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VILLAGER The

Issue 10 - December 2013

and Town

Life

LOCAL NEWS • LOCAL PEOPLE • LOCAL SERVICES • LOCAL CHARITIES • LOCAL PRODUCTS

Inside this issue

The Ultimate

Christmas Survival Guide

How To Purchase Safely on the Winter-Web

Win

£50 in our Bumper Christmas Prize Crossword Bringing Local Business to Local People

Bourn, Comberton, Grantchester, Trumpington, Toft, Hardwick and all surrounding villages every month

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Please mention The Villager and Town Life when responding to adverts


Contents Darker Traditions of Christmas

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VILLAGER The

Issue 10 - December 2013

and Town

Life

LOCAL NEWS • LOCAL PEOPLE • LOCAL SERVICES • LOCAL CHARITIES • LOCAL PRODUCTS

Inside this issue

The Ultimate

Christmas Survival Guide

How To Purchase Safely on the Winter-Web

Win

£50 in our Bumper Christmas Prize Crossword Bringing Local Business to Local People

Bourn, Comberton, Grantchester, Trumpington, Toft, Hardwick and all surrounding villages every month

r

u E Ey FRcop

Yo

The Ultimate Christmas Survival Guide..................20 Seasonal Delights...................................................22 Puzzle Page............................................................24 What’s On...............................................................26 Bumper Christmas Prize Crossword........................28 Hearing Dogs for Deaf People.................................30

Ginger Christmas Puddings How to Purchase Safely on the Winter-Web.............4

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Wildlife Wanderings.................................................6 What is the Winter Solstice?.....................................9 Christmas Eve Countdown......................................10 The Darker Traditions of Christmas.........................12 Family Law.............................................................14 Gardening..............................................................18 7,000 copies delivered free of charge in the following areas: Barrington, Barton, Bourn, Caldecote, Caxton, Comberton, Grantchester, Hardwick, Harston, Haslingfield, Papworth and Toft (We also have over 100 distribution points, including pubs, garages, most shops, post offices and Bar Hill Tesco)

Editorial - Jonathan Vernon-Smith, Christine Donnelly, Alex Albrighton, Susan Brookes-Morris, Guy Bolton, Fiona McLeman Advertising Sales - Justine Miller- 07905 063211 justine@villagermag.com Photography - Steven Cukrov Design and Artwork - Design 9 Tel 07762 969460

Publishers Villager Publications Ltd 24 Market Square, Potton, Bedfordshire SG19 2NP Tel: 01767 261122 nigel@villagermag.com www.villagermag.com Disclaimer - All adverts and editorial are printed in good faith, however, Villager Publications Ltd can not take any responsibility for the content of the adverts, the services provided by the advertisers or any statements given in the editorial. No part of this publication may be reproduced or stored without the express permission of the publisher.


Three Counties Radio

How to Purchase Safely on the Winter-Web

By Jonathan Vernon-Smith

The internet has been with us since the mid 90s. Whilst it has of course brought some fantastic benefits to our lives, it has also created some absolute headaches as well. The fact the entire world is accessible in our homes is a wonderful thing, but it is worth noting that there are lots of internet companies out there, particularly those in other countries that can provide a less than desirable service. So how can you protect yourself against these companies, particularly when making purchases for Christmas? The most important thing you can do, is to of course avoid buying items from dodgy internet companies in the first place. It sounds simple, but you’d be amazed how many people still find some weird company online that nobody’s ever heard of and hand over hundreds of pounds. They are then amazed when they find themselves out of pocket without the goods they’ve ordered. Therefore, always make sure you research the internet company you are planning to buy from. Find out where they’re based, look for a UK telephone number, check reviews and complaints about them so you know exactly who you’re dealing with. Ensure that their delivery timeframe will ensure your gifts will arrive in plenty of time for Christmas. Make sure you’re paying a sensible price. If a company is selling an item at a ridiculously low price compared to all other companies, there’s usually a reason why. Often the items are fake. Over the years I’ve dealt with my fair share of customers who thought they were getting a great deal with ‘Ugg boots’ or ‘GHD hair straighteners’, only to find they’ve bought fakes from a company abroad. You should always pay for goods by credit card but particularly when buying over the internet. It is worth noting that you are not protected by the consumer credit act unless you’re paying over £100, but you’re still more likely to get your money back using a credit card rather than debit card, cheque or bank transfer. I would go so far as to say you should NEVER buy goods from a company that asks you to transfer money directly into their account. If you decide you’re going to buy Christmas presents from an online auction site like ebay, it is worth familiarising yourself with their safety advice. You generally have fewer rights when buying goods in this way, particularly if they are second hand. Paying by paypal and ensuring that you NEVER collect items in person will go some way to protecting yourself. Only buy from highly rated sellers, based in the UK. It is worth remembering that when you buy brand new items over the internet, you are protected by the distance selling regulations. Because you haven’t had the chance to see the item in the flesh, you have 7 days from delivery to change your mind and send it back for a full refund. Unless the company specifies their returns postage policy, then they are liable for the postage too. Make sure you order things online in plenty of time to allow for this, after all, you don’t want unhappy friends and relatives whose presents are NOT under the tree.

Jonathan Vernon-Smith not only offers you his consumer advice here but you can listen to The JVS Show tackling your consumer problems every weekday morning from 9am. 4

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Travel

WILDLIFE WANDERINGS

By Christine Donnelly

We are lucky to live in an area that is in reach of some of Britain’s best coasts for finding spectacular wildlife. Whilst the Lincolnshire coast has some superb places to see nesting seabirds in summer, winter is the season when the Norfolk and Suffolk coasts provide some of Europe’s richest feeding grounds for large flocks of birds known as ‘waders’. Having spent the summer in the far north of Europe or Asia, millions of small birds arrive on the shores of the North Sea and on nearby mudflats, salt marshes and estuaries. A December trip to favourite summer holiday destinations such as Heacham, Holme, Brancaster and Wells introduces you to a new world full of birds including curlew, redshank, knot, sanderling and dunlin. The Suffolk estuaries south of Aldeburgh and Orford contain internationally important wintering grounds for birds such as avocets and godwits.

Clematis cirrhosa, cultivated forms of which are both becoming popular in our gardens.

Crown anemone, Cyprus For those venturing further afield, December and January are ideal months to visit two places in the southern hemisphere that are famous for their unique natural history. New Zealand and Tasmania each have a fantastic range of habitats including rainforests containing elegant tree ferns, rich coastal waters teaming with seabirds and marine mammals and extensive grasslands with many rare plants. Tasmania’s mammals include wombat, platypus, echidna and the endangered Tasmanian devil, whilst New Zealand is the home to the highly protected kiwi and the very unusual kea, an ‘alpine’ parrot.

Black-tailed godwit. Suffolk Nearer home, you can often see other species of wader in the fields so look out for golden plover as well as the more familiar lapwings. Other large flocks are made up of fieldfares and redwings, relatives of the song thrush that are here for the colder months. For details of local talks and walks over the winter check the Events page of The Wildlife Trust www.wildlifebcn.org or phone 01954 713500. Details of local nature reserves and how to become a member of the Trust can also be found. A Christmas break in southern Europe can be surprisingly good for early ‘spring’ flowers, many of which start to flower before the end of the year. In Cyprus, wild daffodils and crown anemone are in flower in December along with the delicate winterflowering Cyclamen cyprium and the beautiful

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Tasmanian echidna Wildlife Travel has been running wildlife holidays worldwide for 25 years. Contact 01954 713575 or check www.wildlife-travel.co.uk for details of trips. Any profits from Wildlife Travel are donated to nature conservation through The Wildlife Trusts.

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THE CENTREPIECE of your FESTIVE FEAST

Whether it’s a traditional free-range or organic turkey, venison, game, or our own special meat cuts, our Master Butchers can offer you all this plus a healthy serving of expertise and advice. Order early to be sure you get exactly what you want this Christmas, and if you don’t know what you want, just ask! Our craftsmen will make sure you get only the finest select local produce for your perfect festive feast.

1&3 STATION RD, MELBOURN, HERTS SG8 6DX TEL: 01763 260255 BURWASH MANOR, NEW ROAD, BARTON, CAMBS CB23 7EY LEECHANDSONS.COM 8L&S_villagerXmasAd_131x194.indd

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Winter Solstice

What is the Winter Solstice? By Alex Albrighton

In the Northern Hemisphere, the Winter Solstice occurs when the ‘top half’ of the Earth tilts away from the Sun at its most extreme angle. This gives us the longest night and shortest day of the year. It normally falls on 21 December, and from this point on, the days will begin to lengthen until the Summer Solstice on 21 June. The word ‘solstice’ comes from the Latin phrase for ‘sun stands still’. This is because the sun appears to rise and set in the same two places for several days in a row. Cultures through the ages have marked the Solstice and celebrated the triumph of light over dark. Massive prehistoric monuments such as

Stonehenge were built to align with the Winter Solstice sunrise. The ancient Romans had a seven-day festival called Saturnalia, when everything would be reversed – men would dress as women and masters dressed as servants. People decorated their houses with greenery, lit candles and gave presents. Celtic druids gave pieces of mistletoe as a blessing. They also began the tradition of the Yule log, which was burned to conquer the darkness and bring luck for the year ahead. Many people celebrate the Solstice today, and it’s interesting to see how many of the customs have become part of our Christmas festivities.

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Time of Year

Christmas Eve Countdown By Susan Brookes-Morris

The big day is nearly here! So what can you do on Christmas Eve to make things easier on Christmas Day? Many top chefs support the idea of preparing much of the Christmas dinner well in advance. Christmas puddings are often made months ahead, and many elements of a traditional Christmas dinner can be prepared the day before. Commonly, vegetables such as carrots, parsnips, sprouts and potatoes are all peeled and left in saucepans of cold water. It’s also a good idea to prepare the turkey, pigs in blankets, stuffing and any sauces. If you have bought a frozen turkey, you will almost certainly need to start the defrosting on Christmas Eve. If you have baked batches of mince pies or other goodies in advance and frozen them, do

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remember to check the freezer and take out anything that’s required. Depending on your choice, some starters can also be made and stored in the fridge. You might also want to lay your table. This job can easily end up rushed if left to Christmas Day, so why not take the time now to get it exactly how you want. Finally, try to get to bed at a sensible time. That way you’ll be on top form for a fabulous Christmas!

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Family Law Legal Aid‘s all but gone but not for Mediation

By Fiona McLeman

On 1st April 2013 the Legal Aid landscape radically changed for clients seeking legal support during relationship breakdown. Legal Aid was withdrawn for most types of family law disputes. Importantly however Legal Aid is available for some clients who wish to resolve their arrangements in Mediation. Mediation is one of the constructive approaches to resolving family disputes away from Court. As NationalFamilyDRweek on 25-29 November 2013 is approaching (www. nationalfamilydrweek.org.uk), we thought this would be a good opportunity to review whether Legal Aid might be available for Mediation. How do I know if I qualify for legal aid for mediation? If you are in receipt of Income Support, Job Seeker’s allowance (income based), Employment and Support Allowance (income based), Pension credit or Universal credit then you should qualify for legal aid for mediation. In addition to this if you have dependent children and earn less than £2,657 gross per month (if you have 5 children or more this increases slightly) then you may qualify. This is provided that you don’t have more than £8,000 in savings (you can ignore the first £100,000 of equity in your home but after that any equity applies towards this capital limit). So how does this help me? Mediation can be a quicker and more amicable way of resolving disputes that arise when a couple separate. Both parties discuss the things they need to sort out with help from a mediator. The mediator provides information to help the parties’ discussions - but does not offer advice. The mediator will try to help move things forward

if the parties get stuck. If the parties are able to find common ground in mediation then they can take this away and ask a lawyer to turn it into a formal agreement for them. Ideally each party will have their own lawyer (no lawyer can act for both people because there would be a conflict of interest) and one client’s lawyer will draft the agreement for the other client’s lawyer to check. Can I get legal aid for the solicitor to help me with this agreement? You may potentially be entitled to limited help from a lawyer to complement the mediation process. You will need to check with a solicitor who offers legal aid as to whether you might be entitled . How can Fiona McLeman Family Law help? Whilst we do not have a Legal Aid franchise, we are able to offer fixed fees or a Pay-As-You-Go service to support you through the Mediation process. We can be flexible and will work with you to ensure that the work we do for you is tailored to how much you can afford. In NationalfamilyDRweek 25-29 November we are pleased to be offering 30 no cost minute consultations to explain more about Mediation and other forms of dispute resolution.

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TABLE TOP SALE

Cambridgeshire Foot Clinic Podiatry/Chiropody Yvonne Siudak

BSc (Hons.) MChs, HPC Registered

Every Sunday at Papworth Village Hall Set Up from 7.00 am Public from 8.00 am Close 1.00 pm

Podiatrist / Chiropodist Private Podiatry / Chiropody Care in Cambridge, UK A comprehensive service for all your foot care needs

Hard Skin • Corns • Nail Cutting Ingrown Toe Nails • Fungal Nail Infections General Foot Care • Verrucae Treatment • Laser Treatment • Diabetic Assessments • Biomechanical Assessments Full details of our specialist treatments are available, call Yvonne for an appointment:

Cambridgeshire Foot Clinic

20 Chesterton Road, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, CB4 3AX. Tel: 01233 358 431 Mob: 07562 748 352 E: yvonne@yourfootclinic.co.uk

www.yourfootclinic.co.uk Also Bedfordshire Foot Clinic Tel: 01767 681 704

Dedicated support for clients in relationship breakdown:

• • • • •

Separation Financial Settlements Change of Name Prenuptial Agreements Mediation

• • • • •

Divorce Living together agreements Adoption Children issues Collaborative family law

Fiona McLeman Family Law is accredited by Resolution and the Solicitors Regulation Authority as a Specialist in Family Law. For a free initial consultation contact Fiona:

fiona@fmfamilylaw.co.uk, 07894095775, www.fmfamilylaw.co.uk Regus House, 1010 Cambourne Business Park, Cambourne CB23 6DP To advertise in The Villager and Townlife please call 01767 261122

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Christ

Burwash Manor is a group of converted farm buildings and a day spa, plus a tea-room with both indoor seating Situated on a working organic farm, complete with seve Burwash Manor provides fantastic variety and a friendly With plenty of free parking, it’s the perfect antidote to t The shops at Burwash Manor are all small independent complimentary range of goods and produce, many stoc Whether you’re after outdoor, lifestyle or designer cloth toys and childrenswear or looking to decorate or furnis

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tmas at

housing fifteen independent, unique shops g and an outdoor terrace. veral enjoyable farm walks of differing lengths, y, peaceful shopping experience. the crush of the High Street. tly owned businesses offering a wonderfully cking items exclusive to the Burwash site. hing, jewellery, delicious organic produce, wine, gifts, sh your home and garden - we’ve got it covered!

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Garden

Gardening By Pippa Greenwood

The garden may be quieter than usual at this time of year, and certainly not likely to be yielding vast quantities of crops, but this near dormant time is perfect for planting fruit. You can grow fruit trees in surprisingly small spaces, training them to espaliers (so that they have several sets of horizontal arms), cordons (as single main stems grown at an angle), fans (with their branches trained in to a fan shape) or as step-overs, (trained so that they make a neat edging for a bed or border about 45cm or so above ground level). You could also use a fruit tree to create a decorative and later a wonderfully productive arch. At this time of year fruit trees are great value because they are sold ‘bare root’, lifted from a field and not container grown. I find these establish particularly well and because you usually obtain them from a specialist supplier or nursery, the range of varieties available is second to none. You can either buy one year old ‘maidens’ and train these yourself, or if you want to save time, you can often buy trained or part trained forms. When you are choosing fruit trees it’s essential to get them on the right rootstock as this determines the ultimate size and vigour of the tree. Apples are particularly complicated, but as a rule, for step-overs, cordons, dwarf bushes and trees in containers try the extremely dwarfing but somewhat tricky M27 - but beware weak varieties or any tree grown on this rootstock in a poor soil as it may well fail. For bush, cordon, espaliers and half-standard try the easier to look after dwarfing rootstock M26 and for a cordon or espalier on a poor soil, for arches and for bush trees try the semi-dwarfing MM106.

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You will need to choose the varieties you grow so that they can pollinate each other (if there is no suitable pollinator in the vicinity you will not get fruit) and on the basis of the taste and texture of the fruit and how well it stores and so forth. If you have space, it is good to grow apples for cooking as well as eating, or look out for those described as ‘dual purpose’, meaning they make very passable cookers as well as dessert apples. As well as tree fruits such as apples, pears and maybe even a medlar or a plum or gorgeous gage, you could also consider some delicious bush fruits. The great thing about these is that they take up even less space and again can often be trained into wacky shapes such as fan-trained or standard bushes, making them all the more ornamental and easier to fit into the smaller garden. Then there are raspberries - on my rather heavy and very alkaline soil I tend to stick to the autumn fruiting varieties such as Autumn Bliss and Joan J, but on freer draining and acidic soils you can try some of the more numerous summer fruiters too. Bare root fruit trees, bushes and canes are generally available from about November through until early March, depending on the weather, so don’t delay, start ordering or better still, planting, today. Visit Pippa’s website www.pippagreenwood.com for a great range of gardening-related Christmas gifts and stocking-fillers, including stylish ‘Grow Your Own with Pippa Greenwood’ gift cards, handmade pottery herb planters, Pippa’s favourite weeding tool, signed books and lots of seriously useful garden items for your friends and family, or yourself.

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Can I go to the Paddocks for my Holiday please?

Paddocks Boarding Cattery Peaceful location. No dogs boarded. Spacious, individual, heated chalets with large covered runs. Inspection welcome. Boarding from ÂŁ6.60/day. Rabbits/guinea pigs also boarded. 64 Meadow Road, Great Gransden

Telephone 01767 677 759 www.catterybedfordshire.co.uk Open all year.

The cattery for caring owners. Comfort and security for your pet. To advertise in The Villager and Townlife please call 01767 261122

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Time of Year By Susan Brookes-Morris

The Ultimate Christmas Survival Guide Christmas can be a time of stress and worry. What could you do to make things more enjoyable? Ask yourself - What is most important to me about Christmas? Then, keep focussed on that and let go of the rest. Don’t overburden yourself by believing everything has to be just like the ‘ideal version of a perfect family Christmas.’ Your Christmas is just that, the one that fits you and your circumstances. It can be however you want it to be. For most people being with friends and family is important at Christmas, but it’s not necessary to force everyone to be together just because it’s Christmas. If people haven’t got on for years, it’s very

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unlikely that some turkey and a spot of tinsel will heal the rift. Why risk a big row and be anxious all day? Choose to see small groups of people separately instead. Whatever type of Christmas you want, you probably wouldn’t choose to burn the dinner or to forget anything. Try to avoid this by planning, and accepting help. Find out about the closing times of shops you know you will need to visit, and about delivery times if ordering online. If posting cards and presents, ask about the latest posting dates. It’s also useful to keep details handy for pharmacies that will be open, and have medical numbers such as NHS Direct close by, and the vet too if you have pets. If travelling by car, find out which petrol stations will be open and check tyres, oil and water before you go. Revised bus and train timetables are usually published well in advance, so hunt these out too. You are not alone. Sharing with friends, family and neighbours is part of the Christmas spirit. Let go of needing to do everything yourself. Some families split the meal duties: One part of the family brings a starter, the host household do the main and other guests bring along a pudding for example. Perhaps you know that your friend works right next to that shop on the other side of town that you can just never find time to get to - ask them to pop in and get what you need, you’d do the same for them wouldn’t you? If things don’t go quite to plan- ask yourself will this matter in 5 years time? Chances are it won’t be significant at all. Many things that seem disastrous at the time are laughed at later. However Christmas turns out, and however much you have or don’t have, choose to be grateful. No matter how difficult things are notice what you have rather than what you don’t have, and you will find plenty of Christmas joy.

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Recipe

SEASONAL DELIGHTS

Ginger Christmas Puddings

Makes 6 Ready in 1 hour 30 minutes These fruity mini puds flavoured with stem ginger are much lighter than a traditional rich Christmas pudding and don’t need to be made weeks in advance. INGREDIENTS 175g butter, softened, plus extra for greasing 175g self-raising flour ½ tsp baking powder 175g light muscovado sugar 1 tsp each ground mixed spice and ground ginger 3 large eggs 100g dried mixed fruit 50g glace cherries, chopped 50g stem ginger, finely chopped 4 tbsp stem ginger syrup Softly whipped cream or brandy butter, to serve 1 Preheat the oven to 190C/375F/Gas Mark 5. Butter six small pudding basins (each about 200ml capacity) and line the bases with circles of baking parchment. 2 Place the butter, flour, baking powder, sugar,

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spices and eggs in a large mixing bowl and beat together with an electric mixer for 1-2 minutes until pale and creamy. Fold in the dried mixed fruit and two-thirds of the cherries and stem ginger. 3 Divide the mixture evenly between the prepared pudding basins then cover each basin with a circle of greased and pleated baking parchment and secure with string. Cover each basin with pleated foil. 4 Stand the basins in a roasting tin and pour in enough boiling water to come halfway up the sides of the basins. Bake for 45-50 minutes, or until risen, firm to the touch and a skewer inserted into a pudding comes out clean. 5 Leave the puddings to stand for 10 minutes then turn out onto serving plates. Mix the remaining cherries and ginger with the stem ginger syrup and spoon over the puddings. Serve with cream or brandy butter. Tip - For a boozy flavour, gently heat the stem ginger syrup with 1-2 tbsp of rum or brandy then pour over the hot puds just before serving.

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Everyone at The Villager would like to wish all our readers and advertisers a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Easy Suduko

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Brian R Bulley C.M.B.H.I Horologist

Repairing: Antique & Modern Clocks

All clocks are collected & examined in my workshop and then you are contacted with cost for repair. On agreement the clock will be repaired, Tested & Delivered. If you decide not to go ahead with repair the clock will still be delivered free of charge. • Over 50 years Experience • Tel: Email:

07521 442 050

brian@brianbulley.co.uk

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n O s ’ t a h W

1 December Craft Show 12 noon-4pm Catworth Village Hall, Church Street, Catworth Craft stalls selling unusual Christmas gifts. Refreshments available. Tel: Joan 01832 710296

1, 8, 15, 22 & 29 December Kingfisher Church 10.30am Little Paxton Primary School Every Sunday – all welcome. Services include children’s groups and a crèche. Refreshments served. Tel: 01480 394321 Web: www.kingfisherchurch.co.uk 4 December Christmas Coffee Morning 10-11.30am Millard Suite, Buckden Village Hall Admission £2 to include coffee and mince pies Buckden St. Mary’s Church Fundraisers. Cake stall, Gifts and Raffle. All welcome. 4 December Little Paxton Gardening Club AGM & Christmas Social 8pm Little Paxton Village Hall. Annual subscription £6 Members only meeting as it’s the Club AGM. The Club meets on the first Wednesday of the month, excluding January and August. New members and visitors always welcome. Web: www.little-paxton.org.uk 6-7 December An Evening of One Act Plays Doors open 7.30pm for 8pm, Orwell Village Hall Tickets: Thursday £8, Friday & Saturday £10 The Orwell Players present two comedies. “Happy Birthday Me!” by Simon Williams, and “Strictly Sex Factor” on Ice by David Tristram. Tickets available from Orwell Post Office. Bar. www.theorwellplayers.co.uk 6-8 December Christmas Tree Festival Fri & Sat 10am-4pm, Sun 12 noon-3pm St Neots United Reformed Church. Programmes £1 More than 40 trees. Raffle and Tombola plus Christmas craft stalls and children’s lucky dip. Refreshments. All welcome 6-8 December Christmas Tree Festival Fri 7pm, Sat 10.30am-5pm, Sun £12 noon-5pm St Andrew’s Church, Kimbolton Friday tickets £3.50 including mince pies and mulled wine Saturday & Sunday admission £2.50 Refreshments on sale throughout the festival. Tickets from Truffles & Twine.

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7 December Craft Fair 9.30am-4pm St Ives Free Church Local people selling hand-made crafts at very reasonable prices. Held on the first Saturday of each month. Charity tombola and free entry. For details visit www.saintscrafters.blogspot.com 7 December Christmas Craft and Produce Fair 11am-4pm Manor Farm, 14 Alms Hill, Bourn, Cambridge, CB23 2SH Free Entry Wide range of stalls including jewellery & accessories, needlecraft, home ware, homemade jams and confectionary. Christmas trees and wreaths also for sale. Hot and cold food available. Mulled wine and cider. Tel: 01954 713971 Email: joproud@manorfarmbourn.co.uk 7 December Christmas Fayre 11am-5pm Grafham Village Hall Local Produce, Arts and Crafts. Children’s Lucky dip, Raffle and More. Mince Pies, Coffee, Mulled Wine. All welcome. In aid of Grafham Church. Web: www.grafham.org.uk 7 December Hardy Plant Society Talk 2pm The Wetherley Centre, Biggleswade Small charge for visitors Cambs and Beds Hardy Plant Society present a talk by Andrew Sankey on ‘Rethinking your garden’. Andrew is a garden designer, plant fair organiser, and Nurseryman. Plants will be available for sale. All welcome - small charge applies. Tel: Winifred 01234 721720 Web: www.hpscambsandbeds.co.uk 7 December Christmas Handbell Concert 3.00pm St. Mary’s Church, Eaton Socon Adults £10, Concessions £8, Children under 12 £3 East Anglian Handbell Team. Your chance to hear over 100 bells and handchimes in an amazing concert that will include Christmas carols to help you start your Christmas off on the right note. Mince pies and hot drinks. Tickets available from Church Office. Tel: 01234 823811 Web: www. ear.hrgb.org.uk 7 December Masked Christmas Dinner Dance 7 for 7.30pm till midnight. Great Stukeley Village Hall Tickets £20 including 3 course meal Entertainment by local vocalist Steve Lake. Tickets: Jan Sly 01480 450197 7 December Haslingfield Choir and Orchestra performs Handel’s Messiah 7.30pm All Saints’ Church, Haslingfield Tickets: £10, Concessions £8 Tickets from The Village Shop or on the door. Tel: Kate Dickens 01223 872088 Web: http://haslingfieldvillage.co.uk/choir/


7 December Sawtry Chorale in Concert 7.30pm All Saints Church, Sawtry Seasonal songs for all ages. Proceeds in aid of church funds. Web: www.sawtrychorale.co.uk for further details 7 & 8 December Art Exhibition 11am-4pm St James’ Church, Little Paxton Art Exhibition by Little Paxton Art Club. Refreshments, Christmas craft, cakes, books, preserves etc.. 8 December Carols by Candlelight 3pm Little Barford Church The church looks quite magical with all the candles (in excess of 100) so it is well worth seeing and with other floral decorations looks very Christmassy. There is no heating so wrap up warm! 10 December Buckden Gardeners Association 8pm Buckden Village Hall Members free, guests £2 Christmas Social. Bring/share food festival. Tel: Pam 01480 811680. Web: www.buckdengardeners.info 11 December Wildlife Landscapes of the Hebrides 7.30pm Brampton Memorial Hall, Thrapston Road, Brampton A talk by Barrie Mason. Barrie is an experienced speaker and has enthralled many people with both his talks and inspirational wildlife photography. Anyone interested in wildlife is most welcome to attend. Tel: Phil 01487 822835 Web: www.wildlifetrust-huntsareagroup.org.uk 11 December Thirsty Godmanchester – Pubs Past & Present 7.30-9pm Women’s Institute Centre, Waldon Road, Huntingdon Non-members welcome - £1 donation appreciated at the door Huntingdonshire Family History Society talk by Ken Sneath. Web: www.huntsfhs.org.uk/ 13 December White Christmas. 7 for 7.30pm. Mandeville Hall, Kimbolton Adults £4, Concessions £3, Under 16s £2 Kimbolton Community Cinema presents White Christmas. Licensed Bar. Free Popcorn. Tickets available from Watson’s, Dixi’s Deli, Bytes Café, or on the door. 13 December Christmas Concert by Huntingdon Male Voice Choir 7.30pm Great Stukeley Village Hall Tickets £10.00 including light refreshments Tickets: Jan Sly 01480 450197 14 December Christmas Market. 10.30am-12.30pm Shepreth Village Hall Lovely festive items for sale, along with fresh, local produce. Refreshments by Shepreth WI. Ample parking at rear of hall. Tel: Jane 07554 207580

14 December An Orchestral Concert 7.30pm Adults £12, Students £6 Hinchingbrooke Performing Arts Centre, Huntingdon Handel - Messiah Part 1, with Mozart’s orchestration, Strauss - Waltz of the Spheres, Lumbye - Champagne Galop, BerliozHungarian March. Carols by Christopher Brown and Margaret Stokes and traditional carols for all to sing. Tel: Tickets Anabel Capon 01832 274834 Email: huntsphiltickets@btinternet.com 14 December Sawtry Chorale in Concert 7.30pm St Andrew’s Church, Kimbolton Proceeds in aid of Kimbolton Castle Rotary Club charities. Web: www.sawtrychorale.co.uk for further details 15 December Christmas Songs of Praise 4pm Godmanchester Baptist Church Carols, readings, a great message and a traditional Christmas tea. Tel: 01480 458565 - call us if you need transport www.godmanchesterbaptist.org/christmas 15 December Christmas Music with Carols by Tapestry Singers 5pm Tickets £5 including refreshments In aid of CHUFT. Tickets from Alison Rogers 01480 215607. 17 December Kimbolton Flower Club 7.30pm Mandeville Hall, Kimbolton Admission £6 Christmas Workshop and Social Evening. If you wish to make an arrangement please bring your own materials. Some accessories will be on sale. Please bring a sharing plate of finger food. Tea and coffee provided. Visitors most welcome. 22 December Kingfisher Church 10.30am Little Paxton Primary School Family Carol Service. Refreshments served. Tel: 01480 394321 Web: www.kingfisherchurch.co.uk 22 December Traditional Christingle Service 4pm St James’ Church, Little Paxton Collection in aid of The Children’s Society. 24 December - Christmas Eve Christingle Service with Carols 2.30 pm St James’ Church, Little Paxton Christmas Crib. Collection in aid of The Children’s Society. 24 December - Christmas Eve Carols by Candlelight 6.30pm Godmanchester Baptist Church An hour of popular carols, readings and special items. Followed by mince pies and mulled wine. Suitable for all ages. www.godmanchesterbaptist.org/christmas

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Bumper Christmas Prize Crossword

Complete the crossword, fill in your details

Prize

£50

below, cut out this page and send to the address below before

16th December 2013 Prize Crossword, Villager Publications Ltd 24 Market Square, Potton, Beds SG19 2NP

Name:

Down 1 Imagining (8) 2 Wash (5) 4 Frozen water (3) 5 Sizes (12) 6 Créche (7) 7 Vomit (4) 8 Adequately (12) 12 Enumerate (5) 13 Pest (8) 15 Make ready (7) 19 All (5) 20 Imitation (4) 22 Vegetable (3)

Tel:

Address:

Last Month’s Crossword Winner - Mrs P Myers from St Neots For last month’s solution please visit www.villagermag.com 28

Across 1 Harbour (4) 3 Precious stones (8) 9 Implement (7) 10 Concur (5) 11 Produced (12) 14 Short sleep (3) 16 Coarse (5) 17 Pronoun (3) 18 Despite (12) 21 Modify (5) 22 Design (7) 23 Daily (8) 24 Musical instrument (4)


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Local

Can You Help?

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People The Cambridge branch of Hearing Dogs for Deaf People was established in 2008, with the purpose of fundraising and promoting awareness of the charity. Hearing Dogs change lives for the better by alerting their deaf companions to household sounds such as the telephone, doorbell, smoke alarm etc. The training can take up to 18 months, including socialising and basic obedience classes for the first year, followed by sound work in designated residential training centres designed to suit the individual deaf person’s life style. There is no direct government support for the charity; we therefore rely heavily on donations from individuals and companies. It costs in excess of £40,000 to train and support just one Hearing Dog throughout its life. This is why our local group is vital in helping the charity. If you think you could spare a little time and would be interested in

occasionally helping at fundraising events, or feel you could help in any other way please contact our Branch Organiser, Debora Carter, by e-mail: debora. carter@yahoo.co.uk For more information about hearing dogs please visit www. hearingdogs.org.uk

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Grantchester dec 13