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MAGAZINE

A Times-Herald Publication

Newnan’s most thankful homeowner

Cowetans believe in Santa

One elf’s story

The art of David Boyd Jr.

Christmas November/December 2010 | $3.95


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Comprehensive cardiac care close to home. Piedmont Newnan Hospital announces the grand opening of the Piedmont Cardiovascular Imaging Center. Our state-of-the-art cardiovascular imaging center is the latest addition to Piedmont Newnan Hospital and offers comprehensive cardiac care for patients in Coweta County. Staffed with board-certified cardiologists, registered technologists, patient care technicians, cardiac rehabilitation nurses and therapists, we are dedicated to taking care of all of your cardiac healthcare needs today. CARDIAC SERVICES INCLUDE: I

Nuclear Medicine Stress Testing (Myocardial Perfusion Imaging)

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MUGA (scanning of the heart to look at the ventricles)

Lobby

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NOW OPEN! Piedmont Newnan Hospital Cardiovascular Imaging Center 20 Francis Way, Suite 301 Sharpsburg, Georgia 30277 For more information on cardiac services, please call 678.854.2980 or visit piedmontnewnan.org. Physician referral required.

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CLOSE TO HOME, CONVENIENT, STATE-OF-THE-ART -ART

CELEBRATING SUCCESS in Cancer Treatment Years ago, the Radiation Oncology Services – Newnan (ROS) physicians developed a unique clinical program still in active use today: New Patient Tumor Conference (NPTC). NPTC provides a weekly forum for treatment planning and peer review. All new ROS-Newnan patients have the benefit of this built in second opinion. During NPTC, the treating physician presents new cases to our team of eleven ROS physicians for their input and approval of the treatment plan. Through a collaborative effort, NPTC ensures that all patients receive treatment consistent with both ROS and national standards. The Ne Newna Newnan wnann cent ccenter enter er has ex expan expanded panded ded to in inclu include clude de two lilinea linear nearr acce a accelerators. cceler lerato ators rs. Dr. Rao, Dr. Santiago and the ROS-Newnan team provide state-of-theart te techn technology chnolo ology gy to inc includ include: lude: e: ■

Intensity Inte In tens nsit ityy Mo Modu Modulated dula late ted d Ra Radi Radiation diat atio ion n Th Ther Therapy erap apyy

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Accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) in radiation therapy since 1995.

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On Our Website

www.newnancowetamagazine.com

Special Features Book giveaways

MAGAZINE Established 1995 A publication of The Times-Herald

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Web extras you’ll find only online. Look for the computer icon throughout every issue to lead you to the special content at newnancowetamagazine.com.

Alex McRae, Elizabeth Melville, W. Winston Skinner, Kenneth Wilson, Martha A. Woodham Photography

Bob Fraley, Jeffrey Leo, Katherine McCall, Tara Shellabarger

Circulation Director Sales and Marketing Director Advertising Manager Advertising Consultants

On Our Cover

Naomi Jackson Colleen D. Mitchell Lamar Truitt Doug Cantrell, Mandy Inman, Candy Johnson, Norma Kelley, Jeanette Kirby

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Debby Dye, Graphics Manager Sandy Hiser, Jonathan Melville, Sonya Studt

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION, call 770.683.6397 or e-mail colleen@newnan.com. Newnan-Coweta Magazine is published bi-monthly by The Times-Herald, Inc., 16 Jefferson St., Newnan, GA 30263. Subscriptions: Newnan-Coweta Magazine is distributed in home-delivery copies of The Times-Herald and at businesses and offices throughout Coweta County. Individual mailed subscriptions are also available for $23.75 in Coweta County, $30.00 outside Coweta County. To subscribe, call 770.304.3373. Submissions: We welcome submissions. Query letters and published clips may be addressed to the Editor, Newnan-Coweta Magazine at P.O. Box 1052, Newnan, Georgia 30264. On the Web: www.newnancowetamagazine.com © 2010 by The Newnan Times-Herald, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Member:

MAGS MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION OF THE SOUTHEAST

A sampler of festive and delicious cookies is just the thing for holiday entertaining. See article on page 30. – Photo by Bob Fraley

4 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE

WINNER OF FIVE 2009 GAMMA AWARDS (for issues published in 2008) Gold Award for Best Series, Silver Award for Best Single Issue, Bronze Award for Best Single Cover, Bronze Award for Best Profile, Bronze for General Excellence


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OF WEST GEORGIA

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Contents FEATURES

12

12 THANKFUL FOR HOME When Kathy Grant’s home burned down four years ago at Thanksgiving, the family learned an important lesson about what’s really most valuable in life.

20 BEHIND THE SCENES AT A TREE FARM When members of the Lovell family decided to open a Christmas tree farm together, they didn’t anticipate the amount of planting, trimming, tending and loving that would be required, but they say it’s worth it.

24 SETTING THE HOLIDAY TABLE Enjoy some holiday place settings created by the ladies of Newnan’s First United Methodist Church and learn about some of the churches offering Christmas events for women this year.

30 DELICIOUS HOLIDAY COOKIES Looking for a new cookie recipe to try this holiday season? Our staff has been busy sampling some favorites and is ready to offer a few recommendations!

38 THE DECORATOR SHOW HOUSE This year the Piedmont Newnan Hospital Auxiliary will be offering a Decorator Show House instead of the annual Candlelight Tour. Learn about the design teams who will be decorating this wonderful old home in holiday finery.

24

42 TEA FOR TOYS Join Newnan-Coweta Magazine staffers and a few of our friends at a holiday charity event at Holly Cottage Tearoom.

44 I BELIEVE IN SANTA Is there really and truly a Santa Claus? Lots of Cowetans say “yes” and tell us why!

52 NCTC PRESENTS SANTALAND DIARIES Actor Jeff Allen is busy preparing to entertain local audiences in the Newnan Community Theatre Company’s production of David Sedaris’ The SantaLand Diaries this December.

58 PAINTING FROM THE HEART

58 6

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Artist David Boyd Jr. is taking his work in a different direction with new pieces that are being praised for their splashy, abstract style.


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A DEVELOPMENT OF CBL & ASSOCIATES PROPERTIES, INC.


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Contents 66

DEPARTMENTS 66 THE THOUGHTFUL GARDENER Learn more about the plant known for its draping red berries and lovely foliage, Nandina domestica.

72 SADDLE UP At Mark and Julie McKee’s 50-acre horse farm near Grantville, there’s one rule that is followed above all others: the horses always come first.

76 LOCAL HERITAGE Many southern families have an ancestral tie to Jamestown and the first permanent English settlement in America. Several Cowetans have ancestral ties to John Woodlief, who is known for leading a Thanksgiving service in the New World.

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In every issue 10 EDITOR’S LETTER 79 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 80 THE BOOKSHELF 82 I AM COWETA


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Savings Made Simple SM

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From the Editor }

Christmas Wishes he Christmas lights I most remember from Christmas ’09 were of the blue flashing variety and came perched on top of a black and white patrol car that pulled me over on Bullsboro just days before Christmas. My attitude was not a very merry one as the polite but firm officer pulled out his pad. I was especially ticked at being ticketed because, technically, I think it was the fault of that slowpoke in front of me who lollygagged through the light leading out of Ashley Park and caused the delay. Besides the expense and embarrassment of having to pay a traffic fine, this unscheduled stop kept me from getting back to a local shoe store where I feared the last pair of pink cowgirl boots would be purchased before I could get to them. You see, my then four-year-old niece, a great shoe lover, had requested just three items when I asked what she wanted for Christmas: some blue boots, some red shoes and some high heels. The red shoes, oddly enough, proved hardest to find, but at last I found a local store with cute ones in her size. I was torn, though, because at this store I also came across the pink Dingo boots that I strongly suspected my niece would absolutely adore. I bought the red shoes she requested, but I was unsettled about having left those pink boots behind. I told my husband about them and asked if he thought I should return the red shoes and swap them for the boots. “Get ’em both,” he said. “After all, it’s Christmas!”

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I don’t know why I didn’t just do that to start with. It truly is more blessed to give than to receive. My niece was crazy about those pink boots from the minute she opened them and enjoyed clomping around the kitchen in them on Christmas Day. She was still wearing those pink boots with shorts around Easter. Much as I love to give gifts to the children in my family, this year I’ve become aware of the greater-than-usual need for toys in our community. For that reason, I am delighted our magazine will be sponsoring a “Tea for Toys” charity event at Holly Cottage Tearoom on Dec. 2 and hope some of you will be able to attend (see page 42). The toys are urgently needed this year, and I hope we’ll get some nice donations. If you do decide to meet us for tea, learn from me and take it easy through those intersections around Bullsboro. The person in front of you may not be quite as driven as you are! Wishing you a Happy Thanksgiving and a very Merry Christmas, from my home to yours.

Fondly,

Angela McRae, Editor angela@newnan.com

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 | 10


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Thankful for

Home By Elizabeth Melville | Photos by Bob Fraley

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our years ago at Thanksgiving the Grant family stood in the smoldering rubble of their home and realized they had nothing but each other. The family lost their worldly possessions in the fire. Armed with a determined spirit, the family’s matriarch, Kathy, has refurnished their exquisite new home bit by bit with yard sale items – though you’d never know it stepping foot in their immaculately designed home. During the holidays, Grant reflects on the fire and chooses to acknowledge the things she’s gained, like a new passion for yard sale-ing and a little perspective on what truly matters in life. The Grants – Kathy and Clay and their daughters Finley, 22, and Jordan, 17 – lived in an old dairy farm on Sullivan Road that was built in 1847. The fire happened over the Thanksgiving holiday in 2006. It was the Friday after Thanksgiving. No

Kathy Grant’s family rebuilt their home following a devastating fire at Thanksgiving four years ago. Though the home today is beautifully furnished, largely via yard sales, Grant is now careful to note that “it’s just stuff” and counts her family and friends as her greatest treasure.

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one was home except Clay, who was working in a detached garage on the property. An electrical fire sparked an inferno that destroyed their historic home. All that remained were some bricks and a Pampered Chef pizza stone they found inside a melted oven. “It was hard,” Kathy Grant recalls. “We lost sentimental, irreplaceable items, like the family’s china, silver and photos. “But, it’s just stuff in the end,” she quickly adds. “I remember the amazing people that helped us – people we didn’t even know.” The Grants lived in their garage for six weeks. She remembers spending Christmas there. “I love Christmas ornaments,” she said. “I’d been collecting them for 30 years.” A friend of Kathy organized an ornament party for her, and Grant recalls having the “most interesting tree” that year. Every Christmas since, she’s decorated her family’s tree with those ornaments as a reminder of the compassion her family was shown. A fellow church member moved to Florida and let the Grants stay in her furnished home in SummerGrove for two years. When their generous landlord returned from Florida, the Grants rented a home on Sullivan Road and found themselves in need of furnishings for the first time since the fire. This transition happened to coincide with SummerGrove’s neighborhood yard sale. “I started yard sale-ing that weekend, and I was hooked,” said Grant. Quickly, her rental home filled up. Kathy and her husband decided that this was their opportunity to design and build their dream home – and they decided to do it on their former Sullivan Road property. “There is nothing you can’t find at a yard sale,” says Kathy Grant, who discovered the joys of such sales while furnishing her home following a fire. “If you have time and patience, you can find it all.”

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Rebuilding after a fire, the Grant family was able to use a few pieces such as an island top and dining room table constructed from old flooring from their attic. The materials had been removed from the home and stored elsewhere before the fire. At bottom left is the Christmas card the family sent just weeks after fire destroyed their home.

16 |


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They set about rebuilding using the few salvageable items from their home that remained. They used bricks found inside the previous home’s chimneys to create a magnificent open foyer and great room. Their island top and dining room table were constructed from old flooring from their attic that had been removed from the home and stored elsewhere prior to the fire. With the rental house furnished, she decided to keep frequenting yard sales because she didn’t have the upfront money to furnish her dream home with new items. Quickly, she filled her garage. “When we moved in, we pretty much had everything,” recalls Grant. The family moved into their new home in October 2008. Grant would estimate that 98 percent of their furnishings are “yard sale stuff ” – with a few pieces from her family and some thrift store finds. “There is nothing you can’t find at a yard sale,” she said. “If you have time and patience, you can find it all.” In retrospect, Grant fully believes she could have even built the house from materials she finds at yard sales. Every week, Grant spends an hour Thursday night and an hour Friday night combing through her favorite yard sale websites to map out a route for her weekend excursion. Her game plan is to concentrate on an area where she can visit the most yard sales during her outing. Grant jokes that yard sale-ing has gone from a hobby to an addiction. She rarely comes home empty-handed, and she’s admittedly haunted by the items that she let get away. Friends – most of whom have been dragged along a time or two –

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Beautiful as it now is, “this is just a house,” Kathy Grant says of her home in Newnan. The family rebuilt on Sullivan Road following a fire.

joke that Grant finds something everywhere she goes. “You’ve just gotta dig,” said Grant. And everywhere she goes, she runs into her new group of yard sale friends. Grant admits that when she started yard sale-ing, she thought it was a temporary thing. “It’s fun! I can’t go anywhere and pay full price ever again.” Her best tip for yard sale-ing newbies: “An address means nothing.” In other words, don’t assume that the location of the yard sale has any bearing on the quality of the items being sold. Secondly, “there’s not enough time to visit them all.” Go in with a game plan. Grant sticks to Coweta and Fayette counties when she’s shopping for bargains. And, in the case of yard sale-ing, the early bird doesn’t always get the worm. Grant said she leaves when she gets up and she never has trouble finding a few deals during her outing – and she’s found peace with never knowing what items she missed out on. Grant says the fire was the great lightbulb moment of her life. She may have a new hobby, but she frequently reminds herself that it’s “just stuff.” When she reflects on her family’s tragedy at Thanksgiving, she’s grateful for the health and safety of her loved ones and for the outpouring of love and support from her community. The homemade Christmas card her family sent out in the weeks following the fire says it all. It contains a photograph of the Grants standing in the ruins of their former home holding a holiday wreath. Their message that year: It’s not what you have, but whom you have that’s important. The photo reminds her that, no matter what, “this is just a house.” NCM

18 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE


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THE HERITAGE SCHOOL imagine the possibilities

* Competitive athletics, AA division, GISA * Individualized college counseling program * Extended day services * Bus service to selected areas * Foreign language instruction K-12: French, Spanish, and Latin * Performing and visual arts programs * Classroom Smartboards and computer labs * 15 Advanced Placement courses offered

Call for a personal tour today Now accepting applications for the 2011-2012 academic year The Heritage School is an independent, college preparatory school serving students ages 3 through twelfth grade. We are dually accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and by the Southern Association of Independent Schools (SAIS).

2093 Highway 29 North Newnan, Georgia 30263 770.253.9898 www.heritagehawks.org


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Behind the scenes at a family Christmas Tree Farm By Sarah Fay Campbell | Photos by Bob Fraley ince 2003, the Lovell family of Senoia and Newnan has been planting and trimming, tending and loving, the trees on their Christmas tree farm. The family includes Doyle and Jackie Lovell, son Jerry Lovell and his wife Stacy, daughter Cheryl Martin and her husband Scott, and their grandchildren. Originally, they thought owning a tree farm would be easy. “You’re thinking, you have harvest time once a year. How hard can it be?” said Cheryl.

Cheryl Martin

20 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE

“We didn’t know!” Harvest is once a year, but a tree farm is a yearround job. In addition to tending to the trees themselves, it’s “keeping the grass cut, fighting the fire ants, those kinds of things through the year,” Cheryl said. “It’s a whole lot more work than what we thought it was going to be.” But it’s fun, too. Doyle and Jackie Lovell bought the tree farm property on Crawford Road, adjacent to property they already owned, several years ago. For many years,


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Cheryl Martin says it was her father’s idea for the family to open a Christmas tree farm. Everyone in the family helps out, whether it’s spring planting season or Christmas.

Doyle used it for hay growing. But “that just got to be too hard of a job to keep up on his own,” Cheryl said. The Martins had just moved back to Georgia from California and “mom said ‘I want to do something productive with the land,’” Cheryl said. “We thought – what about a Christmas tree farm?” 22 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE

They did some research, hooked up with the Georgia Christmas Tree Association and talked to other farmers. “We thought, well, we’ll give this a shot. And seven years later, here we are,” she said. They planted their first crop in 2003. “We just kind of did research on it and did what we thought we

should do,” Cheryl said. They started with small “linersized” Leyland Cypress that can’t go into the ground for a year. They quickly switched to buying gallonsized seedlings. They’ve also diversified, adding rows of Carolina Sapphire and Murray Cypress. The Carolina Sapphire has a blue tint and a great Christmas tree scent. The Murray Cypress variety has stronger branches that hold up better under heavy ornaments. The Lovells had considered growing landscape trees but “my dad really wanted to do the Christmas trees,” Cheryl said. He had fond memories of cutting his own tree and “really wanted that family experience,” she said. “So there was a romantic idea to it from dad’s perspective.” The first year the farm was open for business, 2006, “we just had a pop-up tent and a fire. We opened the gate, we did a little bit of advertising, and sold some trees,” Cheryl said. Now, they offer hot chocolate and cider, boiled peanuts, and have built a new fire ring. They’re planning on adding a hay ride, Cheryl said. “It is a family environment. We want to make it safe and fun.” Everybody helps out at the farm. “We have a lot of hands on. We touch every tree,” Cheryl said. Her mother lives right next door so “she is out here every day,” Cheryl said. “It is very personal, because we are out here.” Jackie Lovell retired last year and working at the farm “keeps me out of trouble, most times,” she said with a smile. Everybody gets involved in spring planting. “I can’t ride on the tractor or anything,” said Cheryl’s oldest


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daughter, McKinley, 13, but “we’re coming behind and dropping trees in and then planting them,” she said. “I guess I’ve learned how to plant a pretty good tree.” McKinley even operates her own sideline business selling snowman, reindeer and Grinch “poop.” The poop – marshmallows, green M&M’s, or Whoppers, respectively – is sold in little bags with a “cute little poem,” McKinley said. “I hear you’ve been bad, so here is the scoop. All you get this year is ... poop,” she said. “It’s really funny to have the adults come in and you ask them if they want to buy some poop,” McKinley said. “They don’t get what you are talking about at first, then you show it to them and they laugh,” she said. “We sell a pretty good amount of those.” McKinley wanted to be more involved, so she and her mom came

up with the poop peddling idea. McKinley and her sister, Reagan, love being a part of the tree farm. “I think it is really cool,” said Reagan, 9. “It is challenging to work there, but I still think it is fun,” she said. And their friends love to spend the night when they know the family will be working at the tree farm the next day.

“If you like nature, you should really come there,” Reagan said. “I think they get to have an experience that so many kids don’t get to have,” said Cheryl. “They’re learning about money and the cost of supplies and having to talk to customers, so it’s a good learning thing for them,” she said. But more than that, “it’s something they’ll remember.” NCM

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Setting the

Holiday

Table Photos by Bob Fraley

or many local ladies, creating a lovely table for family and friends to enjoy is one of the pleasures of the holiday season. Local churches have in recent years become a great resource for decorating ideas. Many of them hold an annual event in November or early December where members decorate elegant tables which are then presented for the enjoyment of all. Sometimes it’s an afternoon tea event, and other churches choose 24 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE

to hold a more formal dinner cloaked in candlelight. It’s always fun to see how each table hostess interprets the holiday theme, whether she’s using contemporary dishes and accents, heirloom family china, or a hodgepodge of pieces chosen for a certain theme. Last year the ladies of Newnan’s First United Methodist Church invited us to tour their Christmas dinner, and we hope you’ll be as inspired by their beautiful tables as we were!


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Salute to Santa < Vintage plates featuring Santa’s likeness shine on gold chargers at this Santathemed table.

Silver Splendor

Traditional Red carnations and Christmas greenery spruce up a classic red and green table setting featuring Spode’s popular Christmas dishes. >

<

A soft green color palette spotlights a table set with Christmas dinnerware and elegant crystal and silver accents.

Radiant Reds A patchwork quilt topper pulls together all the elements in the red and green table at left. At right, poinsettias are prominent in this tablesetting, featured in both the table linens and the napkin rings. 26 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE


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PRESENTING ANOTHER

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eautiful homes and cottages with acres of wellmanicured grounds, wisdom and wellness classes, excursions, activities and spiritual services are only a part of what makes Wesley Woods so attractive. Transportation, housekeeping, maintenance upkeep and chef prepared meals offer active, involved retirees all the charm of a friendly neighborhood. Both you and your family will appreciate the peace of mind that comes with continuing care. Now is the time to secure your retirement future. The BeneďŹ ts of Continuing Care Our Continuing Care Retirement Community offers independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing care, all in one location, should your health needs change.

Come to Wesley Woods. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Love How You Live! Call 770-683-6833 to schedule a complimentary lunch and tour! 7ESLEY7OODSn(IGHWAYs.EWNAN '! WWWWESLEYWOODSNEWNANCOMs   Wesley Woods of Newnan-Peachtree is part of Wesley Woods Senior Living, Inc. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a not-for-proďŹ t corporation serving Georgia seniors since 1954.

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Karen Dailey decorates her table at last year’s Christmas dinner at First United Methodist Church in Newnan. Dailey used a variety of family pieces, including her daughter’s Bernardaud Grenadiers china, her mother’s silver and her grandmother’s ruby red berry bowls.

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Upcoming Ladies Christmas Luncheons, Dinners & Teas in Newnan â&#x20AC;˘ Royal Baptist Church, Saturday, Nov. 6, 5:30 p.m. dinner, with Betty T. Smith speaking. 770-251-7762 â&#x20AC;˘ First Baptist Church Newnan, Sunday, Nov. 14, 12:30 p.m. luncheon following the morning worship service, 770-253-0797 â&#x20AC;˘ Bethlehem Baptist Church, Newnan, Saturday, Nov. 20, 5:30 p.m. Christmas Traditions dinner. (Tickets must be purchased in advance.) 770-583-2394 â&#x20AC;˘ First Methodist Church Newnan, Tuesday, Nov. 30, 6-8 p.m. dinner, with Lori Wilson speaking. 770-253-7400

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â&#x20AC;˘ Unity Baptist Church, Saturday, Dec. 4, 5:30 p.m. Christmas Treasures dinner, 770-253-2483

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DOWNTOWN

â&#x20AC;˘ Crossroads Church, Friday, Dec. 3, 6:30 p.m. dinner, 770-254-0291

â&#x20AC;˘ Orchard Hills Church, Afternoon Christmas Tea, Saturday, Dec. 4, 2-4 p.m. 678-854-9180

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www.downtownchurchofchrist.com NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010 | 29


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C

Delicious

Holiday

ookies

By Angela McRae and Deberah Williams | Photos by Bob Fraley

Whether you prefer large-scale celebrations or small family gatherings, chances are you can use a new cookie or candy recipe to serve this Thanksgiving and Christmas. Recently we baked up several batches of our favorite treats and had a tasting at the offices of The Times-Herald and Newnan-Coweta Magazine. The sweets were a real hit, and we wanted to share our recipes with you!

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“Oatmeal cookies dipped in chocolate – OUTSTANDING.” — Debby Dye, Graphics Manager

CHOCOLATE-OATMEAL CHEWY COOKIES 2/3 cup butter or margarine 2 cups quick oats 1 cup sugar 2/3 cup all-purpose flour 1/4 cup corn syrup 1/4 cup milk 1 teaspoon vanilla 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 (12-ounce) package semi-sweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Melt butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Remove from heat, then add oats, sugar, flour, corn syrup, milk, vanilla and salt. Drop by half-teaspoons onto foil-lined cookie sheet sprayed lightly with cooking spray. Bake for 8-10 minutes or until edges are just starting to brown. Let cool. (Tip: If cookies are well-baked but still sticking to the foil, pop the cookie sheet into the freezer for a few minutes and they will peel right off.) To assemble: Spread a thin layer of chocolate between two cookies (flat sides facing) and press lightly together. Dip edge of cookie in melted chocolate and place finished cookie on waxed paper to set. Yields about 3 dozen cookies.

“The Almond Cupcake Cookies were delectable! I love that they had a chewy texture with a crisp exterior – and the tiny bit of icing on top was the perfect finish. This could easily be a new holiday favorite.” — Elizabeth Melville, News Staff

ALMOND CUPCAKE COOKIES 1 cup brown sugar 1/3 cup butter or margarine 1 egg 1 teaspoon vanilla 1 cup white whole wheat flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/8 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 cup almonds, chopped in food processor, divided use

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line 36 mini-muffin tins with paper baking cups (or use silicone baking cups placed on a cookie sheet).

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In a small pan, stir brown sugar and butter over low heat just until mixture is melted and combine well. Remove from heat. When cooled, add egg and vanilla. In another bowl, combine flour, baking powder and baking soda. Add flour mixture to butter mixture and combine. Set aside about 3 tablespoons of the almonds and add remainder to the batter. Fill baking cups about half full, then sprinkle a few almonds over each cup. Bake for about 15 minutes or until tops are just beginning to brown. Cool on wire racks. When cool, you may add your favorite powdered sugar glaze/icing if desired.


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WHITE CHOCOLATE MACADAMIA NUT BALLS 7 ounces (1/2 can) sweetened condensed milk 1/4 cup butter or margarine, softened 1 (16-ounce) box powdered sugar 1 (7-ounce) package flaked coconut 3/4 cup macadamia nuts, chopped in food processor 1 (1-pound) package Almond Bark

Mix sweetened condensed milk, butter, powdered sugar and coconut. Add nuts. Dough will be very stiff. Cover and chill for several hours before shaping into balls about the size of a large gumball. Melt Almond Bark according to package directions, dip balls and place them on wax paper to set. Yields about 50 balls.

GERMAN CHOCOLATE COOKIES

BROWNIE MIX COOKIES

1 box German chocolate cake mix, dry (Duncan Hines German Chocolate Cake Mix was used for this recipe) 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 eggs 3 to 4 teaspoons water 1 (18.25-ounce) container of coconut pecan frosting One (4-ounce) package of German sweet chocolate

1 box brownie mix, dry (Ghirardelli Double Chocolate Brownie Mix was used for this recipe) 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 eggs 1 (7-ounce) jar of Kraft Marshmallow Creme (consistency is best) Optional: 1 (4-ounce) bag semi-hard peppermint candy, chopped 1 (16-ounce) package chocolate candy coating, melted 1/4 cup white chocolate chips, melted

Mix first three ingredients, then add enough water to make mix the consistency of cookie dough. Drop by scant teaspoonful onto baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Cool for a few minutes on baking sheet and transfer to cooling racks after cookies have set. After completely cooled, spread a scant teaspoon of frosting in between two cookies, sandwich-style. Optional garnish: Melt chocolate in the microwave for 30 seconds, remove and stir. Repeat two to three more times until chocolate is melted. Roll filled cookies in melted chocolate or drizzle chocolate on top. Makes approximately 45 cookies.

Mix first three ingredients and, if necessary, add enough teaspoons of water to make mix the consistency of cookie dough. Drop by scant teaspoonful onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes. Cool for a few minutes on baking sheet and transfer to cooling racks after cookies have set. After completely cooled, spread a scant teaspoon of marshmallow creme in between two cookies, sandwich-style. Yield: 45 cookies. Optional garnishes: Roll edges of sandwich cookies in chopped peppermint, or melt chocolate in microwave and dip sandwich cookie in chocolate coating. Cool on parchment paper, then drizzle with melted white chocolate.

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MARKET BULLETIN ORANGE BALLS

Several years ago when I received a cookbook that had belonged to my maternal grandmother, I learned that, like me, she had clipped and saved recipes from the Georgia Farmers and Consumers Market Bulletin. This one is a classic, easy-to-make citruspacked treat that never fails to surprise those who take a bite. And friends I’ve shared these with tell me they just get better after a few days in the fridge! AM 1 (16-ounce) box + 1 cup powdered sugar, divided 1/2 cup butter or margarine, softened 1 (6-ounce) can frozen orange juice (do NOT thaw) 1 (12-ounce) box vanilla wafers, crushed in food processor 1 cup chopped pecans

Combine box of powdered sugar, butter, orange juice, vanilla wafers and pecans. Roll into balls about the size of a large gumball, then roll in powdered sugar. Store in refrigerator. Yields about 5 dozen balls.

“I devoured several Noel Bars. I love all bar cookies, but these had an extra zing with the dried cherries. Loved the orange-flavored cookies – very rich! Gluten-free cookies had great texture.” — Nichole Golden, Close-up Editor

CHOCOLATE CHERRY NOEL BARS

This is based on my mother’s “Noel Bar” recipe. We used candied cherries, chocolate chips and pecans. They were always a very popular Christmas treat in our home. DW 1/2 cup butter 1 cup brown sugar, packed 2/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 large eggs 1-1/2 cups plain flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1-3/4 cups dried cherries (two 5-ounce packages) 1 cup chopped pecans 1 cup semisweet chocolate chips

Mix butter, sugars, vanilla and eggs. Add flour, baking powder and salt and mix well. Stir in cherries, pecans and chocolate chips. Pour into 9 x 3 x 2 inch pan for thick bars or 12 x 15 x 2 inch pan for thinner, more chewy bars. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until center is done. Cut into bars of desired size.

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CANDY CANE COOKIES

This recipe is based on my mother’s recipe for sugar cookies. At Christmas, we would mix up multiple batches of cookie dough, roll them out and cut out star or bellshaped cookies. We would then press a pecan half in the center of each cookie. Sometimes we would sprinkle on granulated sugar, colored red or green before baking. We thought they were wonderful. DW 1/2 cup butter 3/4 cup sugar 1 egg 1/2 teaspoon soda 1/2 tablespoon vinegar 2-1/3 cups plain flour, plus 2-3 tablespoons 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon red gel food coloring 1 teaspoon mint flavoring 1 (4-ounce) bag semi-hard or oldfashioned peppermint candy, crushed or chopped into small bits 1 (6-ounce) package white chocolate candy coating

Cream butter and sugar. Add egg and beat until creamy. Dissolve soda in vinegar and add to mixture. Add 21/3 cups flour and salt and combine. Divide mixture and store half in refrigerator. To remaining batch, add

36 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE

food coloring and mint flavoring, then mix well. Add enough plain flour until mixture is thick enough to roll into cookies. Chill in the refrigerator for at least two hours. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Remove doughs from refrigerator and form into scant half-teaspoon balls. For each cookie, take a ball of each color, roll into logs of equal length, then twist the two lengths into a candy cane shape. Place on baking sheets lined with parchment paper. The cookies will expand, so don’t space them too closely together. Bake for 5 to 7 minutes. Allow to cool completely on racks. These cookies are delicate so be sure to handle them carefully as hooks sometimes break. Chop peppermint in small pieces in food processor. Place white chocolate candy coating in a bowl and microwave on high for 30 seconds. Remove from microwave and stir. Repeat until white chocolate is melted. Dip edges of cookies in white chocolate to simulate snow. Immediately dip into chopped peppermint candy. (An alternate method would be to drizzle on the white chocolate and sprinkle with chopped candy.) Allow to cool on parchment paper. Yields 3 dozen cookies.

GLUTEN-FREE APPLE SWIRL PASTRIES

This is a gluten-free recipe made from a baking mix. 2 cups Bisquick gluten-free mix 2-1/2 tablespoons butter, softened (divided use) 1/2 cup vanilla almond milk 2 tablespoons brown sugar 1-1/2 large apples or two small apples (peel and finely dice) White sugar Cinnamon In a mixing bowl, combine baking mix and 1 tablespoon of butter using a pastry blender (or use a food processor). Add almond milk and mix well. Roll out dough onto parchment paper into a 12 x 6 inch rectangle. Spread 1-1/2 tablespoons of butter on the dough and top with 2 tablespoons of brown sugar. Layer with diced apples. Sprinkle with a few teaspoonfuls of white sugar and cinnamon. Carefully roll up along the 12-inch side and seal. Slice into 15 equal pieces and arrange pieces on a baking pan lined with parchment paper. Bake at 375 degrees for approximately 20 to 25 minutes or until lightly browned. Makes 15 rolls. Glaze: 1/2 cup Confectioner’s sugar Vanilla almond milk Mix enough almond milk with the sugar until it is thin enough to drizzle over the warm rolls.


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cookie evenly until it is flattened. (This is important because these cookies won’t flatten as well as cookies made with regular flour. This step also prevents

cracks and breaks.) Bake at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes. Substitutions: You can substitute more oatmeal for the oat bran and oat flour for the white rice flour. You can add gluten-free ingredients like your favorite candy, pumpkin seeds, white chocolate, raisins, walnuts or other nuts or dried fruits. Yields 5 dozen cookies. NCM

GLUTEN-FREE MONSTER COOKIES

These cookies have everything a regular cookie has except gluten. Make sure additional ingredients, such as chocolate chips, don’t include corn syrup, fillers and thickening agents that contain wheat or corn. This recipe is not low-fat. It may contain other ingredients that may cause allergies, like nuts, but it is a good alternative for people who have allergies to most gluten-containing grains. DW 1 cup butter 1 cup brown sugar, packed 2/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 large eggs 2 tablespoons Tapioca flour 3/4 cup coconut flour 1/2 cup white rice flour 1/2 cup oat bran 3/4 cup oatmeal 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup pecans 1-1/3 cups dried cranberries 1-1/2 cups gluten-free chocolate chips

Mix butter, sugars, vanilla and eggs. Add flours, oats, baking powder and salt and blend well. Stir in remaining ingredients and combine. Form into teaspoon-sized balls and place on baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Use a glass to press each

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Piedmont Newnan Hospital Auxiliary event

By Nichole Golden | Photos by Bob Fraley

Photo courtesy of Bob Shapiro

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he Piedmont Newnan Hospital Auxiliary will reprise its Decorator Show House this November, featuring the Georgian-style mansion at 74 Jackson St. in Newnan. The auxiliary opened Decorator Show Houses in 1990 and 1992 as an alternative to its annual Candlelight Tour of Homes. Several talented local designers, businesses and the Newnan-Coweta Historical Society are part of the 2010 Show House. Barbara Tumperi and Julie McKinney, representing the auxiliary, are the chair and cochair for the Show House project. Tumperi says proceeds from the Show House will provide scholarships for children of hospital employees and support the auxiliary’s pledge to the Women’s Diagnostic Center. Each designer is responsible for a specific area of the two-story red brick home, constructed in 1937-38. “I’m doing the breakfast room,” said Janet Cantrell of Encore Décor. The small room features a bay window, and Cantrell has searched for the perfect table and chairs and focused on accessories to emphasize the room’s charm. Martha Ann Parks of Panoply Interior Design is decorating the home’s master bedroom and a series of rooms off the master. “We’re calling it the lady’s retreat,” Parks said of the adjacent space. The master bedroom will be decorated in a monochromatic theme with a “pop of color,” said Parks. The lady’s retreat will be contemporary yet will display vintage frocks on loan from the historical society, Parks said. Other participating designers and businesses are Knox Furniture, Cheryl Simpson of CCS Interior Design, Cook Office Supply, Jamie McPherson of Hearth & Home Interiors, and Ethan Allen. The home was designed by well-known Atlanta architect Kennon Perry, who also designed the neighboring Newnan Hospital and the Coweta County Administrative Building on Perry Street. The house was first

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Janet Cantrell of Encore Décor, Martha Ann Parks of Panoply Interior Design and Pamela Prange of the Newnan-Coweta Historical Society are among those helping with the Decorator Show House in November.

Pamela Prange

Several talented local designers, businesses and the NewnanCoweta Historical Society are part of the 2010 Show House. 40 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE

Janet Cantrell

home to Ellis H. Peniston and his bride, Mildred Arnall. Contractor Tom Ball of Newnan hired both local artisans and out-oftown specialists in building the home. The windows and doors were all fabricated by the R.D. Cole Manufacturing Company of Newnan. Carved limestone lintels cap all windows, and a wide limestone band surrounds the house at the bottom of the upper windows. The heavy single front door with sidelights is topped with a molded plaster design matching the capitals on the fluted columns at the frame. The lanterns are electric antique carriage lanterns. A suspended curved staircase greets guests entering the foyer.

Other highlights of the home include a formal dining room with decorated mantel, black walnut-paneled den, and powder room with wrap-around mirrors. The Penistons, known fondly as “Bunny” and “Old Man,” were generous members of the Newnan community. They had no children of their own and willed their home to Mrs. Peniston’s niece, Susie Arnall Mann Thomasson. She and her husband, Dr. James J. Thomasson Jr., returned to Newnan in 1967 upon completion of his surgical residency and service in the U.S. Navy. The Thomassons raised their four children in the home and sold the home to Newnan Hospital in 1988. Newnan Hospital added a long, covered walkway to join the two buildings. The home served as its administrative hub. The Show House will be open to the public November 20-23. Hours will be Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday from noon to 5 p.m., Monday from noon to 7 p.m. and Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets are available for a $10 donation and will be sold at the door. Martha Ann Parks


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Above left, Inger Gilstrap of Ethan Allen and Cheryl Simpson of CCS Interior Design, at front, and Eddie Cook of Cook Office Supply and Julie Ruble of Two Turtle Doves, at back, are among those helping with the Decorator Show House. At right, Cheryl Simpson, Barbara Tumperi of the auxiliary and Inger Gilstrap discuss preparations for the Show House.

Pre-sale ticket locations include the auxiliary gift shops at both Piedmont Newnan and Piedmont Fayette Hospitals, Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Book Store,

Panoply, Knox Furniture and Encore Décor, all in Newnan, and Ethan Allen in Peachtree City. A visit to the 2010 Decorator

Show House will be a lesson in architecture and Newnan history and serve to inspire your own home design and decorating plans. NCM

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Newnan-Coweta Magazine presents

Christmas Tea at Holly Cottage ew things are more rewarding than giving a gift to a needy child at Christmas. If you agree, then join Newnan-Coweta Magazine for a Tea for Toys event at Holly Cottage Tearoom in Newnan on Thursday, December 2! Tea for this event will be served in two seatings, at 11 a.m. and again at 2 p.m. Tickets, which must be purchased in advance, are on sale now at the TimesHerald offices for $15 each, and participants are also asked to contribute a toy with a suggested value of $10 at the door on the day of the tea. Toys will be donated to the Coweta County Foster Parent Association for their Christmas toy distribution program. The menu for the event will include Holly Cottageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signature Yorkshire Loaf, two gourmet tea sandwiches, one plump traditional fruit scone with lemon curd, berry preserves and clotted cream condiments, a hand-rolled truffle and a seasonal fresh fruit cup. Dessert will be a Traditional English Sherry Trifle, and of course hot tea and water will be available as well. The tearoom will be decorated in Christmas finery, so this will be a great way to kick off the Christmas season! Each guest will receive a goodie bag including recipes and a special tea party memento. Door prizes will be given away at each teatime, including cup and saucer sets, candles, books, teas, tea accessories and more. Editor Angela McRae and Art Director Deberah Williams will be on hand to share some of their favorite holiday decorating and baking ideas. Seating for this intimate event is limited to 27 guests at each teatime, and there is a limit of two tickets per person. When you purchase your ticket, please specify whether you wish to attend the 11 a.m.-1 p.m. seating or the 2-4 p.m. seating. For more information, e-mail ncmagnews@newnan.com or call 770-253-1576.

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Discussing plans for the Tea for Toys charity event at Holly Cottage Tearoom in Newnan on Dec. 2 are, seated, Frances Smith of the Coweta County Foster Parent Association and Bonnie J. Dejoie of Coweta County DFACS, and standing, Deberah Williams, Newnan-Coweta Magazine’s art director, and Angela McRae, editor. Admission to this special Christmas Tea is $15 – and a toy.

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By Kimberly Campbell | Photos by Bob Fraley

ver a hundred years ago, little Virginia O’Hanlon made history when she wrote her now famous letter to The New York Sun. Dear Editor, I am 8 years old. Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, “If you see it in The Sun, it’s so.” Please tell me the truth, is there a Santa Claus? Virginia O’Hanlon Reading this letter (and the editor’s brilliant and thoughtful response), I wondered how people nowadays would answer that question. Is there a Santa Claus? Do people still believe? I sure hope so – because Santa is a tradition of

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the heart and mind. He is a symbol of believing in something good, even when you cannot always see it or touch it. Santa spreads joy to everyone by faithfully delivering happiness, wonder and delight. While Christmas for most of us holds a deeper spiritual meaning that shapes our lives and hearts all year, have you ever noticed that especially during the holidays, folks have a tendency to open their hearts wider, be more charitable, be kinder to strangers and spend more time with family? If Santa Claus and the good Lord can inspire us to do all that, then I will forever be a believer. So, yes, Coweta, there is a Santa Claus!

The Brooks family Kyle, Jodi, Dalton, 9, and Cory, 6, Sharpsburg The boys attend Brooks Elementary “We believe in Santa Claus because he is an inspiration to the meaning of Christmas and the gift our heavenly Father gave. Just as our heavenly Father gave his only Son for us, Santa gives graciously to all the good boys and girls. Santa Claus is someone that children can respect for his jolly spirit and selfless attitude when our world is all about, ‘What can you do for me?’”

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Anna Marie Campbell, 10 Newnan Fifth grader, Brooks Elementary “I know he’s real because I’ve done research. Santa Claus used to be a saint. Then Mother Nature gave him magical powers to be everlasting.”

Newnan Mayor Keith Brady and granddaughter Grier Brady, 1 “I still believe in Santa Claus because the spirit of giving brings out the best in all of us. As soon as the Christmas season begins, smiling faces appear on every corner; then you see the sparkle in the eyes of children and you just believe! Santa Claus of course is part of this magical time of year and he makes you believe anything is possible! I wish everyone in Newnan a very Merry Christmas.”

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Carolyn Walz Kramlich Newnan “I wanted a blue bicycle for Christmas. Weeks before, my parents explained that a bicycle was a very expensive gift for a five-year-old; there would be no other presents. When I awoke Christmas morning and found not only a bicycle but also a red doctor’s bag and a Tiny Tears baby doll, I knew there was a Santa Claus—and he had more money than my parents did!”

Andrew, Jack, and Anna Seppings Ages 4, 8, and 10 (Pre-K, third grade and fifth grade) Brooks Elementary “Santa Claus gives everyone a present but nothing for naughty children!” — Andrew “He eats cookies and is a very nice man. No one could get into our house anyway because we’d hear—we have good ears. It’s magic!” — Jack “We write letters to Santa Claus every year. I keep mine a secret. And he brings exactly what I ask for!” — Anna

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Visit LaGrange for Exciting Holiday Events! November 10 U.S. Army Field Band & Soldiers Chorus Free Concert 7:30 pm First Baptist Church Downtown LaGrange November 20 Candlelight Holiday Sip & Shop 5-7 pm Downtown merchants will host a special evening of holiday shopping with different wines and beverages to sample.

November 21 Holiday Open House 12-5 pm Shop locally in downtown LaGrange while you enjoy refreshments and in-store specials. A guide will be provided to customers for participating merchants.

December 2 Mingle with Kringle 3-5:30 pm Join Santa and Mrs. Claus at the Chamber Plaza for photos, fun and a few surprise guests!

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December 2 Annual Downtown Christmas Parade 6 pm Kids and grownups of all ages wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss our biggest parade event of the year. Join us downtown for some Christmas cheer!


DowntownLaGrangeHolidayCalendar Five Exciting Events

Holiday Open House Sunday Nov. 21, 12-5 pm

locally in downtown LaGrange while you enjoy refreshments and in-store specials! A guide will be provided to customers for participating merchants and restaurants*.

Mingle with Kringle

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Thursday Dec. 2, 3-5:30 pm

Santa and Mrs. Claus at the Chamber Plaza for photos, fun and a few surprise guests!

Shop

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Thursday Dec. 2, 6 pm

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Kids

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Actor Jeff Allen is ready for his role as Crumpet the elf in David Sedaris’ SantaLand Diaries, to be presented by NCTC in December.

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The reluctant

of Jeff Allen By Kenneth R. Wilson | Photos by Bob Fraley

t is a brisk fall evening with the temperature hovering around 45 degrees – a sure sign that, ready or not, the holiday season has arrived in Georgia. Retail stores explode with flamboyant holiday decorations, blinking lights, the overpowering smell of cinnamon and 1,000 renditions of “Jingle Bells.” Their carefully crafted winter wonderlands, splattered with red, silver and gold, whip most people into a buying frenzy. But on this chilly night, despite milliondollar attempts by big-box retailers, there just doesn’t seem to be any HOLIDAY SPIRIT. For some, the search for holiday cheer leads them to their local theatre company, where one professional actor notes, “People see a lot of

theatre over the holidays. It’s probably the busiest time of the year.” There are two productions on the Newnan Community Theatre Company’s holiday calendar. One of them is David Sedaris’ SantaLand Diaries, a one-act production with one actor playing the part of Crumpet the elf. Jeff Allen, who plays the part of Crumpet, has a bubbly demeanor which stands in stark contrast to his character in The SantaLand Diaries.

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Jeff Allen, a veterinarian as well as an actor, says his favorite holiday is basketball’s Final Four Weekend, but Christmas is a close second.

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The dark comedy tells the story of an unemployed aspiring soap opera writer trying to make ends meet working in Macy’s SantaLand display. Allen says, “The play gives us the behind the scenes, hilarious, truelife story of David Sedaris’ adventure from finding the want-ad, applying, training, working with fellow elves and the Santas, interacting with families and kids, right through Christmas Eve.” Crumpet pulls no punches detailing the bad behavior of rude customers and the peculiar personalities of his coworkers. Sedaris first recited The


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SantaLand Diaries on National Public Radio in 1992. Since then, Sedaris has become a best-selling author and his story is now a Christmas tradition for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;bah humbugâ&#x20AC;? crowd. It was Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s idea to do SantaLand Diaries here. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that it is everything I want in a play,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are parts which are funny, sarcastic, witty, touching and droll.â&#x20AC;? Allen can relate to Sedaris and shares a similar sense of humor with the author â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a strange revelation for such a chipper personality. By day, Allen is a Peachtree City veterinarian and spends Saturdays working with the Newnan-Coweta Humane Society. He moved to Newnan in 1993 and immediately became involved with the Newnan Community Theatre Company. He

acts, directs and works behind the scenes on three or four productions each year. Like Sedaris, Allen spent his childhood in North Carolina. But, herein lies the first clue that connects this happy actor to this angst-riddled play. He gets more excited about college basketball than he does about mistletoe and wassailing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In fact, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m named after the former Duke basketball player Jeff Mullins, who also happens to have the same birthday as me,â&#x20AC;? he admits. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clear basketball is Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite sport, but he offers a surprising answer when asked about his favorite holiday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favorite holiday would have to be the NCAA menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball Final Four Weekend,â&#x20AC;? he says.

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Why? Allen elaborates, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although it may not be officially recognized as a religious or state holiday, it is one of the most sacred times of the year, especially when Duke is still in there!â&#x20AC;? He adds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmas would be a close runner-up though.â&#x20AC;? At this point, Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HOLIDAY SPIRIT is suspect. He later confirms his views on the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I personally get into some of the aspects of Christmas but not all of them.â&#x20AC;? Such as? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love the traditions that seem to get passed from one generation to the next.â&#x20AC;? Then Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest in The SantaLand Diaries becomes apparent when he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hate the commercialism and the chaos that

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has seemed to become synonymous with the holiday shopping season.â&#x20AC;? Despite his glowing demeanor, Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire to play Crumpet appears to be an outlet for his personal holiday season frustrations. So why did Allen want to do such a dark play in the middle of this cheerful season? After a brief moment of reflection, Allen responds, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything I can do to help those around me enjoy life a little more, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m all for it.â&#x20AC;? Then the actorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HOLIDAY SPIRIT comes into full view when he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the years, Newnan Community Theatre Company has given me a creative outlet for learning the art of theater, and I just want to keep returning that gift.â&#x20AC;? And what a perfect gift it is. NCM

The SantaLand Diaries by David Sedaris, a one-man show starring Jeff Allen and directed by Tony Daniels, will be presented at the Newnan Community Theatre Company Dec. 10-12 and 17-19. NCTC will also present A Christmas Twist, a humorous Christmas tale by Doug Armstrong, Keith Cooper and Maureen Morley, Dec. 9-12 and 16-19. Dave Dorrell directs. For ticket information, call 770-683-6282 or visit newnantheatre.org.

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D a v i d B o y d J r.

Painting from the

HEART By Alex McRae | Photos by Bob Fraley

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ost kids who scribble on their bedroom walls earn a spanking for their efforts. David Boyd Jr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reward was encouragement and applause. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not surprising since his mother, Rosalyn, is a longtime patron of the arts and his dad, David Sr., is an illustrator and political cartoonist whose work has appeared in newspapers from coast to coast.

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David Boyd Jr.’s splashy, abstract painting style is unmistakable. Above, some of Boyd’s pieces were featured at Panoply in downtown Newnan at Main Street Newnan’s fall Art Walk.

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In fact, once Boyd Jr. showed an aptitude for art, his parents left the walls of his bedroom white and bare to give him a bigger work space. “I started drawing on the walls as soon as I could hold a pencil,” Boyd says. “Nobody complained so I kept it up.” By the time he graduated from The Heritage School Boyd was the go-to guy for all things artistic, providing illustrations for everything from school publications to promotional posters. No one was surprised when Boyd enrolled at the Savannah College of Art and Design, but few knew his plans didn’t include painting pretty pictures. “I wanted to be an architect,” he says. “It sounded mature and responsible and grown up.” Boyd’s dreams were dashed when one look at the math and science requirements for an architecture degree took his breath away. “I knew right then and there it wasn’t going to happen for me,” he says. Boyd tried graphics and eventually focused on illustration. “It made more sense than anything else,” he says. “I knew it wasn’t exactly right for me, but at least it was art.” Boyd also dabbled for the first time with oil paints. He knew nothing about color or technique, but was still proud of his early efforts. His professors didn’t share his enthusiasm. “Let’s just say it didn’t elicit the response I’d hoped for,” Boyd says. “It was very disheartening.” Boyd graduated from SCAD in 1995 and headed back to Newnan determined to earn a living as a freelance illustrator or cartoonist. Boyd’s political cartoons were well-received and are now syndicated in several newspapers. But cartoons didn’t pay the bills and Boyd shopped his illustration work to scores of commercial firms and advertising agencies, but lost job after job to “artists” more skilled with a computer mouse than a sketch pad and pen. “I had followed my own footsteps right into extinction,” he says. “It was a pretty low point for me.” Boyd fell back on the skills he sharpened working for Headley Construction during school breaks and started painting houses. He knew the work would never cause critics to swoon, but he was calling his own shots and at long last, getting paid to put paint on something.

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I remembered how much I loved crawling around the old beat up cars and tractors at my grandmother’s house and I knew I was painting a piece of my heart.” — David Boyd Jr.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;I loved working alone and the physicality of it,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was just what I needed.â&#x20AC;? Demand for Boydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work grew and he had to hire friends to help. Soon the painting venture was all job and no joy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I realized I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cut out to hire or work with other people,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I shut it down.â&#x20AC;? Boyd was pondering his next career move in 1997 when one of his former Heritage art teachers, NancyJeanette Long, became ill and took a leave of absence. Boyd agreed to fill in temporarily. When the job became permanent several months later, Boyd knew he had found a home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I loved teaching,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Better yet, I got excited about art all over again.â&#x20AC;?

Boyd sketched, scratched and covered acres of canvas with fastdrying acrylic paint, but artistic satisfaction remained out of reach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the great painters worked in oils and I felt like Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never be good if I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I kept trying but I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what I was doing.â&#x20AC;? One day he received a call from Newnan artist Millie Gosch. She was a fan of Boydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work and invited him to try plein air, a style of outdoor oil painting first popularized by 19th century impressionist painters. Boyd hesitantly agreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew it may not be my cup of tea,â&#x20AC;? he says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but figured it was a good place to start.â&#x20AC;? It turned out to be the doorway to a whole new world. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d never watched anyone really work with oils or mix colors or even

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use a palette,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I saw Millie work, I was amazed. Three hours that afternoon changed my life.â&#x20AC;? Boyd learned to create a rainbow from a few basic colors and used palette knives to lend a new edge and distinctive style to his work. He painted still lifes and landscapes but found himself drawn more and more to paintings of vintage cars, rusting farm equipment, crumbling motels and old signs still clinging to a few specks of paint. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I finally realized I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just drawn to a bygone era,â&#x20AC;? Boyd says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remembered how much I loved crawling around the old beat up cars and tractors at my grandmotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house and I knew I was painting a piece of my heart.â&#x20AC;? Boydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest work is bold and

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big. His splashy, abstract style is unmistakable and demand for his work is soaring. Boydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings hang in several metro Atlanta galleries and are on display as far away as Highlands, N.C. and Seaside, Fla. His art also graces the walls of the Southern Living Idea House in Senoia. Boyd knows his artistic journey is far from over, but he is finally enjoying the ride. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m finally doing what I want and what I like,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m more comfortable in my skin than Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever been before.â&#x20AC;? NCM

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David Boyd Jr. at work in his studio

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Thoughtful Gardener }

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Nandina domestica Story and photos by Katherine McCall

or the three of us, 1973 was a tottering year. We tottered on a precipice, glancing somewhat longingly back over our shoulders at childhood, innocence and all things familiar. Looking ahead, also somewhat longingly, at Growing Up, junior high, platform shoes and bell bottoms. The nightly news shouted to us incessantly of a war in Vietnam, the IRA in Ireland and an oil crisis. Yet, our lives remained virtually unchanged. It was a confusing, exhilarating and terrifying time which intermittently required a physical and mental retreat. A time to think, muse and slip back into being a child. A narrow row of nandina bushes, flourishing along the west side of our neighbor’s house, provided that retreat. The cool, crumbling brick of the house was one side of our refuge, and the other was the upright trunks of a mass planting of nandina. Behind our nandina “wall,” my two friends and I lived out the secrets of our childhood. Alternate worlds which changed day by day and hour by hour, according to the whim of our imaginations. A brief respite unaffected by the inevitable events which swirled around us. A leafy, earthy place where we were joined by birds and crawling things with an endless, everchanging sky arching overhead. These interludes bolstered us when we rejoined our

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In China, where this shrub originated, it was also thought of as heaven on earth and appropriately named Heavenly Bamboo or Chinese Sacred Bamboo. 68 | NEWNAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; COWETA MAGAZINE


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contemporaries in our teenage rush to engage the world. The nandina hedge was the perfect place to come to terms with life ... a little heaven on earth. In China, where this shrub originated, it was also thought of as heaven on earth and appropriately named Heavenly Bamboo or Chinese Sacred Bamboo. In Gardens and Historic Plants of the Antebellum South, James Cothran provides us with Robert Fortuneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s observations while in China in 1843:

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the winter season at Shanghai, a plant with red berries is seen in the gardens which takes the place of our English holly. The Chinese call it Sacred Bamboo. Large quantities of its branches are brought at this time from the country and hawked about the streets. Each of these branches is crowned with a large bunch of red berries, not unlike those of the common holly, and when contrasted with the dark, shining leaves, are singularly ornamental.â&#x20AC;? The draping red berries and delicate foliage supported by cane-like trunks are a familiar sight in the southern landscape. Nandina domestica, an evergreen

s3AND'RAVEL s#EMENT-ORTAR s'RASSES&ERTILIZER s#ROSSTIES s0INE3HAVINGS s$RIVEWAY0IPES s$ECORATIVE3TONES AND2OCK &RANKLIN2OADs(IGHWAY7ESTs.EWNAN   s- & 3AT .OON NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010 | 69


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shrub, is perfectly suited for our climate and can go for years untended by human hands. The hardiness and ornamental beauty mentioned by Fortune are endearing facets of its personality. Placement in full sun will produce a wider variety of foliage color, but nandina also does well in shade. In the spring, small creamy flowers arrive in clusters or panicles, followed by the hallmark arches of bright red berries. The lacy leaves are green throughout the summer, then in the fall the leaves become tinted with bronze or purple. Winter frosts will cause a deepening of the colors, producing beautiful crimson leaves. Nandina is very drought tolerant but does not like wet feet. In the garden, these shrubs can be used as specimen plantings or massed for greater effect. In the home, the berries and foliage create striking fall and winter bouquets. As the nandina made its way from China to England and finally to the Americas, a legend traveled along with the hardy shrub. When you plant the nandina by the entryway to your home or garden, it will hear and absorb all the household worries and problems. Maybe that is why the nandina hedge provided such a wonderful hideaway. But in reality, it refreshed us because we actually had time to think. Thinking that cannot be done when oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day is full and every minute accounted for. Our little nandina heaven gave us free time in which nothing was scheduled except our imaginations and the beauty of nature. Sir John Lubbock, British archaeologist, biologist and politician, said it well: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earth and sky, woods and fields, lakes and rivers, the mountain and the sea, are excellent schoolmasters, and teach some of us more than we can ever learn from books.â&#x20AC;? NCM

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{ The

Thoughtful Garden er }

Plant Index

Nandina

Common name: Nandina, Heavenl Chinese Bamboo y Bamboo, Sacred Botanical name: Nandina domestic a Description: An evergree suited for the southern n shrub which is perfectly climate and can untended by human go for years hands. Bamboo delicate foliage. -like trunks with The lacy leaves are green througho the summer, then in the fall the leaves ut with bronze or become tinted purple. ening of the colors, Winter frosts will cause a deepproducing beautifu leaves. l crimson Blooms: In the spring, clusters or panicles small creamy flowers arrive in , of bright red berries. followed by the hallmark arches Cultivation: Nandina is very drought not like wet feet. tolerant but does In the garden, these used as specime n plantings or massedshrubs can be effect. for greater Special notes: In the home, the berries and foliage create striking fall and winter bouquets.

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Go to newnancowetamagazine.com to download your next garden journal page, Nandina.

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These horse lovers enjoy

Living by the Rules By Martha A. Woodham | Photos by Bob Fraley

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Today the McKees are very happily married, living hen Mark on a 50-acre Coweta County farm near Grantville with McKee first their horses, dogs and cats. Mark, co-owner of met the woman Cunningham Associates, puts in long hours helping who would clients with their heating and cooling needs, but most become his wife, weekends are reserved for foxhunting with his wife. she laid out three Julie is a full-time horse trainer, producing horses for rules. the sports of foxhunting and eventing. Both recovering The couple belongs to three Georgia foxhunting from bad marriages and worse divorces, the couple clubs, Bear Creek Hounds, Midland Fox Hounds and had been set up by friends on a blind date in October Shakerag Hounds. During the season, from September 1995. He recalls that the evening was going well to March, when Julie Julie McKee Whitlock hunts about McKee said, four times a “We’ve both week, usually been to this on a client’s rodeo before. horse she is Before we go training to be any further, safe while on would you the chase like to hear after a coyote the rules?” or fox. Mark Mark, joins her intrigued, when he can said sure. get away Rule No. from his 1: The horses professional always come duties. first. “The Friendly horses are with other what’s foxhunters important to across the her, and she country, the has been true “The horses always come first” is Rule No. 1 at Mark and Julie McKee’s farm couple to her word: near Grantville. frequently The horses travels from Florida to Virginia to Canada to hunt. In always come first,” he says. 2007, Julie and her horse Leica competed in the Rule No. 2: If it’s not fun, we’re not doing it. “I Masters of the Foxhounds of America’s quest to find had just spent 15 years of not having fun, so I the best hunt horse in America as part of its centennial thought that doesn’t sound so bad,” he says. anniversary celebration. At 24 the oldest horse in the Rule No. 3: It’s always your fault. “She set me up competition and a well-seasoned campaigner, Leica for Rule No. 3, but I thought, that’s OK,” Mark says, bested hundreds of other horses to place third. adding that when something goes wrong when he’s Although his experience had been limited to a few riding, it usually is his fault.

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Horses and fox hunting are passions of Mark and Julie McKee that are reflected in their home near Grantville.

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lessons at camp when he was a teen, Mark had always been interested in riding. But he had never had a chance to learn until he met Julie: “I was smitten by Julie and the horse world. I soon realized she was having a lot more fun than I was.” Julie McKee, who grew up in Atlanta, discovered her passion for all things equine at age 3, when she was just tall enough to hug the knees of her grandfather’s horse. Prince was a notoriously grumpy animal who seemed to detest everyone, especially small boys like her two brothers. But he didn’t seem to mind Julie, even when she curled up on his rump for a nap. Her grandfather was convinced it was because Prince recognized her as a true horsewoman. Beginning at age 8, Julie took the way of most horse-crazy girls – riding

lessons and local shows, spending all of her time at the Westminster School stables, bumming rides on the horses no one else wanted, all of which helped develop her riding skills. She recalls the first time she showed her horse – a $500 bargain that was a crazy mix of Quarter horse-Arab-Tennessee Walker – on a cross-country jumping course. “She ran away with me, and I fell off three times and had five refusals – and we still came in under the optimum time!” Julie recalls. Julie’s mother and grandfather encouraged her horsey ambitions, although her father said horses were a waste of time and sniffed that they made him sneeze. Still, Julie persevered. As a student at Woodward Academy, she spent her senior year career session, when seniors interned in a field that

interested them, working for a real horse trainer, Frank Gombolay. She chose to attend college at Virginia’s Southern Seminary so she could major in horses. After graduation, Julie held a variety of jobs before quitting to follow her true calling: horse training. “I never stopped training horses – I just couldn’t do it full time,” she says, recalling boring desk jobs as a travel agent and mortgage broker. She married, and when her then-husband said, “It’s me or the horse,” she chose the horse. Then Mark McKee came into her life and, like Julie, picked the horses. Since then, the horses have always come first, the McKees don’t do it if it’s not fun, and it’s always, always Mark’s fault. NCM

he depends on you. At Southern Crescent Equine, we know how important your horse is to you. From lameness evaluations to reproduction and emergency services, you can count on us to provide quality care for your horse’s total health.

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Heritage }

Descendants of first Thanksgiving leader still celebrate in Coweta by W. Winston Skinner

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The plantation house at Berkeley in Virginia was built in 1726, but the first English Thanksgiving observance was held nearby in 1619.

he word Thanksgiving brings to mind thoughts of turkey, pumpkin pie, Pilgrims and Plymouth, Massachusetts. Yet more than a year before English settlers landed at Plymouth, a Thanksgiving service was led in the New World by John Woodlief, a native of England who was settling what was then frontier woodland in Virginia.

Capt. John Woodlief, who led the first Thanksgiving in America, has a spot on the family tree of many Cowetans.

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This plaque at Berkeley Plantation recalls the provision calling for a day of Thanksgiving when the settlers landed at Berkeley Hundred and yearly thereafter.

My father’s blessings still bring us to tears as he thanks our Heavenly Father for the reason for Thanksgiving. He always mentions our service men and women, our president, our health, and our family and friends. He always reminds us that our greatest blessing is being together as a family in the United States — Emeline Loughlin of America.”

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Many southern families have an ancestral tie to Jamestown and the first permanent English settlement in America. Several Cowetans who have genealogical ties to John Woodlief have special traditions associated with Thanksgiving. John Woodlief is said to have first arrived in Virginia in 1609, two years after Jamestown was founded. He made at least two return trips – once bringing his family back with him. Then in 1619, as captain of the ship Margaret, he brought 38 settlers to Berkeley Hundred, about 20 miles up the James River from Jamestown. The charter for Berkeley Hundred called for a day of Thanksgiving: “Wee ordaine that the day of our ships arrival at the place assigned for plantacon in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perpetually keept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty God.” The dates of Dec. 4 and Dec. 14, 1619 have been cited as the date for that first Thanksgiving observance. Berkeley Hundred was wiped out in a 1622 Indian uprising. A plantation built there in 1726 became the birthplace of Benjamin Harrison V, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and William Henry Harrison, ninth president of the United States. Thanksgiving is still a big day at Berkeley. The Virginia state tourism site for this year proclaims: “Attend the Berkeley Plantation First Thanksgiving Festival on Nov. 7 to see where English colonists first held a thanksgiving celebration, one year and 17 days prior to the landing of the Pilgrims in Massachusetts.” The site also suggests places to “enjoy your Thanksgiving dinner in Virginia” and even offers a link to “book a Thanksgiving travel package.”


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Many Cowetans can trace their roots to colonial Virginia. Retired teacher Judy Ethridge said her mother was a Pace. The Paces “inhabited Jamestown,” Ethridge recalled. Emeline Loughlin is one of dozens of Cowetans descended from Ezekiel Strickland, who came to north Meriwether County between 1830-1840. His mother, Amy Pace Strickland, was a descendant of those early Paces. An abundance of Richards in the Pace line has made it hard to sort the strands of the family tree. Some genealogists have concluded Amy Strickland was the granddaughter of George Pace, who married Sarah Woodlief, John’s granddaughter. Others believe Amy was the granddaughter of George’s brother, one of the Richards, who married a great-niece of Jane Poythress – herself daughter-in-law of the legendary Pocahontas. Both Loughlin and Ethridge have traditions associated with Thanksgiving. “In 1967 when my father finished his tour of duty in the Navy, we moved to 74 Jackson St. and became part of the holiday rotation in my mother’s family,” Loughlin remembered. “We ate dinner – meaning noon – and we dressed in our finest, making sure we brought the best manners to the table. Our tables were decorated for the season using the china and silverware that told you to behave,” Loughlin recalled. “Adults ate in the dining room – and the children in the breakfast room.” Loughlin remembered the wonderful people who worked for her grandmother, Myrtle Mann, and her great aunt, Katie Arnall Freeman, and how they joined with Loughlin’s mother’s help to prepare and serve

the holiday feast. “We always had the traditional southern Thanksgiving of turkey and dressing, sweet potato soufflé, green beans, rolls and nut pudding,” she recalled. “We ate slowly – enjoying each other and each bite, remembering why we were thankful.” Ethridge was a working wife for her adult life until her recent retirement. “I’ve never had gourmet dinners,” she said. Thanksgiving and Christmas were exceptions. “There are two times of the year when I go all out,” she said. Generally, Ethridge has prepared all the traditional Thanksgiving foods, but risen to culinary heights with her desserts. She makes all the sweets from scratch – even pie crusts. Those who have eaten them know the crusts to be as flaky as those in the Betty Crocker commercials of years ago. “Betty Crocker would kill for my pie crust,” Ethridge said. Ethridge’s husband, Wayne, particularly loves her cherry pie – made with boiled cherries and almond flavoring. Loughlin and her family still celebrate Thanksgiving at the home of her parents, Dr. Jimmy and Susie Thomasson. Her father’s Thanksgiving prayers are a special part of the holiday. “My father’s blessings still bring us to tears as he thanks our Heavenly Father for the reason for Thanksgiving. He always mentions our service men and women, our president, our health, and our family and friends,” she reflected. “He always reminds us that our greatest blessing is being together as a family in the United States of America.” Those prayers would probably have a familiar ring to John Woodlief himself. NCM

{ Index

of Advertisers }

Arbor Place Mall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Bank of Coweta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 BB&T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Carrollton Eye Clinic, P.C. . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Center For Allergy & Asthma . . . . . . . . . .5 Chin Chin Newnan Chinese Restaurant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Coweta-Fayette EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Coweta Medical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Crescent Veterinary Hospital . . . . . . . . .47 Crossroads Podiatry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 The Dinoff School for the Gifted . . . . . .47 Downtown Church of Christ . . . . . . . . . .29 Downtown LaGrange Development . . . . . Authority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 Farm Bureau Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Farm & Masonry Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Franklin Road Animal Clinic . . . . . . . . . .49 GMC Community College . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Grantville Package Store . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Heritage Retirement Homes of Peachtree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Kimble’s Events by Design . . . . . . . . . . .49 The Heritage School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Hollberg's Fine Furniture . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Landmark Christian School . . . . . . . . . . .35 Lee-King and Lee-Goodrum Pharmacies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Main Street Newnan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Mercer University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Morgan Jewelers/Downtown . . . . . . . .47 Newnan Academy of Preschool & Child Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 NGTurf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Oak Mountain Academy . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Phillips Dental . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Piedmont Newnan Hospital . . . . . . . . . . .2 Piedmont Newnan Hospital Auxillary . .15 Radiation Oncology Services . . . . . . . . . .3 The Ritzy Roost . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Sam’s Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Savannah Court of Newnan . . . . . . . . . .17 Southern Crescent Equine Services . . .75 Southern Shooters Hunting & Archery Pro Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Spoon Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 StoneBridge Early Learning Center . . .56 Super Sand Professional Topdressing .71 A Taste of Lemon Restaurant and The . . Lemon Tree Shoppes . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Torrance Construction Company . . . . . .49 Uniglobe McIntosh Travel . . . . . . . . . . . .57 University of West Georgia . . . . . . . . . . .37 Wesley Woods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Wedowee Marine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 West Georgia Hospice Christmas Tour of Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 January/February 2011 Ad Deadlines Published: January 7, 2011; Contract Ads: November 24, 2010; New Ads: December 3, 2010. Call 770.683.6397 for details and advertising information.

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Strangers at the Feast By Jennifer Vanderbes Scribner, $26 Reviewed by Holly Jones They say you can’t judge a book by its cover, but the cover of Jennifer Vanderbes’ latest novel, Strangers at the Feast, gives a hint of the discord in this story. The bottom layer of the image shows a beautifully set table, laid out for a family dinner. The top layer shows the book’s title and author, but it looks like a label on top of that perfectly set scene. This label is tearing. It is being peeled away, torn apart – just like the Olson family. Eleanor Olson wants nothing more than a perfect family. It is all she’s ever wanted, what she was raised to believe she could and should have. At the very least, she wants people to believe she has a perfect family – a loyal husband, two successful, happy children and doting grandchildren. And this Thanksgiving, 80 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE

when the story Vanderbes has created takes place, Eleanor wants her family to have the picture perfect, Norman Rockwell-inspired holiday. From the outside looking in, it would appear Eleanor might get what she wants. Her family is together, gathering at her daughter Ginny’s new house where they will meet Ginny’s recently adopted daughter. Ginny is even excited about cooking her first Thanksgiving dinner for the family. Eleanor’s son Douglas, his wife Denise and their three children are there, another picture of a perfect family. And Eleanor’s husband Gavin, while he isn’t exactly father or even conversationalist of the year, will at the very least watch football with Douglas and eat with his family. A perfect family Thanksgiving, right? Not exactly. Peel away the top layer – or the cover – and you have another layer entirely. There are other forces at work in Vanderbes’ story. Readers get a glimpse of each adult member of the Olson family’s past, what’s really going on under each character’s shiny exterior and why history is catching up with them. A home break-in brings everything to the surface. One Olson’s past puts the entire family in danger; but it also sheds light on the family’s real problems, their true relationship with each other, and what it means to truly be a family. Never judge a book by its cover. Never gauge a family by their appearance. Tear away the top layer of the turkey this Thanksgiving to the meat of the story. You might find Strangers at the Feast, but you will also find a richly satisfying tale.

100 Things Bulldogs Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die By Jon Nelson Triumph Books, $14.95 Reviewed by Holly Jones Glory, glory to old Georgia, Glory, glory to old Georgia Glory, glory to old Georgia, and to…. University of Georgia fans know the rest of that song – however they choose to sing it. They know Sanford Stadium, The Arch, Ugas I–VII, and Larry Munson’s famous calls. There are hundreds of things Georgia fans know about their school, but Jon Nelson has narrowed the list to an even 100 Things Bulldogs Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die. The usual suspects are included, like the Hedges, the 1980 National Championship team, Herschel Walker’s first game, and a play simply known as “Run Lindsay Run!” There are stories in Nelson’s book fans already know but might enjoy reliv-


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ing, like Erk Russell and his Junkyard Dawgs, The Varsity (you’ll crave chili dogs) or Kevin Butler’s 60-yard field goal. There are stories some fans might not know – or not know well. One of these lesser-known stories might be that Frank Sinkwich, who wore number 21 for the Dawgs and was the first player to have his jersey retired, was discovered through a gas station attendant. Bill Hartman, on a recruiting trip for a player who ultimately went to Ohio State, was getting gasoline when the attendant told him the best running back in the state wasn’t the guy Hartman had driven to Ohio for, “it was Frank Sinkwich.” Sinkwich said he’d come to Georgia, if they signed his friend George Poschner too. A lucky deal was struck. Most UGA fans know the name Dan Magill. And the school’s most loyal fan is listed in Nelson’s book. But do fans know Coach Magill once cut the grass in Sanford Stadium with a push mower, he types 148 words a minute – with only two fingers – and he once battled for one point in a table tennis match for an hour and 58 minutes? Coach Magill is a legend and a true Dawg. Nelson’s 101 Things is a book any Dawg can enjoy, even those who believe they know everything about UGA. However, a few warnings must be issued. The book was printed before Damon Evans’ arrest and resignation, so he is included. There is also one item in the book that UGA fans won’t like. Item #100 is, in fact, someone Dawgs love to hate. But we’ll leave it at that. After all, the other 99 items are well worth knowing!

Christmas With Southern Living 2010 Oxmoor House, $29.95 Reviewed by Angela McRae No matter what your decorating or baking style, you can find lots of inspira-

tion in the 2010 Christmas With Southern more contemporary cream and silver Living book. This 30th anniversary edimantel. One of the mantels displays red tion of a holiday favorite has beautiful, poinsettias in silver galvanized buckets, do-able decorating ideas as well as 100all tucked in a garland of burlap. plus recipes to make your holiday a Perhaps one of the most helpful featasty one. tures in the book is its section on Gift Six full menus are presented, celeIdeas. The suggestions for food gifts brating occasions ranging from the tradiinclude recipes for holiday sweets (the tional (a Make-Ahead Progressive Dinner Orange Pralines look tasty) and some and a Christmas Tree-Cutting Party) to more unusual food gifts, such as the more contemporary (a Holiday TexRosemary-Marinated Olives. Directions Mex Party). The southern touch is eviare also included for spa gifts such as dent in recipes such as Roasted Root bath salts, hand scrub and a foaming Vegetables with Praline Crunch, bath oil. Cornmeal Cheddar Scones, CinnamonThe book ends with a Holiday Pecan Cookie S’Mores, and an Andouille- Planner, which features calendar pages Cheese Grits Dressing with Crawfish for November and December and secGravy. tions for list-making, dinner planning Are you a fan of the legendary big and more. If you’re looking for inspirawhite cakes from Southern Living? Then tion for Christmas baking and decoratdon’t miss the four-layer Bananas Foster ing, you will not be disappointed in this Cake or the equally decadent looking latest Southern Living release. NCM Ambrosia Cake. Chocolate lovers will find much to admire, including the Chocolate Chunk Cheesecake and the Mexican Chocolate Bar Cookies with Bittersweet Chocolate Frosting. If you’re looking for decorating ideas, the book offers lots of eye candy for those who want to deck the halls with boughs of holly – or front doors with multiple wreaths, or staircases with small grapevine wreaths. One particularly lovely idea is to cover a square-shaped wreath form with greenery and tie on ribbon-trimmed pieces of old silverplate flatware that have been stamped with words like “Merry Christmas,” “Noel” and “Yule.” Mantels earn a spread of A copy of this book will be among the door their own, and the color prizes given away at our Tea for Toys on Dec. 2. palettes range from traditional See page 42 for more details! red and green to a cleaner, NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010 | 81


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I am Coweta }

Marylyn McPhie By Nichole Golden | Photo by Bob Fraley The Coweta County Health Department offers many valuable programs to protect the public’s health and well-being. Marylyn McPhie, a transplant to Coweta and a health department staff member, is key to helping the department run smoothly. How long have you called Coweta home? It was nine years in June 2010. We moved here in June of 2001 from Long Island, N.Y. (For those familiar with Long Island, Marylyn was born and raised in Glen Cove, and then lived in Bay Shore.) Tell us a little about your family. Husband Victor works at the Coweta County Sheriff’s Office as a narcotics investigator. Daughter Laryssa is a senior at East Coweta High School. She works at Panera and is looking to study nursing at Georgia Southern University after graduation. Daughter Krystal is a freshman at East Coweta High School and is a JV Football Cheerleader and also plays softball with the Sharpsburg Girls’ Softball League. Son Victor is a fifth grader at Willis Road Elementary School and plays baseball, football and basketball. What do you and your family enjoy doing in Coweta? We spend a lot of time playing taxi for our kids, but we also enjoy the restaurants and the shopping. Where we lived in New York, we had to travel at least 30 minutes for a good restaurant and shopping, so having everything right here in our town is wonderful. We also attend St. Mary Magdalene Church, where the people have been so welcoming and friendly from the very beginning, which made for a pleasant transition. We also enjoy the pace, calmness and quiet here, even though native Cowetans would probably beg to differ with me. In New York, it was always so noisy and everyone is always rushing around to get somewhere. It was difficult in the beginning getting used to the pace but we certainly enjoy it now. What is your job at the health department, and what do you like most about working there? Well, I actually wear many hats at the Health Department. I assist and supervise the front desk. I am the translator for Spanish-speaking clients, and I handle the accounting. I enjoy working here because I can honestly say that every day I feel like I have helped someone in need in some way. As Thanksgiving and the Christmas season quickly approach, what are your favorite holiday traditions? Our holiday traditions consist of spending time with loved ones and eating big meals. This is usually the hardest time for us because a lot of our family still live in New York and this is when we miss them the most. What are you most thankful for this holiday season? Being able to spend quality time with my family. NCM 82 | NEWNAN – COWETA MAGAZINE


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You’ll find that partner in your Bank of Coweta banker. Your banker will work to understand the goals of your company and offer sophisticated products to help you reach your destination. Whether it’s our enhanced Business Internet Banking and Business Online Library or our complete array of personal products designed to help you manage your finances, we deliver with commitment. It’s how we do business at Bank of Coweta. Visit us today and discover all the financial services we offer, some which you might not expect from a community bank. > Business Internet Banking > Business Online Library > Business Lines of Credit*

>tŽƌŬƉůĂĐĞ^ŽůƵƟŽŶƐ > Cash Management Services > Commercial Lending*

> Commercial and Personal Deposit Products and Services > Mortgages*

*Subject to credit approval. Bank of Coweta is a division of Synovus Bank. Synovus Bank, Member FDIC, is chartered in the state of Georgia and operates under ŵƵůƟƉůĞ ƚƌĂĚĞŶĂŵĞƐĂĐƌŽƐƐƚŚĞ^ŽƵƚŚĞĂƐƚ͘ŝǀŝƐŝŽŶƐŽĨ^LJŶŽǀƵƐĂŶŬĂƌĞ ŶŽƚƐĞƉĂƌĂƚĞůLJ&/ͲŝŶƐƵƌĞĚďĂŶŬƐ͘dŚĞ &/ĐŽǀĞƌĂŐĞ ĞdžƚĞŶĚĞĚƚŽĚĞƉŽƐŝƚĐƵƐƚŽŵĞƌƐŝƐ that of one insured bank.

Newnan-Coweta Magazine, November/December 2010  

Christmas cookies are featured, plus a thankful Newnan homeowner, I Believe in Sana and the art of David Boyd Jr.

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