED | FDA REGISTERED ©2017 MDHearingAid, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Wisdom for

EVERYDAY LIFE The Promises of God

with Pastor Drew

G

Part III

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled “The Promises of God”. As mentioned in part one of this series, t h e r e are but a few promises to all of mankind, the vast majority are to those who have become His children by adoption through faith in Jesus Christ and repentance from sin. Some may think this is not “fair”, that all of God’s promises should be to everyone. Well they are to everyone that will repent of sin and turn to Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of sin. Think of this way, you are a parent, your children have your protection; love; provision; sacrifice; and will inherit what you have at your departure. Should others who are not your children or even those who hate you and your children be beneficiaries of what you have for your own children? Of course not, that would be absurd! Now let us continue to look at some more of the many promises that God makes to all that are His. God promises wisdom and guidance, wisdom is one of God’s promises. James 1:5, “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, who gives to all liberally and without reproach, and it will be given to him.” There is a condition that goes with this promise as many of God’s promises have conditions attached to them. James 1:6-8 “But let him ask in faith, with no doubting, for he who doubts is like a wave of the sea driven and tossed by the wind. For let not that man suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways.” God gives wisdom and guides us. It’s in the Bible, Psalms 32:8, “I will instruct thee and teach thee in the way which you shall go: I will guide you with mine eye.” Don’t look to yourself for wisdom. As the previous verse says, “He will guide you with His eye”. The obvious implication is that for Him to do this we must be looking to Him. Proverbs 3:5-7. “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths. Do not be wise in your own eyes; Fear the Lord and depart from evil.” God promises to guide you on His pathway. Isaiah 30:21, “And your ears shall hear a word behind thee, saying, This is the way, walk ye in it, when ye turn to the right hand, and when ye turn to the left.” What a great privilege and honor it is to have the King of Kings; Lord of Lord’s; Creator of the Heaven and Earth willing and desirous of leading and guiding my life, not to be there only as a “last resort” when my ways do not work out which is the way many look at God. Look at how God describes Himself through the Prophet Isaiah 9:6 “For unto us a Child is born, unto us a Son is given; and the government will be upon His shoulder. And His name will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” Think of this dear ones, the Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace offers to be your Wonderful Counselor, to lead and guide you through this life that is filled with obstacles; dangers; unknowns; heartaches; trials and temptations. How can you neglect so great an offer? Yet the sad fact is that many do. When I say many, I am not talking about those who want nothing to do with God, this is a given. I am talking about those who profess to know and trust in Him and this is why many “professing” Christians lives are a mess, they insist on choosing their own path and way, then when things go wrong they wonder why and even have the audacity to blame God for suffering the consequences of their actions.

Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


MAY 11-17, 2017

Sunday, May 7, • Flinn Springs Kathy Foster/The East County Herald See More www.echerald.com

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE SEVEN


PAGE EIGHT

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

MAY 11-17, 2017

El Capitan Dance Company & Jr. Dance Company

Annual Spring Show May 3 & 5 • Santee

Rob Riingen/ The East County Herald See more at www.echerald.com


MAY 11-17, 2017

Kathy Foster / The East County Herald See More at www.echerald.com

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE NINE


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE TEN

MAY 11-17, 2017

Grossmont Union High School District Sponsors

First Friday Breakfast Friday, May 5 • Rancho San Diego

Jay Renard, The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE TEN

DEC. 29-JAN.4, 2016

Cus om Branding ogos BUSINESS CARDS

2016 F S July T 1 2 T W S M 28 29 30 8 9 7 26 27 16 5 6 14 15 3 4 23 12 13 21 22 10 11 30 19 20 28 29 17 18 6 26 27 4 5 24 25 2 3 31 1

rday

016

June 2

sday

day

2016 F S May T 7 T W 5 6 S M 3 4 14 12 13 1 2 21 10 11 19 20 8 9 28 17 18 26 27 15 16 4 24 25 2 3 22 23 31 1 29 30

ay Sund

Tues ay

Mond

ne Wed

Satu ay

Frid sday

Thur

Brochures ations

4

3

2

1

11

31

10

30

9

29

8

18

7 16 15

25

14

24

13

Booklets

23

12

22

2

21

1

20

30

19

29 28 27 26

air Co.

The H

...leave

&spa

salon

ind!

rld beh

side wo

the out

1791

664.

810.

b anners Letter Head

17

6 5

and More!

Contact

East County

design@apostropheprintanddesign.com Est. 1998

for your custom quote..


MAY 11-17, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE ELEVEN

Rancho San Diego

Every Great Event Begins and Ends at Hooleys!

2955 Jamacha Rd. 619.670.7468

La Mesa

5500 Grossmont Center Dr. 619.713.6900

Your Community Calendar

LA MESA RESIDENTS ENCOURAGED TO APPLY FOR VOLUNTEER POSITIONS ON CITY BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS LA MESA — Applications are now being accepted for volunteer positions on the City’s boards and commissions. The deadline for submission of applications is 5:30 p.m., Monday, May 22, in the City Clerk’s office at La Mesa City Hall, 8130 Allison Avenue. Applications may be obtained at City Hall or from the City of La Mesa website, www.cityoflamesa.us. The La Mesa City Council will be interviewing applicants for appointments to the City’s advisory boards and commissions at their meeting on June 13. A total of 24 vacancies will become available on the Community Relations and Veterans Commission, Community Services Commission, Design Review Board, Environmental Sustainability Commission, La Mesa Community Parking Commission, Personnel Appeal Board, Planning Commission, Traffic Commission, and Youth Advisory Commission. “The Mayor and City Councilmembers value the input from our community volunteers,” said Megan Wiegelman, City Clerk. “By serving as a member on one of the boards or commissions, residents have an opportunity to assist in the decisions that affect their neighborhoods and city.” Further information can be obtained from the Office of the City Clerk, 619.667.1120 or by visiting the City’s website at www.cityoflamesa.us.

East County

Est. 1998

Submit Your Community Event Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.


PAGE TWELVE

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

MAY 11-17, 2017

SDSU BEATwith Steve Dolan

OLLI at SDSU Announces Summer Schedule

T

he Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at San Diego State University will offer nearly 30 exciting courses during the summer for lifelong learners age 50 and better from June 2-Aug. 18. OLLI at SDSU will host a special event Conversations Worth Having: The Surprising Science of Happiness on July 11 at the beautiful new St. Paul’s Plaza in Chula Vista. This is the second in a series of the Conversations Worth Having events that use TED (Technology, Entertainment, and Design) Talks – stimulating 4- to 18-minute videos by some of the most engaging speakers around the world – to facilitate meaningful discussion. During this presentation, OLLI at SDSU members will examine our most valued and often most elusive emotion. Participants will explore the newest research into what makes us happy, how memory and experience affect our sense of satisfaction very differently, and specific exercises we can do to be happier right now. Each screening will be followed by group discussion facilitated by Kathi Diamant, an author, speaker, teacher, broadcaster, and adjunct professor at SDSU. OLLI at SDSU began its collaboration with St. Paul’s Plaza by offering two highly-popular classes in April at the Chula Vista facility. “Our whole population was not being reached,” said OLLI at SDSU member Louise Phipps, a retired high school principal who’s chair of the operating board at St. Paul’s Plaza. “We thought it would be natural to acquaint South Bay with SDSU’s OLLI program,” she added. “OLLI at SDSU is a perfect fit for staying involved. Anything you were interested in before but didn’t have time to learn, you can learn now.” Every semester, OLLI at SDSU features an exciting lineup of lectures, workshops, book clubs, Edventures, and events. There are no tests, grades or exams, just the thrill of learning with likeminded peers. To find out more about OLLI at SDSU or to become a member, call (619) 594-2863, e-mail osher@mail.sdsu.edu or visit neverstoplearning.net/olli This is a SDSU Research Foundation program managed by SDSU’s College of Extended Studies. SDSU’s College of Extended Studies reaches out to San Diego, the nation, and the world with a wide variety of lifelong learning opportunities, and more than 50 certificate programs for career advancement. Topics range from contract management, construction, and craft beer, to grant writing, marketing, and human resources. And many programs are available online.

Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZwith Rick Griffin Alpine Chamber hosts third Wednesday mixer

The Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Commerce will host an after-work mixer starting at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 17at Mediterraneo Italian Bistro & Bar, located in the Alpine Creek Town Center, 1347 Tavern Road, Alpine. Admission is free. Enjoy Italian hors d’oeuvres and great conversation, as well as an opportunity drawing. For more information and to RSVP, call (619) 445-2722, e-mail KimberlyB@AlpineChamber.sdcoxmail.com or visit www. AlpineChamber.com. The Chamber’s mission is to advance the commercial, industrial, civic, agricultural and general interest and prosperity of Alpine and the Mountain Empire.

Free senior health fair in La Mesa on Friday

The 18th annual East County Senior Health Fair will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Friday, May 12, at the La Mesa Community Center, 4975 Memorial Dr., La Mesa. Admission is free. No advance registration is necessary. The East County Senior Services Providers, a coalition of community organizations and agencies serving seniors in the East County, said the health fair will feature more than 60 exhibit booths, along with free health screenings for stroke, blood pressure, balance, check your mood, and medication review. Information will be available about senior housing, home care services, home safety, fall prevention, health education, advance directives, nutrition services, social programs, caregiving services, educational programs and volunteer opportunities. Exercise demonstrations will be performed by members of the Feeling Fit Club, OASIS and Silver Sneakers. Event sponsors include the Grossmont Healthcare District, Sharp Grossmont Hospital, City of La Mesa and the County

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to editor@echerald.com

Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency. For event information, phone the La Mesa Adult Enrichment Center at (619) 667-1322.

Canyon Dr., Borrego Springs. “One in three American moms struggle to provide clean diapers for their children,” said Voepel. “Diapers cost about $100 per month per child, an amount many families are Apprenticeship Fair on Friday at unable to afford. It is so important to help mothers take care Grossmont College of a new generation of children. This is an opportunity for our The East Region Apprenticeship Fair will be held from community to come together in order to address an important noon to 3 p.m., Friday, May 12, at Grossmont College, 8800 need, and I know this will be a cause that everyone can agree Grossmont College Dr. El Cajon. Admission is free. Free on and support.” parking is available in Lot #7. Apprenticeship programs Voepel’s 71st Assembly district includes the East San offer opportunities to earn while you learn while training for Diego County communities of Alpine, Borrego Springs, Casa a high-demand career in the trades. Exhibitors include the de Oro, Spring Valley, Mount Helix, El Cajon, Rancho San Associated Builders & Contractors of San Diego, Associated Diego, Jamul, Ramona, Santee and Lakeside, as well as the General Contractors, General Dynamics, San Diego & Imperial Southern Riverside County communities of Anza, Aguanga, Counties Bricklayers and Stone Masons, San Diego County Idyllwild, Pine Cove, Lake Riverside and Mountain Center. Cement Masons, San Diego & Imperial Counties Roofers Grossmont Center Reading Cinemas has and Waterproofers and Kitchens for Good. Event sponsors include the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College new giant screen District, Grossmont Union High School District, College and Reading Cinemas at Grossmont Center in La Mesa has Career Readiness and East Region Adult Education. For more unveiled a new giant screen in one of its movie theaters. information, contact Frank Luera at fluera@guhsd.net. The Titan Extreme Cinema (XC) system features a screen

Assemblyman Voepel’s diaper drive runs through May 14

California Assemblyman Randy Voepel (R-Santee) has launched a diaper collection drive that runs through May 14. Constituents of the 71st Assembly District are invited to donate diapers that will be delivered to the East County Pregnancy Care Clinic in El Cajon. Collection points include: East County Chamber of Commerce, 201 S. Magnolia Ave. El Cajon; Alpine Mountain Empire Chamber of Commerce,1620 Alpine Blvd. Alpine; Ramona Chamber of Commerce, 960 Main St., Ramona; Voepel’s District Office,10152 Mission Gorge Road, Santee; and, Zippers Creations, 571 Palm

measuring 55 feet wide and 31 feet tall. The new screen was recently introduced with the release of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.”

KB Homes opens River Village in Santee

KB Home has opened sales at River Village, its new singlefamily residential development at 10707 Braverman Drive, in Santee. The company said it plans to build 82 one- and two-story homes, though three-floor plans are available. The homes range in size from 2,210 to 2,850 square feet. Homes with as many as six bedrooms and three-and-a-half baths will be available at River Village, it said. Prices start in the mid$600,000s.


MAY 11-17, 2017

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE THIRTEEN

SYCAMORE CANYON ELEMENTARY, cont’d from p.2

COLLEGE COPY CENTER Ted Walton for The East County Herald

From left: John Jenkins, Vice President of SDG&E and Lea ParkKim, Communications Director for Senator Joel Anderson. learned about importance of trees and what they could do to help promote a healthy environment. It was also an opportunity to thank the fifth grade students who spent the day planting trees on campus, and the community partners who made the school’s Arbor Day celebration a possibility. California State Senator Joel Anderson provided certificates of recognition to Sycamore Canyon Elementary School, CAL FIRE, San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E), the Arbor Day Foundation, and the Association of State Foresters for their unyielding commitment to educating students on the importance of being good stewards of their environment. Anderson later remarked, “What an incredible idea to involve our youth in appreciating and planting trees. I am grateful to be surrounded by companies, agencies and local leaders who constantly empower our students to do good and learn how their actions can make a positive impact.” SDG&E’s Vice President John Jenkins came to show the company’s dedication and support to the students. He shared after the event, “It was great to see the improvements that the new trees are going to make on the school grounds. It was also rewarding to see how excited and engages the students were for the event.” Sycamore Canyon Principal Jeri Billick thanked Anderson and the organizations for their involvement and exclaimed, “As educators, we are preparing children for a future that is uncertain and changes daily due to technological advancements. The one constant is the environment and how it sustains life.” Billick continued, “Our students will remember this day long into the future. They not only learned how to plant a tree, they learned the importance of community and public service.”

Quality

Value

Experience

Color Copies Business Forms Digital Input/Output Color Posters

Newsletters Business Cards Blueprints Manuals

(619) 697-2355 Fax: 619-697-7760 Send Digital Files to: copyguys@collegecopycenter.com 7939 El Cajon Blvd.

La Mesa, CA 91942

www.collegecopycenter.com

D ISCO 2017 6TH A N N U A L FU N D R A ISI N G GA LA B EN EFITI NG

H A N DS U N ITE D FOR C H I LD RE N

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED 2017-18 BUDGET

FR I D AY, M AY 19, 2017 | 6 :30 – 11PM VI E J AS C ASI NO A N D R E SO RT H OS TE D COC KTA I L & H O RS D 'Œ UVRE S RECE P TI ON • SI LE NT A UCTI ON 3 - CO U RSE D I N N E R • LIVE A UCTI ON LIVE E NTE RTA I N M E NT & DJ • FREE VA LE T PA R K I N G

100% O F YO U R C H A R ITA B LE CONTR I B UTI ON B E N E FITS:

In accordance with the provisions of the Education Code Section 42103, you are hereby notified of the preparation of the proposed Annual Financial and Budget Report of the Santee Elementary School District, for school year 2017-18. The proposed budget, computed district tax requirement, and any recommendations made by the Superintendent of Schools, San Diego County, shall be available for public inspection on June 2, 2017 to June 6, 2017, 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM, Douglas E. Giles Educational Resource Center, 9619 Cuyamaca Street, Santee, CA, 92071. YOU WILL THEREFORE TAKE NOTICE THAT the Governing Board of the Santee Elementary School District will conduct a public hearing of the proposed budget on June 6, 2017, 7:00 PM, Multipurpose Room / Cajon Park School, 10300 N. Magnolia Avenue, Santee, CA, 92071 Edward Velasquez Interim County Superintendent of Schools San Diego County May 2017 SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD PUBLISH: MAY 4, 2017.

The Children’s Nature Retreat Alpine

The HUFC Preschool & Nursery Burkina Faso, West Africa

Tickets: $175 per person when purchased by May 1. After May 1: $195 per person. $1,700 per table of ten. Disco attire encouraged You could be the lucky winner of the Best Disco 2017 Attire Prize! For details and to buy your tickets online, please visit HandsUnited4Children.org or email matilde@handsunited4children.org Mail checks to: Hands United For Children 5178 Japitul Spur, Alpine, CA 91901

HUFC Dental Clinic Southeast San Diego


BILLBOARD

METAPHORICALLY SPEAKING

The San Diego County Herald PAGE FOURTEEN • MAY 11-17, 2017

Legal Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2017-008089 (A) BEACHFRONT SAND CASTLES (B) GORILLA MARKETING located at 171 LA CRESTA HTS., RD., EL CAJON, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92021. Mailing address: P.O. BOX 2756, EL CAJON, CA 32021. This business is conducted by: A CORPORATION. The registrant commenced the transaction of business on: NOT YET STARTED. This business is hereby registered by the following: (A) GORILLA TEAM, INC. of 171 LA CRESTA HTS., RD., EL CAJON, CA 92021. State of Incorporation: CALIFORNIA Signed by: ROWENA KELLER HART / PRESIDENT. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on MARCH 23, 2017. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: APRIL 20, 27, MAY 4 AND 11, 2017.

FOR RENT!!! THIS SPACE!!! CLASSIFIED ADS in THE HERALD!

Legal Notices

We’ll run your legal notices for

LE$$

Your ad could be than you’d pay viewed by in any other local MONITORCROSSWORD Thousands! METAPHORICALLY SPEAKING adjudicated Simply fill out newspaper. the form far right E-mail: and mail with ads@echerald.com your check or for your quote or money order! CALL: It’s that

EASY!

CLASSIFIED

Place your Classified or Announcement Ad with the East County Herald News for only $5.00 for three lines per week. (Approx. 35 characters per line) - $2.00 per line after the first three. Add $5 for Edited by Charles Preston Kind of bread or flour hall photo. (Note: photos will not55beMilitary returned.) Lost and25 Found Ads are Free. ACROSS By Don Haines

619.445.0374

East County

Like Us on Facebook!

20 21 22 23 26 28 32 33 34 36 40 43 44 45 46 48 50

East County

Est. 1998

1 5 10 14 15 16 17

Est. 1998

The Christian Science Monitor

53 54

27 Like some decorations 57 Not eager Camembert cousin 28 Communications code 62 Reason for irrational Muscle man Charles start behavior? Mourn, in a way 29 Father Bruce, daughter 66 Girlfriend, in Calais Rank below marquis Laura 67 Gage memoir Extend to 30 Purely academic 68 Night deposit, e.g. Part of AD 31 Eat 69 Neck or shoe connecFriend who’s not a 32 1 Across, e.g. tion friend? 35 Bashful 70 Kemo Sabe’s riding Intellectual strength 37 Schnoz partner Next in line? 38 Thugs’ rods 71 Cellist Ma Prompter’s box help 39 Cornelia ___ Skinner It can be cutting 41 Fingers of land DOWN Hit into the air 42 Powerful one, once 1 Porgy’s woman Fleet or vice rank 47 Online newsgroups 2 Hindu queen Birth veil system 3 “If ___ the Circus”: Dr. Former of Fill outkingdom this form and send it with your check/money order to: 49 WWII journalist Ernie Seuss Spain Group of conspirators 4 Actress SommerHerald, 50 County LLC Football advanceThe San Diego 51 Wooly-haired ruminant 5 Onassis, to friends River in Zaire P.O. Box Alpine, CA 91903 52 Relating to vision 6 2568, Jefferson’s bill Orator’s nemesis? 53 Pasty paper. shop machine Stakes Deadline is Monday7 atMachine 12 p.m. for that Thursday’s 56 Normandy sea town 8 Heart follower Peepers 58 Song of yesteryear: var. 9 Aussie girl Piedmont city 59 ___-Americans 10 Active hostility Nonlethal gun type 60 Schliemann’s dig 11 Perform, as a part Lacking vitality 61 ___thermia 12 Succeed Cambria and 63 Recognize 13 Sat damask, e.g. 64 Finish for differ or 18 Jug Ethereal absorb 19 Grumbler Swiss peak 65 Short life 24 Repair socks

METAPHORICALLY SPEAKING

East County

Sudoku

Est. 1998

See the digital edition of your favorite Get Your Community Fix!community newspaper, The East County Herald, every week! Difficulty:

Threeby-three square

2 9

8 6

ounty

The East County Herald

9

3 8

445.0374 • www.echerald.com

Like us on Facebook! By Ben Arnoldy

7 2 4

1 5

The Christian Science Monitor

Edited by Charles Preston 25 Kind of bread or flour 55 Military hall ACROSS 27 Like some decorations 57 Not eager 1 Camembert cousin By Don Haines 28 Communications code 62 Reason for irrational 5 Muscle man Charles start behavior? 10 Mourn, in a way 29 Father Bruce, daughter 66 USUDOKU_g1_07xx01.eps Girlfriend, in Calais 14 below marquis PubRank Date: 05/07/10 Slug: Laura 67 Gage memoir Extend to © 2010 The 15 Christian Science Monitor rights reserved. 30All Purely academic 68 (www.csmonitor.com). Night deposit, e.g. 16 Part of AD 31 Eat Distributed by The Christian Science Service (email: syndication@csmonitor.com 69 News Neck or shoe connec17 Friend who’s not a Monitor 32 1 Across, e.g. tion friend? RICH CLABAUGH/STAFF ILLUSTRATOR.eps 35 Bashful 70 Kemo Sabe’s riding 20 Intellectual strength 37 Schnoz partner 21 Next in line? 38 Thugs’ rods 71 Cellist Ma 22 Prompter’s box help 39 Cornelia ___ Skinner 23 It can be cutting 41 Fingers of land DOWN 26 Hit into the air 42 Powerful one, once 1 Porgy’s woman 28 Fleet or vice rank 47 Online newsgroups 2 Hindu queen 32 Birth veil system 3 “If ___ the Circus”: Dr. 33 Former kingdom of 49 WWII journalist Ernie Seuss Spain 50 Group of conspirators 4 Actress Sommer 34 Football advance 51 Wooly-haired ruminant 5 Onassis, to friends 36 River in Zaire 52 Relating to vision 6 Jefferson’s bill 40 Orator’s nemesis? 53 Pasty 7 Machine shop machine 43 Stakes 56 Normandy sea town 8 Heart follower 44 Peepers 58 Song of yesteryear: var. 9 Aussie girl 45 Piedmont city 59 ___-Americans 10 Active hostility 46 Nonlethal gun type 60 Schliemann’s dig 11 Perform, as a part 48 Lacking vitality 61 ___thermia 12 Succeed 50 Cambria and 63 Recognize 13 Sat damask, e.g. 64 Finish for differ or 18 Jug 53 Ethereal absorb 19 Grumbler 54 Swiss peak The Christian Science Monitor 65 Short life 24 Repair socks

MONITORCROSSWORD METAPHORICALLY SPEAKING

2 5 9 7 1

6

9 2

Fill in the grid so the numbers 1 through 9 appear just once in every column, row, and three-by-three square. See example above. For strategies, go to csmonitor.com/sudoku.

8

199

• Your Community • Our Community

619

2 8 1 6 7 9 2

How to do Sudoku

East C

Est.

6 7 4

Column

Row


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

MAY 11-17 2017

Lakeside Junior Olympics Saturday, May 6 • Lakeside

Rob Riingen/ The East County Herald See More at www.echerald.com

PAGE FIFTEEN


PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

5000 Willows Road, Alpine, CA 91901 • www.viejas.com • 619.445.5400 Must be 21 years of age. Viejas reserves all rights. Visit a V Club Booth for details. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling call 1-800-426-2537. © 2017 Viejas Casino & Resort, Alpine CA

MAY 11-17, 2017

051117 the herald  

Enjoy the May 11-17 digital version of The Herald! Get Your Community Fix! Happy Mothers Day! <3