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Monte Vista Village Military Christmas Dinner, p15

East County

JAN. 7-13, 2016 Vol. 17 No. 18

Est. 1998

The San Diego County Herald, LLC

The East County Herald • A Year in Review

Get Your Community Fix!


NEWS In the

PAGE TWO • JAN. 7, 13, 2016

Santee’s Walker Preserve Trail on 360 Acres

East County

Est. 1998

Santee Chamber Morning Buzz By Faith Garcia

For The East County Herald SANTEE — Before its creation, the Walker Preserve in Santee was formerly a 350-acre dairy farm owned by the Walker family. Last October the ground was broken for the Walker Preserve: a community trail where families, community members, and visitors can come to walk along. This preserve has uplifted the community and created a family-friendly place for all in the City of Santee. At a recent community field trip, Special Project Coordinator for the City of Santee, Terry Rodgers, guided the trip. Rodgers expressed, “It has been a grand slam home run with the community! It is a really nice place and I just love the way it is designed.” California State Senator Joel Anderson, who provided a Senate Certificate of Recognition at last year’s ground-breaking, stated, “Santee’s Walker Preserve Trail is a fantastic example of the community working together to preserve nature and provide invaluable outdoor recreation opportunities. I am so excited to continue to watch this trail bring people together and appreciate the amazing environment we live in.” Upon visiting the Walker Preserve, one will find this thriving nature preserve to be full of life. There are ducks wading in the pond, butterflies fluttering through the air and even a roadrunner will often make an appearance. Rodgers shared, “This place is extremely popular. The sheriff patrols here on bicycles it is a very safe environment. Mainly the people take care of the park as it should be.” This preserve was a collaborative effort made by the City of Santee and the San Diego River Conservancy. In the creation of the Walker Preserve, the community began coming together. This community bonding has been displayed through businesses and organizations participating in the planting trees along the path. Eventually, these trees will create a naturally shaded pathway, which will aid in the preservation of the park. This peaceful area can be enjoyed by everyone and now members of the community do not have to travel far to find a beautiful place to relax and enjoy nature.

On The Cover

SANTEE — The New Year’s first Morning Buzz sponsored by the Santee Chamber of Commerce was held Tuesday, Jan. 5 at the Town Center Santee Coffee Corner. The Morning Buzz is an informal get together for networking purposes for chamber members and prospective members.

Jay Renard/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.com

EAST COUNTY — Your East County Herald takes a look back at the year 2015 and shares some of our favorite covers of the year. Happy and Healthy New Year East County! Cover: Rob Riingen, Jay Renard and Torrie Ann Needham Cover design: Steve Hamann / The East County Herald

See more on P7-P10 and at www.echerald.com


SERVICE DIRECTORY Herald Business

PAGE THREE • JAN.7-13, 2016

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OPINiON Politics and

The East County Herald strongly believes in the freedom of speech and the rights of all sides of an issue to be heard. The letters and guest opinions/commentaries published herein present differing points of view, not necessarily reflecting those of the publisher, The Herald or it’s advertisers. Note: Letters and opinion/commentary pieces may be edited due to space restrictions. Send all letters, opinions/commentaries to: editor@echerald.com

So Cal Focus with Thomas D. Elias

PAGE FOUR • JAN. 7-13, 2016

Major Highway Repairs Unlikely in 2016

I

t will be no surprise if Californians don’t see many needed highway repairs getting underway in the next year. For the Jerry Brown administration says it will take $59 billion to repair state roads and another $78 billion to fix those maintained by cities and counties. This magnitude of repair money is not available from the state’s general fund or from current gasoline taxes, which are carved up into many pieces, the money going for things like building hydrogen refueling stations and mass transit in addition to fixing roads. So it will take either higher gas taxes or a major bond issue to bring California highways up to the standards they enjoyed for more than 50 years prior to about 1990, when raids on the gasoline tax fund began in earnest. But Republicans hold just over one-third of the seats in both houses of the state Legislature, and they are adamantly against new taxes, especially any that might be proposed by the majority Democrats. It would take at least one GOP vote in both the Assembly and the state Senate to get the two-thirds vote needed for a gas tax hike without a general election vote. Plus, no bond money could possibly be available until the middle of 2017, even if legislators manage to settle on how much to borrow and then convince voters to okay their plan. There are three roots to the state’s difficulties in getting new highway money. One is the long history of politicians “borrowing” from the gas-tax-fueled highway fund and then not repaying the money in a timely way. That leaves a lot of Californians distrustful of putting more money there. A second problem is the GOP’s long-standing opposition to new taxes of any kind. Ever since President George H.W. Bush famously intoned at the 1988 Republican National Convention in New Orleans, “Read my lips… No New Taxes!” and then reneged on his pledge, only to be dumped from office after just one term, his fellow Republicans have been loath to okay any new levy. Third is the general level of public distrust for state government and the bond issues it proposes. One such bond was to fund high speed rail, but the current bullet train plan is so far afield from what voters okayed that it draws opposition even from Quentin Kopp, the former judge and state senator who was a leading progenitor of the entire concept. Other major agencies have been caught in corruption and cronyism, but don’t bother to change the rules that permitted it, and Gov. Brown exerts no pressure for such repairs. And what if a bond issue does make the November ballot? It could be buried among as many as four dozen other propositions and get little attention from voters even if many millions were spent to promote it. If that bond proposal were written to provide money for other programs, thus freeing up general fund budget money for roadwork, voters might be distrustful that highway money would even really be voted, seeing anything like this as more likely to create a massive slush fund for politicians to draw upon as they please. But Brown remains optimistic about getting at least something done. “The roads are going to get fixed,” he told reporters last fall. “Whether it takes a week, a month, a year or two, ultimately…it’s just a question of when.” That’s probably right, but the when probably won’t arrive in 2016 or anytime before Democrats somehow manage to capture two-thirds majorities in the Legislature. They had that margin sporadically between 2012 and 2014, but only for short intervals, as several Democratic legislators vacated their seats to run for other offices, leaving Assembly or Senate seats unoccupied and unable to contribute to super majorities. In the meantime, there’s enough money for the most urgent repairs, like the repaving, lane and off-ramp replacements prominently visible now on two of the state’s main north-south highways, Interstate 5 and California 99. But not enough for new roads, new ramps, replacing most worn-out bridges or fixing even very bumpy, potholeriddled pavement. Elias is author of the current book “The Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government’s Campaign to Squelch It. The book is now available in soft cover, fourth edition. His opinions are his own. He can be reached at tdelias@aol.com


HEALTH

The Healthy Geezer with Fred Cietti

To Your

From The Geezer’s Mailbag

PAGE FIVE • JAN. 7-13, 2016

Living with MS with Dee Dean

QA

. What bacteria causes athlete’s foot? . Athlete’s foot is not caused by bacteria. It is caused by tinea, a fungus that also can give you jock itch and ringworm. You can catch it from another person, from animals or wet surfaces such as the floors of public showers. Athlete’s foot symptoms include dry skin, itching, burning, scaling, inflammation, and blisters. If blisters break, tissue becomes exposed and this can be painful. Athlete’s foot usually shows up between the toes, especially the last two toes. Tinea thrives on feet because they are usually in shoes, which are perfect for fungus—they are warm, dark and humid. The fungus can spread on the feet. It can also travel to other parts of the body if you scratch your feet and then touch elsewhere. For a mild case of athlete’s foot, your doctor may recommend an over-the-counter or prescription preparation. There are antifungal sprays, powders, creams and lotions. If you have a severe case of athlete’s foot, your doctor may prescribe an oral medication. . In what parts of the country are you most likely to get Lyme disease? . The federal government’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified the Northeast, the upper Midwest and the West Coast as the places you’re most likely to get Lyme disease. Lyme disease is caused by bacteria spread by bites primarily from deer ticks, which are brown and often no bigger than a pin head. The disease was named for a Connecticut town where it was first recognized in 1975. Lyme disease can cause fever, headaches, fatigue, joint pain, sore muscles, stiff neck and a skin rash that usually begins where the tick dug in. The rash may start out as a small red spot that can get bigger. A ring within the spot can fade and create a “bull’s eye.” Some people with Lyme disease get many red spots. If you don’t treat Lyme disease, it can spread to the heart, joints and the nervous system. Patients with late Lyme disease can suffer permanent damage. If Lyme disease spreads to the heart, the person may feel an irregular or slow heartbeat. The disease is rarely fatal. Lyme disease is treated with antibiotics. In most cases of early Lyme disease, two to four weeks of oral antibiotics kill the bacteria. If the disease has progressed, your doctor may recommend an intravenous antibiotic for two to four weeks. This IV treatment is usually effective, although it may take some time to recover. . What causes bipolar disorder? . It’s not known what causes bipolar disorder, but a variety of biochemical, genetic and environmental factors seem to be involved in causing and triggering bipolar episodes. Bipolar disorder—also called manic-depressive illness—causes extreme mood swings. When people with bipolar disorder are happy and energetic, they are in the mania phase of the illness. When they are sad and listless, they are in the depression phase. The shifts from mania to depression and back again can occur quickly. The deep mood swings of bipolar disorder may last for weeks or months. Often, there are periods of normal mood in between. Sometimes, severe episodes of mania or depression include symptoms of psychosis such as hallucinations. Some people with bipolar disorder become suicidal. Some studies indicate that people with bipolar disorder have physical changes in their brains. And researchers are trying to find genes that may be involved in the condition.

Q A

Full Service Salon

QA

Ask The Healthy Geezer a question at: fred@healthygeezer.com

High Doses of Vitamin D3 May Help Reduce Inflammation in MS

T

aking a high dose of vitamin D3 is safe for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and may help regulate the body’s hyperactive immune response, according to a pilot study published by Johns Hopkins physicians in the Dec. 30 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. “These results are exciting, as vitamin D has the potential to be an inexpensive, safe and convenient treatment for people with MS,” says study author Peter Calabresi, M.D., director of the Johns Hopkins Multiple Sclerosis Center and professor neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. “More research is needed to confirm these findings with larger groups of people and to help us understand the mechanisms for these effects, but the results are promising.” Low levels of vitamin D in the blood are tied to an increased risk of developing MS. People who have MS and low levels of vitamin D are more likely to have greater disability and more disease activity. For the study, 40 people with relapsing-remitting MS received either 10,400 international units or 800 international units of vitamin D3 supplements per day for six

months. Patients with severe vitamin D deficiency were not included in the study. The current recommended daily allowance of vitamin D3 is 600 international units. Blood tests at the start of the study and again at three and six months measured the amount of vitamin D in the blood and the response in the immune system’s T cells, which play a key role in MS. While researchers are still determining the optimal level of vitamin D in the blood for people with MS, a suggested range of 40 to 60 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml) has been proposed as a target. Participants taking the high dose of vitamin D reached levels within the proposed target, whereas the group taking the low dose did not reach the target. Side effects from the vitamin supplements were minor and were not different between the people taking the high dose and the people taking the low dose. One person in each group relapsed. The people taking the high dose had a reduction in the percentage of inflammatory T cells related to MS severity, specifically IL-17+CD4+ and CD161+CD4+ cells. When the increase in vitamin D levels in the blood over base line levels was greater than 18 ng/

ddean@echerald.com

ml, every additional 5 ng/ml increase in vitamin D led to a one percent decrease in the percentage of IL-17+CD4+ T cells in the blood. The people taking the low dose did not have any noticeable changes in the percentages of their T cell subsets. “We hope that these changes in inflammatory T cell responses translate to a reduced severity of disease,” says Calabresi. “Other clinical trials are underway to determine if that is the case.” Source: John Hopkins University School of Medicine, Neurology

Dean has been fighting Multiple Sclerosis for 29 years. She continually studies and researches the disease to educate herself. She writes this column as a community service to share her findings and to raise public awareness about MS. The opinions and experiences shared are her own. Dean is NOT a medical doctor. ALWAYS check with your doctor first before trying a new therapy. This column is intended for informational purposes only. Dean can be reached at ddean@echerald.com. NOTE: Dean is the recipient of the 2004 STAR Community Outreach Award by the MS Society Dec. 2, 2004, the American Red Cross Real Hero Wendell Cutting Humanitarian Award, Oct. 13, 2006 , the Stoney Community Service Award, February 29, 2008, Women in Leadership Award for Art/Media/Culture Oct. 29, 2010, El Cajon Citizen of The Year Nominee Feb. 2013 and Recipient of the National MS Society’s 2014 Media Partner of The Year, Feb. 10, 2015.


COMMUNITY Matters PAGE SIX • JAN. 7-13, 2016

East County

Est. 1998

Get Your Community Fix! Visit www.echerald.com

East County

Est. 1998

Wisdom for

EVERYDAY with PastorLIFE Drew

G

A Day in the Life of Jesus the Messiah PART XL

reetings precious people, this week we continue our series entitled, “A day in the life of Jesus the Messiah.” Over the past 2,000 years there have been many writings, books, messages, and ideas, expressing various thoughts and opinions concern who Jesus was and is. My intention in doing this series is that you, the reader may come to know who Jesus really is and there is no better place to look than the Word of God the Bible. This week we will continue to look at the events that occurred one day in the life of Jesus as recorded for us in Mark 10:17-31 “Now as He was going out on the road, one came running, knelt before Him, and asked Him, “Good Teacher, what shall I do that I may inherit eternal life?” So Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good but One, that is, God. You know the commandments: ‘Do not commit adultery,’ ‘Do not murder,’ ‘Do not steal,’ ‘Do not bear false witness,’ ‘Do not defraud,’ ‘Honor your father and your mother.’ “ And he answered and said to Him, “Teacher, all these I have observed from my youth.” Then Jesus, looking at him, loved him, and said to him, “One thing you lack: Go your way, sell whatever you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, take up the cross, and follow Me.” But he was sad at this word, and went away sorrowful, for he had great possessions. Then Jesus looked around and said to His disciples, “How hard it is for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!” And the disciples were astonished at His words. But Jesus answered again and said to them, “Children, how hard it is for those who trust in riches to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.” And they were greatly astonished, saying among themselves, “Who then can be saved?” But Jesus looked at them and said, “With men it is impossible, but not with God; for with God all things are possible.” Then Peter began to say to Him, “See, we have left all and followed You.” So Jesus answered and said, “Assuredly, I say to you, there is no one who has left house or brothers or sisters or father or mother or wife or children or lands, for My sake and the gospel’s, who shall not receive a hundredfold now in this time-houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions--and in the age to come, eternal life. But many who are first will be last, and the last first.” In past weeks we have seen how the rich young ruler responded to the words of Jesus, this week we will turn our attention to the conversation Jesus had with His disciples after this rich, young man departed. What Jesus said to them was difficult for them to accept and understand, “How hard it is for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!” The disciples, like many today, thought that riches were a sign of God’s blessing on a person’s life and if anyone was going to heaven it were those who had wealth. It is not possible to “buy” one’s way into Heaven. Jesus explained what He meant by saying, “How hard it is for those who trust in riches to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.” Did you catch that? Jesus said it is impossible for those that “trust in riches” to get to Heaven on that basis. Jesus spoke more about money than any other subject, in fact it is mentioned over 2,000 times in the Bible. Though money in and of itself is neither good nor evil, it can and does take such a hold on a persons heart that it easily becomes a ‘god’ to many. The disciples continued to be astonished at these truths that Jesus spoke as they responded, “Who then can be saved?” To which Jesus responded, “With men it is impossible, but not with God; for with God all things are possible.” Did you get this all important truth? The disciples asked who can be saved? Jesus stated, “With men it is impossible!” Man can do nothing to save himself, yet every religion in the world attempts to follow a number of rites; rituals; oaths; and other rules to gain entrance into Heaven. If man could have done something on his own to merit forgiveness of his sins thus earning entrance into Heaven, Jesus would not have had to suffer and die on the Cross. The Apostle Paul said it this way in Ephesians 2:8-9 “For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.” Drew Macintyre is associate pastor of Calvary Chapel of Alpine and can be reached at 619-445-2589, or ccalpinemac@gmail.com


JAN. 6-13, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

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THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

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THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

JAN. 6-13, 2016

PAGE ELEVEN

Your YourCommunity CommunityCalendar Calendar Alpine Woman’s Club

Sheriff’s Coffee with the Community Community outreach is a top priority of the San Diego County Sheriff's Department. Members of the community should feel comfortable bringing problems related to safety and security to our staff. The Lakeside Sheriff's Substation is holding a Coffee with the Community on:

For more information, please call: Holly Angeles (619) 956-4021 Public Affairs Office (858) 974-2259 The San Diego Sheriff's Department is on

http://www.sdsheriff.net/

ALPINE — Alpine Woman’s Club Monthly Meeting January 19, at 12 PM. The Alpine Woman’s Club is open to all East County Women. Our Mission is two-fold: to provide opportunities for Alpine women to meet and socialize and to maintain our Clubhouse which is the Historic Alpine Town Hall at 2156 Alpine Blvd. The Woman’s Club also puts on special events such as the Christmas Home Tour* and Victorian Tea, the proceeds of which go to scholarships for local high school graduates. The chatter in the Clubhouse after the Home Tour was very positive. We had some great decorators this year! There was also a raffle for $500, as well as several wonderful gift baskets. If you missed it, you missed out! Planning now for the [always marvelous] Victorian Tea to be held on Saturday, April 16. Mark your calendars! If you are interested in the Club and would like to attend a monthly meeting/luncheon, contact Joanie Bogle at (619) 328-5728. You may also check out our website at www.alpinewomansclub.org or our Facebook page! The luncheon meeting for January will feature a presentation from Kristen Dreesen of Young Lives, who will be describing her work with teen moms in the San Diego County area.

Thursday, January 14, 2016 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Lakeside Branch Library 9839 Vine Street, Lakeside This gives the public a chance to chat with the Station's command staff, deputies and Crime Prevention Specialist in a casual setting and exchange ideas and concerns. Enjoy free coffee and cookies courtesy of the staff of the Lakeside Branch Library. Come out and make a positive difference in your community!

Submit Your Community Event

Do you have an upcoming community event that you would like to see posted on The Herald Community Calendar? Send the Who, What, When, Where, Why and contact information to

editor@echerald.com for consideration.

Thinking Of Adopting A New Pet? EL CAJON — The El Cajon Animal Shelter has a variety of dogs, cats and kittens to choose from! If you are looking to adopt a pet, or have lost your pet, please stop by the shelter, 1275 N. Marshall, and see the dogs and cats in the adoption center. The shelter is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. For more information, please call us at (619) 441-1580.

Upcoming Free Community Event in La Mesa on Senior Care Planning

EL CAJON — “Planning Senior Care on Your Terms” January 7, 2016 at 7pm at Hillside Park Center 840 Buena Terrace, El Cajon, between Petree & Fletcher. Experts discuss & take questions. Panel of Speakers: Consumer Advocates for RCFE Reform (CARR), Grace Care Management, San Diego Elder Law Center. RSVP (619) 795-2165. Sponsored by the La Mesa Soroptimist Club

Awareness, Fellowship, Service:

Martin Luther King, Jr. Weekend of Commemoration

The San Diego Partnership of UCC (United Church of Christ) Churches is pleased to present “Awareness, Fellowship, Service: Martin Luther King, Jr. Weekend of Commemoration. Commencing Saturday, Jan. 16, its opening program will feature the movie 12 Years a Slave, followed by discussion of the film’s message. Time: 1:30 – 4pm. Place: Friendship Hall, The Table: United Church of Christ of La Mesa, 5940 Kelton Avenue, La Mesa, CA 92142 (619-464-1519, www.tableucc.com). Cost: Free. On Sunday, January 17, a Fellowship Gathering will feature a Small Plate Supper at 4:00pm and Gospel Jazz Vespers at 5:00pm. Location: Hall, Christian Fellowship UCC, 1601 Kelton Road, San Diego, CA 92114 (619-262-8095, info@christianfellowshipucc. org). Cost: Free. Monday, Jan. 18 will include two programs, the African American Ministerial Council’s MLK Jr. Community Breakfast and the MLK Jr. Day of Interfaith Community Service. The breakfast will feature as speaker the Rev. Richard Lawrence, a Selma Walk participant. Time: 7am. Place: Jacobs Center, 404 Euclid Avenue, San Diego 92114 (619-2641214, www.jacobscenter.org). Cost: $50. The MLK Jr. Day of Interfaith Community Service (9am – Noon) at Balboa Park’s Marston House will feature an Opening Interfaith Ceremony (9:15am), cleanup and beautification of the Marston House grounds (9:30am) and musical entertainment and a picnic lunch at 11:30am. See www.cbisd.org/event/mlk for details. Address: 3525 Seventh Avenue, San Diego, CA 92103. Cost: Free.


THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE TWELVE

SDSUwithBEAT Steve Dolan

UP AGAINST ITBuska with S.

M

How to #1

aking peach crisp is easy. Wait! Come back! Peach crisp is gender neutral. Guys can make it; gals can make it; everyone loves it. Just grab a can of peaches and dump them in a casserole dish. Wait—not that skinny little can; you gotta get two of those fat cans. Be sure to get the Alberta peaches if they have them— Albertas have this nice fuzzy texture with the little reddish tinge at the end. Get slices, not halves. If they don’t have Albertas, grab two cans of the regular slimy, slippery peach slices. Make sure they’re in heavy syrup— not that lite stuff. Next you need some Bisquick, sugar and marg a r i n e — o k ay, butter, if you’re a real food connoisseur. Vanilla ice cream tops it off, so if you don’t have any of that, better get some while you’re here. Whipped cream’s okay, but it doesn’t have that solid, creamy texture of ice cream to mix with the rough crumble of the crisp as it rolls over your tongue. Don’t forget to preheat the oven. Oh! Forgot to tell you: you need to partially drain the syrup from the peaches as you’re pouring them out of the can. If you didn’t drain them,

just put the peaches and syrup back in the can and start over. Use the can lid to keep the peaches from falling out of the can while you’re draining them. Oh—you threw the lid away? That’s okay; hold your hand over the top of the can; that’ll do. What about the oven? Oh, sorry. Four hundred degrees. Now for the crisp: Pour two cups of Bisquick into a bowl big enough to hold two cups of Bisquick. Melt a half a cup of that margarine and measure out 2/3 of a cup of sugar. White, not brown. If you really love brown sugar, sprinkle a little in with the white stuff.

S

crumbly. Hands are best, but a fork will do if you’re squeamish about getting your hands messy. Sprinkle the crumbly mixture over the peaches— it won’t go evenly, don’t worry about it. Bake it twentyfive minutes ’til lightly browned and you’re done. All that’s left is to scoop it into a good-sized bowl, top it with vanilla ice cream and dig in. Don’t forget to offer it to anyone else who happens to be in the room or you’ll be in trouble. Short version: Dump partially drained peaches into casserole dish; preheat oven to 400; melt butter; mix Bisquick, sugar and spices; add melted butter; mix until crumbly; scatter over peaches; bake 25 minutes; top with ice cream; eat.

“Albertas have this nice fuzzy texture with the little reddish tinge at the end. Get slices, not halves. “ Not too much, though. Spice it up with cinnamon and nutmeg. If you’re clean out of nutmeg, use more cinnamon. I won’t tell. Add the spices to the mix. You did put the sugar in, didn’t you? If you didn’t, do it now before you put the spices in. Hope you didn’t already put the spices in— they’re awful hard to take out and put back in after you add the sugar. Pour the melted margarine over the mix and crumble it up until everything’s good and

Buska is an author, columnist and long-time resident of East County. Send e-mail to Sheila at 4smbrks@gmail.com and visit her website www.smile-breaks.com

immediately. For a schedule of classes and more information, visit neverstoplearning. net, send an e-mail to marketingcert@mail.sdsu.edu, or call (619) 594-2099. SDSU’s College of Extended Studies reaches out to San Diego, the nation, and the world with a wide variety of lifelong learning opportunities, and more than 50 certificate programs for career advancement. Topics range from contract management, construction, and craft beer, to grant writing, marketing, and human resources. And many programs are available online. The CES also offers one of the largest ESL programs in the U.S. through the American Language Institute; and university-quality courses to students age 50 and better through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Other opportunities include seminars, study abroad, corporate education and access to regular SDSU classes through Open University. For more information or to register, visit neverstoplearning.net or call (619) 2657378 (SDSU).

Steve Dolan hosts a one-hour sports talk radio show Tuesdays from 6 to 7 p.m. on East County’s “The Mountain – 107.9 FM.” The show may also be heard on the Internet at www.themountainfm.com

in the Facilities Development Dept. for Kaiser Permanente, including three years as financial manager. Founded in 1945, SDCTA has spent seven decades Jamul resident Barry Jantz, CEO of the Grossmont saving the region’s taxpayers millions of dollars, as Healthcare District (GHD), has been elected to serve as well as generating information to help educate the 2016-17 chair of the San Diego County Taxpayers Asso- public. ciation (SDCTA) board of directors. Jantz, who joined the SDCTA board of directors in 2007, will lead the region’s leading taxpayer watchdog organization in its role of promoting accountable, The 600-member San Diego East County Chamber cost-effective and efficient government and opposing of Commerce has announced its 2016 board members. unnecessary taxes and fees, discriminatory regula- Leah McIvor, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage, tions and ill-advised public expenditures. Jantz suc- will serve as chair of the board. Steve Hamann, Aucceeds Greg Stein of Millennium Health, who served as tioneer Extraordinaire will serve as past chair. SDCTA chair the past four years. New board members for 2016 include: Nancy Den“I am excited about this opportunity to serve,” said nison, Keller Williams Real Estate; Odie Goward, Jantz. “The Taxpayers Association plays an important California Bank & Trust; Don Parent, SDG&E; Randy role in the region, as our analysis of ballot measures Young, Black Angus Restaurant. helps voters understand their implications and make Board members replacing existing board seats in informed decisions. The Association also is instru- 2016 include: Nabil Abu-Ghazaleh, Grossmont Colmental in recommending important best practices to lege; LaShunna Davidson, Sycuan Casino; Ben Potter, local government agencies in San Diego County.” Grossmont Center. Jantz also is currently co-chairing the SDCTA Returning board members elected for a second term search committee for a CEO to replace Mark Leslie, include: Brett Almquist, On the Border Mexican Grill who retired in June 2015. Longtime civic leader Bill & Cantina; Ramona Bommer, Diamond Creations by Geppert is serving as the other co-chair of the SDCTA Ramona; Paula Trovato, First Citizens Bank. search committee. Geppert, who is not on the SDCTA Additional board members returning in 2016 board, served for 16 years as general manager of include: Peggy Buffo, Aztec & Baron Insurance Cox San Diego and served as chair of the San Diego Agency; Bob Burton, Dominion Financial Services; Regional Economic Development Corporation, San Raymond Cuero, Viejas Casino & Resort; Steve Devan, Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, San Diego Grossmont Schools Federal Credit Union; Jo Marie Bowl Game Association and as a member of numer- Diamond, East County Economic Development Counous nonprofit boards. cil; Guy Gonzales, International Academy of Jazz; Jantz, who joined GHD as CEO in 2004, served as a Chuck Hansen, San Diego East Visitors Bureau, Calimember of the La Mesa City Council for four terms fornia Welcome Center; Elmer Heap, Waste Managefrom 1990 to 2006. Prior to joining GHD on a full-time ment; Patrick Howard, Wade, Howard & Associates basis, he served as district chief of staff to former CPA LLP; Teresa Johnson, Artistic Wedding Cakes; Assemblyman Jay La Suer (R-La Mesa) and as a public Barry Jantz, Grossmont Healthcare District; Steve affairs consultant. He previously worked for 18 years Lambert, Lambert & Rogers APLC; Stacy Mackey, XL

East County Chamber of Commerce announces 2016 board of directors

SDSU Marketing Classes Start this Month

DSU’s College of Extended Studies will begin the New Year by offering two classes in its Professional Certificate in Marketing program during January. “Digital Content Strategies: What Makes People Click” will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Wednesdays, Jan. 20 to Feb. 10. This class will cover critical principles of digital marketing, including content creation and organization, digital conversion strategies, user experience, and more. Instructor Aaron Hoskins is the supervisor of digital operations at Sharp HealthCare. Registration is $309 for the general public ($329 after Jan. 10). The second class, “Writing for the Web,” will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. on Mondays, Jan. 25 to Feb. 15. You’ll learn how to blog and post regular content on the web, as well as how and when to use the web’s many free or low-cost applications to increase website traffic and ensure site loyalty. Instructor Nicole Vargas is a digital media producer and consultant. Registration is $309 for the general public ($329 after Jan. 15). SDSU’s College of Extended Studies and SDX joined forces to offer this up-to-the-minute program, taught by instructors who lead the way in the local marketing community. You’ll learn skills and multiplatform strategies you can apply

EAST COUNTY BIZ with Rick Griffin Jamul resident Barry Jantz named 2016 chair of taxpayers group

JAN. 6-13, 2016

Submissions are welcomed for this column. Press releases can be sent to info@rickgriffin.com or faxed to (619) 461‑3151. Press releases may be edited due to space considerations.

Staffing Service and Excell Security; Marcel Becker, Trident Maritme Systems; Randy Okamura, AT&T; Kathy Olsen, RCP Block & Brick; Kristie Powell, State Farm Insurance; Sandy Pugliese, Sharp Grossmont Hospital; Dana Rivers, Barona Resort & Casino; Maureen Shinn, Home Point Financial; Dave Steele, Pure Solar Power; Cameron Stewart, Pure Light Cleaning Specialist; Jim Timlin, San Diego Business Supply; Bob Scheid , Forefront Consulting Group.

Grossmont Hospital patients now staying in renovated rooms

Patients are now being treated in state-of-the-art, upgraded rooms on all five floors of the East Tower of Sharp Grossmont Hospital in La Mesa, the Grossmont Healthcare District (GHD) reports. Over the past three years, taxpayer-funded renovation has been underway on floors two through five of the seven-story East Tower building, originally constructed in 1974. The East Tower work was part of the hospital’s Facilities Master Site Plan. Renovation cost of $41 million was financed through Proposition G, a bond measure sponsored by GHD and approved by East County voters in June 2006. Each renovated floor of the East Tower has 37 patient beds for a total of 148 beds. Among the improvements: patient-bed utility headwalls were replaced with advanced units; new ADA and bariatric accessible rooms were retrofitted; and, nurses are now using newly configured central work stations with upgraded lighting and finishes. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems also were modernized with new lighting throughout the floors. Five existing elevators were upgraded with mechanical and cosmetic improvements. Private restrooms also were upgraded. The project included a seismic retrofit of the East Tower, which will bring it into compliance with current California Building Code earthquake standards.


JAN. 6-13, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE THIRTEEN

Alpine Education Foundation

Mardi Gras Ball Saturday, February 6, 2016 6:30 - 10:30 PM

Alpine Community Center


BILLBOARD

NAME SHARES

The San Diego County Herald PAGE FOURTEEN • JAN. 7-13, 2016

Legal Notices

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STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2015-030876 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S) (FBN) to be abandoned: (A) ENCINITAS HEARING AID CENTER located at 2210 ENCINITAS BLVD., SUITES L & M, ENCINITAS, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92024. Mailing address: P.O. BOX 404 MINNEAPOPLIS, MN 55440. This business is conducted by: A CORPORATION The registrant filed the above FBN(s) on: 01/09/2015, and was assigned FILE NO: 2015-000697. This FBN is hereby abandoned by the following: (A) NORTHLAND HEARING CENTERS, INC of 6425 FLYING CLOUD, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN 55344. STATE OF INCORPORATION: MINNESOTA. Signed by: ANITA WAGNER / ASSISTANT SECRETARY. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on DECEMBER 01, 2015. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: DECEMBER 31, 2015, JANUARY 7, 14 AND 21, 2016.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2015-030873 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S) (FBN) to be abandoned: (A) OCEANSIDE HEARING AID CENTER located at 2204 EL CAMINO REALE, SUITE 14, OCENSIDE, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92054. Mailing address: P.O. BOX 404 MINNEAPOPLIS, MN 55440. This business is conducted by: A CORPORATION The registrant filed the above FBN(s) on: 12/24/2014, and was assigned NAME SHARES FILE NO: 2014-033231. This FBN is hereby abandoned by the following: (A) NORTHLAND HEARING CENTERS, INC of 6425 FLYING CLOUD, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN 55344. STATE OF INCORPORATION: MINNESOTA. Signed by: ANITA WAGNER / ASSISTANT SECRETARY. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on DECEMBER 01, 2015. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: DECEMBER 31, 2015, JANUARY 7, 14 AND 21, 2016.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2015-030878 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S) (FBN) to be abandoned: (A) ADVANCED HEARING CARE located at 171 SAXONY ROAD, SUITE 111, ENCINITAS, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 92024. Mailing address: P.O. BOX 404 MINNEAPOPLIS, MN 55440. This business is conducted by: A CORPORATION The registrant filed the above FBN(s) on: 03/26/2010, and was assigned FILE NO: 2010-008532. This FBN is hereby abandoned by the following: (A) NORTHLAND HEARING CENTERS, INC of 6425 FLYING CLOUD, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN 55344. STATE OF INCORPORATION: MINNESOTA. Signed by: ANITA WAGNER / ASSISTANT SECRETARY. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/ County Clerk of San Diego County on DECEMBER 01, 2015. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: DECEMBER 31, 2015, JANUARY 7, 14 AND 21, 2016.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT ASSIGNED FILE NO. 2015-030874 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S) (FBN) to be abandoned: (A) THE HEARING AID STORE located at 7090 PARKWAY DR., SUITE B, LA MESA, CA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, 921942. Mailing address: P.O. BOX 404 MINNEAPOPLIS, MN 55440. This business is conducted by: A CORPORATION The registrant filed the above FBN(s) on: 01/09/2015, and was assigned FILE NO: 2015-000697. This FBN is hereby abandoned by the following: (A) NORTHLAND HEARING CENTERS, INC of 6425 FLYING CLOUD, EDEN PRAIRIE, MN 55344. STATE OF INCORPORATION: MINNESOTA. Signed by: ANITA WAGNER / ASSISTANT SECRETARY. This statement was filed with ERNEST J. DRONENBURG, JR, the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County on DECEMBER 01, 2015. SAN DIEGO COUNTY HERALD, PUBLISH: DECEMBER 31, 2015, JANUARY 7, 14 AND 21, 2016.

Legal Notices

FOR RENT!!! We’ll THIS SPACE!!! run your CLASSIFIED ADS in legal THE HERALD! ad could be notices Yourviewed MONITORCROSSWORD by Thousands! for Simply fill out the

By Judith Davies

LE$$ East County

form far right and mail with your check or money order! It’s that EASY!

Est. 1998

than you’d pay in any other local adjudicated newspaper. E-mail: ads@echerald.com for your quote.

The Christian Science Monitor

CLASSIFIED

Place your Classified or Announcement Ad with the East County Herald News for only $5.00 for three lines per week. (Approx. 35 characters per line) - $2.00 per line after the first three. Add $5 for photo. (Note: photos will not be returned.) Lost and Found Ads are Free. Edited by Linda and Charles Preston 11 Truth stretcher 43 French literary name ACROSS 12 Olympic runner’s goal 44 Legal doc. 1 Over 13 Port of Yemen 46 Chalky silicate 5 Dandy 21 More vast 47 Actor and vice presi9 Mississippi feature 22 Dostoyevsky heroine dent 14 Medieval city near 25 Like a whistle 54 Blackish Turin 26 11th c. Norwegian king 55 Toward the morning 15 Melville book 27 Galway’s instrument sun 16 Greek epic 29 Field of competition 56 Protest turned sour 17 Paper measure 30 Indian princes 57 Bakery goody 18 Former Israeli prime 31 Campus VIPs 58 Locale minister 32 check/money Basic principles, for to: direction 19 Day’s march Fill out59 thisNautical form and send it with your order short 60 Acting awards 20 Entertainer and bridge The San Diego County Herald, LLC 33 Like wilderness terri61 Recipient of 60 Across expert P.O. Box 2568, Alpine, CAtory 91903 62 Swiss writer and phi23 “He’s on the ___” Deadline is Monday at 12 p.m. for36 thatLake Thursday’s paper. mineral deposit losopher 24 Blessing 37 Waterfall 25 River of Zaire 43 Small NA perch DOWN 27 Marsh 45 Point ___, Calif 1 Young salmon 28 Ollas 46 Seed coat 2 Voyaging 32 ‘‘___ know of heaven’’: 47 Italian town near 3 Prop Dickinson Padua 4 Comedian and country 33 Ali, once 48 Ruin singer 34 Algerian city 49 Residence for 31 Down 5 BLT ingredient 35 Actress and tennis 50 Come-on 6 Hebrew measures great 51 Unctuous 7 Fencing weapon 38 Guinea pig 52 Red deer 8 Ancestors 39 Squealers 53 Hivers’ opposite 9 Painter Rivera 40 Held and Magnani 10 Vocalist and baseball 41 Irritated state Hall of Famer 42 Mesabi product

NAME SHARES

Sudoku Difficulty:

Threeby-three square

2 9 8 6

6 7 4

2 8 1 6 7 9 2

9

3 8

2 5 9 7 1

6 7 2 4

9 2 1 5

Column

Row

How to do Sudoku Fill in the grid so the numbers 1 through 9 appear just once in every column, row, and three-by-three square. See example above. By Ben Arnoldy

The Christian Science Monitor

Edited by Linda and Charles Preston 11 Truth stretcher 43 French literary name ACROSS 12 Olympic runner’s goal 44 Legal doc. 1 Over Pub Date: 01/04/13 Slug: USUDOKU_g1_010413.ai By Judith Davies 13 Port of Yemen 46 Chalky silicate 5 Dandy 21 vast 47 (www.csmonitor.com). Actor and vice presi© 2013 The9Christian Science All More rights reserved. Mississippi feature Monitor 22 Dostoyevsky heroine dent 14 Medieval city near Distributed by The Christian Science Monitor News Service (email: syndication@csmonitor.com) 25 Like a whistle 54 Blackish Turin 55 Toward the morning 15 Melville book RICH CLABAUGH/STAFF ILLUSTRATOR.ai 26 11th c. Norwegian king 27 Galway’s instrument sun 16 Greek epic 29 Field of competition 56 Protest turned sour 17 Paper measure 30 Indian princes 57 Bakery goody 18 Former Israeli prime 31 Campus VIPs 58 Locale minister 32 Basic principles, for 59 Nautical direction 19 Day’s march short 60 Acting awards 20 Entertainer and bridge 33 Like wilderness terri61 Recipient of 60 Across expert tory 62 Swiss writer and phi23 “He’s on the ___” 36 Lake mineral deposit losopher 24 Blessing 37 Waterfall 25 River of Zaire 43 Small NA perch DOWN 27 Marsh 45 Point ___, Calif 1 Young salmon 28 Ollas 46 Seed coat 2 Voyaging 32 ‘‘___ know of heaven’’: 47 Italian town near 3 Prop Dickinson Padua 4 Comedian and country 33 Ali, once 48 Ruin singer 34 Algerian city 49 Residence for 31 Down 5 BLT ingredient 35 Actress and tennis 50 Come-on 6 Hebrew measures great 51 Unctuous 7 Fencing weapon 38 Guinea pig 52 Red deer 8 Ancestors 39 Squealers 53 Hivers’ opposite 9 Painter Rivera 40 Held and Magnani 10 Vocalist and baseball 41 Irritated state Hall of Famer 42 Mesabi product The Christian Science Monitor

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JAN. 6-13, 2016

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

PAGE FIFTEEN

Monte Vista Village

Military Christmas Dinner December 2015 • Lemon Grove

Photos courtesy of Monte Vista Village See more photos at www.echerald.smugmug.com

LEMON GROVE — This December, an incredible 136 local enlisted military families attended Monte Vista Village’s 9th Annual Military Christmas Dinner! Thanks to fundraising throughout the year, each family received $150 in a Christmas card. A money jar with $400 was also raffled. Monte Vista Village residents knit hats for the children, which they handed out at the event. The residents’ gift shop raised more than $3,000 in 2015 for the families. Monte Vista Village is located at 2211 Massachusetts Avenue in Lemon Grove. Monte Vista Village would like to thank John Goodman from The Goodman Group, our management company, for his support.

The National Funding

Holiday Bowl

December 30 • Qualcomm Stadium Rob Riingen/The East County Herald See more photos at www.echerald.smugmug.com


PAGE SIXTEEN

THE EAST COUNTY HERALD • YOUR COMMUNITY OUR COMMUNITY

JAN. 7-13, 2016

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