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in the revolution of African fashion in this continent and the impact in other continents. Fashion is moving from the glossy magazines into reality. Models are becoming more outspoken. Designers are going against all odds to be more creative; turning haute coutures into everyday casual Wears.

EKUBAN EMMANUEL

nce, I had a long conversation with my cousin whom I hadn’t seen in years, concerning the budding entrepreneurship skills flooding our continent. To us, it was more of an eye opener than just a conversation. Today, every social entrepreneur tries as much as possible to keep their work more creative and authentic. It’s all about materializing your ideas. Just like a round table with many creative minds, over the years, we’ve seen a lot

“Around here, however, we don’t look backwards for very long. We keep moving forward, opening up new doors and doing new things, because we’re curious... and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” We are on our 11th issue with a new twist moving from a webzine to a Digital Magazine. We intended to capture some up-and-coming creatives in the budding African fashion industry especially in Ghana and other parts of the continent, cast a spotlight on talents making waves and also report new trends. Enjoy the Read.

Cover story

Cave Boys Women in mode

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21-29 VINTAGE SACKER 30-33 STREET STYLE

61-67 GENDER FLUIDITY

68 90-95 THE UNTITLED SERIES 96-97 THE VINTAGE TREND IN NIGERIA 100-101 FASHION TRENDS


ADVERTISE HERE

CONTACT: MAGAZINE.DEBONAIRAFRIK@GMAIL.COM


CAVE BOYS Photography: NUELJHOEY Models: NANA BLAQ NII PRO ANDY

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The

MODEL Next Door

Maxwell Annoh

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WHO DO YOU ADMIRE MOST AS AN ARTIST? Kanye West is my favorite artist; such a creative genius. But creativity wins my love for any artwork anytime. HOW IMPORTANT IS MODELING EDUCATION TO YOU? I think models need the real insight into the job, trust me a lot models haven’t hit the reality check yet, all they see are flashy Instagram feeds and that is kind of risky to them. It’s really important to know the hard truth of this career journey so you know how to deal with them when they happen. ANY BIG NAMES YOU’VE WORKED WITH IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY? Speaking of names I have worked with, I think I am blessed to have got the chance to work with some great people at this early TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF. stage ranging from photographers, Maxwell Annoh, is an Accra born stylists, designers as well as other model. Last of three childre born to models... I have such a long list of my parents and a Cancer. names but the highlight of it all was when I shot for Louis Vuitton. It was WHEN DID YOU START MODELING? such a memorable moment meeting Mr I started modeling in 2014. Kim Jones and a couple of the people on the team. HOW MANY AGENCIES ARE YOU SIGNED TO ? WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS AS A MODEL, AND Am currently signed to three agencies, HOW DO YOU SEE YOURSELF PROGRESSING Twenty Model management (Cape Town) IN THE FIELD? ,Izaio Model management (Berlin) and My goals are quiet huge and are Brave Models in Milan. not just about modeling. It’s WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO WHEN YOU’RE NOT MODELING? When am not modeling, I like to work as a barrister in a bar or coffee shop. I love making beverages and cocktails. 16 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

about tapping into other fields in connection with modeling, so you don’t look at me as just a model but someone more than that. My career is in motion, consistency is key to me and I leave the progression part for you all to judge.


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DO YOU EAT NUTRITIOUSLY AND HOW OFTEN DO YOU WORK OUT? I think our eating habits shouldn’t be be based on the fact that we are models but raher it should be because of our health. We all need to stay alive regardless of what we do. Both my diet and workout is a lifestyle, it doesn’t even matter if I am in business or not, it is a priority.

WHAT HAS BEING YOUR GREATEST CHALLENGE WORKING IN A WHITE DOMINATED INDUSTRY? There is no challenge; it’s about proving what you got whenever you are given that shot, we all need a chance in everything we do. WHAT IS YOUR DREAM AS A MODEL? Every model wishes to be at the top and mine isn’t different, what’s different is not losing yourself whiles you achieve all this dreams.

WHAT ARE YOUR HOBBIES? I love watching documentaries, listening to music, movies , reading DO YOU HAVE LIMITATIONS? and I love to play football. I wish AND HOW DO YOU DEFEND YOUR BOUNDARIES to be more adventurous. WHEN CHOOSING TO ACCEPT A MODELING GIG? WHAT IS UNIQUELY BEAUTIFUL ABOUT YOU My values are really keen to me, THAT WILL MAKE CLIENTS BOOK YOU? it doesn’t even matter the business, Every model has their own unique there are limitations and there features and I think mine is my would be more but that isn’t going cheekbones and skin color. But with to change me. that being said , every client has their own preference and you can’t WHAT’S YOUR MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE AS tell why a client book you until you A MODEL? ask. Shooting for Louis Vuitton , it’s every model’s dream to work with HOW DO YOU STAY INSPIRED? brands like this... Where I’m coming from and where I am now and where I see myself going, these are my inspirations... Like Sarkodie said

“IF WE WENT A HUNDRED WHEN WE HAD NOTHING, THERE IS NO EXCUSES TO BE MADE NOW THAT WE HAVE IT. WE NEED TO GO A THOUSAND.”

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Photography: LIGHTNING PATHWAYS CO. Model: MAXWELL ANNOH Interview/Styling: STEPHEN KWAKWA Designer: ATTO TETTEH


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Vintage Sackar

Collection by Nuna Couture

Photography - BEN BOND Models - TASIA COBBINAH AKUVI ( Tmmanagement ) Mua - DEBBIE TOUCHES Creative Directing / Styling - DEBONAIR AFRIK

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The Best Of STREET

Style

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T

he Style Lounge is an event organised by Debonair-Afrik for the social, educational and cultural integration of designers, photographers, models and everyone in the fashion industry. Its aim is to assemble all talents and disseminate knowledge, both practical and theory to everyone and to foster healthy relationships among designers, models and everyone at large. This year’s Style Lounge was a two-day event which took place at the Impact hub in OSU, on 10th and 11th June, Saturday and Sunday respectively.The designers gave us a peek into the incredible indigenous talents and culture of Africa and how we emanate authenticity and craft at every given opportunity. The event commenced on Saturday with the first speaker, Molly Keogh, a co-designer at Osei-Duro speaking on Ethical fashion. Osei-Duro’s designs are all about

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the colours and patterns of Africa blended and coordinated with the intercontinental styles to create clothing for everyone. Osei-Duro’s clothing is made and hand-dyed. She emphasized how recycling is a necessity hence is their main reason for using hand dyes for their clothing to protect the eco system. Our second speaker for the event, who was in the person of Rania Odaymat, centred on the need for creativity and originality. She explained how something can be made out of nothing, how to assemble the various variables to project a look or style depending on the concept or idea and how no one else can quite express and idea the way you would. Even though a group of people may be given a particular or common idea to work with, each and every one of them would express their thoughts in different ways. Though they may be similar, they will never be the same and that’s what makes us unique.


As the event rolled on, Nuel Bans from DebonairAfrik spoke about look books, how to assemble one, the factors to consider when creating a look book or fashion campaign, it types and mood boards. He explained a look book as ‘’fashion look books and campaigns are forms of fashion communication that markets a particular collection or brand. These tools are interrelated but serve different purposes of communication. Look books are to show details of a collection or capsules and are usually simple in nature but fashion campaigns are used in telling creative narratives’’. He also mentioned that photographers, models, makeup artistes and creative directors/ stylists are the key players in planning and executing a fashion campaign/ look book. Finally, he explained the types of look books as conceptual and nonconceptual. The final speaker was our very own Ngozi Dickson who described the fashion industry as one of the biggest players of the global economy. As everything being made has a cost of production, so does fashion. Dyeing, printing and bleaching are one of the most energy and chemical intensive stages along the manufacturing line. ‘The aim or goal of sustainable fashion is to bring environmentalism and social responsibility into all the stages and processes of production of a fashion goods and services’. Sustainable fashion has some goals which focuses on both quantity and quality based on the law of demand and supply. Sustainable fashion brand itself in personality, core branding values, style, business/ ethical practices etc. she continued to give the three steps stability and maintaining your sustainability which included Engage your people Use proven frameworks Implement best practices.

After these detailed presentations was a panel discussion where general important issues in the fashion industry was discussed. On the final day, which was Sunday, there was a street style fashion show and photo shoot where we saw our fashion designers showcase some of their best clothing. Some of the designers who showcased were Osei-duro, Nuna Couture, Larry J collection and few more others. After the fashion show, there was a photo shoot section where anyone who wanted to take a shot of their street-styled clothing got a chance to be shot by some of our best photographers including Quincy Asephua of vine imagery and other photographers. We concluded this year’s Style lounge with closed networking where social interactions were encouraged. BY: PRISCA WOEDEM

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THE PORTRATIST Sharon Okai

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Taking a look through the lens into the fashion industry as a whole, fashion photography is one of the sectors in the industry which is mostly populated by men but Felicia Abban is Ghana’s first female professional photographer. She learnt photography from her father Joseph Emmanuel Ansah, apprenticing to him in his studio in the Central Region, as the only female apprentice. She set up her own photography studio one year before independence in 1956. Today, we have women who however are making waves in the fashion photography industry. With Sharon Okai, I remembered when she called me one afternoon saying“I want to start fashion photography “in my head I knew her as one of the best marketers and PR and not someone who would love the lens. Today she is one of the sought-after female fashion photographers in Ghana. TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF? My name is Sharon Okai. I quit my job four (4) months ago to do photography. I had several chances to master photograph when i was in African University of Communications, but the lecturer didn’t make the class interesting. I found myself as the Floor manager at via sat 1 and helping out with other production actives. That was where I fell in love with the camera. You will always find me among the guys asking questions. WHAT INTRIGUED YOUR PASSION FOR PHOTOGRAPHY? I have always loved taking pictures of myself and my family during the holiday season. My interest in photography really took off when I started working with Glitz Africa back in 2014. Thephoto-shoot for each issue, the styling, make up and how the pictures turn out after editing made me fall in love the more. HOW DO YOU EDUCATE YOURSELF TO TAKE BETTER PICTURES? I educate myself by learning from a Photographer friend who has been

in the photography industry for some time now, I admire his work a lot. I watch videos on YouTube and go through a lot of magazines. AMONG YOUR WORKS, WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVORITE? WHY? Honestly, with the works I have done so far i don’t have a favorite because; i am still learning and feel like I have a lot to learn. ANY CHALLENGES AS A WOMAN WORKING IN A MALE-DOMINATED INDUSTRY? It’s no secret that photography has been, and continues be a male dominated world. For some reasons, that gives a lot of clients the ideas that because you are a woman, you don’t know what you are doing or you just not as good as the legion of men who are doing the same work. The solution is working harder and finishing stronger.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR RECENT VISIT TO KENYA. The whole idea of going to Kenya was to network, meet photographers, models and designers. WHAT INFLUENCES AND INSPIRES YOU? My main sources of inspiration for my photography come from nature and fashion. YOUR LAST WORDS TO YOUNG LADIES OUT THERE WHO WANT TO BE LIKE YOU? To the young ladies; don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do it. You can do whatever you set your mind to. Don’t let anyone stop you from reaching for the stars HOW DOES IT FEEL GETTING A FEATURE ON DEBONAIR AFRIK MAGAZINE? How does it feel getting a feature.. That means I'm doing a good job. It's has built my confidence and it also means good things are yet to come.

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WHOSE WORK HAS INFLUENCED YOU MOST? Mario Testino, it's my dream to shoot like him in the near future. WHAT KIND OF ASSIGNMENTS IN EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING DO YOU LIKE THE MOST? The whole process of shooting editorial excites me; the search of new locations, conceptualizing and meeting new people etc.

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WHO ARE YOUR TOP 3 FASHION PHOTOGRAPHERS IN GHANA? Favorite Ghanaian photographers are FocusPhotography, Amfo Connolly and Lightville


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Photography: @sharon_o_photography Designer: @millecollines Models: @lynakemunto Make-up: @makeupby_bilha 44 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)


WOMEN IN MODE

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D’Ivoire and Nigeria. I am a member of the interim board for the Creative Arts, which is part of Ministry of Tourism and Creative Arts. An active member of, Ghana Culture Forum, a creative arts association that are pushing Culture and Creative Arts forward within Ghana. I also sit as Head of Advisory Board of Models Union of Ghana/MODUGA.; The Voice of the Modeling Industry. Currently, I am also a permanent judge on the Belinda Baidoo Model Search Africa, which airs on GH One TV at 4 pm on Sundays (repeated Mondays at 11 am).

Miss Makeba

Boateng Founder Of Fashion Forum Africa

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rowing up in the fashion industry, one of the famous faces you can’t afford to have around is Mrs Makeba Boateng. I could literally stare at her till my eyes fell off. A decade later, Nothing has changed about how she carries herself glamorously. Shooting and having to interview her divulge another side of her being A P-E-R-F-E-C-T-I-O-N-I-S-T . CAN YOU TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF Someone once said to me, ‘Makeba, you are like an onion. There is so much to you and every time we meet up, I learn or discover something new’. That was Ulla Holm, a teacher of Fashion and Communication from Denmark in Scandinavia. To speak of oneself is to give away a bit more of yourself and to hope in most cases that the person can empathize, identify and truly understand better. I am the founder of Fashion Forum Africa and the CEO of Public Relations Consultancy MCPR Africa based in Accra with satellite offices in Cote

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AS A WOMAN, WHAT IS YOUR INSPIRATION IN LIFE? My inspiration as a woman is to be a good citizen of the earth and a strong role model for my sUn, my family and females in Africa and of African descent in general. I am an optimistic person and take inspiration from nature and GOD daily. WHAT HAS BEEN THE GREATEST MOMENT IN YOUR CAREER? There have been many great moments in my career. I have lived many lives and have experienced many achievements and success, intangible rewards and profound and indescribable experiences to say the least. Meeting all types of influential, inspirational and motivational people along the journey have also added to these great moments. One great moment was to be crowned as the original Miss Ghana UK in my late teenage years. At that time, Miss Ghana UK marked the first African Beauty pageant of the African Diaspora communities in the United Kingdom. It is not strictly related to my business focus right now but it did help me to understand my identity as a Ghanaian. It also prepared me for work and opportunities that I would gain within African dialogues and also business in my home country of Ghana.


YOU ARE A WIFE AND A MOTHER, HOW DO YOU BALANCE YOUR WORK WITH YOUR PERSONAL LIFE? I am a very spiritual person, so I try to be in solitude when I can. I was a wife once for many years from an earlier age and my sun, (yes Sun) is almost twenty years old so you can imagine he is independent. He is an extremely talented young man in Music and Art. During his formative years, I didn’t find it too challenging raising a child, to be honest. I just got on

with it because that’s what we do as women, especially as a wife and mother combined. I never saw my sun as an obstacle as he was born out of Love, marriage and he was planned. As a woman, in particularly a wife/mother, we tend to be good organizers – it’s our GOD given nature.

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WHAT HAS BEEN SOME OF YOUR CHALLENGES WORKING IN AFRICA? I am confident that most in particular entrepreneurs would agree that it’s hard to find the right dedicated people to work with in Ghana. Loyalty and a dynamic team, with the right attitude that gives they all towards business and growth, is a rare thing although possible. There is a lack of consistency and professionalism in Ghana, which I hear is the same in our neighboring countries and sadly throughout the continent. There is a lackadaisical approach to work, which seems to be part of the current culture. A common Ghanaian employee lacks enthusiasm and is unconcerned about business and growth of the employee or company. Regardless of the opportunities, personal growth, experience or financial gains that the employee could gain or earn with that employer or company. SHOULD WE EXPECT ANY THING NEW FROM KEBA CLOTHING/LIFESTYLE? Keba Lifestyle brand is currently on hold although under this new lifestyle brand it is the sole distributer of the exclusive drink NeHoLikors from Togo. Keba clothing has to its credit, the first to infuse t-shirts with African fabrics, which

we created for Keba with the most talented designer Castillo. Renee Q is recognized for this as the label made it their signature line and we Love how innovative she became with that style. Keba was probably one of the first to introduce African fabrics to Top shop’s flagship store in London’s Oxford Circus. The label also received a visit and credit by the late Kofi Ansah for creating the innovative and patriotic Ghanaian flag corsets and blouses for women. The label also received a certificate of recognition at the Miss Ghana national pageant for winning the Miss Ghana Spectacular Gown of the Year 2003. We shall see what the future holds

trends and fashions. These people are all around us, yet we don’t give them credit for the role they play. I am sure you know all too well that wordof-mouth is still the most powerful form of communication.

AS AN ICONIC FIGURE IN THE GHANAIAN FASHION INDUSTRY, HOW HAVE YOU INFLUENCED THE FASHION SCENE? Thank you for that accolade, that’s kind of you. I hope my influence has been that of virtue, of motivation, aspiration towards Fashion Unity and togetherness. I believe my influence has been as a connector. Do you know of the writer Malcom Gladwell? He claims that there are three kinds of people: Mavens, Connectors; and Salesmen, who each play a critical role, in wordof-mouth epidemics. Yes, epidemics that influence our tastes,

I would say what makes me unique, in the words of Gladwell, is that ‘I give numerous people access to opportunities and worlds which they don’t belong in’.

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I am a connector. I know a lot of people. And a lot of people know me. I maintain my relationships. My iphone is priceless. It contains all types of diverse people in Media, Fashion, Art, Culture, the Creative Arts and business, spanning Africa, UK and USA. I introduce people to people. I’m known for that. And I make things happen, because I’m organized and resourceful.

YOUR TOP 3 FASHION BRANDS IN AFRICA. This is an impossible request. It’s so easy on the continent for people to discover or stumble across new or different labels of all types of apparel, accessories and adornments. In Ghana, I have always enjoyed rummaging through the rails of beautiful dresses at DUABA SERWA, I take pleasure in trying on


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exquisite romantic gowns at VH Mode by Vanessa Harrison. I really do like the classy Charlotte Privé label. For one of a kind accessory I shop at A-KINKO, or hunt for fibre glass jewellery brands Joansu or Seiwa Akoto Collection, which both pop up in Ghana once in a blue moon. Now you’ve got me started, have you seen the beautiful beads at Sun Trade or wearable art by UNKOWN COLLECTION? One of my guilty pleasures is adapting gold plated decorated regalia with Budding Tree Jewelers for those ceremonial but fashionable occasions. And when you just want that simple but stylish leather sandals or accessory then one place to try is SOL Inspiration. WHAT FASHION BRANDS ARE TO BE WATCHED FOR IN 2017? Totally Ethnik, Christie Brown, Studio189, Bakers-Woode, Papa Oppong, OseiDuro, Lumiere Couture and Raffia TELL US ABOUT FASHION FORUM GHANA AND WHAT ARE YOUR GOALS Fashion Forum Ghana’s (FFG) is a subsidiary of Fashion Forum Africa (FFA). It’s registered as a NonGovernmental Organisation in Ghana and has created quarterly talk series in March, June, Sept and December months in Accra. FFG’s long term goal is to provide the Ghanaian Fashion Business Community with a fully stocked library of reference materials inclusive of books, magazines, videos, tutorials, national and international registry of designers, media, legal resources, funding sources, and other fashion targeted businesses to aid in the potential growth of individual businesses and the collective industry. FFG aims to establish and redirect the Ghanaian fashion industry with respect to both design and best business practices. By providing a forum to discuss and debate the challenges experienced by all members in the industry, It intends 50 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

to identify challenges and to find creative solutions to strengthen the fashion business community, ensuring Ghana’s recognition in the world of fashion, design and creative arts. FFG5, takes place as part of the Ghana Culture Day celebrations on Tuesday 14th March at the National Theatre, Accra/Ghana. It’s a good place to network, share ideas and see the efforts of the Culture and Creative Arts industry in Ghana. DO YOU THINK THE GHANAIAN FASHION SCENE HAS DONE A LOT IN TERMS OF MARKETING AND MERCHANDISING? I believe we have come a very long way indeed although we need to be more united as a fashion business community. A lot of us have credible experience and knowledge to move the community into industry but unfortunately many of us are working in isolation due to bad experiences in Ghana. We have many pioneers like Joyce Ababio, Nora Bannerman, Cadling Fashions and the new school like Studio 189, Yvonne Ntiamoah of Radford University College and Elle Lokko who have great expertise in this field whom many entrepreneurs and students can learn from. OVER THE PAST YEARS, WHAT HAS BEEN A REVOLUTION IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY IN YOUR VIEW? I would say since Papa Oppong hit the scene, there has been a new breed of males into the fashion scene, which has brought in a renewed energy. He is a revolution in Fashion and I personally see Papa as crucial to Ghana Fashion as our late Kofi Ansah. There has not been any male that has captured all our fashion senses as Papa Oppong. IF YOU HAD THE CHANCE TO CHANGE ONE THING IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY, WHAT WOULD THAT BE AND TELL US WHY? I would like to change some of the players in the fashion business community here in Ghana. We have many talented people and so many who have paid their dues in such a


positive way through the years who are not being credited for their vast contributions to the fashion business community. I feel that there are far too many people who have jumped on the bandwagon of fashion in the last few years and claim to be influences, trend setters or fashion professionals. These people do not belong in key areas of fashion yet they pretend to be and unfortunately the masses do not know any better so are non the wiser, and shower them with praise without these people having credibility or substance. I think many people need to get educated and not just relay on their own understanding or only their own experiences of the fashion world. WHAT WOULD YOU TELL THE YOUNG WOMEN WHO WANT TO GET INTO THE FASHION INDUSTRY? Get educated and get some hands on experience as an apprentice or intern so you understand and hopefully master the field that you want to be in. Join a reputable association, club or membership of your field and let them guide and support your dreams and goals. You must have thick skin in fashion generally and the right attitude. Fashion can appear frivolous on the surface but know that there are different levels of fashion, which can vary in different countries. You must always strive for excellence and it’s imperative to keep your feet on the ground and a level head. Do not be taken up by fashion’s fantasy or people’s perception of its world, or you could get swept away and disillusioned. Do not forget that fashion is a professional career, it’s not all about the glamorous side, its big business if we can get it right.

years and she is always a delight to collaborate or talk with. Her energy along is captivating which I believe goes with her outlook on life. Faith Senam is a new contender within fashion in terms of my generation here in Ghana. I have worked with her briefly on a project last December and I found her to be extremely professional. I also enjoy reading her column in B&FT when I get the chance. It was a nice surprise when I was told who I would be sharing the cover page with. These women are good people trying to do good in fashion in Ghana for a potential industry that we are passionate about as well as believe in. I found the Debonair Afrik Crew very friendly and easy to get along with as well as time conscious. It was my first-time experience with a full male crew. I really enjoyed the day’s shoot in the heart of James Town, a part of Accra I really only venture to for James Town Café, and for the popular, ChaleWote Street Art Festival. It was really cool to explore the tiny tight streets at lunchtime in search of kenkey, choffy and fried fish. IF MAKEBA IS NOT WORKING, WHAT WILL SHE BE FIND DOING? This is a tough one as the lines between my personal and business life are blurred. After working hours, if I am not at attending an event, a launch, a soiree or social dinner then I must be sleeping.

Now-a-days I crave for ‘me time’, I like to watching movies or documentaries, going to places of creative interest or the theatre. I am also an artist so at times I create crafts and pieces of art. I enjoy WHAT WAS IT LIKE, SHOOTING FOR reading so my home is full of books and I enjoy drawing, meditation and DEBONAIR AFRIK? It was a fun experience, I really horse riding when the opportunity admire what Stefania Manfreda has allows me to. been doing within fashion over the 51 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)


WHAT LED YOU INTO STARTING A CAREER IN PR IN FASHION? Knowing the potential of the fashion industry and the role PR can play in it, I realized the need for many businesses in fashion to include public relations in their overall brand/business development strategies in order to build successful brands. Something that is lacking in the fashion industry in Ghana hence my decision to start a career in fashion as a PR professional. HOW HAS IT BEEN SO FAR IN GHANA? Not easy at all. This is because fashion PR is still yet to gain any meaning to designers here in Ghana. Since I started freelancing in 2012 it’s been a roller coaster ride. However, I have managed to keep working at it and I know hopefully soon, things will change. People within the fashion industry still find it difficult to pay for the services of a PR representative like they will pay for their fabric aith Senam Ocloo is a Young or any other thing needed to make and Beautiful Fashion PR their designs or collection. I am Consultant and Founder of optimistic things will change soon E’april Public Relations; A and designers will be interested in Boutique Agency with Specialization engaging a PR professional to develop in Fashion, Beauty, Lifestyle and and promote their brand. Events. She is also the Content Developer/ WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PR IN FASHION PR Specialist for Evangel Magazine, AND WHY DO YOU THINK DESIGNERS Accra Men’s Fashion Week and Totally SHOULD INCLUDE PR IN THEIR OVERALL Ethnik. Faith is also a Weekly BRAND STRATEGY? Columnist with the Business and A Public Relations representative Financial Times Newspaper (BFT). She for your brand will be responsible tells us a bit About Herself and her for your brand image both online and offline. They will also see to Career. it that you gain adequate exposure through brand mentions, features, A LITTLE INTRODUCTION? collaborations, brand/ I am Faith Senam Ocloo, I am Fashion events, product placements all in an effort PR Specialist and founder of E’april Public Relations; a boutique PR to keep your brand constantly talked firm dedicated to developing and about while maintaining a positive executing PR and brand strategies image. Having a PR representative or for emerging and established brands including PR in your brand strategy within the fashion, beauty and will support all the efforts being put into growing your brand and lifestyle industry. keeping it being talked about.

F

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WHAT INFORMS YOUR DECISION TO HANDLE PR FOR ONE BRAND OVER ANOTHER? First, I need to believe in your brand. Meaning, I need to be confident about the brand I represent. That way I can be able to create a lovable brand out of it. Also, having a fashion brand means you should be talented, creative and passionate about what you do. I love to work with people who have the urge to still learn and push to greater heights. Once I am convinced about the prospects of

your product, we are good to go. WHAT KINDS OF BRAND/PRODUCTS DO YOU REPRESENT? As a fashion publicist, I represent brands within the fashion, beauty and lifestyle industry. Currently, I handle PR for Totally Ethnik, Accra Men’s Fashion Week, Evangel Christian Magazine and the new addition to the bill is an accessory brand called Egudzi.

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ASIDE PR WHAT OTHER ACTIVITIES DO YOU ENGAGE IN TO PROMOTE FASHION AND DESIGNERS? Aside being a fashion PR Specialist, I run a blog called Fashion and Public Relations where I blog about my day to day life as a fashion publicist. I am also a weekly columnist with the Business and Financial Times Newspaper called “Fashion & More with Faith Senam� where I write on diverse topics relating to fashion such as features, events and articles all geared towards promoting and supporting brands and fashion. In other instances, I support events and brands to gain more visibility for their products or brands. WHAT HAS BEEN SOME OF THE CHALLENGES WORKING WITH DESIGNERS IN GHANA? Running a fashion business is already a challenge here in Ghana. However, there are some designers who barely even have time to respond to emails or opportunities to feature. This is as a result of doubling in other roles.So there are instances where I contact a designer to feature their latest collection or profile them in my column, they may either take

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forever to respond or never respond at all. By these, they miss out on several opportunities. Additionally, most people are still yet to grasp the importance of PR to their brand development and growth hence hesitant to engage the services of a PR professional. WHAT ARE YOUR FINAL WORDS TO DESIGNERS WHO WISH TO PROMOTE AND GROW FROM LOCAL BRANDS INTO GLOBAL ONES? I will say, they should never stop learning. They should not limit themselves as knowing so much. They should research and learn more from other designers and not just see them as competitors. They can take inspiration from them to build a much stronger brand. Also, they should not try to do everything by themselves. If they want to grow and expand they should engage the right resources to support them to attain that.


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exhibitions and experiences that revolve around these and other fields of interest such as contemporary Ghanaian art, music and urban culture. I tend to work and leisure in as many of these areas of interest as it is I have. Believe me when I say there’s quite a few of them! Overall though it’s just my way of observing life and creative expressions. Sure, science does its part, but I think creatives are better able to express in much simpler and accurate terms whilst also taking into account the element of emotion. Through brands I created such as Elle Lokko, Lokko’08, The Warehouse and The Container, we work and play with these concepts in a contemporary Ghanaian urban context and hope to contribute to the development of creatives here and in other areas.

Elle Lokko is an appealing, concept store situated in the scenic Lokko Road in downtown Osu-Accra with outfits and accessories from a number of designers like Iamisigo, Raffia Ghana and Monaa among many others. The Owner, Stefania Manfreda is an incredible and good-natured young lady. She is of a Ghanaian-Italian descent. The shop is dedicated to cater for the needs of the modern day woman as well as promoting exclusive made in Africa brands by Young creatives and entrepreneurs. Elle Lokko is all about fashion. Lifestyle.Beauty. Art. Culture and Design. TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF? I’m Stefania. I’m a Creative hence a curious, passionate and sensitive human being. A Designer/Curator to identify me professionally. I currently work in fashion retail, visual design & communication and furniture design. I curate events, 56 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN THIS BUSINESS? Since 2008 here in Ghana running Lokko’08 Concept Store and then Elle Lokko Concept Store since 2015. Before that I worked as Art Director of an ad agency in Lecce-Italy for 3 years working specifically with small/medium businesses in fashion. That experience enabled me to fully understand and appreciate the marketing and promotional aspect of the business, which is not to be underestimated. HOW ARE GHANAIANS RESPONDING TO THE WHOLE IDEA OF A CONCEPT STORE? I remember when we first opened back in 2008 with Lokko’08, the first thing people would say when they visited was they felt like they were abroad, in some shop in a western country probably as seen in a movie or something. It was interesting to me. Even though there was this excitement to see something new and pioneering for Accra at the time, there was also a very obvious attraction towards the concept of the store simply because it took into consideration all that


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is special to Ghanaians and spoke a language of local content alone. Every item within the store was either recycled from local workshops or made strong references to Ghana’s past both recent and not. This immediately tugged at the heartstrings because it would take you back to your childhood. The response of course was positive and continues to be to date as we have expanded to other areas and to different audiences. HOW DID YOU COME ABOUT ELLE LOKKO, WHAT INSPIRED IT? I had been saying for a while that I needed to do something more feminine for my existing Lokko’08 clientele and that’s how it initially began. Elle Lokko however quickly took on a life of its own and became something very different from just a female version of Lokko’08. The two, in fact, have always operated separately and independently. Elle Lokko happened as part of a healing process I was going through in a moment of my life in which I had to completely change everything and really come to terms with who I wanted to be. I would say it was inspired by that moment that happens in everyone’s life when you need to be real with yourself and develop selfknowledge and acceptance. Choosing to use your gifts, becoming an adult, I guess, taking responsibility. I just had the impulse to start one day and I enjoyed it so much (putting the space together) that I just threw my heart into it and did only that for about 2 to 3 months. People would pass by to see how it was coming along and Elle Lokko soon became a peaceful place where interesting conversations could happen. I received a great deal of support from a lot of people that really surprised me in a good way and kept me going. AS A WOMAN, INSPIRATION?

WHAT

IS

YOUR

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I’ve always had a hard time first of all labelling myself as a woman. Simply because of the many connotations and definitions that it could imply. Even saying the word in my head is awkward sometimes, because it can be said in so many ways to mean so many things. I mean, I am female, and I know that, but the definition of woman… I’ve never yet been comfortable with it so I hardly use it. I am who I am and don’t really look at life in terms of gender that much. People find this weird about me sometimes but that’s how I’m comfortable interacting. As far as my inspiration goes therefore, gender is still not a defining factor. I am very conscious of the difference in behaviour between the sexes, as well as roles and dynamics and fully appreciate that but I don’t limit my inspiration to be confined to what is considered only inspirational to women. If I understand the question correctly. Life inspires me, in all its forms. The good, the bad and the ugly. Creation and all its wonders. I always say God is the ultimate designer and creative. I guess He would be my biggest inspiration. HOW DO YOU BALANCE YOUR WORK WITH YOUR PERSONAL LIFE? For now, it’s all a bit mixed up together so I don’t necessarily ever focus on that. I’m a one-person family unit for now so I am pretty free to decide how to manage my time. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR GREATEST MOMENT IN YOUR CAREER? I truly believe it is yet to come so we’ll wait to see what that will be. IF YOU ARE GIVEN THE CHANCE TO CHANGE ONE THING IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY, WHAT WOULD IT BE AND WHY? In my opinion, we are yet to establish a fashion industry so I don’t


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know that I would change anything exactly, but I would work towards establishing a strong foundation that would allow such an industry to flourish. Government or private sector institutions should by all means work towards first changing the perception of the general public towards Fashion. People need to be educated on the reality and scale of the global fashion industry and be encouraged to see it as a viable investment opportunity. WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR CHALLENGE WORKING IN AFRICA? There are quite a few difficulties, but there are also lots of situations that are a lot easier to deal with here than they would be anywhere else. I’m feeling optimistic today so I won’t go on a rant. YOUR TOP 3 FASHION BRAND IN AFRICA Tongoro, DuroOlowu, Maki Oh.

WHAT WAS IT LIKE, SHOOTING FOR DEBONAIR AFRIK? Was great fun, Nuel had marked me for a gorgeous gown since I never dress like that and I must say I loved it. WHAT ADVICE DO YOU HAVE FOR THE YOUNG WOMEN OUT THERE WHO WANTS TO GET INTO FASHION? As with all things be very sure that whatever you dedicate your life to do is very much connected to your natural talents. This will bring out the best in you and you will be happier as well. That said, always make sure to do your research first and know about the industry you want to get into. There’s more to working in fashion than just being a fashion designer. There are many opportunities in different aspects of the industry and it’s good to have an idea of how the whole mechanism works.

HOT SEAT QUESTIONS

HOW DO YOU GET BRANDS TO STOCK IN SHOP? DESCRIBE YOURSELF IN 3 WORDS Research online, through people I Creative, witty and curious know, fashion events or fairs, some brands approach me themselves. IF YOU COULD MEET AND HAVE DINNER WITH ANY PERSON WHO EVER LIVED, WHAT FASHION BRANDS ARE TO WATCHED WHO WOULD IT BE AND WHY? AND WHAT OUT FOR IN 2017? WOULD YOU ASK THE PERSON? Looking forward to what the younger I don’t think there’s a person in designers like Jermaine Bleu and particular I would want to meet and Hazza will do. eat with… I kind of like to go with what life throws at me. IF YOU ARE NOT WORKING, WHAT WOULD AT WHAT AGE DID YOU HAVE YOUR FIRST YOU BE FIND DOING? KISS? Feeding my mind, my stomach or my I think I was 14 or so lol friendships.

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GENDER

FLUIDITY 61 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)


NANA POLEY Androgyny = a teaspoon of common sense, a tablespoon of sweetness, a pinch of sass and a touch of class. We are always quick to conclude with our own definition, this is something I have contemplated on more than two or three occasions basically being a mass personality trait. It is the social conviction that you should look a specific route as a man, and another as a lady. Likewise, the measures of what qualifies as female are completely unreasonable . Indeed, even the most unassuming individuals can be casualties of its irresistible nature. Butch, mean, lesbian, forceful and less appealing to the inverse sex; this is the world’s comparison to a manly Lady. On the other hand, For a man to be ladylike is likened to being frail, compliant, homosexual, a sissy, debased, and as being less appealing to the opposite sex. Men can likewise be gender ambiguous, however it is a character that gathers considerably more investigation for men. opening our psyches to picture one’s sexual orientation; way of life just like a decision. “I’m amazing, I’m beautiful, and I’m priceless---and I believe it!” Deal with it. We live in a general public that is foresighted on the biological chromosome and life structures, move down with Spirituality neglecting to factor emotions glued to one’s sexual orientation. The sex articulation is dependably assumed to 62 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

acclimate with the Masse’s introduction of the Respective sex casting, it’s con’s on sexual orientation; LOVE, anticipating the sexual conduct per what you do. Androgyny however, isn’t something all people get it. In a world that deals to sexually orient us into perfect little classes, and with everyone’s perspective being differing androgyny, can put you in your own one of a kind universe. Subsequently, an important understanding of what sex uncertain means is critical. Androgyny is really the mix of having qualities of folks and females; A women with wide shoulders, a male with a balanced or oval shaped face, and so forth. Various things can make you sex questionable. Sex verbalization for one can make you sex vague. The way you dress, do your hair, and nails, and the way you hold yourself can teach someone concerning your sex. Your considerable degrees can state a ton with respect to your sexual orientation, from the width of your hips, to the conditions of your face. For example, women tend to have rounder appearances, and men tend to have squared faces. Men have longer more enunciated noses, and women have more prominent lips. A mix of any of those qualities can make you male/ female. But, hey No one is perfect, but we are 100% REAL. You want prefect?? Go Buy a Barbie! When you grow up from this side of the world you are assumed to keep an ldris Elba Physical Appearance on the off chance that you got Balls in the middle of your legs and be that OHEMA MERCY in the event that you got a pie for Pleasure. No! U can’t have balls and be “#ALASKA or #SASHAVALOUR how dare you spilt Coffee on the Family’s White sheet. Androgyny especially in Ghana is as yet disdained, and to numerous degrees it contrasts from society’s thoughts of appearance. You, you, you… blah blah blah… seriously next subject please! Scarcely any individuals can draw of gender ambiguous without flack in our general public unless they are perfectly male/female. But f*#k it, pardon my French, Anyone who is wrapped up in themselves is over


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dressed. Unfortunately, the mental parts of promiscuity seem to have been lost in this age, by simpletons who think just because (there’s something missing ) are being imaginative and novel by the way they dress, the way they twerk, or the way they implied “darken the lines”, Puts the “Butty” tag on you. When frankly, all the investigation suggests that it’s mental androgyny, not physical crosssexuality, or typically masculine or cultured grandstands of lead, that is connected with creativity. Be that as it may, there is as yet a wide exhibit of issues in our way of life with androgyny in light of things like sexism, like a Fruit loop in a world of

Cheerios, a Skittle in a bag of M&M’s, a Rainbow in the night, that one star that always shines brighter than the others, the quiet neighbor with the big freezer. Yes, different! Being different is a good thing! Why would you want to be like Them! Hi Berla, what’s good? You like to pleasure your soul in mum’s closet, that’s not a bad religion. You don’t have an amazing figure or a flat stomach (replace with tummy), far from being Idris Elba, have man curves, you are YOU! Don’t try to make YOURSELF a Duplicate, if they want copies, get them a printer. love being different. It keeps everyone else amused!!!

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COVER STORY

Ashkar?” For once a-not-so-regular response came from her as she sipped her camomile tea. She simply smiled and said “Every woman wants to tell her story from her perspective in her own terms. Roselyn is one of the not-so-many young woman who is able to not only tell her story but also live on her own terms regardless of the prevailing circumstances around her while keeping a good head on your shoulder.” I closed my notepad and listen as she explained further her persona. To her modeling was but an extension of her liberation as a woman. Her art represented empowerment and this veered us off the typical conversation line we were meant to have.

I

The Roselyn Ashkar Brand Story.

t is an eerie Tuesday evening in a lonely booth of a homely café in the capital, Accra. I sat with my notepad going through my prepared questions as I waited for my date for the night; a model. Exactly at the brink of 7 o’clock PM, in walks a graceful young lady, seemingly young, in glasses with flowing curly hair. This was the first time we were meeting and expectations were to meet a model in her full element. She quickly introduces herself, “Hi I’m Roselyn,” with a hearty smile beaming on her face.

Roselyn is a known international fashion model but what you may not readily know is that she is a TV and radio presenter (formerly Live 91.9 FM ), visual storyteller and photographer with a degree in Communications. Jack of all trades as she may seem, she follows her mantra. Her direction which took her through each path she carefully chose pinnacled at the success she is currently chalking.

Before appearing on Africa’s Next Top Model (ANTM) as the only contestant from Ghana competing with other talented models from around Africa, Roselyn debuted as a model with the now-defunct EXOPA in 2009. In 2010, she went on to appear in the 8th edition of the popular reality As she sat across pageant, Miss the table from me, I couldn’t help but notice the subtle Malaika Ghana and Also making it as yet elegant appearance. She beckoned part of the final five contestants the waiter’s attention and ordered for the Africa’s Next top Model. for tea while I flipped through my notepad readying myself for an average interview. Once settled, I asked for the mere sake of formality the curtain raiser… “Who is Roselyn

“DIRECTION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN SPEED.”

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Photography by: Josh Nii Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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Photography by: Josh Nii Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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S

he was later signed on to the Outlaws Model Agency and ICE Model Management, two of the top agencies in South Africa after ANTM. She has since featured in a plethora of high profile campaigns and editorials for brands not limited to, Spanish lingerie line -Women Secret, Netherland’s Suit Supply,, Levi’s, Eucerin, Mr Price, YDE, ABSA Bank, Cruz Vodka, Vlisco Hollandais, ATL, Da Viva Fabrics and editorial features in Cosmopolitan, World Swim Suit Magazine, Edgar’s Club Magazine and the Nubian Bride.

whatever selection process and job. My interest was piqued at this point so I asked her opinion on the contrasts in the local and international modeling professional scene. “Professional, modeling has come a long way,” she said. She went on to point out the only three areas which could be improved. To her standard of work for models locally is not at par with the international brands. “If only people could place more value on the work of these artistes the standards would greatly increase.” She commented on professionalism as well; attitude to work and adherence to procedure and time. Then lastly, the quality of works produced. To her this is the area where we came close to the international standards but still need a little work to become top-notch.

“THE REALITY OF BEING A MODEL IS FAR MORE IN-DEPTH THAN THE PICTURES THE MYTHS CREATE.”

She pauses in between her autobiography and tells me this, Though modeling to her brings in the cheese, it is extensively on regional basis and there are many models who will still wallow in poverty because they cling onto the myths of the profession. The myths she pointed out were the fact that, it is all about the looks and you could “sleep your way” to the top. Contrary to this assertion, her rise to success went past these construct. This she did in three ways. First she had to accept what she was best at which wasn’t dependent on the opinions of others. Then came in the hard work. “HARD WORK IS BEING

ABLE TO BE ON YOUR FEET 16 HOURS AND MAINTAINING YOUR COMPOSURE. IT GOES BEYOND USING YOUR FACE. IT IS A TEST OF STRENGTH. YOU HAVE TO BE READY TO GO BEYOND WHAT EVERYBODY AND MOST IMPORTANTLY KNOWS.” A

Fast forward after our three-hour, seemingly short conversation, she had touched on very sensitive topics relating to women and children’s health, history and alternate music genres as well. She spoke extensively on the need to empower women laying bare that she supported “Pro-feminism”-that women deserved equal rights without prejudice or discrimination. She then went on to reveal the line from Lauryn Hill that keeps her grind alive…

little research in her assessment went on to make her better prepared than any other average model she auditioned with. This then led to the last hack, learning to interact to leave an indelible impression in 71 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)


Photography by: Josh Nii Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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This was right before she dropped the bomb that she was a big on reggae music, a habit she picked up from her dreadlocked -reggae-loving parents. Her reason for sticking to this genre was simple “Reggae music has content which is still relevant to our struggles now even decades after their release”

”DON’T BE A HARD ROCK WHEN YOU’RE MEANT TO BE A GEM.” At this moment I was convinced I had just interacted with a WOKE NERD! Right before she gets up to leave, she turns to me and says,

“Models have substance. They have actual souls and are not just faces. MODELS ARE NOT AIRHEADS”

By: Joseph Mclean-Arthur

Get Social with Roselyn Ashkar Website:roselynashkar.com Instagram: roselyn_ashkar Twitter: roselyn_ashkar Facebook: Roselyn Ashkar Official Vimeo:roselynashkar@vimeo.com

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Photography by: Josh Nii Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Designer: Jermain Bleu Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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Photography by: Josh Nii Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Designer: Jermain Bleu Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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Photography by: Josh Nii Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Designer: Djouldé Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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Photography by: Josh Nii Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Designer: Jermain Bleu Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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Photography by: khaleb Gayobi Styling / Art direction: DebonairAfrik Designer: Jermaine Mua: Afroface.Mua Location: Untamed Empire

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inspiration for concepts, taking advice from other photographers and learning different styles of photography, YouTube tutorials. AMONG YOUR WORKS, WHICH ONE IS YOUR FAVOURITE? WHY? I’d never had a favorite till recently. I like all of them. But one of my editorials got featured by Afropunk and has been my most shared work. So I think that’s my favorite right now. ANY CHALLENGES IN THE INDUSTRY? There are always challenges. Shooting out of Minnesota isn’t very helpful. The big guys are out of New York and Los Angeles. I find a lot of creatives that want to work with me but are unwilling to travel that far. Seth Aryee is a Ghanaian born raised in Accra ,Ghana . Growing up in a Ga community, One can boost of its artistic environment and the dynamic culture of the people . He later Moved to the United states of America shortly after His Senior High School Education in Ghana at Accra Academy. With his imaginative composure, he has always been attracted to the arts and fashion Even though he is currently pursuing an education in Computer science. He Said “in my free time I like to see different Museums and draw inspiration” when I caught up with him.

WHAT IS THE ONE THING YOU WISH YOU KNEW WHEN YOU STARTED TAKING PHOTOS? I wish I knew more about lenses. A good lens makes a quality picture.

WHAT INTRIGUED YOUR PASSION FOR PHOTOGRAPHY? I hung around a lot of photographers and it naturally sparked an interest in the field.

HOW DOES IT FEEL GETTING A FEATURE ON DEBONAIR AFRIK MAGAZINE? It’s the biggest compliment paid to my art. It will be my first feature in an African editorial.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST THINK OF BECOMING A PHOTOGRAPHER? I’ve been a creative for over 8 years but I only started doing my own photography 3 years ago

WHOSE WORK HAS INFLUENCED YOU MOST? A direct influence on my work is my close friend Michael Amofa ( @kvvadwo on IG)

HOW DO YOU EDUCATE YOURSELF TO TAKE BETTER PICTURES? I learn from everything. Finding 80 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

WHAT GENRE OF STORIES DO YOU TELL WITH YOUR IMAGES? I like to leave the interpretation of my photos to the viewer. WHOAREYOURTOP3FASHIONPHOTOGRAPHERS IN YOUR COUNTRY? I can only think of two of biggest inspirations. But they live in Nigeria, Daniel Obasi (iamdasidy on IG), and Brazil Mar+ Vin ( mar______vin on IG)

WHAT INFLUENCES AND INSPIRES YOU? A good location makes my work very easy and inspires so much out of me.


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Designer: Designs by Martasia (designerpreneur IG) Models: Setor (bijouxduchess IG) Chelsea (Londonseabreeze IG) Ashely (annifaras IG) Photographer: Seth Aryee (sethnocentric IG)

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60 YEARS OF GHANAIAN FASHION

DENZEL

F

ashion In Ghana has had its ups and downs. From the sculpted wax print “Kaba and slits” worm in the 90’s to present day fashion there has been a lot going on fashion-wise in Ghana. One major problem with Ghanaian fashion is it’s not dynamic enough. Ghanaians stick to one trend for too long while the world moves on every season. Ghana fashion finds one trend and will mass produce it until it becomes unbearable to see it on the streets. Another thing that hinders Ghanaian fashion is the lack of innovation. This links into the earlier point. Because Ghanaian fashion designers are not creating new styles, patterns and silhouettes, the fashion industry seems a bit stagnant. This is partly the fault of designers and also the Ghanaian community. Designers are afraid to try new things the target consumers, Ghanaians, wouldn’t like and have them turning a loss. Which is good business but then a wise woman by the name of Diana Vreeland once said: “fashion is giving people what they don’t know they want.” But there is still hope. Younger Ghanaian designers are breaking the mould. Coming up with new and innovative designs that can compete on the international market. Designers are finding themselves coming up with innovative styles that are pushing the idea of what Ghanaian fashion is. There is a young designer, Alexandra Tomiyama, who is fusing Japan and Ghanaian culture into beautiful garments. People like her and much more are the future of Ghanaian fashion and with the right investments or financial backing, the future of Ghanaian fashion looks promising.

The Ghanaian fashion industry needs some work but one thing that would drastically improve it is funding. More precisely the right people getting the appropriate funding. Fashion is an expensive undertaking and needs a lot of money to start and sustain, be it a fashion label, magazine or a fabric maker. The fashion industry is more than just fashion houses. It involves so many other industries. Investors in Ghana do not find fashion as a viable investment and think of it more as a hobby for a bored housewife. These investors obviously haven’t heard of multi-billion dollar companies such as LVMH who is the parent company of Christian Dior and the amount of money the fashion house makes for them. If the right people and industries are given funding to streamline the fashion industry, we would be tapping into a cash cow. A multi-billion dollar cash cow. It is my hope that with time and a better understanding of fashion as an industry and not a hobby, the Ghanaian fashion industry will grow to rival that of developed countries.

NAA ADJELEY ell, 60 years on and there's certainly been growth. The new school is trying extremely hard to catch up on the world of fashion, the old school is also catching up with the new school. In all of this digital innovation is at its peak and currently the best tool to have ones work out there. I hope more brands will hop onto this trend to trend. Finally, with the present state of our industry, we need to believe in and respect each other's abilities. This makes room for partnerships and collaborations where everyone wins.

W

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DION

O

h yes, we have seen a whole lot of improvement. Fashion before isn't like fashion now. Will say, as Ghana journeyed its 60 years, it journeyed with its fashion as well and that to me is improvement enough. We play around more with textile/fabrics, we are more daring with styles and we can rub shoulders with our western brothers and sisters; that is improvement enough. Talking about downfall, we lack "wear Ghana, feel Ghana". Our people prefer buying more from outside countries than from their homeland, and I attribute it to either cost or lack of acceptance. Some Ghanaians haven't yet woken to the fact that we have geniuses in our Ghanaian fashion industry, ones that can serve them what they seek from out there and even more. Some also prefer to buy from outside because it's less expensive. Some of our fashion designers have also failed to think out of the box and have failed to be original. Instead of designing and making, they rather pick and make. What happened to creativity, what happened giving birth to an original Ghanaian design. It is a total downfall for us if we still looking at western designs and making same. I suggest the industry learns to be creative and original. I also think Ghanaians should wake up and accept that we have incredible fashion designers out there. Some are hidden and some are already at their doorstep.

NANA POLEY ashion, an innately culturally diverse and world-class situated type of dress that encapsulates change through development, is a standout amongst the most important and outwardly exhibit types of imaginative articulation.

F

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Fashion is to extend our comprehension of design past Western inclinations. As the capital of Ghana, Accra has filled in as a nexus for the trade and production of differing, what's more, differing types of dress since 1957, empowering the advancement of a perplexing and lively fashion culture. The verifiable significance of fashion in Accra is confirmed by early issues of the Sunday Mirror, a week after week distribution that reliably featured the social occasions and fashion inclinations of Accra's differing subjects. Chez Julie" Norteye styles that were seen as abnormal and imaginative, made space for the improvement of the nation's first formally-prepared fashion Designer. She created a spectacle to look through and find more designer in our now budding industry. Social media has been a great tool in recent times in the 60years of Ghanaian fashion. It breached the usually dummy and fashion show marketing. Now anyone can buy and sell anything fashion with just a tap on their phone screen. That's a big plus to the industry.

JESHUA WRIGHT ownfalls. It’s really sad to see our native textile brands suffer at the hands of foreign competitors. Fashion in Ghana for some years now has lost its direction. We are adopting foreign concepts instead of revolutionizing our culture designs. It’s amazing what we can do. Only if we have designers who can observe just AS the inventor of kente did.

D


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THE UNTITLED SERIES

Creating unique objects with everyday materials, is an integral aspect of my artistic style. Borrowing techniques and materials from the hair saloon, I create these intriguing unique forms. In the process of making the familiar strange, my practice also divulges the politics of hair in relation to the various cultural/ religious attitudes towards it. 90 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

The presentation of my works usually take different forms, they either exist as individual forms or two or more forms assembled to create one unique piece. In this project my works become wearable sculptures on the models taking roles that doesn’t necessarily define it but extends it’s possibility.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY: GANYOBI STYLING AND ART DIRECTION: DEBONAIRAFRIK MAKEUP: JUURY PRODUCTION MODELS: KWEKU ADADE, AZUMI HABIB HAIR: ESINAM ROSEMARY

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY: GANYOBI STYLING AND ART DIRECTION: DEBONAIRAFRIK MAKEUP: JUURY PRODUCTION MODELS: KWEKU ADADE, AZUMI HABIB HAIR: ESINAM ROSEMARY

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY: GANYOBI STYLING AND ART DIRECTION: DEBONAIRAFRIK MAKEUP: JUURY PRODUCTION MODELS: KWEKU ADADE, AZUMI HABIB HAIR: ESINAM ROSEMARY

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY: GANYOBI STYLING AND ART DIRECTION: DEBONAIRAFRIK MAKEUP: JUURY PRODUCTION MODELS: KWEKU ADADE, AZUMI HABIB HAIR: ESINAM ROSEMARY

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY: GANYOBI STYLING AND ART DIRECTION: DEBONAIRAFRIK MAKEUP: JUURY PRODUCTION MODELS: KWEKU ADADE, AZUMI HABIB HAIR: ESINAM ROSEMARY

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THE VINTAGE TREND IN NIGERIA ADEDEJI ABIDEMI

Vintage clothing has proven to be wardrobe stables over time. The best part about shopping vintage clothing for me remains how affordable they are. Style enthusiasts would tell you how happy they are to see their favorite trends come back, the excitement in my case would is being able to style whatever piece into trendy looks. From different array of fabrics, refreshing color combinations, which can come in form of silk, cotton, chiffon and linen. Some of my all time favorites include; BERET: Last season made this trend a comeback, which leaves us with nothing with the fact that headwear is big news for the season. Marc Jacobs opted for 90s inspired Kangol shapes; Rihanna has since been seen in Dior’s leather Style. 96 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

OVERCOAT: No cold season is ever complete without the coats, not saying Nigeria is particularly cold we have our cold regions like the Jos Plateau which can go as low 12 degrees during the rainy seasons, hence, influencing the style in the western Region around the 1970s. @thestyle_train @vintageMenNG


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entertainment life with their Thrift Social events. The different themed editions are arguably one of Nairobi’s most fashionable and creative extravaganzas. From Future Trends edition to African Wax Print Edition Thrift Social has curved a way for the creatives to fully express themselves and their personal sense of style.

Fred Anyona

THE BUDDING NAIROBI FASHION INDUSTRY Let’s talk about Nairobi Fashion. Nairobi is the capital of the East African country, Kenya. Kenya has always been a major player in the region when it comes to lifestyle events and entertainment. Fashion is also a major strong suit in the country with different brands and designers representing the East African country in different international platforms.

From fashion bloggers, stylists and fashion enthusiasts we see a lot of potential and growth by the Kenyan representatives. SautiSol, a powerhouse band of four men contributed to fashion history by having one of their eccentric outfits featured at the Fashion Cities Africa Exhibition at the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery. Creatives, Velma Rossa and Oliver Asike continue to place Kenya and Nairobi 98 DEBONAIRAFRIK MAGAZINE (CREATIVE ISSUE)

Fashion Designer Munga, among others have changed the perspective on African wear, with the incorporation of different fabrics, silhouettes and cuts. Kenya is an amazing space to grow and challenge one’s inhibitions, and I cannot wait to share this and so much more. As a fashion blogger and content creator I am honoured to share this and more through my SoYouLikeFashion platform where I highlight everything from style trends in Nairobi, event coverage and different key players in the fashion industry in Kenya and wider Africa. My main motivation is to change the perceptions on African and African culture.


Lifestyle SOME PUT OFFS AFTER SEX!!

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EX is about two adults who have a mutual agreement to come together but that’s not just all it is! Love making is not just about the physical intimacy, but also about the actions before and after the act. Your behavior means a lot to your partner and also is the basis of your future acts of intimacy. People often take their partners for granted and behave boorish. It surely steals the charm of your relationship and also annoys your partner. According to Pawas Kumar, here are some things you must never do after ma king love.

respect that. Its soo annoying when after fucking the hell outta your partner you pick up your phone to reply texts. Then you find yourself telling another “i miss you” and all. Crap!!!! These days there’s even the fear of the other texting his fellas or ladies to run a commentary on how the sex was, how juicy or dry that pussy was, how big or small that dick was or even how fast he came.

DRESSING TO LEAVE You are done and you are moving on, certainly it means you just needed pleasure and love making was just another task on your mind. You may be getting late for work but a minute of togetherness when you look into your partners eyes and bond at an emotional level goes a long way in your relationship. Even for booty calls unless that pussy or dick was so wacky you don’t want a repeat.

BLOWING YOUR OWN TRUMPET

Getting up and rushing to the bathroom just after making love is a terrible idea. Most people go to the bathroom to check their appearance, brush their teeth or take a shower. Flash out the sperms or just wash down the sweat It is understandable that you want to be clean but sometimes just lying in the bed with your partner is much more intimate. Let your partner feel appreciated it’s even a good way of expressing how great the sex was.

You need not to blow your own horn. You may feel that you were “superhuman” in bed today but saying that makes it cringeworthy. It is better to compliment your partner, and if they feel you were good they will certainly say so. Turning on the TV Listening to the problems of the free world or catching the latest score just after some great sex may seem to be a very relaxing and luxurious idea but actually it is not. It shows your insensitivity towards the intimacy you just shared. If you have to watch TV, select something both of you can watch together.

UNHYGIENIC AND UNCOOL ACTION

NOT CUDDLING

RUSHING TO THE BATHROOM

Lovemaking is an act in which you share your privacy with your partner; still there are limits. Scratching or picking your nose or passing gas is not at all funny. One must maintain certain etiquette even in their closest moments together. Remember also that during that time you both have to feel relaxed and nothing should spoil that after orgasm peace.

CHECKING YOUR MOBILE Almost everyone does it. Checking your phone just after making love makes your partner feel neglected. We know your time is valuable and you need to stay connected to the world, but the intimate moment with your partner is also a precious one,

Some people just roll over and go to sleep after making love. It is better to cuddle and show your love and affection to each other. Look into each other’s eyes and relax in your partner’s arms. This is a great moment to bond and have a romantic conversation about your love, dreams and life. How dare you not cuddle! I mean i want your sweaty body all over me and the slow kisses in fact I might just get down on my knees and give you the best head you ever had. You can even talk about how it was and what ways you can enhance it. Add some flavor to your pleasure try it!!! Written by: BLACKCURRANTGH (dsextherapistgh)


FASHION TRENDS

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5 EMERGING GHANAIAN DESIGNERS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

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merging designers always have a way of breathing some freshness onto the fashion scene. They bring on broad lots of energy and new creative direction that gets us yearning to see what is next for these designers. Without a doubt there is still a lot of work to be done after you debuted your brand and made quite a great impression on many, the expectations become high and designers can only work harder to keep the momentum alive.With each year serving us some new entrants of young talented designers, we certainly are looking forward to what their next collections will be and how they will keep being top of mind. In no particular order, here are my 5emerging designers who have made great entry onto the scene and ones you should be now know about them LARRY JAY COUTURE Anyone at Accra Men’s Fashion Week held earlier this year, will affirm that Larry Jay’s collection was one of the best for the entire show. Timeless legacy which happens to be his debut collection introduces clothing and accessories for both men and women. The brand brought some new feeling to urban wear through oversized wax print shirts and fitting pants/joggers, oversized silky tunics, shorts, open front cardigans, shawls, infinity scarves, etc. He also showcased at the 2017 Edition of Style Lounge and the Flower and Garden Fashion Show. This brand is certainly one to look out for in the coming year. AKUA ASANTE I fell in love with this brand the first time I saw it. It was full of life and had bold colors and playful look that attracted my interest. Her pieces draws inspiration from her Ghanaian heritage interspersed with

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influences from cultures across the globe. The bold signature and unique craftsmanship of her pieces coupled with vibrant colors makes her designs to stand out. Akua Asante made her debut appearance during her graduate show at the Marangoni Graduate Fashion Show in 2016. QUOPHI AKOTUAH This designer is becoming a strong one on the Ghanaian fashion scene and obviously have had a great year already having won the Emerging Designer Award at the Glitz Style Awardsand nominated for the Creative Designer of the Year at Men’s Fashion Week Nigeria coming up this year. He has also collaborated with GTP in producing his collections and has been spotted on some top celebrities in Ghana. Quophi Akotuah opened this year’s Glitz Africa Fashion Week held at the Kempinski Hotel. QWAME OWUSU Quame Owusu came into prominence in 2015, when he won the much coveted Vlisco Students Awards at Joyce Ababio College of Creative and Design (JACCD). He has since then been working and producing great designs for Vlisco and GTP fashion campaigns. Few months back he was adjudged with theBest African Collection after debuting his Perfect Ashlar collection in GTP Fabrics at the #DFF2017 ramp at the Durban Fashion Fair inSouth Africa. This designer is certainly one to watch in the coming years. LAKOPUE This young designer has had a good year so far after introducing his debut collection “The Atelier by Lakopue”. A collection which emphasizes on craft and the idea of every profession being an art. Prior to debuting his collection, he has worked with Woodin for their fashion campaigns and shows. Lakopue showcased at the recently held Glitz Africa Fashion Week 2017 where he had a presentation alongside other talented designers.


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We are on our 11th issue with a new twist moving from a webzine to a Digital Magazine. We intended to capture some up-and-coming creatives i...