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America WHY COWETANS LOVE IT

FOUND TREASURES WHERE TO PICK UP STYLISH "FINDS"

CELEBRATING THE FOURTH


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Have You Visited Us Lately ?

A New Day for Healthcare in Coweta County is Here! Healthcare is a vital component of the infrastructure of any community. As your local hospital, we are dedicated to meeting your growing healthcare needs. Piedmont Newnan Hospital recognizes that your health relies heavily on the strength of the services we deliver.

Successes of 2006 a An agreement reached and executed with Piedmont Healthcare, Inc. for the acquisition of the majority of Newnan Hospital’s assets and the building of a state-of-the-art replacement hospital as soon as necessary processes will allow.

a A re-directed focus on customer service in every aspect of our operations, resulting in significant positive responses from patients and visitors.

a The installation of two hyperbaric chambers enhancing the services of our Wound Treatment Center. a New state-of-the-art 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in operation seven days a week. a The addition of twenty two physicians to our medical staff, either adding to or bringing new specialties to the community, including neurology, infectious disease, oncology, pediatric orthopedic surgery, and hyperbaric medicine.

a Expanded cardiac services with the installation of an in-house, state-of-the-art diagnostic cardiac catheterization lab. a The renovation of labor and delivery suites in our Center for Women & Children. a The opening of a new Sleep Center with four patient rooms and private baths. a A new visitor friendly waiting room for the Surgical Services Department. a The creation of a new hospital department dedicated solely to quality and performance improvement in all of our activities. a Employees identifying a community benefit project and subsequently raising funds to provide medical testing equipment (pulse oximetry) to every school in the Coweta County School System.

60 Hospital Road, Newnan, GA 30263, 770-253-1912, www.newnanhospital.org


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“ My doctors and I worked together. And we made the right choice in treating my cancer.” Cancer treatment has come a long way in the last ten years and Radiation Oncology Services (ROS) has the newest and most advanced treatment choices available today. Our team of specialists works together with patients to plan a road to recovery.

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MAGAZINE Established 1995 A publication of The Times-Herald President

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Marianne C. Thomasson Publisher Sam Jones Editor Angela McRae Art Director

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Submissions: We welcome submissions. Query letters and published clips may be addressed to the Editor, Newnan-Coweta Magazine at P.O. Box 1052, Newnan, Georgia 30264. On the Web: www.newnancowetamagazine.com © 2007 by The Newnan Times-Herald, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Member:

MAGS MAGAZINE ASSOCIATION OF THE SOUTHEAST

WINNER OF FOUR 2007 GAMMA AWARDS (for issues published in 2006) Gold Award for General Excellence, Gold Award for Best Single Issue, Silver Award for Best Photography, Bronze Award for Best Series


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Leave Allergy Symptoms Behind

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ON OUR WEBSITE www.newnancowetamagazine.com

Special Features Web Web extras you’ll find only online. Look for the computer icon through- extras out every issue to lead you to the special content at newnancowetamagazine.com.

In this issue: Join our new online book club! (See page 81 for details and a special giveaway being offered to celebrate our new club)

Free book giveaways: Garage Sale and Flea Market Annual 1,001 Gardens You Must See Before You Die

Online Surveys Guest Book ON OUR COVER

Recipe Box Podcasts Blogs

When you talk about Cowetans known for their patriotism, three names are bound to come up: Col. Willie H. Boyd, Mrs. Norma Haynes and Col. G.D. Hendrix. Read their guest essays to find out what being an American means to them.

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Links of local interest


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contents F July/August 2007

eatures

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PROUD AMERICANS Three of the most patriotic Cowetans we know — Col. G.D. Hendrix, Mrs. Norma Haynes and Col. Willie H. Boyd — help celebrate the Fourth of July by sharing their thoughts on being an American.

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COWETA CELEBRATES THE FOURTH

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WHERE TO CELEBRATE THE FOURTH

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EXPERIENCE NEW FLAVORS OF FRIENDSHIP Manuel Robero and Rene Carballida are two men who came to America seeking better lives for their families. Today they operate two of the growing number of Coweta businesses specializing in Mexican cuisine and groceries.

45

TRASH OR TREASURE?

50 ON PARTIES AND PARADES

RESTORATION TO THE RESCUE

Find out which LaGrange Street porch is party central during Newnan’s annual July 4th parade and fireworks extravaganza.

When that cherished family plate comes crashing down in a dozen pieces, Newnan’s Frederica Barr is the woman to call.

54

DOLLAR STORE DIVAS For a select group of Coweta women, there’s joy to be found combing the thrift stores and consignment shops around town.

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How much is it worth? Nationallycertified appraisers Carlene Collins and Sally Wood know a thing or two about what’s valuable in those Coweta attics and basements.

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From Newnan’s annual downtown parade and nighttime fireworks to the annual barbecue in Moreland and a patriotic play in Grantville, we show you where the action will be in Coweta County on the Fourth of July.

WITH AN APPRAISING EYE

GOING JUNKIN’ At the home of Scott and Liz Barnett of Newnan, vintage finds are repurposed and artfully displayed in a home that is an elegant blend of old and new.

66

PRESERVING FURNITURE — AND MEMORIES Brent Harmon of Newnan has been restoring furniture for more than 30 years, preserving family memories as well as furniture.

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AN AUTOMATIC FRIENDSHIP It may not be Mayberry, but the friendship is a big part of what keeps Floyd Hanie and Barney Boatright restoring old cars together.

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TO JUNK OR NOT TO JUNK Whether you want to store your junk or simply get rid of a load of it, Cowetans can help you manage your stuff.


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Departments 22

LOCAL HERITAGE With a presidential primary just months away, many Cowetans are already thinking about politics. In this issue we take a look back at state politics with the “Three Governors Controversy” which included Gov. Ellis Arnall of Newnan.

38 26

MEET A READER Meet Shannon “Lucy” Garlington, a wife, mother and homemaker who came to Newnan from Louisiana.

28

SADDLE UP Equine veterinarian Larry Olsen puts 200,000+ miles on his Chevy Suburban each year caring for animals in Coweta County and a dozen other counties nearby.

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COWETA COOKS

18

Her Turtle Cheesecake is the stuff of legend, but Coweta Cook Suzanne Moore doesn’t like to talk about her cooking prowess, preferring to let her cooking doing the talking — and that’s just fine with her friends.

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42

FAMILY FUN Let the kids spend a day learning about puppets and the art of puppetry and puppetmaking with a trip to the Atlanta Puppetry Arts Center.

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50

In every issue 10

FROM THE EDITOR’S PEN

80

THE BOOKSHELF

82

10 THINGS I’VE LEARNED

83

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

70 9


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> FROM THE EDITOR’S PEN

The Joys of Junk

D

id you know that Jane Seymour and June Carter Cash were friends and used to go to garage sales together? I just loved learning this fact when I read Seymour’s lovely new decorating book, Making Yourself at Home. While best known for her roles in TV shows and movies such as “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman” and “Somewhere in Time,” Seymour in recent years has become something of a lifestyle maven, known for her artwork and decorating sensibilities. Anyone who’s a fan of garage sales, antique shops or estate sales is a kindred spirit, so it makes me smile to know these two women shared that bond. For months I’ve been looking forward to this issue’s section on Coweta’s own “Trash or Treasure,” and frankly, I’m convinced they’re all “treasure.” In this issue you’ll get the scoop on estate sales, thrift shops and even “decorating with junk,” and I have a feeling some of you are really going to enjoy this. (If there’s a run on the thrift stores, well, so be it.) My best recent junk find occurred close to home. Seeking a quiet place to proofread stories for the magazine, I wandered back to an abandoned darkroom in the

photo department. There was a stool next to a small desk, the perfect spot to read in peace and quiet. The desk had definitely seen better days, its chippy paint peeling from years of photo chemical abuse, but the “bones” of the piece were great; it was sturdy, if small. There was a shallow drawer. I opened it and saw a number of names inside, including the proclamation that “Jackie Wells loves Anderson Walker.” Thus began two great mysteries: 1) Was this an old school desk? 2) Was the old desk being tossed, and if so could I buy it? Billy Thomasson, who owns the newspaper and magazine, answered all my questions. He bought the desk and another like it (still in use downstairs) as surplus from Cook’s Office Supply years ago. He says they’re old typewriter desks from the schools and pointed out holes which once secured the typewriters. The shallow drawer must have been for pencils and typing paper. After Billy offered the desk at a price I couldn’t refuse (free!), I decided it will be just adorable in my craft room painted pink and used for cutting quilt squares. I’ll try to post a picture on the web site once the boss’s trash has been transformed into my new treasure. Warmly,

Angela McRae

Web Extra

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Wondering if your own junk is trash or treasure? Check out listings in the new Garage Sale & Flea Market Annual (Collector Books, $19.95). We’re offering a free copy to one lucky winner at www.newnancowetamagazine.com.

MAGAZINE


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Coweta Celebrates Independence Day

JULY/AUGUST

2007

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What Being an

American Means to Me

t has been a long time since I personally heard the sound of artillery being fired and the stunning sound of small arms fire, the AK-47 and M16. By Col. Willie H. Boyd, U.S. Army (Ret.), A long time since I smelled the Photo by Bob Fraley spent smoke of gun powder, smelled mogas and diesel fuel from our trucks and JP-4 fuel I flew from the exhaust pipes of daily, and I helicopters and airplanes. believed that we were the best It’s been a long time fighting force in the world and we since I observed the have the means to deliver movement of a massive punishment to any adversary we number of troops by helicopters for encounter. either combat insertion or extraction. As Americans, we must always be It has been a very long time since I prepared. Being prepared for war listened to the cry for help from our requires dedication, service and wounded soldiers in combat. It has been a long time for me, but sacrifice. According to John Stuart Mill in the reality is that we have soldiers who 1865, “War is an ugly thing, but not even now are guarding our gates of the ugliest of things. The decayed and freedom. degraded state of moral and patriotic As a Dustoff pilot our job was simple but very challenging. Evacuate feeling which thinks that nothing is the wounded from the battlefield and worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is get them to a medical treatment facility as soon as possible. It has been willing to fight, nothing which is a long time since I felt the excitement more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature of starting the helicopter engine and and has no chance of being free looking at a tactical map of the unless made and kept so by the evacuation site knowing that the area exertions of better men than himself.” will be hot and we would be on a We must maintain a strong suicide mission. This was our task military force regardless of the cost. and we did this without any We need the men and women in rationalization, without any uniform as well as our citizens to compromise and above all without understand that the cost of freedom is any hesitation. We would fly not cheap. anywhere, anytime and any place to I am an old soldier, I am proud get our wounded. I had confidence in the helicopter to be an American, and I love this

I

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land and will continue to defend it until I fade away. Being an American means that we will never have to experience war (death and destruction) on our homeland. As a military retiree and war veteran, it is my obligation to insure that we remain a strong country and we can help by giving back to our community. Being an American means one will be an informed citizen and volunteer for community service. There is no measuring stick that says how much volunteering one should and can do. If one believes the community is the centerpiece of our social being, then the answer is clear: do what is necessary to make our community better. As for me, I am thankful that through the grace of God I have the opportunity to participate and try to make a small contribution to making our local community and our Nation a better place to live. Being an American means that you will look for the good in people and always look for the little things that make a difference. Being an American means that I pledge allegiance to the flag and stand up when “The Star Spangled Banner” is being played. Being an American means that I will never stop dreaming. Being an American means that we should serve the children of the world. They are our future, and one can make a difference. NCM


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I am an old soldier, I am

proud to be an American, and I love this land and will continue to

defend it until I fade away.

— Col. Willie Boyd JULY/AUGUST

2007

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Being an

American is a Great Gift By Norma Haynes, Photo by Bob Fraley

D

uring the 1940s, when World War II was full blown, my daddy was the air raid warden for our street. We lived on Jefferson Street where the Bank of Coweta now stands. In preparation for an attack on our country by the Japanese and the Germans, we had to endure practice air raids during the night. An ear-piercing siren would sound, and we had to put out all the lights and close all the curtains. It was Daddy’s job to take his flashlight and go up and down the street, making sure the street was totally dark so that the enemy planes could not see our homes. During those hours, I lay in my bed, so afraid that we would be bombed, but when Daddy returned, he assured me that we had brave men and women overseas fighting to be sure that the enemy would not come to us. Somehow, I was

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comforted by his words and resolved then to always honor every man and woman who served to protect me and to always honor my country. The freedom I enjoy today has been given to me at a great price by


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brave men and women who have given and are giving their lives that I and all Americans can enjoy that freedom. When I realize how blessed I am that I can express my opinions without fear; that I can vote my convictions; that I can attend the church of my choice; that I can watch what I please on television; that I can travel anywhere in this beautiful country without fear, I am so very grateful. I am so blessed! How can I not honor this country and the people who have worked and died to keep America free! I wake in the mornings and praise God for this beautiful land and all its resources, and I proudly wave the American flag which is the symbol of all that is brave, good and free. My heart truly beats faster when I say the Pledge of Allegiance and when I hear “The Star Spangled Banner” sung as it was written to be sung. Tears come to my eyes when I watch the Honor Guards from our law enforcement agencies and our high schools march by with our American flag. How proud I am. I feel that having the privilege of being an American obligates me to do what I can to serve and to honor at all times. Before my teacher and one of my best friends, Miss Sally Bowen, died, she left me many wonderful words of wisdom. The most important message Sally left me was that I must always honor and serve my church and my country. She lived that advice. Being an American is one of the greatest gifts I have been given, and I will say to my dying day, “I am so proud to be an American, and I pray that God will always bless America.” NCM

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I

am proud to be an American because America is the greatest country in the world. We live in a land that is free, but freedom is not free. Over 1 million veterans have died in past wars for our freedom. I take great pride in paying honor and tribute to the courage, confidence and commitment of those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice of giving their lives for us to be free. I feel as President Lincoln did at Gettysburg when he said, “May these honored dead have not died in vain.” I’m glad to be an American because America does not give up or give in. United We Stand, One Nation Under God. When George Washington faced a much larger British army, he and his army chose to fight for their (and our) freedom. Did the men who defended the Alamo give in? No, even when they knew they would be killed. They died so that others could be free. They gave their lives so others wouldn’t die. When the Japanese army made their strike at Pearl Harbor, did we give in? Or when our troops landed at the beaches in Normandy and things were really bad? No, they fought on to victory! We have a song we

use in the American Legion’s POW and MIA meetings and programs entitled “All gave some and some gave all.” So I remember and honor those who gave all, and I salute and thank those who have given some and those men and women still fighting, giving and serving today. I love our United States flag and the story behind “The Star Spangled Banner.” Even after the 25-hour bombardment of Ft. McHenry, our flag was still there. Why? Because real Americans don’t give in. We don’t call America “the land of the free and the home of the brave” for nothing. I love our national anthem and get chills and feel great pride when it is played and sung. I’m proud to be an American because over two centuries ago a group of our concerned men met in a small Pennsylvania state By Col. G.D. Hendrix, U.S. Army (Ret.), house. They gathered to decide on a course of action. Photo by Bob Fraley Behind the locked and guarded doors they debated for hours whether to sign the Declaration which had

I’m Proud to Be an

American 16

been presented for their consideration. They signed it and made it the greatest document ever in our history, the Declaration of Independence. I am glad to be an American because we can worship God anywhere, any time, and anywhere we desire and believe. God has given America to be free. I’m glad to live in a country where we can help others. Through our senators and congressmen, we are able to cut through some red tape and get benefits for those that deserve and need it. Also, we can raise money for the needy and special situations. We can just help others and those in need. A former state and national


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chaplain of the American Legion talked about the Ministry of Presence. Sometimes just being present with those in trouble, sickness, worry, sadness and sorrow can be of great comfort. I’m glad we are free and can be present for someone’s needs. I am thankful and proud of those World War I veterans that started the American Legion in 1919, and to the 18 men that chartered our Post 57 in 1919. The American Legion, which has 2.7 million members, was responsible for getting the G.I. Bill passed by one vote, and that vote was by a senator from Georgia. I’m proud of Senator Max Cleland and Tommy Clark, both triple amputees from Vietnam. They have spent most of their lives serving America. In some speeches, they have said that on a bunker in Vietnam was written, “Life has a flavor for those who have fought for it the protected will never know,” and also, “In time of war and not before, God and the Soldier men adore, but in time of peace and all things righted, God is forgotten and the soldier slighted.” In closing, I am proud of Maj. Stephen W. Pless and Col. Joe M. Jackson for their service and receiving the Medal of Honor. Col. Jackson, a veteran of World War II, Korea and Vietnam, said it best in 1995 when we dedicated the highways in their honor and placed the monument at the Courthouse. “When you are riding down the highway and you see the signs that say Col. Joe M. Jackson Medal of Honor Highway, don’t see my face and remember my name; see the faces and remember the names of those who didn’t come back.” I have used his great statement in several speeches and think of it each time I see those signs. I love the song “God Bless America.” God has indeed blessed us, God has given America to be free, and God continues to bless us every day. NCM

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Newnan

One of the biggest and best parades in the area, Main Street Newnan’s Fourth of July Parade begins at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, July 4. The parade starts at the City Park at the corner of Temple and Jackson Street and continues down Jackson and LaGrange Street to conclude at Newnan High School. The theme of this

Grantville

Grantville playwright David Wilson will appear as George Washington in “America, the Great,” his play being performed at the John C. Meadows Log Cabin at the Grantville

Each year on July 4, Moreland’s population swells as people from Coweta and surrounding areas flock here to eat barbecue and examine the wares of artists and craftsmen. The barbecue has been held since the late 1940s. White Oak Presbyterian, First Baptist of Moreland and Moreland United Methodist join forces each year to prepare, serve and sell the barbecue. Plates of the succulent barbecue and tasty Brunswick stew will be $7. Serving begins at 11 a.m. at the Lewis Grizzard Memorial Barbecue 18

year’s parade is “Celebrating Freedom.” After the parade there will be children’s activities and entertainment at Newnan High School’s Drake Stadium. Sponsored by the City of Newnan, Coweta County, and the Rotary Club, fireworks begin at dusk. “The great parade and fireworks

Little League Park on July 4 at 6 p.m. “America, the Great” is the story of Timothy Landry and Laurence Cushing, two men who become best friends while serving in the British Army during the French and Indian War but find themselves on opposite sides when the American Revolution breaks out. Landry, who is for the Revolution, joins the Continental Army as an officer, and Cushing, loyal to England, joins the British Army as an officer. In the War they cross paths with

Moreland

Pavilion behind the Moreland Mill. People often begin lining up soon after


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K_\i\ËjX 9XZbpXi[C`m`e^Jkfi\ `ePfliE\`^_Yfi_ff[ display have become a great tradition for the community,” said Alise Cartledge, Main Street Newnan coordinator. “Fourth of July activities in Newnan are hopefully on everyone’s ‘must-do’ list. It’s become another way to enjoy the holiday and really celebrate being an American.”

historical figures including Betsy Ross, General Charles Cornwallis and George Washington. Eventually, the brutality and barbarism of a British officer causes Cushing to switch sides. He is reunited with his friend Landry, and both are at Yorktown with George Washington when General Cornwallis surrenders. This play is dedicated in memory of Wilson’s parents, Emily Gene Smith Wilson and Leonard Suttle Wilson Jr., who Wilson said always did “something big on the

Fourth of July. My parents were of the World War II Generation and were very patriotic.” Admission for the play will be $5 for adults and $3 for children. Tickets are available at Mr. C’s in Grantville; Scott’s Bookstore, the Costume Shop and the Male Academy Museum in Newnan; and at the gate of the cabin when the play is performed by the Grantville Playmakers on July 4. For more information, call Wilson at 770-583-2918.

10 a.m., and the barbecue is sold until everything is gone. Also returning will be the annual Puckett Station Arts and Crafts Festival, which is held during the day. In addition to artists and craft makers of all kinds, antique dealers are considered for the festival, but the focus is on handmade, one-of-a-kind items. An old-fashioned children’s game area will return for a time during the morning this year. Opening ceremonies with the Pledge to the Flag and “The

Star-Spangled Banner” are a longtime tradition, as is the early morning contest for children who decorate bicycles in patriotic style. Plans also include a July 4 family portrait photography area and a Patriotic Pickin’ On The Porch, in which musicians get together to entertain the crowd during the day. That event will be held on the large porch at the Erskine Caldwell Birthplace, which is located on the town square. NCM

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ON PARTIES

& PARADES

By Leigh Knight, Photos courtesy of the Markham family

“Location, location, location,” as the saying goes, and Carol Markham’s LaGrange Street porch is prime real estate during Newnan’s annual Fourth of July parade and fireworks display. For the past 20 years, Markham has graciously hosted

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a porch party for a core group of friends and a few who “wander in off the street,” according to Markham, including one family (who shall remain nameless) who crashed the party year after year until they finally got wise and started bringing a

dessert. Now they are regulars. “People can drop in, but they have to bring something to eat!” jokes Markham. The tradition began even before the parade existed. “When the kids [Matt and Brad,


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L. Jack Cheng, MD, PhD Medical Director

now 29] were younger it was more of an afternoon/dinner event. We’d swim in the pool next door, then cook out and watch the fireworks from our yard,” says Markham. “Then the kids grew up, and it evolved into an adult party.” Markham’s guests enjoy hors d’oeuvres complemented by ice cold margaritas made from Markham’s special recipe, which has developed quite a reputation. “One year we had someone break away from the parade, grab a margarita, and run out the back door,” says Markham, who holds the event rain or shine. “The weather does not affect us at all. We can stand on the front

porch, but the parade may be smaller, and the fireworks cancelled if it rains a lot,” says Markham. “Election years are fun because there are lots more people in the parade to have fun with!” After the parade, partygoers enjoy hamburgers grilled to perfection by Neal Shepard along with an array of side dishes and desserts. Guests have the option of walking to Newnan High School to see the fireworks but most, content from a good meal and afternoon of fun, opt to stay right where they are. “It’s a small town, and we just love it!” says Markham. NCM

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When Georgia had

governors By W. Winston Skinner

olitical pundits gripe about the perennial lack of leadership in government, but Georgia once experienced the opposite problem. In 1947, Georgia found itself in the unique position of having three governors â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at the same time. One of them was Newnan native Ellis Gibbs Arnall.

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When I first came to The TimesHerald as a reporter, Gov. Arnall was a part of day-to-day life in downtown Newnan. It was exciting — but not unusual — for him to visit the newspaper offices. He would walk through our building, chatting with everybody from the publisher to the janitor. I have a nice, fat file on Gov. Arnall that includes a raft of newspaper clippings. Most treasured, however, are the letters from him to me — usually about something I had written. Ellis Arnall was Georgia’s governor from 1943-1947. Family members still living in Newnan recall with pleasure Christmas visits to the Governor’s Mansion during that time.

Gov. Arnall made a name for himself as a reformer. He led in the creation of the University System Board of Regents, lowered the voting age to 18 and helped make the state’s prisons more humane. He also led in the crafting of a new state Constitution. In 1946, Gov. Arnall could not succeed himself. This was in the era when the Democratic Primary decided virtually all state and local races. Eugene Talmadge, a former governor and political powerhouse, was elected to another term in the governor’s seat with Melvin Ernest Thompson, an Arnall supporter and colleague, as lieutenant governor. There had been rumors

throughout the campaign that Gene Talmadge was in precarious health, and 675 Talmadge supporters — rather than voting for the official candidate — had written in the name of his son, Herman. The Nov. 5, 1946 General Election confirmed the TalmadgeThompson victory. On Dec. 21, just three weeks before his scheduled inauguration, Eugene Talmadge died. Thompson figured he was supposed to become governor — having been elected lieutenant governor. The Talmadge camp had other ideas. They took a good look at the new Constitution, the one Ellis Arnall had championed, and found some language that indicated the JULY/AUGUST

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legislature should pick the new governor from among the primary candidates. The legislators voted for Herman Talmadge — on the basis of his write-in votes. Herman Talmadge and M. E. Thompson were not, however, the only people with opinions on the matter. Gov. Arnall referred to Herman Talmadge as “the pretender” and refused to relinquish his post. The new governor had been scheduled to take office on Jan. 15. That morning, Herman Talmadge entered the governor’s office at the gold-domed Capitol with some supporters. Gov. Arnall told him, “Herman, you have no claim to the office of governor.” In the ensuing scuffle, an Arnall supporter sustained a broken jaw, and the Talmadge forces took hold of the office and locked it. Ellis Arnall set up a desk in the Capitol rotunda. He and Thompson filed suit. For several days, three men — Arnall, Talmadge and Thompson — all were governor in the eyes of their respective supporters. Talmadge had possession of the office and the Governor’s Mansion, but the courts ultimately took the side of the others. In the meantime, there were reports that the dead voted — alphabetically — in Talmadge’s home county, Telfair, during the primary. Ben W. Fortson, Georgia’s wheelchair bound secretary of state, sat on the state seal to prevent official action from being undertaken improperly. On Jan. 18, Gov. Arnall relinquished his post to Melvin Thompson. A court ruling in March of that year resolved the issue in Thompson’s favor. I never met Thompson, whose greatest legacy is probably the acquisition of Jekyll Island for the state. I did interview Herman Talmadge. He is one of several luminaries Earlene Scott has brought to Newnan to sign copies of their books. He came with his third wife, Lynda. Gov. Talmadge was affable and had kind words to say for Ellis Arnall, his one-time nemesis. I don’t think Lynda


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Talmadge was aware of the ladies who dropped by the book store just to take a look at her huge diamond ring. Talmadge married Lynda Pierce in 1984, after he had retired from politics. His second wife, Ashburn native Betty Shingler, was his first lady during the three governors fracas and during his subsequent terms from 1948-1955. My path crossed Betty Talmadge’s several times. I remember her dropping by The Times-Herald to be interviewed when she ran for Congress. Though she was unsuccessful, I recall that her ex gave her permission to be listed on the ballot as “Mrs. Herman E. Talmadge.” Later on, Betty Talmadge tried her hand at acting. She played Merle Hannah in the movie version of Margaret Anne Barnes’ “Murder In Coweta County.” My wife, Lynn, went with me to Betty Talmadge’s plantation home at Lovejoy — said to be Margaret Mitchell’s inspiration for Twelve Oaks — when I was covering a fundraiser for Newt Gingrich. I remember Mrs. Talmadge chuckling at what her father-in-law would think of her as hostess of a party for a Republican. Mildred Slemons Arnall was a quiet, dignified lady with an incandescent smile. I remember her particularly when I was a college student at UGA and covered the dedication of a portrait of her husband at the law school. After Mildred Arnall died, Gov. Arnall married Ruby Hamilton McCord. I photographed Ruby Arnall and chatted with her when the statue of the governor was dedicated on the grounds of the Georgia Capitol in 1997. Ellis Arnall’s legacy — before, during and after the three governors crisis — continues. When he died in 1982, Herman Talmadge came to Newnan to pay his respects. NCM

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Meet a Newnan-Coweta Magazine READER

...

Photo by Bob Fraley

Shannon “Lucy” Garlington Tell us the top six things that are most important to you.

Honoring God; Loving my family; Building friendships; Studying and sharing the truths of the Bible; Making things beautiful (decorating the house, the yard or helping my friends find the best “look” for them); Sharing Southern hospitality Your nickname is “Lucy.” How did you get it and what does it mean?

When we were dating, my husband Todd told me he thought the name Lucy suited me better than Shannon and started calling me “Lucy.” Now everyone who’s close to me calls me that. Word is out that you have a beautiful voice and occasionally perform at church, Bible study and for friends. If you were younger, would you have considered trying out for American Idol?

Absolutely! When you were a little girl, what did you dream of being when you grew up?

A singer on stage, so you can see why I would have tried out for “Idol”! You are from Louisiana. When you heard you were moving to Newnan, what were your first thoughts?

My first thought was “Why?” We were so involved in our church ministry in Tallulah, La. but I knew that the Lord had a plan for us and Newnan has been wonderful! What are your favorite things about Coweta County?

I love that Coweta County has everything you need but still has a small town feel. It reminds me of home! Back in the day, were you “Rock ’n Roll” or “R & B”?

I was all about dancing — Gap Band, Stevie B, Prince, Michael Jackson — that type of music (I guess that is funk, R & B, whatever — I call it dance music!) Do you still have lots of friends from high school?

Just a few. I have two best friends from home that I have stayed in touch with since grade school, and we are still real close. I have friends in lots of places. What is your most treasured family keepsake?

My family photo album. Do you do anything special for the Fourth of July?

We usually go to my dad’s house on Lake Bruin in Louisiana and go skiing, set off fireworks and just do “lake stuff.” This year we are having our 19th and 20th year combined high school class reunion. What do you enjoy reading about in Newnan-Coweta Magazine?

I like reading about all the different people in the county and the decorating pieces, the wedding stories and about the diverse people. 26

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MORE ABOUT SHANNON: Shannon is married to Todd and they have two sons, Kaiden, who is 16, and Scout, 13, and “our sweet dog Barkley.” Todd works at Lab Corp, and Shannon says she receives great joy as a wife, mother and homemaker. She will soon lead the Women’s Ministry at Southcrest Baptist Church in Newnan, and she has served on the Leadership Team with Walking in Joy Women’s Bible Study for several years. Shannon went to the University of Louisiana and received a degree in Journalism with a History minor. NCM

Office: 770.252.6860 • Fax: 770.252.6861 608 Hwy 29 N., Newnan, GA 30263 JULY/AUGUST

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A Sure Touch By Martha A. Woodham, Photos by Bob Fraley

W

With a sure touch, Dr. Larry Olsen of Southern Crescent

Equine Services runs his hand down a horse’s leg, his blue eyes behind their wire rim glasses narrowed in concentration as his fingers search for signs of injury — heat or unusual lumps. With patients who can’t say, “Doc, my leg hurts,” an equine vet’s most important diagnostic tools are his eyes and hands to see and feel what’s wrong.

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During a typical day, Olsen sees a variety of cases, and like an emergency room doctor treating humans, he has to be ready for anything. He might administer doses of mineral oil and muscle relaxant to a horse that is colicking, kicking at its belly or rolling in pain from an intestinal impaction. He may have to sew up a shoulder laid open where a horse was kicked, taking care to minimize scarring. He may be called upon to euthanize an elderly horse whose quality of life has declined. Each year, he puts 200,000-plus miles on his mobile office, a Chevy 30

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Suburban packed with the latest in veterinary technology, as he travels from farm to farm. He can administer an ultrasound on a pregnant mare or x-ray a horse’s leg. He depends on his cell phone and portable computer as he roams Coweta County and beyond. His practice encompasses 13 counties, and he sees all kinds of horses, from high-priced show horses worth tens of thousands of dollars to backyard pets who are priceless to their owners. He and his partner, Dr. Jason McLendon, see their first patients at

Sound Advice Dr. Larry Olsen has simple advice for horse owners whose animals are sick or injured: “Don’t panic.” And don’t believe everything you read on the Internet or hear from other people, he adds. “It is a challenge keeping people educated about diseases of horses when there is so much misinformation,” he says. “I don’t have all of the answers, but I am making an informed decision based on the best scientific information. Combating misinformation is difficult.”


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daybreak, and their workdays don’t end until well after dark. Their last scheduled appointments are at 6 p.m., and they are on call at nights and on weekends. Like people, horses get sick or hurt outside of office hours. Olsen’s busiest time is his favorite: spring, when mares are foaling. Horse reproduction is his specialty, and he and McLendon have held free seminars on breeding for horse owners in the area. Olsen’s sure touch with horses began decades ago when he was just a boy of 10 in Conway, Ark. His parents had no interest in horses other than going to the track, but those visits to Oaklawn Park in Hot Springs sparked the desire to ride in their son. Olsen’s first horse was a gray cowpony who had a few quirks, like heading for the nearest tree to rub its rider off. Olsen learned to ride Western and progressed to rodeos and barrel racing. He and his neighborhood

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buddies frequently went on trail rides or to horse shows. But it was an aunt who lived in Oklahoma who opened his eyes to the idea of becoming an equine vet while a college student at the University of Arkansas. “Her friends who were in vet school were my introduction to large animal practice,” says Olsen. “We did everything from pigs to cows to goats and horses.” Olsen attended veterinary school at Louisiana State University and then headed for his first job at one of the top equine clinics in the country, the Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital in Lexington, Ky. He was a resident vet at Rood & Riddle for about 13 years, during which time he also managed broodmare barns at several of the large racehorse farms surrounding Lexington. Living in Bluegrass Country, working at Rood & Riddle, Olsen was immersed in Lexington’s thriving horse community, so it was only natural that his off-time was also spent around horses. He traded in his Western saddle for an English one and took up the sport of foxhunting with other riders who share an interest in hounds, land conservation and the historic traditions of foxhunting in America. For the uninitiated, foxhunting is much more than chasing a fox while riding a horse: It is the interaction of a finely bred pack of hounds that have been trained to chase fox and coyote. The main function of the hunt is to keep coyotes dispersed so they do not become a threat to livestock and house pets. The chase takes riders across all sorts of terrain at breakneck speeds, so the horses used in foxhunting must be sure-footed and dependable. In the rolling hills of Kentucky, riders were often faced


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with heart-stopping thrills, like having to jump 5-foot-tall rock walls. “I just fell in love with jumping and riding to hounds,” says Olsen, who became a member of the Woodford Hounds. He is now a member of Bear Creek Hounds in Coweta County. “The excitement of going over fences is unlike any other feeling.” So great was his dedication that Olsen became a whipper-in, or assistant, to the Woodford huntsman, for 10 years. During a hunt, he acted as the eyes and ears of the huntsman, helping keep the hounds on the quarry and away from dangerous situations like highways. Changes in the racehorse industry and a divorce sent Olsen back to school at the University of Idaho, where he earned a Ph.D. in equine physiology with a specialty in equine reproduction. He then became farm manager and veterinarian at a large Thoroughbred farm with 200 broodmares and seven stallions in Puerto Rico, where racing is held 365 days a year. Before coming to Coweta County in 2004 and opening his practice, Olsen taught veterinary students at the University of Idaho and at Ross University in St. Kitts, in the Caribbean. As in Kentucky, horses are an important part of Olsen’s life away from the office. Although he has eight horses on his farm in western Coweta, his burgeoning practice doesn’t leave him much time for riding and hunting. He and McLendon have begun clearing land near Moreland for an equine clinic to serve their more than 5,000 four-legged patients. “In the three years I’ve been here, I think I have been hunting twice,” he says with a rueful smile. NCM

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> COWETA COOKS

Suzanne is the wife of Scott and mother of Neely, 14, and Reagan, 10. Right about now they should be moving into their dream house, which has taken Scott, a former homebuilder, three years to build since he has been doing it in his spare time. You can bet it will have a fantastic kitchen where Suzanne can create fantastic new “classic” recipes!

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Talented Cook Suzanne Moore lets her cooking do the talking By Janet Flanigan, Photos by Bob Fraley

W

When Tina Neely served her sister-in-law’s famous “Turtle Cheesecake” to her friends at a luncheon, the room became strangely and unusually quiet before erupting in explosive blasts from every seat. “This is the best cheesecake I have ever tasted!” “I have to get this recipe!” “Who made this divine creation?” Suzanne Moore is the one responsible for creating such a stir, and it’s not the first time she’s created such a happy fuss. Suzanne is a very modest person and seems reluctant to discuss her kitchen triumphs. “My mom’s a good cook, but she doesn’t enjoy cooking like my dad did. He would experiment and he loved to add this and that. I guess I really learned from him because that’s how I like to cook,” says Suzanne, while taking one of her signature cheesecakes out of the springform pan. “When I go out to eat, I’m always trying to figure out what’s in the dish and then go home and try to recreate it.” She invented the Turtle Cheesecake last Christmas as a variation on a recipe she saw on television, and she took it to a Sunday School party where it was an instant classic. “I love to make foods for friend’s showers and weddings. Another specialty of mine is handmade chocolate mints, and I do a really good Chocolate Pumpkin Bread.” Suzanne’s talents extend beyond bags of sugar. She can do the savory dishes, too, and Chicken Pasta Salad is one of her most frequently requested recipes. “I love to cook Italian food and also to eat at Italian restaurants. We especially enjoy The Sundried Tomato in Peachtree City and order their homemade pastas,” she says. She smiles as if remembering a particularly delicious bite of their eggplant ravioli. One senses she’d much rather let her food do the talking for her. Somehow, her modesty just makes her food taste that much more delicious.

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TURTLE CHEESECAKE

Suzanne also makes a mean Strawberry Cheesecake and once tried a Pumpkin Cheesecake for Thanksgiving, but this one seems to be everyone’s favorite. 50 vanilla wafers, crushed 1-1/4 cups sugar, divided 1 stick butter, melted and divided 3 (8-ounce) packages cream cheese, softened 1/2 cup sour cream 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 3 eggs 25 caramels, unwrapped (Kraft) 3 tablespoons milk 3/4 cup pecan pieces, toasted 1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate morsels 1/2 tablespoon vegetable shortening Preheat oven to 325°F if using a silver 9-inch springform pan (or 350°F if using a dark, nonstick 9-inch springform pan). Finely crush wafers; mix with 1/4 cup sugar and 1/2 stick melted butter. Press firmly onto bottom of pan. Beat cream cheese and remaining one cup sugar in large bowl with electric mixer on medium speed until well blended. Add sour cream, vanilla and remaining melted butter; mix well. Add eggs, one at a time, beating on low speed after each addition just until blended. Pour into prepared crust. Bake 45 to 50 minutes or until center is almost set. Cool before removing rim of pan. Refrigerate 4 hours or overnight. Microwave caramels and milk on high 1 minute or until caramels are completely melted, stirring every 30 seconds. Pour over cheesecake; top evenly with pecans. Microwave chocolate morsels and shortening at 70% power 1 minute or until completely melted, stirring every 30 seconds. Put melted chocolate in a Ziploc freezer bag. Snip off corner tip of bag and drizzle over cheesecake. Let harden and serve. Serves 8-12.

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CHICKEN PASTA SALAD 1 (16-ounce) box penne pasta 1 (10-ounce) package Perdue Short Cuts Oven Roast Chicken, cut into bite-size pieces Chicken broth or bouillon cube (optional) 1 yellow bell pepper, chopped fine 1 (10-ounce) jar roasted red bell peppers, chopped fine 1/2 tablespoon lemon zest Juice of 1 lemon 1/2 (7-ounce) tub refrigerated basil pesto 1/4 cup Romano cheese, or to taste Italian flat leaf parsley, to taste Salt and black pepper, to taste

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Boil pasta for shortest amount of time according to package directions. Suzanne adds chicken broth or bouillon to water. Drain and rinse pasta with cool water to stop the cooking process. Pour pasta, chicken and bell peppers in a large bowl. Add lemon zest and squeeze juice of 1/2 lemon over pasta. Mix well. Add pesto and mix well to evenly distribute. Add cheese, parsley, salt and pepper to taste. Squeeze remaining lemon juice over pasta and mix well. This dish is best when refrigerated at least 3 hours to allow flavors to combine. Serves 4-6. NCM

Chin Chin N E W N A N Chinese Restaurant

Tel: (770) 254-1212, (770) 254-1222 Fax: (770) 254-1278 1111 Bullsboro Drive, Suite 12, Newnan, GA 30265

NO CHECKS ACCEPTED

Home Depot

N

Bullsboro Dr Exit 47

Lowe’s

Shell

Wal-Mart Super Center

Newnan Crossing Blvd. E.

Monday-Thursday — 11:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.; Friday — 11:00 a.m. - 10:30 p.m. Saturday — 12:00 noon - 10:30 p.m.; Sunday — 12:00 noon - 10:00 p.m.

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

I-8 5

MEMORABLE FOOD BEAUTIFUL SURROUNDINGS REASONABLE PRICES • OPEN KITCHEN DINE IN • CARRY OUT • CATERING DELIVERY (Limited Area, Min. Order $15.00, from 5:00-10:00 p.m.)

JULY/AUGUST

Newnan Promenade

Chin Chin

2007

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W

hen our family moved to Newnan from Pasadena in 1996, one of the things we missed most were the authentic Mexican restaurants and taco stands that dominate the Southern California landscape. We literally craved joints like Pasadena’s El Taquito Mexicano and their enticingly spicy Al Pastor Tacos (Charbroiled Seasoned Pork centered on small corn tortillas)

Experience new

FLAVORS OF FRIENDSHIP at Coweta’s Mexican groceries By Janet Flanigan, Photos by Bob Fraley

topped with their homemade salsas served with finely chopped onions, cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemons and the requisite radish on the side. Today, we don’t have to miss these foods any longer. Friends Manuel Robero and Alejandro (Alex) Castenada struck out from their historic colonial home city of Zacatecas, Mexico to forge new lives in the United States. While Zacatecas is indeed beautiful and a tourist destination, it did not offer them opportunities to create the lives they dreamed of for their families. They immigrated to the U.S., and went first to Athens, Ga. Robero purchased a restaurant called Agua Linda (Beautiful Water) where both worked and prospered. In 2007, Robero branched out and bought Newnan’s Don Pedro Tienda (grocery) in Newnan, and he asked Castenada to move to Newnan to run the shop. They changed the name to La Tienda Latina y Taqueria and 38

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Manuel Robero looks over the produce at his Mexican grocery in Newnan. JULY/AUGUST

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haven’t looked back. “My wife, little boy and I love Newnan and the people here — it’s a lot more peaceful than Athens!” says Castenada enthusiastically. La Tienda Mexicana has a carniceria (butchers) with a wide variety of fresh meat and also have chicharrones (pork rinds), homemade

chorizo and other Latin specialties. Castenada personally visits the Farmer’s Market two to three times weekly to obtain the specialty produce his customers demand. He says the foods remind his customers of their faraway homes when they prepare the dishes of their home

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towns. When they took over the store, Robero and Castenada brought in their own cooks for the Taqueria Latina (their restaurant in the store), and the menu is full of the specialties that draw in people from Vera Cruz and Michoacan, Mexico; Colombia; and Central America. The kitchen turns out an inspired menu beginning with Antojitos (appetizers). These are kept small and are meant to be shared because these are the types of food that are served at street fares and the like, and are small bites — not meant to be your whole meal. Remember my California dream tacos I mentioned earlier? Taqueria Latina makes an excellent Al Pastor and their other varieties are mouthwatering as well. If you’d rather not have onions or cilantro on your tacos, tell them or they’ll come to the table traditional-style. The Platillos (plates) here are also an excellent way to try authentic Latin cuisine. The Bistek Ranchero is a delicious grilled skirt steak with

fried onions and sides of rice and beans. The menu also has many other dishes including traditional Pozole (a soup with pork, hominy and chilies), fantastic Burritos and many other specialties. There is a full seafood menu, and the homemade salsa bar is deliciosa but folks who can’t handle spicy food should stick to the greener salsas or just lemons — especially avoid the fried chili paste! “We have a lot of Americans who come in here now,” says Castenada, “so I am getting the menu printed up in English and in Spanish.” He says Americans love the quesadillas and fajitas, but if you visit, venture out and try something one of the Latin customers is having. It’s bound to be good. Many Americans travel to the beautiful Mexican state of Oaxaca for vacation, but apparently it is still difficult for many of its citizens to attain their financial dreams there. So several years ago, Rene Carballida and his wife, Olga, immigrated to the United States and ended up in Lawrenceville, Ga. Carballida took business classes at Lawrenceville Tech, studied hard and decided Latino bakery sales would be his specialty. He recognized that people from the Latin countries would be missing the specialty pastries from home and was ready to fill that void. Just three years later, he and Olga own two bakeries. One is Newnan’s Juquilita (named for


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“My wife, little boy and I love Newnan and the people here — it’s a lot more peaceful than Athens!” — Alejandro (Alex) Castenada

their home village in Oaxaca) and the other is in College Park. They specialize in flakey, buttery, sugarflecked Mexican pastries and cakes — all delicious. Juquilita also sells lots of Piñatas, Latin CDs, jewelry and some grocery items. “The Conchas (shells) are my favorites,” says Carballida. “I love to have them with morning coffee.” The Brocas (twisted pastry with cinnamon and sugar) and fruit filled turnovers are also huge sellers. Customers come

in and grab a straw basket, kitchen tongs and place whichever pastries they want in the basket and take them to the register. They will be charged per item, and the price is very reasonable, but be warned — the caloric count is not but it is well worth the indulgence! Cakes require only one day advance order, and if customers are craving something from home, they just tell Carballida and he does his best to get the pastry for them. This

is probably why he has been able to open two stores in only three years. Venturing into businesses specializing in foreign cuisine is like getting a tiny taste of another country for just a little moment. It’s great fun getting to know new people, trying different cuisine and maybe even playing Newnan’s Ambassador for a few moments. Give it a try and see what happens — you may find your own “Al Pastor.” NCM

Summertime Fun Is Downtown! Fourth of July Parade and Rotary Celebration This patriotic, hometown parade through downtown at 6pm is followed by entertainment and food at Drake Stadium with fireworks at dusk.

Homemade Ice Cream Festival and Market Day The traditional Homemade Ice Cream Festival moved from Labor Day to the July weekend from noon - 3pm. Come taste as our area non-profits churn out the best ice cream around! Join us for Market Days! The best homegrown, homemade or handmade products this side of Atlanta, 10 AM - 2 PM!

Labor Day Sidewalk Sale and Road Race Annual downtown Labor Day Sidewalk Sales begin on Friday from 9am - 5pm. Saturday kicks off at 7am with the Sunrise on the Square Road Race through the streets of historic Newnan. Sidewalk Sale and Market Day follow from 10am until.

770-253-8283

www.mainstreetnewnan.com

JULY 4 Fourth Of July Parade 6 PM

JULY 7 Homemade Ice Cream Festival

LET

THE SUNSHINE IN!

Noon - 3 PM

AUGUST 31 SEPTEMBER 1 Labor Day Sidewalk Sale 9 AM - 5 PM

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“We Help Make Your Home Beautiful” J_fniffd`ek_\AIGcXqX?np%*+<%#E\neXe#>8 nnn%]Xp\kk\Z\iXd`Zk`c\%Zfd›..'$),)$/()' JULY/AUGUST

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> FAMILY FUN

P

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MAGAZINE

By Leigh Knight, Photos courtesy of Leigh Knight and Atlanta Center for Puppetry Arts


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Why not beat the sweltering heat with a refreshing new show at the Center for Puppetry Arts in Atlanta? The Center’s Summerfest is in full swing with different fun-filled performances every two weeks. This summer Anansi the spider outsmarts his fellow animals, Pinocchio dreams of becoming a real boy, and a cowboy defends his western town with bananas. The center opened in 1978 when Kermit the Frog and his creator, Jim Henson, cut the ceremonial ribbon, making it the first puppetry center in the U.S. Today it remains the largest American organization dedicated solely to the art of puppet theater. The theater itself has a casual but comfortable atmosphere perfect for little ones. During my family’s recent visit to see the production of Dinosaurs, my children, ages 9 and 6, were amazed at the rod puppets, shadow puppets and full body suits featuring my son’s favorite, T-Rex. While the show’s light and sound system helped keep the young audience mesmerized, my children’s favorite part was meeting the puppeteers after the show. We were particularly impressed that all of the vocals were live.

Hours:

PUPPETRY ARTS CENTER LOCATION: Midtown Atlanta, 1404 Spring St. and 18th St. Free parking behind the museum. MARTA exit Art Center Station.

After the show, kids ages 5 and up can take advantage of the puppet-making workshop (included in the ticket price), which meets Georgia’s Performance/QCC standards. My children made shadow puppets and have spent a lot of time honing their puppeteering skills at home.

Wed.-Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. JULY/AUGUST

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Ticket Once Information: inside, Adults and kids ages 2 children are and older, $16. Includes sure to performance, Create-A-Puppet enjoy the Workshops and admission to puppet the museum and special arcade exhibits. Membership and where they group rates are can available.

Be sure to check out the Puppetry Arts Center Museum. This museum started with a loan of 150 puppets from a noted collector and has grown to 1,000 puppets of historical significance from around the world including Madame and several members of the Muppet family. A word to the wise: my youngest thought the trash can that rises into a ninefoot Phoenix (the symbol of Atlanta) was cool, but smaller children may be frightened.

manipulate puppets such as Xelas, a shape changer from Northwestern Native American mythology. At the Praying Mantis exhibit, kids can transform themselves into human puppets using the special effects of lighting and mirrors. In addition, the Center for Puppetry Arts periodically displays special exhibits including the Alice in Wonderland marionettes from the original Broadway production, which can be found in the Atrium.

This summer’s family series is open to all audiences, but the center suggests ages 4 and up. Reservations are highly recommended since some shows sell out up to a year in advance. However, the theater was almost empty during our Sunday afternoon visit. I was told by an usher that he prefers a larger crowd because it makes for better audience participation. If you’d like to go, but you don’t have any children, no problem. The center makes a great date night alternative. We saw a cute young couple as well as an older couple enjoying the kiddie show, and you can also check out one of the center’s performances for mature audiences and teens. The center’s close proximity to the High Museum of Art lends itself to a perfect date. For families, catch a morning show, then head to Centennial Olympic Park for a picnic and a romp For tickets, through the sprinklers, and call 404-873-3391. you’ve got For more information the Note: No snack and general inquiries, makings bar available and your call 404-873-3089 of true child is sure to want a or visit family puppet of his own from www.puppet.org fun! the gift shop, so plan NCM

accordingly.

Ansley’s Attic Children’s Boutique • Clothing for Infants, Girls & Boys • Unique Gifts • Monogramming • Shoes • Specialty Toys • Yes, we have Bailey Boys!

770-683-0054 M-F 10am-6pm; Sat 10am-5pm

211 Bullsboro Dr. - El Ranchero Ctr., Newnan, GA

www.ansleysattic.com

Angel Shoes ~ Baby Lulu ~ Flap Happy ~ Zackali ~ Rosalina

Angel Shoes ~ Baby Lulu ~ Flap Happy ~ Zackali ~ Rosalina

~ Funtasia ~ Bailey Boys ~ Amanda Remembered ~

~ Funtasia ~ Bailey Boys ~ Amanda Remembered ~ 44

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Providing

Electricity Natural Gas Home & Business Security

770-502-0226 www.utility.org


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Trash or Treasure?

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Carlene Collins, left, and partner Sally Wood say coin silver and an Irish desk are among their prized finds for Coweta County clients.

With an Appraising Eye A visit with local appraisers Carlene Collins & Sally Wood

W

ho hasn’t climbed into an attic or basement and poked through old family heirlooms in search of a treasure? What bounty might be laying around at the next yard sale waiting to bring untold rewards? Certainly, PBS’s perennially popular Antiques Roadshow has lit a flame of excitement for antiquing and attic searches from Brunswick, Ga. to Vancouver, Wash. People bring their treasures and stand in line for hours, vying for a chance to meet with television experts, hoping for their one moment, with millions more at home watching, all breathlessly anticipating “What’s it worth?” 46

Therein lies the ultimate question: “What is it worth?” For almost two decades, Carlene Collins and Sally Wood have been assisting area residents with both personal property appraisals and estate sales in west Georgia, Atlanta and South Carolina. The partners in

Collins & Wood Personal Property Appraisers are both accredited and certified in areas of specialty including antiques, silver, decorative arts, personal property and household contents. They are certified by the American Society of Appraisers (ASA), the nation’s major organization for appraisers in all fields. “We both loved collecting antiques and decorative arts all our lives, and I had decided to go to the ASA to be an appraiser and asked Sally to be my personal reference,” said Collins. “And I had just sold my


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By Janet Flanigan, Photos by Bob Fraley

Donald Glover of Franklin checks out the merchandise at a recent Collins & Wood estate sale in Newnan.

interest in the Jefferson House and decided to go too!” laughed Wood. So off they went together on a course of study that was quite a bit more than they knew they were getting into. “We had to travel all over the country to take the courses — Los Angeles and New York — they didn’t offer the classes in Atlanta. But we loved it. We still take re-accreditation classes and seminars. Every other year is in Europe and then in the United States; we are always learning from our fellow accreditors and experts,” Collins said. While the partners find many clients come from families who have had someone pass on, they are also contacted by people downsizing from a large house who just don’t need all of their personal property. “We have a very detailed contract and finished document outlining the final sale — JULY/AUGUST

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attorneys just can’t believe it!” the ladies chuckled. Collins & Wood follows standard procedures taught by the ASA which keep each job accurate, thoroughly researched and absolutely valued according to the best possible industry standards. For example, Wood said she has seen other appraisers simply list items on a receipt of registry such as “two candlesticks” and a suggested value with no other discerning information at all — nothing on the candlestick materials, age, manufacturer — nothing! While not disrespectful of other appraisers, she simply points out the thorough nature of their work. Many have asked Collins & Wood to have a mini-Antiques Roadshow here in Newnan, and while they admit it would be fun, they also say it would be

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professionally impossible. “I don’t think anyone understands the amount of hours and research it takes to give a true and proper value to the items clients bring to us,” Collins said. Wood added, “Even on the television program, out of the thousands of people that show up, only 10 or so may have something of remote value, and the experts on the show do all kinds of research, with their huge staff, off camera, before ever giving their expert opinion on television. As wonderful as they are, they don’t use ASA appraisers. It is simply impossible to retain every bit of that knowledge about every item presented in any given city. But we love the show — it’s lots of fun!” Were there any “breathtaking moments” of their own when they’ve discovered unbelievable finds for their clients?

“Well there was some Coin Silver (antique Southern silver) we found last year,” Wood immediately remembered. “How about the Irish desk?” Collins recalled. “We had just been to Ireland and had seen this particular style of Irish desk in museums over there, and then we returned here and found one. It was a very rare find.” “Another time,” Wood said enthusiastically, “we found some early American iron cookie presses that didn’t look like they would be valuable to the untrained eye. If you didn’t know what to look for you might pass over some of the most valuable items. Fortunately, we did (know what to look for).” But ultimately the most important lesson isn’t how much is something worth but how much is it worth to you? Family Bibles passed


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down through the generations don’t usually hold a large dollar value, but the replacement cost is immeasurable. While the Antiques Roadshow may have a huge staff of personnel doing behind-thescenes work, Collins & Wood too has a great support system of people who have been with the two ladies for many years. Former banker Carolyn Bowers and Nell Floyd have handled the finances at sales for a decade and a half, and Brenda Harris has been typing the detailed reports for just as long. Emanuel Bridges and Miles Moody have transported goods in and out of sales for years as well. “We have a really good program because we have really good people,” Collins said. NCM

Top: Sharon Denney of Moreland negotiates the price of some boots with estate sale helpers Miles Moody, center, and Emanuel Bridges. Center: Mary Denney of Moreland seems pleased with her finds.

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Rest

he ot

o i n t a t r o

RESCUE A By LaTina Emerson, Photos by Bob Fraley

family heirloom sits safely tucked away in the dining room china cabinet. One day Fido, the family dog, gets a little frisky and bumps the cabinet ever so slightly. The beloved treasure comes crashing down, shattering into countless pieces. For many, this is a 911 situation. Who are you going to call? Frederica Barr of Newnan has come to the rescue of antique lovers in Coweta County and across the United States. With careful hands and the patience of Job, she works her magic to restore broken pieces as good as new. Barr, who moved to Coweta in 2001, specializes in restoring porcelain and pottery. Much of her business consists of the repair of Hummels, figurines which originated in Germany. “This is a large part of what I do,” said Barr. Among her Hummel projects, Barr repaired a limited edition clock released in 1986 and produced for only one year. A man purchased the clock for his wife, but one day she was cleaning and knocked over the table it was on. The clock broke into a multitude of pieces, but Barr was able to reassemble the cherished clock. Barr owned an antique shop in Tennessee for years, and one day she became intrigued by restoration, ultimately beginning her “Jus’ Like New Restorations” business. “When I was going to estate sales and auctions, I kept seeing pieces that were 50


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Frederica Barr, at left, looks on as customer Pat Skinner admires some restoration work. Below is a Hummel figurine before and after Barr’s work on it.

really fabulous. But people wouldn’t buy them because they didn’t know someone who could fix them,” said Barr. “I saw a need for restoration of these pieces.” She searched her immediate area, the East Coast, and then the country, looking for a place to take classes. She finally found a location in Colorado Springs, Colo. and ventured there to learn the craft. When she took her classes about 12 years ago, Barr learned there were only 300 certified Hummel restorers in the United States. “I’m the only one in Georgia,” she said. Because of the high demand for repairs, Barr eventually closed her shop and entered the repair business full-time. She said many individuals make their problem worse by attempting to complete self-repairs. “If people have a broken piece, they need to wrap the broken pieces 52

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in tissue or something soft, and separate them, so the pieces don’t break further,” she said. The certified restorer is skilled at making her own molds. Barr makes the molds from a clay material from England. She fills in chips with the material, and after it dries, she sands, paints and seals the piece. Barr said restoration on items such as antique furniture can

negatively affect their value. “But that’s not the case with porcelain,” she said, and plates or figurines would be worthless without repair. Over the years, Barr has even been called upon to make house calls. She made her largest repairs on a lifesized terracotta Chinese warrior. A North Carolina couple had journeyed to China for vacation and learned that an interesting discovery had been made in the tomb of emperor Qin Shi Huangdi. An entire army of terracotta warriors and fleet of horses had been buried with him. The Chinese began reproducing them, and the couple purchased one of the life-sized terracotta warriors to bring home. They set him outside in their garden, but soon he began to crack under the weather. They contacted Barr and she traveled to their home for the repairs. “It took me five trips over there to work on it,” she said. Barr has also made repairs for “elite” clientele. Former Georgia Governor Lester Maddox’s daughter, Linda Densmore, is among her customers. Densmore, who lives in Jackson, travels frequently through Coweta County. She appeared at Barr’s shop bearing a cup with its handle broken into dozens of pieces. She had acquired a cup, saucer and dessert plate when her father’s estate was divided, but she dropped the cup on her way to her car. “The dessert set was presented to him at the White House by the president,” said Barr. “It was a copy of one that was


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produced for George and Martha Washington when they were in the White House.” The cup has the names of states written around the top. Barr didn’t realize Densmore was Maddox’s daughter and was surprised to learn of the cup’s origin. Barr has also repaired Densmore’s Toby jug of Rip Van Winkle from England. She hopes that people will stop before throwing their treasures away. “A lot of people break things and throw them away because they don’t know they can be saved,” said Barr. “I meet people who have tears in their eyes because it might have been the only thing they had from someone special in their life who has passed away.” “Professional restoration of quality antiques or family heirlooms takes time. Months, sometimes a year or more,” she said. “Most people understand this and are willing to invest the time needed to obtain a quality result.” NCM

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A wide variety of furniture, appliances and fixtures awaits shoppers who visit the Habitat ReStore at 1082 Hwy. 16 East in Newnan. Proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity.

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DO

AR

STORE DIVAS By Leigh Knight, Photos by Bob Fraley

C

oweta is home to a secret society of women. We are your neighbors, your teachers, your friends. You’ve probably noticed the cute skirts we were wearing or complimented us on our blouses. We are the keepers of many secrets. You may have noticed us whispering in the corner or nodding knowingly at one another. We are the dollar store divas. We dig for hidden treasures in consignment and thrift stores all over the county. We are trained to get in and get out quickly with the highest quality merchandise. Unfortunately, our organization recently suffered a breach in security. It happened at a recent tennis match in Peachtree City. My opponent bragged ad nauseam about her home, car, vacation and clothes. Suddenly my tennis shirt caught her eye, and she decided she had to have it.

“I love that shirt! Wherever did you get it?” she asked. “Oh, I’m not sure,” I said nervously. “Darling, I simply must know,” she said. Soon her friends surrounded me, coming closer and closer. “Yes, tell us, tell us,” they chanted. I panicked. “Goodwill!” I blurted. The women gasped in shock. They clearly were not ready to be privy to such information. Because of this incident, however, our Queen has granted permission for us to reveal our deepest secrets to you. After all, we don’t want the Peachtree City ladies sneaking over here and taking our bargains. Here’s a quick where-to-find-us guide: • Consigning Closets Semi-Annual Kids’ Sale, SonRise Baptist Church, 6 Shenandoah Blvd. With 20,000 items sold during the spring sale, clearly the secret is already out on this one. You’ll find maternity, children and teen clothing and shoes as well as furniture, strollers, toys, books and more. Mark your calendars for the fall sale coming Sept. 7-8. To shop online year round, visit www.consigningcloset.com • First United Methodist Church and Preschool Consignment Sale, 33 Greenville St., Newnan. Look for it in late February or early March 2008; www.nfumcpreschool.org • Franklin Road Flea Market, Franklin Hwy./34 West, Newnan. Enjoy the fresh air while you sample boiled peanuts at this year-round flea market with 40 dealers offering new and used merchandise including antique dolls and tools.

Customer Ann Sims enjoys shopping at the Salvation Army in Newnan. JULY/AUGUST

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• Goodwill Industries, 228 Bullsboro Dr., Newnan. A favorite among savvy shoppers. Dropping off donations is easy and gives you an excellent reason to browse the store. Goodwill provides ample parking, excellent lighting and dressing rooms. Although the clothes are slightly more expensive than the Salvation Army’s, the shoes are cheaper, and the linens are easier to inspect since they’re on hangers. Be on the lookout for new items donated by Target, usually seasonal merchandise. My recent great finds include a pink button down polo shirt, a Sock Hop outfit, and an adorable chef statue for the kitchen. • Habitat ReStore, 1082 Hwy. 16 East. Are you in the middle of remodeling? Stop here first for those hard-to-find items. All proceeds benefit the Newnan-Coweta Habitat for Humanity, and donations are welcome. Some of the warehouse’s items include building materials, washers, dryers, stoves, new Toto toilets, light fixtures and furniture.

Opal Ann’s Attic Opal Ann’s Attic

• Katelyn’s Kloset, 10 East Broad St., Newnan. The only consignment store in town that is dedicated solely to children. In addition to adorable name brand clothing, you’ll find furniture, shoes, decor, books and toys. Try consigning your child’s clothes and toys whenever he outgrows them for extra spending money or a store credit. • New Beginnings, sponsored by the Community Welcome House. It takes a keen eye to spot this neat thrift store located off Jefferson Street (just past downtown Newnan’s DQ). This store contains everything from A-Z including cute clothes for kids, books and household goods. All sales benefit the Community Welcome House. Be sure to note the hours, Thurs-Fri., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Sat. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • Opal Ann’s Attic, 36 Salbide Ave., Newnan. Remember the joy of rummaging through your Grandma’s attic when you were a child? From antiques to clothing, you are sure to find something you have to have but never knew you needed.

Opal Ann’s Attic

• ReUse the Past, 98 Moreland St., Grantville. An architectural salvage and antique store that carries a unique assortment of collectible and hard-to-find items including heart pine flooring, heart pine doors, ceiling tin, antique spoons and stained glass. • Salvation Army Service Center, 670 Jefferson St., Newnan. One man’s trash is another man’s (or woman’s) treasure. For those willing to search, you can find great buys on clothes and household goods. The donation drop-off is located in the back of the store.

Opal Ann’s Attic

• X Change, 1690 E. Hwy. 34, Newnan. You’re sure to find something for your hard-to-please teen at this locale — just don’t tell her where you got it or how little you paid for it. This is also a great place to consign those designer jeans she never wears. NCM

Habitat ReStore

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• What’s In Store, 7 Jefferson St., Newnan. Folks wandering into this cute shop located in downtown Newnan may be surprised to realize the merchandise is used. In addition to great customer service, What’s In Store offers a nice selection of dolls, toys, videos, as well as beautiful artwork and furniture. I recently witnessed two sweet little ladies fighting over merchandise before it could even be unloaded.

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Donna Summers of What’s in Store

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Going Junkin’ By Janet Flanigan, Photos by Bob Fraley

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From furniture and lighting to repurposed accents such as the window above this bed, Scott and Liz Barnett of Newnan enjoy going “junkin’” and discovering items they turn into new treasures for the home. JULY/AUGUST

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Liz Barnett's vintage finds include, clockwise from left, a ladder; a glassfronted cabinet; binoculars, a fan and camera; and an antique doorknob. 60

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W

e call ourselves ‘junkers’!” laughed Liz Barnett as she looked at her husband Scott with a sweet smile. “I love nothing more than finding a new use for something old.” She points to an aged wooden ladder, hung on their dining room wall, its paint flaked off with a little

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“I never know what I’m looking for or what will hit me.” — Liz Barnett pigment still clinging in patches. On its rungs are ancient wire baskets found in a barn, each holding different textured items like balls of twine, spindles and household objects. “I was always a bit of an oddity in my family; the rest of them much preferred new things,” Liz said of growing up in Rabun County. She may have been a little different than the other members of her family but she was the perfect complement to her husband Scott, because he, too, enjoys scouring yard sales, Scott’s Antiques, the old Lakewood and antique fairs for the perfect something. “I never know what I’m looking for or what will hit me,” Liz said. “My collection of old men’s shaving brushes is a perfect example of a ‘why?’ I don’t know why. But I love these — the textures, the aged look, the JULY/AUGUST

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way the individual men used them in a different way. I’ll probably never get rid of them.” Because they are always on the lookout for new things, Liz does rotate items out of their home with

some regularity. She doesn’t get too attached to most of her finds and never “collects” things for the sake of collecting, but if she finds a box full of something, like the carton of old hinges and keyholes she once found, well that was a collection she had to have! Liz says she’ll sometimes hang on to something without knowing what to do with it or wait for a long time to purchase something for a space in her home. Take the little upright glass case in their den. It was missing a door for at least a year, and Scott found a door with a similar aged look at a yard sale, worked on it in his basement workshop, added hinges and a handle, and you’d never know it wasn’t original. Liz waited a year to find the tin ceiling panels over their den sofa. Liz says Scott handcrafted their dining room table and hutch the first The "awning" at left was created by Liz Barnett as a new accessory in a downstairs bathroom. 62

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year they were married. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember that our daughter Cydney (now 16 and at East Coweta High School) learned to write her ABCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on that table, and the wood is soft and her pencil carved into the table a little

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bit. I was so upset at the time but now I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trade those markings for anything. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how I feel about old things; I love the history behind them and thinking of the people who made them, used them and loved them.â&#x20AC;? Cydney and her sister Alley (13 and a student at East Coweta Middle School) havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite caught their motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bug for junkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; yet but appreciate decorating and making a space personal. When they moved their bedrooms from downstairs to upstairs, they gave Mom strict instructions that they wanted to pick out everything and make it their own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe they said â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;No decorating, Mom!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Liz laughingly remembers. Liz brings her design talents to Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; B Antiques, designing their display vignettes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We think it helps customers envision the items better in their homes if they can see them in a display rather than just on a shelf or whatever.â&#x20AC;? Many of those wonderful items that rotate in and out of the Barnett home end up at Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; B, so

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Vintage shaving brushes, above, are one of the latest interests of collector and decorator Liz Barnett.

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fellow “junk” aficionados will have a chance to put their own creativity to the test. Liz’s dream is to one day open her own store, and she has even picked out the name — Cydney’s Alley, in honor of her two daughters. Coweta home builder Billy Cranford liked Liz’s style and has asked her to help him decorate his spec homes. “Working with developers is great because they give you a budget and trust you to do a good job,” she said. Husband Scott was a home builder before joining Ply Mart a few years ago, so Liz understands the needs of a builder. With so many things going on, one would imagine she would be exhausted but she says she just can’t stop. “When creativity hits, I just can’t turn it off. It might be the middle of the night and suddenly a great idea will hit me!” she laughed.

Such inspired thinking created a fanciful bathroom. After their daughters moved their bedrooms upstairs, Liz decorated the downstairs bathroom with some of her finds. She took a little girl’s bedroom cornice, purchased at a yard sale for $5, and put it over the plain mirror. Another scavenge yielded $5 worth of fine Waverly fabric, and Liz found a piece of coordinating trim to create a topper that tied the cornice and curtain together. For décor, she used an old fashioned scale with soaps and hand towels on the sink counter, a wallhung hat rack with dangling oldfashioned post cards (their written inscriptions still legible), and some coordinating artwork. Guests may wander into the bath and not want to leave. No danger there of course, for

the rest of the house and its veritable treasure trove of fantastic finds and clever creations hidden in every corner remain to be discovered — even if they wander out eventually. NCM

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Preserving furniture — and memories Restoration expert Brent Harmon shares tales from 30 years of fixes By Alex McRae, Photos by Bob Fraley

B

rent Harmon isn’t a surgeon, but restoration buffs know he’s the man to call when their furniture needs a facelift. In a Dunbar Street warehouse crammed with clamps, saws, drills, knives, paints, stains and exotic oils, the owner of Harmon Restoration performs CPR on fine furniture given up for dead, spending hours bringing the pieces back to their original luster. Which doesn’t necessarily mean showroom shiny. “My job is to leave it looking old,” he says, “not perfect. The character of a piece is important and I don’t want to disturb that.” Harmon has been restoring furniture for over 30 years, but says he still can’t figure out how he wound up in the business he loves. “Things just happened,” he explains. When he was nine, Harmon’s family left his birthplace of East Wilton, Maine, and moved to Griffin. He worked in his father’s cabinet shop and home building business long enough to know he

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wanted to do anything else. After high school and a hitch in the military, Harmon tried his hand at apartment and land development. It didn’t click, and he went back to his woodworking roots, repairing furniture for two major Atlanta retailers. He learned to fix dings, dents and cracks. He also learned the importance of lighting. One day a salesman came in screaming about a scratch on a long table. He wanted it fixed immediately. Harmon took a look as the salesman raced to lunch. An hour later, the scratch was

gone. The salesman was stunned. “He couldn’t believe I’d done it that fast,” Harmon says. Harmon had noticed the scratch was directly under a brightly lit display chandelier. The “repair” consisted of turning the table 180 degrees, taking the scratch out of the spotlight. “Worked like a charm,” Harmon says. In the early ’70s, Harmon and his wife of 33 years, Marsha, came to Newnan to visit a friend, fell in love with the town and moved in. Harmon and his friend started a furniture restoration business and several months later, Harmon took over as sole owner. He quickly learned he wasn’t just preserving furniture. Years ago Harmon was asked to refinish an heirloom dining table. He examined it carefully and noticed a series of faint dents across one end of the table, pencil impressions left by a former family member who did school homework at the table.


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Harmon is especially proud of some work he did for former Georgia governor and Newnan resident Ellis Arnall. Some of the larger pieces had to be taken apart, revealing hidden spaces. Harmon tucked notes saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;restored by Brent Harmonâ&#x20AC;? in the crevices.

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But a month later he arrived early one morning and heard noises at the back of the building. The same crook was at it again. He had filled an old trunk with tools and was trying to get his haul into the back of a VW Beetle.

Harmon told the owner he could sand away the ancient indentations or refinish the table in a way that would leave the tracings intact. The owners chose to preserve the precious memories. “They did the right thing,” he says. Harmon is especially proud of some work he did for former Georgia governor and Newnan resident Ellis Arnall. Some of the larger pieces had to be taken apart, revealing hidden spaces. Harmon tucked notes saying “restored by Brent Harmon” in the crevices. “Somebody will find those things one day, and that’ll be pretty neat,” he says. Although the work can be painstaking and precise, it is never boring. Especially when someone comes along looking for an unauthorized discount. Several years ago, Harmon showed up for work to discover a 68

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thief had cleaned the place out, taking most of the tools and a few other goodies. “He even stole the urinal,” Harmon says. Harmon ordered replacement tools and thought the worst was over.

Most people would have called the law and laid low. Not Harmon. Four years with the U.S. Air Force


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Security Patrol had taught him how to handle bad guys. Harmon hollered and headed toward the thief, who dropped the trunk full of tools and drove off. Harmon called the cops, then watched as the thief pulled a U-turn and buzzed back toward him at full speed. Harmon dove into the bushes as the crook crashed into the trunk, sending tools flying everywhere before driving off again. Cops caught the crook later that day. “Now that was worth coming to work for,” Harmon says.

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From major repairs to detail work like using an artist’s brush to paint wood grain over a repair, Harmon has learned every trick in the book. One time he even put together the jigsaw puzzle left behind when a table fell off the back of a speeding truck. “That was a lot of fun,” he says. “I really enjoyed the challenge. And if you can’t have some fun during the day,” he says, “what’s the point of working?” NCM

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An automatic friendship:

By Alex McRae, Photos by Bob Fraley

F

irst things first. Yes, their names are Floyd and Barney. No, they aren’t from Mayberry. In fact, when these two met, it seemed like they were from different planets. It was 1997. Floyd Hanie had been in Coweta County four weeks and wasn’t looking forward to a fifth. He had just sold the family’s auto repair, restoration and towing business in Jacksonville, Fla., and moved to Coweta looking to start a new career. But he wanted to keep restoring old cars, a passion since childhood. One Saturday Floyd was at a Waffle House thumbing

Floyd Hanie

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FLOYD & BARNEY through a car trader magazine looking for local phone numbers. One appeared frequently. Floyd dialed. Barney answered. It was a disaster. Barney Boatright, born and raised in Coweta County, doesn’t profess to be anything but a country boy. When Barney started talking, Floyd couldn’t understand a word. “I thought oh, Lord, where is this guy from?,” Floyd says. “I wondered if he even had electricity.” Barney had a similar reaction. “I said, ‘This man’s got to be from the city.’” An hour later they were face to face. English was still a problem, but they were both fluent in car. That’s all it took. Two hours later, Floyd had installed an engine in a vintage Cadillac and asked Barney if there was anything else that needed doing. Barney pointed to the dozens of cars on his lot and they got to work. In the next few years, the two bought, sold and restored hundreds of cars together. In the process, they built a friendship with more muscle than a Chevy 409 engine. “You couldn’t find two people better suited to each other,” Floyd says. “If I hadn’t met Barney, I’d have gone back to Florida.” Both men learned their love of cars from family. Floyd’s father ran a garage in Jacksonville for 47 years

Barney Boatright

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and restored vintage cars on the side. Floyd loved driving to school in his dad’s latest project, watching the other kids stare in envy. “It was really cool seeing the looks on their faces,” Floyd says. “I couldn’t wait to start doing it myself.” Barney became a born-again gearhead at age 11 when he started driving his father’s ’46 Chevy truck through the nearby fields and pastures. When his folks bought a ’57 Chevy in 1958, he was hooked. If he wasn’t working on his own cars, Barney worked in his uncle’s Whitesburg shop. “I never wanted to do anything else,” he says. Barney specializes in restoring classic Detroit muscle cars and bringing ’55, ’56 and ’57 Chevys back to life, refitting them with

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modern touches like power steering and AC. Barney prefers vintage hot rods. Between them, they cover the spectrum of classic cars and in their first few years together, couldn’t keep up with the demand for their work. “It’s a great feeling when you take something somebody’s given up on and turn it into something somebody else falls in love with,” Floyd says. Floyd eventually went back to cars full time, joining Protran Transmission Specialists in 2000 and buying an ownership stake in 2003. Barney came on board as a partner in early 2007. The business isn’t just about making money. Floyd and Barney have also sponsored benefit car shows for worthwhile community causes, including a spring 2007 show which raised funds to provide cancer treatments for the son of an employee. “It’s not work for us,” Floyd says. “I can’t think of anything else

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I’d rather do. If it helps somebody out, that’s even better.” The two are always on the lookout for a project. They prowl the Internet, look for junkyard gems and if they see a rusted wreck in a stranger’s yard, don’t hesitate to knock

under the car because he recognized the greenery as poison ivy. Floyd was covered with cream and itchy for the next two weeks. “I though I was gonna die,” he says as Barney grins at the recollection. The two travel to car shows

Barney Boatright and Floyd Haynie, above, look over an engine at Boatright’s home in Newnan.

on the door. Sometimes they’re met with a smile. Sometimes, a frown. Sometimes, something else. “People sicced the dog on me once,” Barney says. Floyd would have preferred a pit bull to one problem he encountered. He and Barney had gone to pick up a new project. Barney told Floyd to go under the car and attach the towing cables. To do it, Floyd had to crawl through a dense patch of vines. “I thought it was that kudzu stuff I’d heard so much about,” Floyd says. Not quite. Barney had sent Floyd 74

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across the Southeast and never tire of talking internal combustion with anyone who will listen. The shows draw some auto lovers that don’t fit the grease-stained stereotype. “We see doctors, lawyers, businessmen and everything in between,” Floyd says. “It’s a common love,” Barney adds. “When it comes to cars we’re all the same.” NCM


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T H E

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M A G A Z I N E A publication of The Times-Herald

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By LaTina Emerson, Photos by John Beck and Bob Fraley

T

o junk or not to junk — that is the dilemma many face as they cling to their prized belongings. That old lawn chair with the broken leg that you’ll fix — one day. Or that personally autographed guitar with one string. We’ve all got it. But what we decide to do with our “junk” separates the brave from the meek. Some have the courage to dispose of their obsolete items once and for all, but others tuck them away, for just a little while longer. Owners of a local junk disposal service and several storage facilities

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have more than a few observations of local people and their “junk behavior” over the years. The 1-800-GOT-JUNK franchise is sweeping the nation; its fleet of blue trucks can be seen coming to the rescue of individuals everywhere who have become overwhelmed by their stuff. The franchise hauls away outdated items and gives people back their homes and personal space. Bill Kessler started the local franchise last year on July 4 and serves the area stretching from

southwest Atlanta to Coweta County. Kessler, who worked for years as manager of the Commerce Club in Atlanta, realized the 1-800-GOTJUNK franchise was an excellent idea based on personal experience. “My parents were successful and had a nice home, but they were Depression babies and they never threw anything away,” said Kessler. He found it daunting to clean out their home. “Stuff grows and it almost overwhelms people,” said Kessler. “It collects and becomes such a pain and


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you really can’t do it by yourself.” “That’s one of the great services that we offer. We give people their space back, which is so much better than buying a new house or adding an addition. It’s like a free upgrade in your home. It’s very cost effective,” he said. “We free up people’s time. And it’s nice to have an objective person to come in and help you make decisions.” Kessler’s company appeared on A&E’s “Flip This House” last August while cleaning out construction debris at a home in Grant Park. “We throw away a lot of exercise equipment,” said Kessler. The team has collected countless treadmills, exercise bikes, and weight lifting equipment, much of which has never been used. “We do a good bit of mattress and refrigerator removal,” he said. Other commonly discarded items include old computer equipment, word processors, speakers, televisions, cell phones, kitchen gadgets, a first generation Atari, and even a leaking

C

Cliff Smith

liff Smith, owner of Greison Storage Mart on Millard Farmer Industrial Boulevard, and John McCollough, manager, also have insight into local junk. “This store is a transition point for many people from all walks of

hot tub and a fiberglass boat. Kessler and his crew recycle as many items as possible before taking the remainder to the landfill.

life,” said McCollough. “They’re transferring, they’re building, others are divorcing or just got burnt out.” “Your normal stuff is just household goods. It’s anything from the minimum of a bag of clothing or TV, up to a well-established home,” he said. “We might think of it as junk, but for them, that’s everything they own.” Smith said Christmas decorations are popular storage items. Like other storage facilities, Greison Storage Mart holds an auction when a person abandons their belongings. “We sold a Mercedes one time,” Smith said. Another person left a boat.

Bill Kessler began his local junk removal franchise last year on July 4. From left are Jeremy Craft, Corey Hendrick, Kessler and Brian Anderson.

The facility has many faithful, long-time customers. One client has done business with them for 18 years. “I’ve had many jobs, but these are the most interesting people that I’ve ever been around. The sadness, the excitement, the tears and the triumph, we share it all,” said McCollough.

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D

Dave Carstairs

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ave Carstairs, manager at Crossroads Mini Storage on Aces Circle, recalled a special Christmas for several local women. “A few years back, they came out with the new Thunderbird. In November, I rented four units to four different guys who bought them for their wives and were hiding them,” Carstairs said. Two of the cars were even the same color. Many use the storage facility to hide Christmas presents. They use the unit for a month and move out after Christmas. Carstairs recalled another memorable client. “I had a gentleman who rented from me for four and a half years and sent a check every month,” said Carstairs.


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Several years ago, he stopped by for the first time in years. “He said he thought he would come down because he’d forgotten what was in it.” The man went to check the unit, but the lock was rusted and his key wouldn’t work. He borrowed bolt cutters. “He came back 20 minutes later and he was laughing,” said Carstairs. “He said there were two boxes in the unit. One had about five paperbacks, and the other was empty.” The patron had moved items into the unit and meant to return, but he never did. The storage facility also turns unwanted junk into another man’s treasure, since a faithful volunteer donates items to families in need. NCM

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2007

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THE BOOKSHELF

Two Days After the Wedding By Joan Medlicott Pocket Books, $12 Reviewed by Holly Jones Hannah Parrish wishes everyone would just leave her alone. No one is deliberately torturing Hannah, they are simply asking questions. The questions aren’t terrible either: What is she going to wear? What date has she chosen? What kind of food will there be? How many people will come? Where will everything take place? These are normal questions to ask a bride. And Hannah’s getting married, she’s just not sure why. The groom-to-be, Max, proposed only because he intends to leave Hannah his estate when he dies and doesn’t want her to pay inheritance taxes. She doesn’t even have to move in with him; she can stay in her own house. The problem is, Hannah is in love with Max and she’s not sure he knows or cares - or that she wants him to. Besides, Hannah is 75 years old and Max is 76, so they should be able to do whatever they want, right? Well, what Hannah wants is for everyone to ignore the whole thing. But in Joan Medlicott’s Two Days After The Wedding, ignoring love is not an option. In fact, in the farmhouse where Hannah lives with her friends Grace and 80

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Amelia, not much is ignored. Family and friends are drawn to these ladies and their comfortable home. Tea and sympathy is the specialty of the house. Not that these ladies think they’ve got their acts together. Besides Hannah’s wedding woes, Grace has a boyfriend next door. He’s had health problems, so she’s trying to find the line between caring girlfriend and overprotective annoyance. It’s a line that Grace fears is not only invisible, but one that will make her invisible. And then there are Grace’s own health problems. She understands she’s diabetic, but the cookie staring back at her doesn’t. Then there’s Amelia. Stubborn and independent, she knows how to get what she wants. The problem is knowing what she wants. The art world has taken notice of Amelia’s photographs, and New York and a dashing art critic are calling. So why is Amelia more worried about the people in her pictures than the ones buying them? Two Days After the Wedding is a story of families — ones you are born into and ones you make for yourself. It is a book about finding yourself and who you can become. And whether Hannah likes it or not, it is a story about love.

Queen of Broken Hearts By Cassandra King Hyperion Books, $24.95 Reviewed by Holly Jones The men aren’t Rhett Butler and Ashley Wilkes, but Clare Ballenger does have a Scarlett O’Hara-sized decision to make. Like Scarlett, Clare has two men with widely different personalities in love with her. Unlike Scarlett, Clare is not pining over either of them but trying to keep them at arm’s length. Scarlett would relish the situation, but Clare thinks it is a disaster.

In Cassandra King’s Queen of Broken Hearts, Clare is a widow. Her husband, Mack, was killed in a hunting accident. That’s what the police and her conscience keep telling her, anyway. Mack was also a depressed alcoholic. Still, Clare loved her husband and swears she’ll never love again. The irony is that Clare deals with love and relationships every day. She is a divorce therapist. She doesn’t help people keep their marriages together; she tries to help them put the pieces of their lives back together after divorce and move on. The problem is, she can’t follow her own advice. She can’t move on. Rye Ballenger is Mack’s cousin and Clare’s Prince Charming. As Clare says, “In addition to being the most breathtakingly handsome man I’ve ever had the pleasure of knowing, Rye is also the most elegant.” He is an exceptional dancer and “has the most pronounced Southern accent I’ve ever heard.” Rye’s foil is Lex, who is originally from Maine but recently moved to town and bought the marina. Lex’s “craggy face reminds me of the maritime maps hanging on the walls of his marina, full of many lines and markings but simple to read and follow.” He and Clare spend time on his boats or gardening. Of course men aren’t Clare’s only problem — or maybe they are. Clare is convinced her best friend Dory should file for divorce. Dory’s husband Son, a pure-bred good ol’ boy, is domineering and sexist, but Dory insists she is in control. And Clare can’t understand why her normally cheerful, loving son-in-law has suddenly become an impatient perfectionist, dissatisfied with his wife, children, home and job. Clare doesn’t have to run through the mist to find her heart’s desire, but she does walk through a labyrinth in the new outdoor retreat she has built to help her clients. And like Scarlett, Clare comes through her trials and her labyrinth stronger. The difference is, by the end of Queen of Broken Hearts, Clare gets her wish, and her man.


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Gardens, Sissinghurst Castle Garden and Highgrove in England; Villa d’Este, Scavi Pompei and Boboli Gardens in Italy; and Ryoan-ji and The Golden Pavilion in Japan. Although the book has plenty of pages, its page-size is relatively small, at just 61/2 x 8-1/2 inches. Readers will get just a small glimpse of these gardens, but what the descriptions lack in quality is certainly made up for in quantity. Garden lovers are bound to come across a few

hundred or so gardens that look tempting. How about the Gnome Reserve in Devon, England? This is “the spiritual home of gnome lovers from all over the world” and home to 1,000 gnomes. If you’re a fan of succulents, you might wish to visit Le Jardin Exotique in Monaco, whose designers include Prince Albert I of Monaco. And if the Western Cape of South Africa is calling your name, you may want to visit Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, home of some living fossils that haven’t changed much since prehistoric times. Imagining a visit to all 1,001 gardens is perhaps a bit ambitious, but armchair travelers will enjoy this book just the same. NCM

Want to win a copy of 1,001 Gardens You Must See Before You Die?

1,001 Gardens You Must See Before You Die Edited by Rae Spencer-Jones Barrons, $34.99 Reviewed by Angela McRae If you’ve been to Callaway Gardens and the Atlanta Botanical Garden, congratulations — only 999 more gardens to go! These two Georgia gardens are among those featured in 1,001 Gardens You Must See Before You Die, edited by Rae Spencer-Jones. Contributors to this 960-page book include an international group of gardeners, garden writers and historians, garden designers, landscape architects and other gardening professionals. The editor notes that the book “is organized geographically from west to east, and north to south beginning with North America and ending with Australia, New Zealand and the islands.” Other southern gardens that made the list include Biltmore Estate in North Carolina, Middleton Place in South Carolina, Walt Disney World Resort in Florida, and Monticello, Gunston Hall, Mount Vernon and Colonial Williamsburg in Virginia. Naturally, many of the more famous gardens around the world are included, such as Giverny and the Tuilerie Gardens in France; the David Austin Rose

WEB EXTRA

Go to www.newnancowetamagazine.com to register. Only one entry per person will be accepted, and we will accept entries until August 10. The winner will be announced on our website on August 15, 2007.

Online Book Club Newnan-Coweta Magazine is starting an online book discussion group, and you are invited to join! Reader Liz Barnett, whose home is featured in this issue, will lead "The Book Nook" each month. She'll select a book (to be announced the first of WEB each month at EXTRA newnancowetamagazine.com) and then post her review of it on her blog on our website. July’s selection: Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia by Elizabeth Gilbert. Start reading now and post your own thoughts about the book during the month of July at newnancowetamagazine.com. Historic Downtown Newnan’s Premier Bookseller

SCOTT’S BOOK STORE Ser ving Newnan Since 1976

Visit us in historical downtown Newnan — We are your independent book store Special Orders Personal Service Book Clubs Welcome Monday — Friday, 9-6 • Saturday, 9-4

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770.253.2960 JULY/AUGUST

2007

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10 things I’ve learned ... as Director of Newnan Presbyterian Preschool As told to Elizabeth Richardson

Barbara Kookogey has had plenty of experience with children. In addition to being a mother of three, she has worked at NPP since September 1991. During her tenure, she has worked in various capacities including caregiver, aide and teacher. Kookogey became the director in 1999. She presently oversees 180 children and 31 staff members.

(1) A school is only as good as its teachers. I have been fortunate to work with the most caring women in Newnan. They treat their students as they would want a teacher to treat their own children. (2) Children are inquisitive and straight-forward. Every year, my 4-foot, 10-inch tall, 80-year-old mother visits and works at NPP. A couple of years ago, one of the children asked her, “Why are you old?” and another asked “Are you a midget?” My mother just laughed. (3) Parents will do the craziest things to be sure their children get enrolled. There was actually a parent that wore adult diapers while she was waiting in line in the wee hours of the morning before registration. (4) The 2- and 3-year-olds think that their teacher should always be with their assistant, and they both should always be at school. When you see a child at a store, they always ask where the other person is and wonder why you are at the store. (5) We don’t like to know the children’s home life, because we might tend to judge or treat them differently. When they’re here, everyone’s the same and we want them to have the same experience. (6) It is so rewarding to see children start a new phase in their young lives. There have been many children who start in the infant room and graduate from kindergarten. We get to see the babies blossom into young children that are well-adjusted and ready to tackle ‘big school.’ (7) Always expect a prospective family to drop in for a tour on one of the craziest days of the year. Since our doors are always open, it inevitably happens. We want parents to see all sides of NPP — even how we handle stressful situations. (8) I’ve learned you have to keep up with the times and survey parents about their needs. Having nearly-grown children myself, it’s easy to lose touch with what young families need today. (9) There are some things you learn not to do. You may think papier mache is a great thing, but it’s not. There are a lot of failed art projects — like dryer lint bunnies. (10) It is very rewarding to see prior students who are now all grown-up and successful. We like to think we had something to do with it. NCM 82

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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS These are the people who make Newnan-Coweta Magazine possible. Please let them know you appreciate their support!

Aesthetic Laser Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Hollberg’s Fine Furniture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

AMSI Supply. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

It’s A Small World Children’s Dentistry . . . . . . 7

Animal Medical Clinic of Newnan . . . . . . . . . 31

J&R Clothing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Ansley’s Attic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Kimble’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Atlanta Vascular Specialists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Lee-King Pharmacy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Au Pair USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Legacy Too . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Bank of Coweta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Lindsey’s Realtors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Baptist Retirement Communities

Main Street Newnan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

of Georgia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Meiller Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

BB&T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Milli Sanders Gifts & Decor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

Benny Bear Factory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

Morgan Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Jay S. Berger, M.D., P.C.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Newnan Academy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Boscoe’s Pools/Aqua Enterprises . . . . . . . . . 69

Panoply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Brown’s Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Parks & Mottola Realtors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Buffalo Rock/Pepsi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Peachtree Hematology-Oncology

Campanile’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Consultants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Center for Allergy and Asthma . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Piedmont Newnan Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Chin Chin Chinese Restaurant. . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Protran. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

The Commonwealth/Susie Walker . . . . . . . . . 63

Radiation Oncology Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Connie’s Antiques & Etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

Rocky’s Barber Shop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

The Cotton Pickin’ Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

Scott’s Book Store. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Coweta Dentistry Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

The Shops of Beard & Company . . . . . . . . . . 35

Coweta Fayette EMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Southern Crescent Equine Services . . . . . . . 27

Coweta Festivals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Superior Walls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Coweta Pool & Fireplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

The Southern Federal Credit Union . . . . . . . . 57

Crescent Veterinary Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

The Times-Herald . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

Law Offices of Stephen E. Fanning . . . . . . . . 33

Traditions in Tile & Stone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Farm Bureau Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

Vaillancourt Pest Solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

Fayette Ceramic Tile, Inc.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41, 64

Watts Furniture Galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Formals & More . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Weedman/Coweta Fayette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

Gotcha Covered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Wesley Woods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Heritage Retirement Homes

The Wynn House on Spring/Bob Shapiro

of Peachtree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Photography/The Major Long House. . . . . . . 15

The Heritage School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

1-800-Got Junk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

September/October Advertising Deadlines Contract Ads: July 18, 2007, New Ads: July 27, 2007 Call 770.683.6397 for details and advertising information.

JULY/AUGUST

2007

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Newnan-Coweta Magazine, July/August 2007  

America: Why Cowetans love it. Also Found Treasures, Spring home and garden