Page 1

‘Mr. East County,’ The Legend, The Legacy, P6,P8-P10

Win a 2016

Maserati Ghibli

East County

Please see back for details.

APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016 Vol. 17 No. 34

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication

t s a E . r ‘M

’ y t n u o C

B. W. ‘Stoney’ Stone

The Legend, The Legacy Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

PAGE TWO • APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

Grossmont Union High School District Selects New Superintendent

Dr. Tim Glover Tentatively Selected to Lead High School District EL CAJON — Dr. Tim Glover has been tentatively selected as the next superintendent of the Grossmont Union High School District. The terms of Dr. Glover’s contract are still being negotiated and will be announced once finalized. The selection followed a comprehensive search conducted by Dave Long & Associates Executive Search Services. Dr. Glover expects to join the District full time in July 2016. He is a 25-year resident of East County whose son is a recent graduate of West Hills High School. “Our Board is pleased with the selection of Dr. Glover. He is an exceptional leader with a proven record of enhancing educational opportunities for all secondary students. Dr. Glover has deep roots in our East County community, and he is committed to building positive relationships with teacher leaders and staff across the District. With his extensive knowledge of public education, we have the utmost confidence that Dr. Glover will be a student-centered leader who will help our schools and students succeed.” said School Board President Robert Shield. Dr. Glover has nearly 30 years of experience as an educational leader, most recently serving as the Assistant Superintendent of the Student Ser-

Dr. Tim Glover vices and Programs Division at the San Diego County Office of Education. A product of Castle Park High School, he returned to the Sweetwater District to serve as Interim Superintendent in July 2014. Dr. Glover also served for three years as senior director of the East County SELPA, coordinating special education services for the 10 East County School Districts and the Barona Indian Charter School. He was honored by the San Diego Chapter of the Association of California School Administrators as the Special Education Administrator of the Year.

He has extensive experience in South County, having spent years in the classroom and working as an administrator in the Chula Vista Elementary School and Sweetwater Union High School districts. Dr. Glover was principal of Salt Creek, Greg Rogers and Olympic View elementary schools, and assistant principal of Hilltop Middle and High schools in the Sweetwater District. At Sweetwater he also served as program manager (19982000), assistant director (20002002) and Director (2004-2006) of Special Support Services (2000-2002), as well as his time at Castle Park High School (1991-1993). His general education and special education teaching assignments included Southwest Junior High School, Mar Vista Middle School, Hilltop High School and Chula Vista High School. Dr. Glover, who attended UCLA for his undergraduate studies, earned a MS in Educational Administration from National University and a doctorate of education in organizational management from the University of La Verne. He also holds several professional credentials (Professional Clear Administrative Services Credential, Specialist Credential – Special Education, and Single Subject Teaching Credential – Social Sciences).

Lakeside Small Business Nominee Recognized By Senator Anderson Katie Downing

For The East County Herald LAKESIDE — Located within a historical building in Lakeside is the office of EC Constructors—a local business that was recently nominated for the 38th Senate District Small Business of the Year Award by the Lakeside Chamber of Commerce. State Senator Joel Anderson awarded EC Constructors with a Certificate of Excellence to thank them for all of the work they have done for the area. When reflecting upon the work this business has done for the Lakeside community, Anderson praised EC Constructors by stating, “EC Constructors has made heartfelt contributions to our community and is an excellent example of small businesses making East County a better place. It is my honor to recognize them and the work they continue to do.” Sherri and Jim Summers both own and operate EC Constructors. Sherri Summers went to El Capitan High School, and coincidentally EC Constructor’s first job brought her

back to the school for some renovations. Summers explained that as a company they do a lot of work with schools. Both of Summers’ children went to Granite Hills High School. There, EC Constructors built a new science building and reconstructed a touching memorial for a former teacher that had passed away. Prior to their renovation, the memorial for the teacher consisted of a plaque on the ground and a tree planted in order to celebrate his life. Instead of demolishing the site of the memorial when constructing the new science building, they made the decision to keep the tree alive and create a new elevated plaque with a concrete face to make it easier for everyone passing by to see. The work EC Constructors does for the community does not stop at schools. One of their more touching community projects was the Cedar Fire Memorial. The Cedar Fire in 2003 was devastating, but also demonstrated the strength and resilience of the Lakeside community. When asked about the memorial, Summers stated, “Instead of just writing

In Loving Memory 1925

B. W. ‘Stoney’ Stone 2016

SANTEE — B. W. ‘Stoney’ Stone – also known as ‘Mr. East County’ – of Santee, passed away peacefully in his home, Wednesday, Apr. 20, surrounded by his family and loved ones. Stoney is proceeded in death by his wife of 54 years, Bonnie; daughter, Michelle Smith; and daughter-in-law, Darlene Stone. He is survived by his four children, Susan Leon of Ione , Greg Stone of San Diego, Bonnie Stone Davis of Santee, Tina Kelly (Bob) of El Cajon, four grandchildren, Brandon Smith, Broc Kelly, Jarryd Davis, Britney Cardinale, two great grandchildren and a rather large extended family of East County.

A Celebration of Life will be held: Thursday, May 5, at 4 p.m. at: Sonrise Community

Church • 8805 N. Magnolia Ave., Santee, CA 92071 • Ph: 619.596.7667. Immediately following the Celebration of

Life, will be a Mexican Fiesta held: Sycuan Golf Resort •

3007 Dehesa Road, El Cajon, CA 92019 • Ph: 800.457.5568. A private burial will be held earlier in the day. In lieu of flowers, Stoney’s wishes were that donations be made to Stoney’s Kids at www.stoneyskidslegacy.org. Or you may send them to: Stoney’s Kids Legacy • C/O

Dee Dean, P.O. Box 2568, Alpine, CA 91903.

Cards and condolences for the family may be sent to the same address above.

On The Cover EC Construction family with Senator Anderson Rep., Katie Downing (second from right). them a check, we were able to participate with some labor and materials by building the Cedar Fire Memorial and making a donation that way.” It is no question why EC Constructors has been recognized for their community contributions. Small businesses like EC Constructors are the backbone of the community, and it is because of businesses like them that Lakeside thrives.

EAST COUNTY — ‘Mr. East County,’ B. W. ‘Stoney’ Stone left an enormous void in the hearts of many East County residents when he passed away in his Santee home, Wednesday, Apr. 20. Cover: Herald hile photo/ The East County Herald Cover design: Dee Dean / The East County Herald

See more P6, P8, P9 and P10 and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

10315 Mission Gorge Road • Santee • 92071

www.SanteeChamber.com Phone: 619.449.6572 Fax: 619.562.7906

Joani Truttmann

Color Specialist

445-4966

619

Direct 619445-3879 1981 Arnold Way Alpine•CA•91901

YOUR AD HERE!

FREE ESTIMATE

HOUSE CLEANING ROCIO & ANA

(619)

884.1798 References Available

YOUR AD HERE!

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy!

A Non-Profit Organization Benefitting East County Kids... Our Future!

www.stoneyskidslegacy.org

Simply mail your business card, along with your check for $25 per week (four week minimum = $100) and mail to:

The East County Herald

Business Services P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 It’s that easy!


OPINiON

Politics and

PAGE FOUR • APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias Key to Voter Turnout: Exciting Candidates, Contests

I

Confused about your Medicare Options? Paying too much for your current Supplemental Medicare plan? Save up to 65% by comparing TOP carriers in your area! Call Now!

Get a FREE no obligation review of your Medicare options.

CALL US! WE CAN HELP

800.548.7351

LEARN about the plans, COMPARE the different types of plans, and SAVE on the plan of your choice! Speak with a licensed adviser today!

We’ll help you find the right plan and carrier for you! Compare every plan in your area with the lowest rates! Compare top carriers costs and benefits side-by-side! Compare your plan to current market rates!

Are you 64 and older? MedicareFAQ (Elite Insurance Partners) helps individuals understand all Medicare options, including original Medicare Parts A or B or any of the other Supplemental Medicare plans like; Medicare Supplements (Medigap), Medicare Advantage (Part C) or Prescription Drugs (Part D).

Friendly service, hassle free & no obligation to sign up! This is a solicitation for insurance. Not a branch of Medicare or any other government agency.

Have an Opinion? Tell The Herald What’s on Your Mind?

Send Your Thoughts to Our Editor:

editor@echerald.com

n election after election, California officialdom has been frustrated by low levels of interest among eligible voters. Just when they were beginning to feel like they had tried almost everything, the obvious solutions to the problem appeared spontaneously: Give eligible Californians exciting, meaningful contests and they will turn out. When they feel their votes matter, they will fill out ballots, either at home or in polling booths. That’s why, instead of wringing hands and whining about irresponsible voters not performing their important duty, all of a sudden this spring state election officials are worried about seeing too many voters. That’s the clear upshot of an appeal by Secretary of State Alex Padilla, California’s top election official, for more money to stage the June primary. In April, he warned of a turnout “surge” and asked Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature for an additional $32 million to pay for more and fatter election guides for the November election, plus added funds to help counties cope with an anticipated flood of voters both then and in June. The two presidential nomination races have produced massive turnouts so far this year across the county, and Padilla realizes California will be the same – in fact it may see a higher percentage increase than anywhere else. One reason is that in recent pre-Donald Trump, pre-Bernard Sanders days, there was little excitement or pizzazz in the state’s elections for 10 years, since Arnold Schwarzenegger’s last run for governor in 2006. Even then there wasn’t much of a contest, as Democratic rival Phil Angelides essentially got swamped. Likewise, there was virtually no contest in 2014, when turnout dropped almost 25 percent from the presidential election voting levels of 2012. In that vote, Brown easily beat his Republican rival Neel Kashkari, a former Federal Reserve banker who has since taken a new role in the national central bank. The extreme low 2014 turnout did two things, causing the number of signatures required for putting initiatives onto the ballot to drop by more than a quarter and pushing officialdom to consider desperate measures. That low vote is behind a current plan to automatically register any U.S. citizen getting a drivers’ license as a voter. It also explains proposals to allow online voting, despite the hackable history of allegedly secure computer systems from credit cards to government records and national security secrets. The real way to spur turnout isn’t anything risky like that. Rather, it’s to make elections meaningful. California legislators could begin by moving the state’s presidential primary up permanently to a slot just after New Hampshire. True, other states won’t like that, because candidates would have to spend time in California rather than the much smaller South Carolina or Minnesota or Tennessee, all among states that voted this year either in mid-February or early March. It’s long been a situation of the tail wagging the dog, as for the last 44 years – since George McGovern used California to win the 1972 Democratic nomination – no California presidential vote has meant much, until this year’s. The rare happenstance of no candidate being sufficiently appealing to seal a party nomination until the very last day of the primary season – if then – is the reason California’s vote suddenly emerged as important. That hadn’t happened in 44 years. So leave the state’s presidential primary in June and California will mostly likely wander another 40 years in the desert of irrelevancy. Not every nominating season will be as exciting as this one: For one thing, the White House is about to be vacated by its incumbent resident, so both parties are nominating now. For another, unique personalities like Trump and Sanders don’t come along in every election cycle. The implications of all this for routine elections around California are also clear. Match exciting candidates against each other and potential voters will become interested enough to become regular voters. Allow elections to be virtually uncontested, as many have been, and interest will wane. The same when voters get the sense that certain candidates appear to be anointed. The bottom line: When voters feel their ballots matter, they will make casting them a priority. When they don’t feel that way, voters won’t bother.

Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It. The book is now available in soft cover, fourth edition. His opinions are his own. He can be reached at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti

To Your

How Common is Amnesia?

Q

.

In soap operas, the writers love to include characters with amnesia who don’t remember their identities. Is it common for someone to actually forget who they are?

A

. It’s extremely rare. People with amnesia usually are aware of their identities. A person’s identity is among the most durable long-term memories. Amnesia, which means loss of memory, comes in several forms. The most common type is anterograde amnesia. People with this form have trouble learning and making new memories. Those who suffer from retrograde amnesia have an impaired ability to recall past events and information that were once familiar. Transient global amnesia is a temporary loss of all memory, but you remember who you are, and you recognize people you know well. It is a rare form of the disorder. Psychogenic amnesia is caused by trauma such as surviving an explosion. A victim of this form of amnesia can lose personal memories and autobiographical information briefly. This form of amnesia is probably the inspiration for all those soap scribes. There are different types of memory affected by amnesia. Memory can be divided into: Immediate: Recalling information a few seconds after learning it Short-term: Recalling recently learned information minutes or more after presentation Long-term: Memory of remote events occurring months or years ago There are other memory definitions, too: • Procedural memory about how to perform a task such as knitting • Declarative memory about past information or experiences • Semantic memory that is independent of time, such as vocabulary • Episodic memory linked to a time such as birthday • Prospective memory about a future occurrence such as a planned meeting There are other symptoms of amnesia. These may include confusion, disorientation, seizures, tremors, lack of coordination and false memories. Any trauma or disease that impacts the brain can affect memory. The following are some causes: Brain tumors, heart attack, head injury, encephalitis (brain inflammation), stroke, carbon monoxide poisoning, dementia, seizures, electroconvulsive therapy, drugs such as benzodiazepines that treat anxiety. There are no drugs to treat most types of amnesia. Scientists are looking into brain neurotransmitters hoping to find ways to treat memory disorders. For now, there are techniques being used to help people with amnesia. These include occupational therapy to develop memory, and the use of electronic organizers, notebooks and photographs as reminders.

Full Service Salon

Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

PAGE FIVE • APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

Living with MS with Dee Dean

Cytokine Now Seen to Have Restorative Properties

R

esearchers at the School of Medicine of the University of California (UC), Riverside, found that TNF-alpha, a factor known for its pro-inflammatory actions, also triggers processes that end inflammation by inducing a type of immune surveillance cell, called M-cells. By advancing our understanding of immune processes, the finding may lead to more specific treatments for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases. “The induction of M cells by TNF-alpha suggests that the body may have a builtin system that promotes the inflammation as well as regulates and ultimately suppresses the response,” said David Lo, the study’s senior author and a professor of biomedical sciences at UC Riverside, said in a press release. TNF-alpha has been observed to drive inflammation and induce tissue damage in several autoimmune diseases by triggering the production of other inflammatory molecules. But, as the finding showed, it can also stimulate tissue repair by resolving inflammation. “Cytokines are regulators of host responses to infection and inflammation,” Dr. Lo said. “Some make disease worse

because they are pro-inflammatory. Others reduce inflammation and promote healing because they are anti-inflammatory. TNF-alpha plays a dual role in that it does both. If we had a more focused way of dealing with the undesired inflammatory aspects of TNFalpha, we could still retain the healing, restorative aspects of this cytokine.” In the study, titled “Induction of Colonic M Cells during Intestinal Inflammation” and published in The American Journal of Pathology, the research team explored TNFalpha in the gut of mice, focusing on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) — an inflammatory condition often treated with anti-TNF-alpha antibodies, entirely removing the actions of the signaling factor. Such an approach is not used in MS because these drugs increase disease activity, a finding that might be linked to the dual actions of TNFalpha. While the study did not attempt to address this issue, its results might provide clues to MS disease processes. “Advanced immune surveillance is a clue into how the immune system is attempting to restore balance and calm in the tissues,” Dr. Lo said. “If M cell production is a critical part of this restoration process, then it means we can

ddean@echerald.com

develop more targeted therapies that don’t block this restoration. Many of the biologicals being used today absorb and wipe out TNF-alpha, but in the long run this may be harmful to the patient, because removing TNF-alpha altogether also blocks its ability to produce restorative mechanisms.” The research team is now focused on untangling the processes, potentially enabling the discovery of more selective therapies targeting TNF-alpha.

Source: University of California, Riverside

Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 29 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.com. NOTE: Dean is the recipient of the 2004 STAR Community Outreach Award by the MS Society Dec. 2, 2004, the American Red Cross Real Hero Wendell Cutting Humanitarian Award, Oct. 13, 2006 , the Stoney Community Service Award, February 29, 2008, Women in Leadership Award for Art/Media/Culture Oct. 29, 2010, El Cajon Citizen of The Year Nominee Feb. 2013 and Recipient of the National MS Society’s 2014 Media Partner of The Year, Feb. 10, 2015.


COMMUNITY Matters PAGE SIX • APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

Wisdom for

EVERYDAY LIFE

with Pastor Drew

A Fond Farewell to ‘Mr. East County’ A Day in the Life of Jesus The Messiah SANTEE — B. W. ‘Stoney’ Stone – also known as ‘Mr. East County’ – of Santee, passed away peacefully in his home, Wednesday, Apr. 20, surrounded by his family and loved ones. Born in Mesa, Arizona in 1925, his family moved to California when he was a young teen. Stoney graduated from Sweetwater High School in 1943. Immediately afterward he served in the Army Air Forces from 1943-1946. Stoney married his beautiful wife Bonnie in 1955. During their 54 year marriage, the two shared five children, four grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Stoney’s first business venture was a market he opened in El Cajon called Stoney’s Rock & Roll Market on Jamacha Road. After the family closed the market, Stoney ventured into the banking industry and became President of Cajon Valley Bank – he retired in early 2000 from Temecula Valley Bank. Stoney’s greatest passion, aside from his family, was helping underprivileged children. From that passion he founded the East County Toy and Food Drive, now headed into its’ 41st year. The drive has since become East County’s largest Holiday charity collection event. Fourteen years ago, Stoney asked the Salvation Army to join the drive as their organization was better equipped to distribute the large amount of food and toys collected. After hosting the Holiday party for the drive for several years, Viejas Casino & Resort took on a major roll and donate thousands of toys annually. It is now estimated that directly due to Stoney’s efforts and initiative, $50-$60 thousand dollars is raised for families and the children of East County through the Toy and Food Drive annually. Over 20,000 families and over 50,000 children have been assisted by Stoney’s annual East County Toy & Food Drive. As a result, because of Stoney, thousands of East County children have a happier and merrier Christmas. Twenty-four years ago Stoney received a call from El Cajon Police requesting assistance in seeking funds for a D.A.R.E. program. Stoney called some business acquaintances and they formed a nonprofit organization to raise money for the program. From that effort it evolved into Stoney’s Kids and now Stoney’s Kids Legacy. Through Stoney’s Kids, Stoney was able to continue to assist underprivileged kids through-out the year. Stoney’s Kids has raised over $800,000 since 1991 to fund programs and provide needs for East County kids. It became known as ‘A Culture of Generosity.’ They fund after school youth programs, summer camp, provide sports equipment, uniforms and shoes for sporting activities, provide musical instruments for school programs, provide exercise equip-

ment for the disabled and help fund playground build-outs, just to name a few. Sycuan Resort has hosted Stoney’s Kids annual Birthday Party for several years and has become large part of the Stoney’s Kids family and it’s success. To sum up Stoney’s Kids [Legacy], as Stoney himself put it, “It’s All About The Kids.” Stoney’s other civic responsibilities and accomplishments include: • 1967 – Man of The Year, San Diego-Imperial Counties Grocer’s Assoc. • 1970 – Mother Goose Parade Association President • 1987 – Citizen of The Year, City of El Cajon • 1996 – Winner of the C.

Allen Paul Award, San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce • 2005 – American Red Cross Real Hero Humanitarian Award, San Diego-Imperial Counties Stoney was also a 40 year member of the Lion’s Club and heavily involved in countless fund-raising initiatives on behalf of The East County Boys & Girls Club, Grossmont Union High School District, Rescue Task Force, The American Cancer Society and Cajon Valley Union School District, among others. It wasn’t long before Stoney became known in his community of San Diego’s East County as ‘Mr. East County.’

G

PART LIV

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled, “A day in the life of Jesus the Messiah.” As a reminder, we are doing this series that you may come to know the truth about Jesus as the Word of God the Bible conveys it. This week we will look at the events that led up to what is known as the Last Supper. In Mark 14:1-21 we read “After two days it was the Passover and the Feast of Unleavened Bread. And the chief priests and the scribes sought how they might take Him by trickery and put Him to death. But they said, “Not during the feast, lest there be an uproar of the people.” And being in Bethany at the house of Simon the leper, as He sat at the table, a woman came having an alabaster flask of very costly oil of spikenard. Then she broke the flask and poured it on His head. But there were some who were indignant among themselves, and said, “Why was this fragrant oil wasted? For it might have been sold for more than three hundred denarii and given to the poor.” And they criticized her sharply. But Jesus said, “Let her alone. Why do you trouble her? She has done a good work for Me. For you have the poor with you always, and whenever you wish you may do them good; but Me you do not have always. She has done what she could. She has come beforehand to anoint My body for burial. Assuredly, I say to you, wherever this gospel is preached in the whole world, what this woman has done will also be told as a memorial to her.” Then Judas Iscariot, one of the twelve, went to the chief priests to betray Him to them. And when they heard it, they were glad, and promised to give him money. So he sought how he might conveniently betray Him. Now on the first day of Unleavened Bread, when they killed the Passover lamb, His disciples said to Him, “Where do You want us to go and prepare, that You may eat the Passover?” And He sent out two of His disciples and said to them, “Go into the city, and a man will meet you carrying a pitcher of water; follow him. Wherever he goes in, say to the master of the house, “The Teacher says, “Where is the guest room in which I may eat the Passover with My disciples?”’ Then he will show you a large upper room, furnished and prepared; there make ready for us.” So His disciples went out, and came into the city, and found it just as He had said to them; and they prepared the Passover. In the evening He came with the twelve. Now as they sat and ate, Jesus said, “Assuredly, I say to you, one of you who eats with Me will betray Me.” And they began to be sorrowful, and to say to Him one by one, “Is it I?” And another said, “Is it I?” He answered and said to them, “It is one of the twelve, who dips with Me in the dish. The Son of Man indeed goes just as it is written of Him, but woe to that man by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been good for that man if he had never been born.” In these verses we see 4 distinct events: the soon approach of the Passover; a woman by faith anoints Jesus for His upcoming burial; Judas Iscariot’s agreement to betray Jesus for 30 pieces of silver; Jesus celebrating the Passover with His disciples. There are many things in these verses that impress me and one of the main ones is Jesus’ love and patience with His disciples. I cannot imagine the anguish that Jesus had to be in, knowing what awaited Him in just a few hours as He would be betrayed; tried in a kangaroo court; convicted and condemned; scourged; beaten; mocked; nailed to a cross and then receive in His own body the punishment of Hell for my sins. All the while those closest to Him (His disciples) were consumed with their own interests of which one of them was accounted to be the greatest among them. Oh the depth and riches of the love and longsuffering of God toward such as me.

Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

PAGE SEVEN

Lakeside Chamber of Commerce

Western Days Parade

Saturday, Apr. 23 • Lakeside

Rob Riingen/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

Mother’s Day Brunch Sunday, May 8 • Seatings at 11am & 2pm Reservations: 619.445.5400 $59.99 per person

Celebrate Mother’s Day with a spectacular lobster feast in the Oak Ballroom! Featuring: • Whole Split Lobster Thermidor • Roasted Tenderloin of Beef with Calvados Demi-glace • Herb-crusted Leg of Lamb • Spiral Ham with Brown Sugar Molasses Glaze • Seared White Sea Bass with Spring Pea Risotto • Gourmet Breakfast Bar with Custom Omelets and Eggs Benedict For more details and a complete menu, please visit viejas.com/mothersdaybrunch

Additional Features Include: Lobster Claws, Snow Crab Legs, Fresh Shucked Oysters, Jumbo Shrimp Cocktail and Caviar

Brunch includes unlimited beer, wine, and champagne! Featured items are subject to availability.

Viejas Casino & Resort ∙ 5000 Willows Road ∙ Alpine, CA 91901 ∙ 619.445.5400

Guests must be at least 21 years of age to enter the Casino. Guests must be at least 21 years of age to drink alcoholic beverages. Guests under 21 years of age are permitted in The Buffet only, but must be accompanied by an adult. Families are welcome at the Viejas Outlets and the Viejas Hotel. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling, call 800.426.2537


PAGE EIGHT

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Stoney S APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

d n e g Le The

1925-20


APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Stone

y c a g Le The

016

PAGE NINE


Stoney Stone Family Love PAGE TEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

1925-2016


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

PAGE ELEVEN

Your Community Calendar HGH’s t a g n i n ical Eve turday, June 11 s m i h W A Sa l Gala – a g will u n n A evenin e. e d n th 2 ly 4 to se bubb

on and sensati a Bright ON — stupendous a d top hats... J A C L n E , a s s u t. r o n e Gra mend , feath the US Cabaret be... tre ificent gowns nce at r le n la u g u p c a o M of cta lement lar, spe bedazz ... a spectacu ted to , la Event! ou will be trea ors Ooh, la y t, la n a me h eG ntertain e dinner, t Roug e e r e a v b li a f C go cours At the g r evenin ktails, three la u evenin c ta c and an you to a spec , themed co g in c n t es , da por nd’oeurv silent auction me will trans with ca e d th n te a ’s le r e p a m liv e nt y o a c g is t bare e ele m. Th progra isian ca les, and all th for this r a P s b s ou the fam ers, roulette ta Paris. Join u , bringing in c n n g fu a in d d n n n e a ca f an ev with intrigue o gether. r to u s o ader glam lled le fi at t ic n p e o v r ge nth dinator, engagin nity and phila r Event Coor -2854 for 8 ) 93 commu ct Jessica, ou or (619 ds.org Conta n a . h n g o @guidin ore informati m jessica

Submit Your Community Event

Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.

Thinking Of Adopting A New Pet? EL CAJON — The El Cajon Animal Shelter has a variety of dogs, cats and kittens to choose from! If you are looking to adopt a pet, or have lost your pet, please stop by the shelter, 1275 N. Marshall, and see the dogs and cats in the adoption center. The shelter is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information, please call us at (619) 441-1580.


PAGE TWELVE

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

SDSU BEATwith Steve Dolan

SDSU Offers Contract Management Cert. Courses

T

he Professional Certificate in Contract Management/ Advanced Contract Management program through SDSU’s College of Extended Studies is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of the key concepts associated with the pursuit and management of contracts. Case studies and hands-on exercises ensure students leave each class with skills they can apply immediately on the job. Courses starting in May are: Essential Contract Management Techniques, Mondays, May 9-June 20, 6-9 pm Teaming, Partnering, and Subcontracting, Thursdays, May 19-June 23, 6-9 pm To earn a certificate, students must take six core and four elective courses. The affiliated advanced certificate is earned by taking four additional electives. This program is offered in cooperation with the San Diego Chapter of the National Contract Management Association. The advisory board is comprised of local industry experts, ensuring updated topics of interest to both federal and commercial practitioners. More than one course may be taken at a time. “Our company is moving into the commercial pump world after 18 years of nothing but government contracts and this program has helped me show my employer that I have the ability to handle both government and commercial contracts as we grow,” said Roger George, operations manager, Eddy Pump Corporation. “Each class thoroughly covered various important topics in the defense contracting industry and I learned many useful things that I would not have learned in my daily work,” said Camille P. Asaro, contract administrator, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems. “By the end of the program, I was quickly advancing in my job due to the enhanced knowledge. I highly recommend this program to anyone interested in this career path.” For more information, visit neverstoplearning.net/contract, email jshamiyeh@mail.sdsu.edu, or call (619) 594-5489. SDSU’s College of Extended Studies reaches out to San Diego, the nation, and the world with a wide variety of lifelong learning opportunities, and more than 50 certificate programs for career advancement. Topics range from contract management, construction, and craft beer, to grant writing, marketing, and human resources. And many programs are available online. The CES also offers one of the largest ESL programs in the U.S. through the American Language Institute; and universityquality courses to students age 50 and better through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. For more information or to register, visit neverstoplearning.net or call (619) 265-7378 (SDSU).

Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

EAST COUNTY BIZwith Rick Griffin East County Chamber’s May Breakfast at Cuyamaca College

The San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce will host its upcoming First Friday Breakfast starting at 7:15 a.m. on Friday, May 6, at Cuyamaca College, 900 Rancho San Diego Pkwy, El Cajon. Breakfast sponsor is the Grossmont Union High School District (GUHSD). Speakers will include participating high school students from the Chamber’s Ethics in Business program. Now in its 25th year, Ethics in Busienss is a joint venture of the Chamber’s Business Education Committee and GUHSD’s Career Technical Education Department and is supported by a consortium of business, education, and community leaders. The most recent Ethics in Business event drew more than 200 students and 30 facilitators. Cost to attend the Chamber breakfast is $20 per person for members with RSVP, $25 per person for non-members with RSVP and $30 per person at the door without reservations. RSVPs are requested prior to Tuesday, May 3. For more information and to RSVP, contact Sarah McCorkle at sarahm@ eastcountychamber.org, (619) 440-6161, or visit www. eastcountychamber.org.

Alliance Escrow opens second office

Alliance Escrow of El Cajon has opened a second office in Mission Valley at 3511 Camino del Rio South, San Diego. The company’s original office, 124 West Main St., opened in 2015. Since then, the company has grown from four to 20 employees, according to El Cajon resident Justen Brown, Alliance Escrow business development director. Alliance Escrow, operated by both Brown and Josh Baker of El Cajon, offers a full range of services, including transaction document processing and funds transfer, management and distri-

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to info@rickgriffin.com or faxed to (619) 461‑3151. Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

bution, as well as responding to requests from princi- the brain and body. It was the 26th year for Walk MS pals. events in San Diego. On Saturday evening, April 16 in Carlsbad, 3,145 people walked a three-mile route overlooking the Flower Fields and looping around the Legoland California theme park. About $358,000 in donations were Bob Baker Toyota, 6800 Federal Blvd. in Lemon collected. It was the first time since 2006 that the Grove, has become Greg Miller Toyota. The dealership National MS Society’s North County’s Walk MS fundwas recently purchased by Greg Miller, ex-CEO of the raiser in Carlsbad was held in the evening. One week Larry H. Miller Group of Companies (LHM Group). It later, on Saturday morning, April 23 at NTC Park at is the first dealership under Miller’s new enterprise, Liberty Station in San Diego’s Point Loma community, Greg Miller Automotive San Diego. Greg Miller, one 4,183 walkers walked three miles along San Diego Bay of Larry Miller’s sons, stepped down as CEO of LHM and raised $366,000 in donations. San Diego County Credit Union (SDCCU), San Group last March after serving for seven years. Larry Miller, who died in 2009, built an auto dealership net- Diego’s largest locally-owned financial institution, work across Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, returned as title sponsor of Walk MS in 2016. SDCCU New Mexico, Utah and Washington. His family still has supported the National MS Society’s Walk MS for owns the NBA basketball team Utah Jazz. Greg Miller the past 18 years, and has served as title sponsor since is expected to remain on the LHM Group board of 2002. Over the years, SDCCU’s sponsorship support directors and in serving as the Utah Jazz representa- for Walk MS has exceeded $1 million, according to the tive on the NBA Board of Governors. He will maintain National MS Society. Presenting sponsors of the 2016 San Diego County his Salt Lake City residence and will continue to also serve in several religious and civic capacities, includ- Credit Union Walk MS included NBC 7 San Diego, KyXy 96.5, Energy 103.7 and Sycuan Casino. Other ing on the board of the Utah Office of Tourism. sponsors included Biogen, Sanofi Genzyme, Mother To Baby, Ability Magazine, San Diego Business Journal, KPBS and Langers Juice. The National MS Society’s national Walk MS sponsor is Novartis. Walkers at Walk MS included a large number of The National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s San Diegobased Pacific South Coast Chapter recently held two teams representing businesses, neighborhoods, clubs, San Diego County Credit Union Walk MS fundrais- community groups, churches and family members ers. The National MS Society said about 7,300 walk- and friends of a person with MS. Walkers will have the ers participated at both events and raised $724,000 in opportunity to earn prizes, including t-shirts, movie donations for MS research and programs and services tickets and gift cards, based on the amount of donafor people with MS, an unpredictable, often disabling tions they collect. Deadline for donations to count disease of the central nervous system that interrupts toward prizes is May 31. To donate, visit www.WalkMS.org. the flow of information within the brain and between

Bob Baker Toyota in Lemon Grove becomes Greg Miller Toyota

Two San Diego County Credit Union Walk MS fundraisers recently held


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

El Cajon Animal Shelter

PAGE THIRTEEN

Opera-Kadabra!

C e l e b r a t e t h e E v e o f C i n c o d e M a yo a t

A Night of Music, Magic and Auction Fun: Benefitting Camperships for Children, 5:30pm, Saturday, May 14

We d n e s d a y, M a y 4 , 2 0 1 6

LA MESA — Comedy, music and legerdemain: That’s Opera-Kadabra, featuring multi-talented baritone Patrick Bell (http://www. operakadabra.com/), who, in the words of reviewers, “…captivates the audience…is warm and funny…befuddled us with his magic… enthralled us with his rich voice…” and, as a delightful bonus, “is drop-dead handsome!” Coming to La Mesa, CA on Saturday, May 14, 2016, Bell’s show will be the highlight of Camperships for Children, 2016, a live and silent auction fundraiser in Friendship Hall at The Table: United Church of Christ of La Mesa (UCCLM). The people of UCCLM invite you to share the fun, the music and the magic. And to join with us in providing opportunities for children to experience the pleasures and benefits of summer camp. A Night of Music, Magic and Auction Fun begins at 5:30pm. Patrick Bell will delight. Snacks will be served. Theme baskets and treasures old and new will be auctioned, along with chances to participate in exciting future events and activities. Refreshments and silent auction start at 5:30pm, show at 6:15 p.m. The silent auction will continue after the show.

11 a.m. to 9 p.m. M a g n o l i a a n d We l l s i n E l C a j o n

Muy Sabroso!

Duncan, a Chihuahua at the El Cajon Animal Shelter, received a life-saving surgery sponsored by the Aces Foundation and was adopted to a good home. This sweet dog invites you support this fundraiser and help other pets find “fur-ever” homes. Present this flyer when you dine in, take food to go, or pick up a Catering order, and Rubio’s will donate 20% to benefit the El Cajon Animal Shelter. Muchas

Gracias!

For further information and other events: www.acesfoundation.org

Adults: $20.00 - Children: $10.00 Free childcare with advance reservation Tickets can be ordered and childcare reservations made at auctionatUCCLM@gmail.com. UCCLM is located at 5940 Kelton Avenue, La Mesa, CA 91942 (www.tableucc.com, 619-464-1519).

La Mesa Chamber of Commerce Spring Fling Business Expo Come & meet local Chamber businesses & have the chance to win one of over 40 FREE doorprizes! Date: Thursday, Apr. 28, Time: 5:30-8 p.m. Place: La Mesa Community Center 4975 Memorial Drive La Mesa, CA 91942 Admission: $10.00 per person – Includes food from over 10 local restaurants! Beer, wine, soft drinks, and water are available for purchase. Join us for this fun-filled evening, which includes great food, good conversation, raffles, and more! Sponsored by: American Medical Response, Carl Burger Dodge Chrysler Jeep RAM World, The East County Herald, Community Spectrum, SDG&E, and Welcome Wagon. Visit lamesachamber.com for more details!


BILLBOARD

SPRING TRAINING

The San Diego County Herald

PAGE FOURTEEN • APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

Legal Notices

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2016-008671 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S) (FBN) to be abandoned: (A) A DIVINE WEDDINGS located at 10840 FUERTE DR., LA MESA, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 921941. Mailing address: 2107 LADRILLO AISLE, IRVINE, CA 92606. This business is conducted by: AN INDIVIDUAL. The registrant filed the above FBN(s) on: 04/06/2011, and was assigned FILE NO: 2011-010126. This FBN is hereby abandoned by the following: (A) ILA RUTH DEVINE of 2107 LADRILLO AISLE, IRVINE, CA 92606. Signed by: ILA RUTH DEVINE. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on MARCH 28, 2016. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: APRIL 14, 21, 28 AND MAY 5, 2016.

Legal Notices

For Rent

CLASSIFIED

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FOR RENT! STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. OFFICE, 2128 Arnold Way, 2016-010298 (A) TRIDENT MORTAbove Alpine Library. Big GAGE GROUP INC. located at 674 VIA DE LA VALLE, SUITE 209, Conference Room/Kitchen/ SOLANA BEACH, CA, COUNTY Place your Classified or Announcement Ad with the East County Herald News for only $5.00 for Edited by Linda and Charles Preston MONITORCROSSWORD Bathrooms, $250 Mo. Incl. OF SAN DIEGO, 92075. Mailing 25 after Prized award 50 line) ___ Aviv ACROSS35 characters per three lines per week. (Approx. - $2.00 per line the first three. Add $5 for Electricity. SPRING TRAINING By Irene Glovsky address: SAME. This business 26 Rust’s summer stage 51 Psychic gift 1 Irish seaport is conducted by: A CORPORAphoto. (Note:5 photos will not be returned.) Ads are Free. CALL: 619.992.2605 27 Earlike 54 Meadows Lost and Found Dietary stats TION The registrant commenced 28 Straight 57 Nimbi 9 Wife of Zeus the transaction of business on: 29 Go get 61 Last chance 13 Mine, in Marseilles 3018 Sq. Ft. – 2130 30 “The Seven Year Itch” 64 Lily relative 14 River in western 04/26/2005. This business is actor Tom 65 Folk singer John Jacob Canada hereby registered by the following: Arnold Way. 31 Surveying instrument 66 Beige 15 Scandinavian god (A) RAJEEB BAHINIPATY of 674 Available in Late 2016 or 32 Small amount 67 Paving stone 16 Is off to a good start VIA DE LA VALLE, SUITE 209, 33 Hourglass component 68 Shine 19 Pottery coating When The Alpine Library SOLANA BEACH, CA, 92075 State 37 Cracker enhancers 69 Observed 20 Son of Adam of Incorporation: CALIFORNIA. Moves to it’s New Bldg. 39 Foams and churns 21 Feline sound Signed by: RAJEEB BAHINIPATY, 42 Be pertinent DOWN 22 Before: poet. Ok to go see, Closed CEO / PRESIDENT. This statement 46 Giving the once-over 1 Batting screen 23 Sometime sushi ingreSun. & Mon. Partitioning 47 Often refried 2 Portent dient was filed with ERNEST J. DRONE48 Close associates 3 Church tribunal 25 Not with it NBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Possible. 51 Time periods 4 Borodin musical 33 Russia’s initials, forClerk of San Diego County on APRIL Two Offices, Two 52 Yard activity 5 Ump merly 12, 2016. SAN DIEGO COUNTY 53 Connive 6 Platform 34 Sped Bathroom, Front Counter. HERALD, PUBLISH: APRIL 21, 28, Fill 35 outPisa this form and send it with your check/money order 55 Indigo plant to: 7 Land measure landmark MAY 5 AND 12, 2016. $3018 Mo. 56 WWII battle site 8 Sonnet’s ending 36 Competed successfully

The San Diego County Herald, LLC 58 Fairy tale start 9 Fireplace shelf P.O. Box 2568, Alpine, 59 To be: Fr. 10 Dutch cheese CA 91903 60 Avoid 11 Ascent Deadline is Monday at12 12Once p.m. for that Thursday’s paper. 62 Tennis term more

CALL 619.992.2605

38 40 41

East County The Christian Science Monitor

43 44 45 49

Becomes party to Leningrad’s river Comaneci, of Olympic fame Behold: L. Space vehicle: acron. Didn’t follow through Mole

14 17 18 24

63

Cornmeal dish Actress Garr Larceny Detroit footballer

Cut

Est. 1998

East County

Est. 1998

The Herald East County

East County’s Only Photojournalism Publication! Your Community • Our Community

Published weekly by The San Diego Display Advertising: Dee Dean: 619. 345.5622 or ads@echerald.com County Herald, LLC. The East County Herald is a proud member Legal Advertising: ads@echerald.com

See the digital edition ofSudoku your favorite community newspaper, The East County Herald, every week! Subscriptions/Back Issues and Distribution Manager: Bob Howell – 619.855.2047 • bobehowell@gmail.com Distribution: Bob Howell, Sun Distributing

Difficulty:

HOW TO REACH US Main Number: 619.345.5532 • FAX: 619.445.0375 • Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2568 • Alpine, CA 91903 Editor: Steve Hamann • Direct: 619.723.0324 • editor@echerald.com Web: www.echerald.com E-mail: publisher@echerald.com Photographers: Curt Dean, Steve Every Edition of The Herald is on-line Hamann, Torrie Ann Needham, Jay at www.echerald.com and posted Renard, Rob Riingen Sales: 619.345.5532 • ads@echerald. weekly on FaceBook. Like The East County Herald on FaceBook. com Contributors: Sheila Buska, Jeff Camp-

Row

Threeby-three square

2 8 1 6 7 9 2

9

3 8

Like us on Facebook! 8 6

MONITORCROSSWORD

2 5 9 7 1

6

7 2 4

9 2

1 5

How to do Sudoku Fill in the grid so the numbers 1 through 9 appear just once in every column, row, and three-by-three square. See example above.

The San Diego County Herald is an adjudibell, Fred Cicetti, Curt Dean, Dee Dean, cated newspaper of general circulation by the Steve Dolan, Thomas D. Elias, Rick Griffin, Superior Court of San Diego County. AdjudicaSteve Hamann, Pastor Drew Macintyre, tion No. GIC 778099 AS: Jan. 8, 2002. Dr. Cindy Miles

SPRING TRAINING

2 9

6 7 4

Column

of the San Diego East County Chamber of Commerce, La Mesa Chamber of Commerce, Santee Chamber of Commerce and the San Diego Press Club. The Herald was named California State Assembly District 77, Small Business of The Year, 2004 and recognized by the State Assembly for EXCELLENCE in Photojournalism in 2009. Publisher: The San Diego County Herald, LLC

SPRING TRAINING

By Ben Arnoldy

The Christian Science Monitor

Edited by Linda and Charles Preston

25 Prized award 50 ___ Aviv ACROSS 26 Rust’s summer stage 51 Psychic gift 1 Irish seaport 27 Earlike 54 USUDOKU_g1_041511.eps Meadows 5 Dietary Pub Date:stats 04/15/11 Slug: 28 Straight 57 Nimbi 9 Wife of Zeus 29 get reserved. 61(www.csmonitor.com). Last chance © 2011 The Christian AllGo rights 13 Mine, inScience MarseillesMonitor 30 “The Seven Year Itch” 64 Lily relative 14 River in western Distributed by The Christian Service actor Tom 65News Folk singer John(email: Jacob syndication@csmonitor.com) CanadaScience Monitor 31 Surveying instrument 66 Beige 15 Scandinavian god CLABAUGH/STAFF ILLUSTRATOR.eps 32 Small amount 67 Paving stone 16 Is off toRICH a good start 33 Hourglass component 68 Shine 19 Pottery coating 37 Cracker enhancers 69 Observed 20 Son of Adam 39 Foams and churns 21 Feline sound 42 Be pertinent DOWN 22 Before: poet. 46 Giving the once-over 1 Batting screen 23 Sometime sushi ingre47 Often refried 2 Portent dient 48 Close associates 3 Church tribunal 25 Not with it 51 Time periods 4 Borodin musical 33 Russia’s initials, for52 Yard activity 5 Ump merly 53 Connive 6 Platform 34 Sped 55 Indigo plant 7 Land measure 35 Pisa landmark 56 WWII battle site 8 Sonnet’s ending 36 Competed successfully 58 Fairy tale start 9 Fireplace shelf 38 Becomes party to 59 To be: Fr. 10 Dutch cheese 40 Leningrad’s river 60 Avoid 11 Ascent 41 Comaneci, of Olympic 62 Tennis term 12 Once more fame 63 Cut 14 Cornmeal dish 43 Behold: L. 17 Actress Garr 44 Space vehicle: acron. 18 Larceny 45 Didn’t follow through The Christian Science Monitor 24 Detroit footballer 49 Mole By Irene Glovsky


APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE FIFTEEN

14TH Annual

Creek to Bay Cleanup Saturday, Apr. 23 • Santee Lakes

Jay Renard/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

52ND Annual

Lakeside Rodeo

Apr. 22-24 • Lakeside Rodeo Grounds

Rob Riingen/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com


PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

Win a 2016

APR. 28-MAY 4, 2016

Maserati Ghibli Over $695,000 in Total Prizes!

Drawings at 9pm, Every Wednesday and Saturday. Nine Grand Prize Winners in April! Multiply your points and entries for Dream Machine and Cash Code!* Mondays, April 4 – May 30

5000 Willows Road, Alpine, CA 91901 • www.viejas.com • 619.445.5400 Must be 21 years of age. Viejas reserves all rights. Visit a V Club Booth for details. Please play responsibly. For help with problem gambling call 1-800-426-2537. © 2016 Viejas Casino & Resort, Alpine CA


042816 the herald  

Enjoy the Apr. 28-May 4 digital version of The Herald! Get Your Community Fix! Like The East County Herald on Facebook and visit us at www.e...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you